I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 20 August 2019

4.00pm

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Chamber
Takapuna Service Centre
Level 3
1 The Strand
Takapuna

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

George Wood, CNZM

 

Deputy Chairperson

Dr Grant Gillon

 

Members

Mike Cohen, QSM, JP

 

 

Jennifer McKenzie

 

 

Jan O'Connor, QSM

 

 

Mike Sheehy

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness

Democracy Advisor

 

15 August 2019

 

Contact Telephone: 021 815 313

Email: rhiannon.guinness@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Patuone Boardwalk                                                                                                       7

12        Auckland Transport Monthly Update - August 2019                                               31

13        Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes      43

14        Third party partnership opportunities for sport and recreation provision        127

15        Devonport- Takapuna BMX Service Assessment                                                 175

16        Sunnynook Wheeled Sports Service Assessment                                                211

17        Park naming at Oliver Reserve, situated at 44 Kawerau Avenue, Narrow Neck 319

18        Local Board feedback on proposed Tūpuna Maunga Integrated Management Plan Strategies                                                                                                                    415

19        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019                                                                    491

20        Chairpersons' Report                                                                                                495

21        Elected Members' Reports                                                                                       497

22        Ward Councillors Update                                                                                         499

23        Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Worshops July 2019                 501

24        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     509  

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

26        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               513

19        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

a.      Draft 2018/2019 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Annual Report          513  

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

 

                  i.        A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member

 

                 ii.        A non-financial conflict interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

 

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

 

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Relationship Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 16 July 2019, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Patuone Boardwalk

File No.: CP2019/13181

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for the concept design for the renewal and upgrade of the Patuone Reserve walkway.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council’s Community Facilities department is currently undertaking a renewal of the Patuone Reserve walkway, Takapuna, as part of the local board’s 2019/2020 Community Facilities work programme.

3.       The walkway and its associated assets have been identified for renewal due to the:

·    degrading condition of the timber walkway, which is becoming a hazard and health and safety issue;

·    existing hoggin path is in poor condition; and

·    poor visual amenity and associated safety issues identified through Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) guidelines.

4.       The scope of the renewal is to address the existing condition issues of the walkway and its associated assets.

5.       During work programme discussions, the local board and staff also identified the opportunity to enhance the scope of the renewal so that it could significantly improve walking and cycling provision along the walkway (resolution number DT/2018/47).

6.       Upgrading the Patuone Reserve walkway has been identified as a key project for the local board, and this is reflected in the following strategic documents:

·    2017-2020 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan: Improve connections from Esmonde Road to Auburn Reserve (page 17); and

·    Devonport-Takapuna Greenways Plan: route G8, Auburn and Patuone Reserves to Esmonde Road (page 33).

7.       Please refer to Attachment B for extracts from relevant sections of the local board plan, and Greenways Plan

8.       Upgrading the walkway will also create a safe and accessible off-road alternative pedestrian and cycle route from central Takapuna to Esmonde and Barry’s Point roads.  This upgraded walkway will also provide an important link to the:

·    Akoranga Bus Station;

·    proposed SeaPath and SkyPaths; and

·    local board’s proposed connection from Esmonde Road to Francis Street

9.       The local board supported the enhanced renewal to enable a 2.5 metre boardwalk for improved walking and cycling provision at Patuone Reserve, and at their August 2018 business meeting (resolution number DT/2018/144) allocated the following:

·    $877,406 from the board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) capital fund; and

·    $122,594 from the Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBATCF).

10.     The concept design outlines the realignment and improvement to adjacent ecology to meet the recommendations set out in the Greenways Plan.

11.     Following further design work, two potential route options and their respective costings have been developed.  The design was prepared to assess the options for the shared cycle and pedestrian walkway.  Safety in design principles, planning requirements and construction cost estimates were prepared.

12.     The following image outlines the two route options: Option One in green and Option Two in blue below:

 

 

13.     It is important to note that matters such as tree pruning, maintenance (i.e. rubbish and litter removal) and estuary restoration are outside the scope of the renewal.  These matters can be addressed through working with council’s operational maintenance and volunteering teams.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve Option One: Part alignment across the mangroves $2,600,000, as it provides walkway users a different experience and is the most economical way to provide this link, as shown in the concept plan provided as Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

14.     Auckland Council’s Community Facilities department is currently undertaking a renewal of the Patuone Reserve walkway, Takapuna, as part of the local board’s 2019/2020 Community Facilities work programme.

15.     The walkway and its associated assets have been identified for renewal due to the:

·    degrading condition of the timber walkway, which is becoming a hazard and health and safety issue;

·    existing hoggin path is in poor condition; and

·    poor visual amenity and associated safety issues identified through Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) guidelines.

16.     The scope of the renewal is to address the existing condition issues of the walkway and its associated assets.

17.     During work programme discussions, the local board and staff also identified the opportunity to enhance the scope of the renewal so that it could significantly improve walking and cycling provision along the walkway. 

18.     Upgrading the Patuone Reserve walkway has been identified as a key project for the local board, and this is reflected in the following strategic documents:

·    2017-2020 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan: Improve connections from Esmonde Road to Auburn Reserve (page 17); and

·    Devonport-Takapuna Greenways Plan: route G8, Auburn and Patuone Reserves to Esmonde Road (page 33).

19.     Upgrading the walkway will also create a safe and accessible off-road alternative pedestrian and cycle route from central Takapuna to Esmonde and Barry’s Point roads.  This upgraded walkway will also provide an important link to the:

·    Akoranga Bus Station

·    Propsed SeaPath and SkyPaths; and

·    Local board’s proposed connection from Esmonde Road to Francis Street.

20.     The local board supported the enhanced renewal to enable a 2.5 metre boardwalk for improved walking and cycling provision at Patuone Reserve, and at their August 2018 business meeting (resolution number DT/2018/144) allocated the following:

·    $877,406 from the locally driven initiatives (LDI) capital fund; and

·    $122,594 from the Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

21.     The concept design outlines the realignment and improvement to adjacent ecology to meet the recommendations set out in the Greenways Plan

22.     The budget for this project was approved in the Community Facilities 2019/2020 work programme, as adopted in June 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

23.     It is proposed that the walkway that runs through Patuone Reserve is widened to 2.5 metres to form a shared path from its starting point at Esmonde Road to the south of the site through to its exiting point to the north at Auburn Reserve.  The realignment will utilise the existing topography and navigate its way through existing trees and vegetation whilst trying to minimise the need for tree removal. 

24.     A combination of concrete pathway and timber boardwalk will be used to form the walkway depending on the existing topography and ground conditions.  The proposed walkway will not impact on the amenity of Patuone Reserve, nor detract other users from enjoying the area as a passive recreational experience.

25.     The walkway improvement and suggested alignment will also provide the opportunity for the inclusion of two viewing areas to take advantage of the visual amenity of the site, and to provide the base for educational signage that relates to the surrounding environment.

26.     Improvements to the two reserve access points from Esmonde Road and Auburn Street Reserve have also been proposed.  This includes widening and formalisation of an entry point from Esmonde Road and the rearrangement of existing parking spaces along Auburn Street Reserve to provide a consistent 2.5m wide access route to the reserve’s northern entry from Auburn Street.

27.     The walkway gradient will be a maximum of 8% which meets the requirements to provide all abilities access from Auburn Street Reserve through to Esmonde Road. The short feeder path from Greydene Place will be steeper at a maximum 23% due to site constraints.

28.     Planting will also be improved throughout the site, with a strong focus on planting native species that support existing birdlife.  Throughout the site, planting is proposed along the estuary edge and below existing trees to improve the existing environment, mitigate tree or shrub loss during construction and enhance the amenity value of the walkway.

29.     The walkway improvement works will also provide opportunity for further improvements to existing storm water infrastructure, with the possible inclusion of gross pollutant traps to the north end of the site to reduce scouring and contamination, of the upper estuary.  Existing storm water outlets will also be cleared of any contamination and overgrown and invasive species will be removed and replanted with suitable riparian planting.  The inlets will also be lined with rip rap (rocks) to slow further contaminants from entering the estuary.  Additional grass swales are also being proposed at the base of existing steep batters to reduce surface water run-off.

Route options

30.     Following further design work, two potential route options and their respective costings have been developed.  The report was prepared to assess the options for the shared cycle and pedestrian walkway.  Safety in design principles, planning requirements and construction cost estimates were prepared.

31.     The following table represents an overview of the options, benefits, impacts and implications:

Option

Cost to implement option

Benefits

Impacts and implications

Option one: Part alignment across the mangroves

Depicted in green in the map below

Recommended option

$2,600,000

·      Provides cost savings of $250,000 from Option 2

·      Offers walkway users a different experience for a section of the boardwalk across the mangroves

·      Avoids the high ecological value sites along the foreshore

·      Provides an accessible route as the boardwalk will be ramped down at a 1:12 gradient from Auburn Street Reserve end

·      An ecological assessment supports this option therefore obtaining resource consent is not expected to be an issue.

New alignment would require some mangroves to be removed to create boardwalk

 

Option two: Alignment along the foreshore

Depicted in blue in the map below

$2,850,000

·      Follows the existing path alignment

·      Provides an accessible route as the boardwalk will be ramped down at a 1:12 gradient from Auburn Street Reserve end

Works will be undertaken on the foreshore in high valued ecological area

Insufficient budget for this option

 

32.     The following image outlines the two route options, option one in green and option two in blue below:

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     Community Facilities staff have also discussed the upgrade with both Bike North Shore and Bike Auckland, and they have informally supported the proposal.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     Local board views and preferences have been sought through a workshop 5 February 2019, and development of this project, and as part of the proposed recommendations in this report.

35.     Local residents and visitors will benefit from the developed walkway as it will provide an improved level of service.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Engagement with mana whenua will be undertaken in the next phase of the project and will be required for resource consent.

 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     A total budget of $2,767,406.76 has been approved, made up from:

 

Financial Year

Capital Works Renewals

Locally Driven Initiatives

Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund

2019 and prior

$967,406.76

 

 

2020

$100,000

$877,406

$122,594

2021

$150,000

 

 

2022

$550,000

 

 

Total

$1,767,406.76

$877,406

$122,594

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     Should the local board not support either option, this will subsequently delay and extend the timeframes to deliver the project.

39.     The new path will be 2.5m wide, which is considered a minimum width for shared pedestrian and cycling pathway. There is potential this width will not be adequate for the number of users and will have to be retrospectively widened to accommodate numbers. The foundations can be designed to accommodate a 3m wide boardwalk that can be refitted in the future, to minimise the risk of the investment.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     If the recommendation is supported by the local board, the project will be progressed through the detailed design, consultation and procurement phases to enable construction to commence in 2020.

41.     The local community, neighbouring residents and owners will also be informed of the local board’s decision, and the proposed time frame for construction.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Patuone Walkway Concept Plan

15

b

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan Extract

21

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Julie Crabb – Principal Project Manager Park Facilities

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



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Auckland Transport Monthly Update - August 2019

File No.: CP2019/02235

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the August 2019 Auckland Transport monthly update.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport August 2019 monthly update report and thank Marilyn Nicholls for her presentation and attendance

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport August Report 2019

33

b

AT Quarterly Report to DTLB  April 2019 - June 2019

39

c

DTLB School Community Transport Report – Quarter to June 2019

41

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


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Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes

File No.: CP2019/14579

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, and to provide feedback on the recommended changes to the document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is currently reviewing the Auckland Film Protocol.  The Auckland Film Protocol sets out:

·        the commitment of the council group to supporting filming in Auckland;

·        expectations and rules that filmmakers must abide by when filming in Auckland; and

·        provides guidance for filmmakers on the process for approval to film in Auckland.

3.       The purpose of the review was to ensure that the Auckland Film Protocol is up-to-date and identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities that should be addressed.  Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Auckland Film Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol. 

4.       A revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in June 2019 for consideration and was approved for public consultation (resolution number ENV/2019/73). 

5.       The following is a summary of the key changes made to the Auckland Film Protocol before public consultation was undertaken:

·        Native species: new content added stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: new content added providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: new content added stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: new content added stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: new content added to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was updated to reflect current policy, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council.  Some structural and editorial amendments were also made to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

6.       Public consultation was undertaken over a three week period between 21 June and 12 July 2019.

7.       A  total of 74 submissions were received during the public consultation period.  The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board residents provided a total of four submissions on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, representing 5% percent of all submissions. The views of Devonport-Takapuna submitters were generally similar to regional views; all public submitters supported Auckland Council s film-friendly policy. Staff are proposing some changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address submitter concerns; the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film protocol are shown in track changes in Attachment B.

8.       This report provides a summary of public feedback and of proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address feedback.  The following is a high‑level summary of the key changes proposed to the Auckland Film Protocol in response to public consultation:

·        Natural environment: include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Native species: include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Kauri dieback: amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

·        Impact on access to public open space: include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

·        Compliance and enforcement: include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with the Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

9.       Submission themes and proposed changes are summarised in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol

b)      provide feedback on the recommended changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol

c)      note that local board feedback will be included in a report to the Environment and Community Committee in September 2019, seeking approval for the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The first version of the Auckland Film Protocol (the Protocol) was adopted by the Regional Development and Operations Committee (resolution number RDO/2013/27) on 14 March 2013.  A review of fees for filming in the Auckland Region was undertaken in 2014 and a new set of region‑wide charges was recommended; providing a simplified and harmonised range of charges.  The Governing Body adopted a region‑wide schedule of film fees and revised Auckland Film Protocol on 28 May 2015 (resolution number GB/2015/36).

11.     Since the Protocol was adopted in 2015 there have been a number of changes to legislation and to Auckland Council’s policy and planning framework. The purpose of the review of the Protocol was to:

·        ensure that the Protocol is up-to-date; and

·        identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities to be addressed in the Protocol.

12.     Content of the Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.

13.     Workshops were held in September and October 2018 to engage with local boards that experience a high volume of filming.

14.     Engagement to inform the preparation of the revised draft Protocol was also undertaken with:

·        mana whenua: mana whenua interests are represented by 19 iwi (tribal) authorities in Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland.  The 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review of the Protocol.

·        staff of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to inform the review.

·        screen sector: the screen sector was invited to participate in a survey in April 2019 to inform the review.  The survey asked a series of general questions about the Protocol and experiences of filming in public open space in Auckland. 

·        public: the People’s Panel in September 2018; a total of 4,762 responses were received.  The survey asked a series of questions on views on and experiences of filming in Auckland. 

A high-level summary of feedback (including local board feedback) is provided in Attachment C.

15.     The review recommended that a range of changes be made to the Auckland Film Protocol, the following is a summary of the key changes proposed to the Environment and Community Committee:

·        Native species: include new content stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: include new content providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include new content stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: include new content stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: include new content to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Filming on Tūpuna Maunga: update content to reflect that applications to film on Tūpuna Maunga are assessed by the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority.

·        Updates to content: update content to reflect current policy (e.g. smokefree policy), plans (Auckland Unitary Plan) and bylaws of Auckland Council.

·        Structural and editorial: amend some parts of the document to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

16.     The revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was approved by the Envrionment and Community Committee for public consultation in June 2019 (resolution number ENV/2019/73).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     Consultation on the revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol took place from 21 June to 12 July 2019.  A total of 74 submissions were received; this represents a substantial increase on the 21 submission which were received in response to the 2015 review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  Of the submissions received, 72 were submitted using the online form and 2 non‑form hardcopy submissions were received. 

18.     Submitters were asked to identify if they worked in the screen sector or not, with:

·        29 submissions (39%) received from individuals or organisations that identified themselves as working in the screen sector

·        45 submissions (61%) received from individuals or organisations that do not work in the screen sector.

The questions included in the online form varied depending on whether the submitter identified themselves as working in the screen industry or not.

19.     A breakdown of all submissions received by local board area is shown in Table 1 below.  The small number of responses from individual local board areas means that a analysis of views by local board area was not possible for all local board areas.

 

Table 1: Breakdown of submissions made by local board area.

Local Board Area

Number of respondents

Percentage of respondents

Waitākere Ranges

17

23.0%

Albert-Eden

9

12.2%

Waitematā

8

10.8%

Rodney

6

8.1%

Upper Harbour

5

6.8%

Ōrākei

5

6.8%

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

4

5.4%

Devonport-Takapuna

4

5.4%

Henderson-Massey

3

4.1%

Kaipātiki

3

4.1%

Howick

2

2.7%

Whau

2

2.7%

Māngere-Ōtahuhu

1

1.4%

Puketapapa

1

1.4%

Hibiscus and Bays

1

1.4%

Papakura

1

1.4%

Franklin

0

0%

Great Barrier

0

0%

Ōtara‑Papatoetoe

0

0%

Manurewa

0

0%

Waiheke

0

0%

Don't Know

1

1.4%

Outside Auckland

1

1.4%

Total

74

 

 

20.     A series of closed questions were asked of non‑screen sector individuals and organisations; a summary of the responses to these questions is shown in Table 2 below.  Table 2 shows that:

·        most respondents are supportive of Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach and that;

·        most respondents think that the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on residents and businesses, on public open space and historic and cultural heritage.

Table 2: Feedback on the Auckland Film Protocols management of the impacts of filming

Question

Response

Percentage of regional submissions

(number of respondents is shown in brackets)

Do you support Auckland Council's film‑friendly approach?

Yes

75% (33)

Partially

20% (9)

No

5% (2)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on residents and businesses?

Yes

56% (18)

Partially

19% (6)

No

25% (8)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on our public open space and environment?

Yes

53% (23)

Partially

33% (14)

No

14% (6)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on our historic and cultural heritage?

Yes

62% (26)

Partially

29% (12)

No

10% (4)

 

21.     The main reasons given by those who supported Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach are shown in Table 3.

Table 3: Summary of key reasons for supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Economic

·      generates employment and economic growth;

·      benefits communities and local businesses;

·      benefits a broad range of trades and industries;

·      attracts investment and businesses to Auckland.

Cultural and creative

·      has cultural benefits allowing and supporting the telling of stories visually;

·      supports the creative economy and enables people to find a future in the creative industries;

·      It’s fun and exciting to see Auckland on the screen.

Promotion and tourism

·      promotes and showcases Auckland to the world;

·      creates a positive image of Auckland.

 

22.     Table 4 showns the key reasons that respondents gave for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Table 4: Summary of key reasons given for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Access

·      the impacts on resident, including parking restrictions, road closures and ability to use public open space while filming is taking place need to be considered and managed;

·      need to ensure that film‑makers are respectful of other users of public open space.

Notification

·      there needs to be sufficient notification to ensure that residents and businesses are aware of open space being used for filming and are not inconvenienced.

Balance

·      need to consider and manage the impact that filming has on the environment and impacted residents;

·      need to balance the cumulative impacts of filming.

Equity

·      need to ensure that fees for commercial use of public places are fair.

 

23.     The key reasons given for not supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach were:

·        the cost to ratepayers of enabling filming;

·        that there is not enough protection for individuals, businesses and residents affected by filming being carried out on private property.

24.     A series of open‑ended questions were also included to elicit further information about responses to these questions and about a range of other topics.  Staff have worked through submissions to determine any changes to be recommended for the final revised Auckland Film Protocol.  Attachment A identifies key themes and submission points along with proposed staff responses.  

A summary of the most common submission themes and the proposed staff responses are shown in table 5.

Table 5: Summary of key submission themes and proposed staff responses.

Key themes

Summary of proposed responses

Use of drones for filming

Include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

Impact on natural environment

Include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Kauri dieback

Amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

Impact on native species

Include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Impact on access to public open space

Include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

Compliance and enforcement

Include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

Health and safety

Amend to enable production companies to arrange alternative timeframes for the submission of a site specific health and safety plan by agreement with Screen Auckland.

Notification

Screen Auckland to consider operational approaches to achieving wider public notification.

Impact on business

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  The protocol is intended to provide a framework that enables decisions to be made on a case‑by‑case basis.

Equity

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  Fees for commercial use of public open space are set under the Auckland Council Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 and amended through the long term plan and annual plan.

 

25.     This report seeks formal feedback from the board at its August 2019 business meeting on the recommended changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol in response to consultation feedback.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.  This included engagement with Auckland Transport, Panuku Development Auckland, and with Auckland Council community facilities, region‑wide planning, social policy and bylaws, visitor experience and heritage

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Role of local boards in film permitting

27.     Landowner approval is required to film on any public open space in the Auckland region.  Local boards are responsible for landowner approvals for local parks and reserves.  Engagement with local boards that experience a high volume of applications for film permits was undertaken in September and October 2018 to inform the review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  A summary of the key engagement themes is included in Attachment C and was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

28.     A key theme from local board engagement was that the film permit timeframes mean that landowner approval timeframes are very tight, particularly when considering complex or contentious applications.  It was also noted that the current timeframes do not allow sufficient time to consider applications at full board meetings or to consult key stakeholders.  Given this, the following options on film permit timeframes were presented to the Environment and Community Committee at a workshop in May 2019 and at the June 2019 meeting.

Option one: Status Quo

Option two: amend the permit timeframes

·        Option 2(a) the permit time frame is amended to be “up to five working days”.

·        Option 2(b) the permit time frame is increased to 5‑7 working days.

29.     Following direction from the Environment and Community Committee, that increasing timeframes could act as a disincentive making Auckland internationally uncompetitive, the status quo option was retained in the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) has an ongoing relationship with several mana whenua and mataawaka groups, across its whole portfolio of activity.  To inform the review of the Protocol the 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review.  In relation to film permit applications Māori views and input may be obtained in several ways where there is a potential impact on particular land or sites. This is usually coordinated either by the film facilitator, or through the relevant parks manager.

31.     Specific processes are in place for the tūpuna maunga, with all commercial filming on the maunga requiring the approval of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority).  Screen Auckland facilitates all requests for approval to film on the tūpuna maunga.  Approval to film will be subject to conditions and restrictions set by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.  Meetings were held with staff of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to inform the review and ensure that proposed amendments are consistent with the policy of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The proposed amendments to the Protocol do not impact on existing levels of service and will not impact on operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     There are no significant risks arising from the local board giving feedback on the proposed changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol at this time.

34.     If adoption of the revised Auckland Film Protocol is delayed this would impact on council’s ability to implement the proposed changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Public feedback and proposed amendments to the Auckland Film Protocol will be presented to the Environment and Community Committee for approval

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key submission themes and responses

53

b

Draft 2019 Auckland Film Protocol

63

c

Summary of preconsultation engagement

123

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Marie Jenkins – Screen Facilitation Manager ATEED

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza – Acting GM Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Third party partnership opportunities for sport and recreation provision

File No.: CP2019/13172

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Devonport-Takapuna Third Party Opportunities Study for sport and recreation provision.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Devonport-Takapuna Third-Party Opportunities Study 2019 (refer Attachment A) was undertaken to identify public access opportunities for sport and recreation purposes, to facilities owned by third parties such as schools and sports clubs.

3.       The purpose of the Third-Party Opportunities Study is to:

·     identify public access opportunities for sport and recreation purposes, within local facilities owned by third parties;

·    identify capacity available within third party facilities;

·    ascertain the current issues and challenges regarding third party facility access;

·    review relevant background information and studies to understand the background information and project need; and

·    research any other similar plans and how their success or learnings can be applied to this project.

4.       The study will help guide provision of sport and recreation opportunities in the Devonport-Takapuna area via third-party facilties. Feedback received from the local board has been incorporated into the assessment and has informed the development of suggested next steps, which will enable projects to be progressed for further investigation.

5.       The study identifies nine facilities for next stage investigations. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve the Devonport-Takapuna Third-Party Opportunities Study (presented as Attachment A to the agenda report) to assist the local board in making decisions to improve their network of sport and recreation faciltities.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Third-Party Opportunities Study (refer Attachment A) was developed by reviewing existing data relating to sport and recreation facilities within the local board area, completing relevant stakeholder engagement to understand current needs, provision, barriers/challenges and potential opportunities. A facility inventory was then completed alongside the identification and scoping of potential partnership opportunities.

7.       The assessment is aligned strategically with the following guiding documents;

·     The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2017;

·     The Devonport-Takapuna Area Plan;

·     Community Facilities Network Plan;

·     Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan;

·     Auckland Sport Sector Facility Priorities Plan;

·     Auckland Indoor Court Plan; and

·     Sport Facility Plans.

8.       Engagement with relevant parties was undertaken to understand the current service provision for sport and recreation with in the local board area. Potential partnership options to support and address facility shortfalls that are negatively impacting the current provision of sport and recreation in the local board area have been identified in the study.  

9.       The purpose of identifying the potential partnership options is to provide a starting point for discussion with the local board and community, and to guide potential community access into third-party facilities in order to provide sport and recreation opportunities. These potential partnership options are high-level only and require further investigation to fully understand the opportunities and constraints.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2017 identifies a key initiative to partner with local schools, churches, and other spaces to make their space available for community use. This initiative aligns with the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan which looks to facilitate partnerships to make the most of local facilities and resources.

11.     The sport codes that were consulted with provided an overview of their current delivery and challenges that they are being faced with in the wider north shore region:

Code

Challenges

Basketball

-     Deficiency of indoor court availability

-     Primary and intermediate games are shortened to allow for maximised delivery due to venue capacity issues

-     There is growing demand for social basketball leagues

Badminton

-     Core delivery sites are at capacity during peak hours and are nearing full capacity

-     Badminton is popular with the Asian demographic which is a growing population within the local board area

Bowls

-     Clubs require assistance with maintenance of clubrooms and greens

-     Support clubs with hosting community events/multi-use

Futsal

-     Availability of court space is inconsistent

-     High demand existing with no capacity to deliver

Gymnastics

-     Storage required at facilities to allow for pack in/pack out delivery model

-     Trampoline and rhythmic gymnastics require roof height of at least 10m

Hockey

-     6-a-side hockey has seen increased demand for alternative turf surfaces such as netball courts and school halls

-     Southern North Shore area identified as next priority for turf delivery

Netball

-     Netball North Harbour Centre is currently at capacity

-     Multiple courts are required to make satellite delivery viable

Table Tennis

-     Volunteers stretched due to pack-in/pack out delivery model

-     Availability of additional space is either inconsistent or does not provide adequate storage

Tennis

-     Support required for sustainability of current facilities

-     Support required for opening facilities up for multi-use partnerships

Volleyball

-     Predominantly delivered to school-aged participants

-     Demand increasing for court space across the region

 

12.     An inventory of third-party facilities within the local board area is provided in Attachment A (p.22-29).

13.     Opportunities to provide additional sport and recreation provision in the local board area have been identified at the sites identified below and should be investigated further for project viability:

·    Bayswater School

·    Belmont Baptist Church

·    Forrest Hill Tennis Centre

·    Hauraki School

·    Holy Trinity Church

·    North Shore Croquet Club

·    Takapuna Grammar School

·    Takapuna Normal Intermediate School

·    Westlake Boys High School.

The opportunities for each site are detailed in Attachment A (p.32-40).

14.     It is recommended that the local board resolves to approve the Devonport-Takapuna Third Party Partnership Opportunities Study as this will provide direction for further project investigation work. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     Subject to formal local board approval of the partnership opportunities defined for sport and recreation provision in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area; further investigation into key projects will be initiated. Further investigation will consider and collaborate with all appropriate departments where required. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     The Parks Sport and Recreation 18/19 Work Programme was approved by the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board on 19 June 2018 (resolution number DT/2018/97).  A third-party service assessment for the delivery of sport and recreation provision in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area was included in the programme.

17.     A workshop was held with the local board on 18 June 2019, when the Sport and Recreation Lead presented the Third-Party Partnership Opportunities Study (refer Attachment A) as an 80% draft. Based on feedback received at this workshop, a final report has been provided.

18.     The projects align to outcomes in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan: Outcome 4; “Our communities are empowered, engaged and inclusive”

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     5.4% of the population in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area is Māori residents.

20.     Sport New Zealand Insights show in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area the most popular ways for Māori to participate in physical activity is walking, jogging, and swimming.

21.     During next stage investigations, Māori participation trends will be considered to align with proposed projects.

22.     The Parks Sport and Recreation 18/19 Work Programme was presented at the North-western area Mana Whenua Hui. No request for further engagement was made at this stage.

23.     Any project that is initiated from the study will be presented again to the North-western area Hui to receive requests for further engagement.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     If the recommended outcomes are agreed, staff will work with the third-parties and the local board to identify possible opportunities for funding as part of the 19/20 Parks Sport and Recreation Work programme item (Sharepoint ID 767 DT: Equitable Access to Sport and Recreation).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There is an inherent risk in the investigation of a project when there is no funding currently identified to deliver the physical work components.

26.     The investigation phase of project delivery would consider financial constraints and potential funding opportunities. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The Parks Sport and Recreation 19/20 Work Programme item ‘Equitable Access to Sport and Recreation’ delivers investigation of the potential sites identified in the study. Staff will work with the local board to progress the project.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Third Party Partnership Opportunties Study for sport and recreation provision

133

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Laura Bertelsen - Sport & Recreation Lead

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Devonport- Takapuna BMX Service Assessment

File No.: CP2019/14552

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the bicycle motocross (BMX) service assessment (refer to Attachment A) and confirm the site of the BMX pump track at Woodall Park. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As part of the approved Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme 2018/2019, a service assessment was undertaken to identify possible sites for a BMX pump track within the Devonport peninsula. The scope of the project was determined to focus on Woodall Park, at the direction of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board at a workshop on 2 October 2018.

3.       The service assessment provides staff and the local board with a framework to assess the appropriateness and high-level feasibility of establishing a small to medium scale BMX pump track facility at Woodall Park. 

4.       Woodall Park was the preferred site for further investigation by the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board, Community Facilities and Parks staff. The Devonport BMX Club and Devonport Rotary are supportive of the proposed concept within the service assessment for Woodall Park (refer to Attachment A).

5.       The service assessment provides a network review, existing site context, planning summary and design development considerations. The recommendations of the service assessment support the detailed investigation and design of Woodall Park.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      adopt the BMX service assessment (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report) as a framework for future development and detailed investigation, as funding becomes available.

b)      confirm the site of the BMX pump track at Woodall Park as referenced in Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board approved a BMX service assessment as part of the Parks, Sports and Recreation work programme 2018/2019 (Sharepoint project ID 415).

7.       The service assessment document is strategically aligned to the following Auckland Council policy and guiding documents:

·    Devonport- Takapuna Local Board Plan 2017;

·    Devonport- Takapuna Greenways Plan 2015;

·    Auckland Plan;

·    Open Space Provision Policy 2016; and

·    Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan 2013.

8.       The Bike Facility Plan for Auckland Region 2013-2021 outlines that local community provision of BMX is to be located close to population centres as part of cycling hubs.

9.       The purpose of the service assessment was to identify possible sites for a BMX pump track within the Devonport peninsula. The review also identified existing provision in the area and how to increase provision for BMX / mountain bike riders. The scope of the project was determined to focus on Woodall Park, at the direction of the local board at a workshop on 2 October 2018.

10.     The Devonport BMX Club had previously identified Woodall Park as a possible site for a community style pump track in 2016.

11.     Devonport Rotary expressed an interest in being involved throughout the project design and delivery. Representatives from Devonport Rotary have been engaged with throughout the service assessment project.

12.     The proposed concept of the pump track at Woodall Park was selected as it is currently used as an informal BMX area. The Devonport BMX Club approached the local board to formalise this area with a professionally designed pump track. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The service assessment of the site was developed through an initial review of the existing network provision. This aligned with the Sunnynook Wheeled Sports Service Assessment. All existing wheeled play was mapped using a network approach.

14.     The existing site at Woodall Park was assessed against the potential development opportunities at the informal BMX area. The site provides good visual permeability through the tree cover, is large and relatively flat. The Reserve Management Plan for Woodall Park (1997) contemplates recreation and sporting activities.

15.     The service assessment reviewed the planning requirements of the proposed site. Resource consent is likely to be required under the Auckland Unitary Plan for the following activities, which will be investigated further during the investigation and design phase:

·    new structures within coastal storm inundation area;

·    new structures within a flood sensitive area; and

·    tree removal and/or works within the driplines of trees over 400mm girth.

16.     The design development was created in consultation with the Devonport BMX Club. Two options were produced, of which the final concept was confirmed by the group as their preference.

17.     The BMX service assessment was limited to one site. This represents a risk that if the site is no longer feasible or viable, a further assessment will be required to progress a more appropriate site.

18.     The proposal of a community style BMX pump track does complement the existing network as there are currently no facilities located within the Devonport peninsula. The closest similar style of facility is the skate park at Ngataringa Park. This provides for a different style of wheeled play. The proposed BMX pump track at Woodall Park would ideally be located in close proximity to Ngataringa Park.

19.     Investment in the potential BMX pump track will meet the service outcomes identified in the service assessment, which is the delivery of a small to medium scale community facility. This facility will provide an area for active recreation and youth placemaking.

20.     The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board is the delegated decision maker over local parks and reserves within its boundaries. The local board will have future decision points to confirm the detailed design and approve funding for the physical works.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The Community Facilities Operational Maintenance and Management team will consider maintaining the asset after construction, provided it meets design specifications and requirements. The cost of maintaining the asset is yet to be confirmed and will be workshopped with the relevant staff and the local board.

22.     The approved Community Facilities work programme 2019/2020 will investigate the implementation of the BMX concept plan at Woodall Park (Sharepoint project ID 2824 Devonport-Takapuna).

23.     Investigation and Design staff require confirmation of the site from the local board prior to this project commencing.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Workshops were held with the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board on 2 October 2018 and 4 June 2019. Feedback was received on the scope of the project and Woodall Park was progressed as the preferred site.

25.     The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board resolved at a business meeting on 17 July 2018 to support in principle the establishment of an all-weather pump track on Woodall Park, Devonport (resolution number DT/2018/119).

26.     The local board provided further direction that the BMX service assessment was to be undertaken at Woodall Park at the 2 October 2018 workshop. This direction was confirmed on the 11 December 2018 business meeting (resolution number DT/2018/224).

27.     The service assessment aligns with the Devonport- Takapuna Local Board Plan 2017, Outcome one: Quality parks, beaches and open spaces that everyone can enjoy. A key initiative of this outcome is to investigate a pump track within the local board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme was presented to the North- West area Mana Whenua Hui on 4 July 2018. Iwi expressed an interest in being involved in parks projects at this time and will remain a key stakeholder throughout the process.

29.     The work undertaken in the Parks and Places Team Work Programme has been designed to enable meaningful engagement with iwi by outlining the potential project and how it will deliver on the outcomes identified in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan. The intention is to provide enough information for iwi to efficiently provide input into the direction of the project before the design process begins.

30.     Works packages identified for investigaion and design will be presented again to the North-western area Hui. Iwi will have the opportunity to express interest in the projects and indicate how they would like to be involved in the project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     Currently there is $25,000 locally driven initiatives (LDI) capital funding allocated in the Community Facilities work programme. This funding will be to undertake detailed investigation and design and scope the works required.

32.     The community-led build process has been indicated by the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board as a possible low cost solution for the delivery of the BMX pump track. Total build costs are yet to be confirmed and may require further funding by the local board. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     A lack of funding may lead to the project being placed on hold. This will negatively impact the project as the timeframe for delivery will be extended. Once total build costs are confirmed they will be reported to the local board for consideration.

34.     The site is located within a coastal inundation and flood sensitive area. Resource consent will be required and will depend on final design, material selection, and construction methodology. Adequate mitigation will be required to minimise any effects.

35.     The current concept will also require tree asset owner approval from the Community Facilities Arborist. This is an additional requirement for an independent works arborist to oversee the works within the driplines of parks trees.

36.     Community-led delivery is preferred by the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board. This process requires significant commitment from the community group. Further engagement is required to understand the services offered by Devonport Rotary. The relevant staff from Community Facilities will need to review the project to further gauge feasibility.

37.     The community-led delivery process will require a principal contractor to manage the community group. Delivery of the project must be in line with the design specifications and requirements of Auckland Council. The Investigation and Design team will report to the local board with options for delivery.

38.     The community-led delivery process must confirm acceptance of a new asset by the Auckland Council’s Asset Management Information Systems team and Operations and Maintenance staff. The costs of maintenance, and maintenance responsibility, have not been confirmed. Due to the style of the proposed pump track, it is expected that annual resurfacing will be required to maintain a baseline minimum to keep the facility in a safe and rideable condition.

39.     The acceptance and maintenance of a new asset is best achieved through the delivery of projects by Auckland Council’s Investigation and Design, and Project Delivery teams.

40.     The current concept for BMX pump track is within the Waitematā Golf Course leased area, being Part Lot 2 DP 19288, The golf course manager has been approached and is supportive in principle of the pump track facility. Once the project has progressed, the Community Leasing team will work with the golf club to amend the leased area to exclude the footprint of the pump track.

41.     The BMX service assessment was limited to one site through previous feedback from the local board. Other sites have not been considered during the assessment. If the Woodall Park site is not feasible then a further assessment may be required to identify other sites.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     Investigation and design will explore the implementation of the BMX concept plan at Woodall Park (Sharepoint project ID 2824 Devonport- Takapuna). The project is approved in the Community Facilities work programme 2019/2020.

43.     Detailed design and resource consenting are the next steps prior to developing an agreement for how the BMX pump track will be delivered. Previously, Devonport Rotary has expressed an interest in being involved during the physical works. Approval will be required from the Devonport- Takapuna Local Board.

44.     Community Facilities will engage with the BMX stakeholder group and Devonport Rotary to ensure that the community is involved throughout the design and build phases of the project.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Woodall Park Pump Track Service Assessment

181

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

George McMahon - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Sunnynook Wheeled Sports Service Assessment

File No.: CP2019/14553

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the service assessment for the provision of wheeled sports options in the Sunnynook area (refer to Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As part of the approved Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme 2018/2019, a service assessment was undertaken to identify wheeled sports options in the Sunnynook area. The purpose of the assessment was to identify service outcomes which are fit for purpose for the local community. These will also inform investigation and design and future project delivery requirements.

3.       Wheeled sports in the context of the assessment refers to informal unorganised activities which are accessible to the public in appropriate locations in the Sunnynook area.

4.       The service assessment has provided staff and the local board with a series of recommendations. These recommendations are based on an assessment of existing provision of skate, mountain biking and bicycle motocross (BMX) facilities within the Devonport- Takapuna Local Board area and adjacent local board areas.

5.       This network review identifies gaps in provision and seeks to provide a framework for future decision making on the provision of wheeled sports facilities within the local board area (refer to Attachment A, p4).

6.       The assessment was completed in four stages to establish gaps in the wheeled sports provision and potential sites to improve such provision at a network level. Initially a desktop study was undertaken to establish the provision of existing facilities. Research was completed to establish catchment areas and acceptable traveling distances. The existing provision and geographical gaps were mapped to show network distribution. Finally, analysis of the potential sites for further investigation and feasibility was documented.

7.       Growth and density of population data from the Transport Modelling Population Projection (previously known as the Auckland Regional Transport model) was used to understand projected growth in relation to play provision. Growth and density of population is forecasted in the Sunnynook area.

8.       Based on empirical research and investigation on traveling distances, catchment parameters were used at a neighbourhood and suburb level to address gaps in provision.

9.       The study area was based off the Devonport-Takapuna catchment area defined in the Sunnynook Plan 2018. Reporting considered adjacent suburbs to ensure a holistic view of the wider network of wheeled sports facilities. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      adopt the Sunnynook Wheeled Sports service assessment as presented in Attachment A to the agenda report) as a framework for future development and detailed investigation, as funding becomes available.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The service assessment document is strategically aligned to the following Auckland Council policy and guiding documents:

·    Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2017;

·    Devonport-Takapuna Greenways Plan 2015;

·    Sunnynook Plan 2018;

·    Auckland Plan;

·    Open Space Provision Policy 2016;

·    Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan 2013; and

·    Devonport-Takapuna Play Provision Study 2018.

11.     The purpose of the wheeled sports service assessment was to identify wheeled sports options in the Sunnynook area. The service assessment sought to outline service outcomes that will be fit for purpose for the local community, now and in the future.

12.     The Devonport- Takapuna Local Board Plan 2017 and Sunnynook Plan 2018 both refer to a commitment to the investigation and delivery of wheeled sports options in Sunnynook. 

13.     As part of the approved Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme 2018/2019, a service assessment was undertaken to identify wheeled sports options in the Sunnynook area. The service assessment provides staff and the local board with a framework for decision-making and the delivery of wheeled sports provision.

14.     The assessment of provision is limited to the study area of Sunnynook and surrounding suburbs within the local board area. Current local board provision of wheeled sports in this area is limited to Greville Reserve and Sunnynook Park. Greville Reserve contains skate, mountain biking and a learn to ride facilities, while Sunnynook Park contains a skate facility.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The assessment methodology was developed through four stages to establish potential sites to improve the provision on wheeled sports at a network level:

·    desktop study to establish the nature and extent of existing facilities and wheeled sports activities

·    research to establish logical network catchment areas in relation to acceptable traveling distances

·    mapping of existing provision and catchment areas to enable the assessment of network distribution, synergies and geographical gaps in provision

·    analysis of the above to establish potential sites for optimization, further investigation and/ or high-level feasibility analysis.

16.     The network review included existing facilities and locations both within the Sunnynook area and outside the area to address identified gaps in provision and barriers to access at a network level.

17.     In addition to existing facilities, a further 13 reserves were considered for their potential to accommodate wheeled sports. Only Seine Reserve, Marsh Reserve, Milford Reserve and Sunnynook Park were considered appropriate in addressing gaps in wheeled sports provision.

18.     Sunnynook Park is recommended to address a gap in skate and BMX freestyle facilities at a suburb level.

19.     Future investment in the potential Sunnynook Park facility will provide an area for the youth to recreate and would enhance the existing skate facility. Access has been identified as key to increase participation in the chosen wheeled sport. Quality parks assets will enable this outcome to be met.

20.     Greville Reserve is not identified as a specific gap in the existing network. However, the current mountain biking facility provides only for experienced riders and would benefit from investment and ongoing maintenance.

21.     Future parks projects will require approval by the Devonport- Takapuna Local Board as the allocated decision makers over local parks.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     Community Facilities staff have been consulted on the recommendations of this service assessment and support progressing Sunnynook Park for development.

23.     The approved Community Facilities work programme 2019/2020 includes the project ‘Implement wheeled sport concept plan at Sunnynook Park’ (Sharepoint ID 2676 Devonport- Takapuna).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     A workshop was held with the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board on 4 June 2019. Feedback was received on the draft service assessment and incorporated into the final draft.

25.     Public feedback was received during the local board plan process requesting priority be given to a skate park in Sunnynook.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     The Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme was presented to the North- West area Mana Whenua Hui on 4 July 2018. Iwi have the option to express an interest in being involved in parks projects at this time and will remain a key stakeholder throughout the process.

27.     The work undertaken in the Parks and Places Team Work Programme has been designed to enable meaningful engagement with iwi by outlining the potential project and how it will deliver on the outcomes identified in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan. The intention is to provide enough information for iwi to efficiently provide input into the direction of the project before the design process begins.

28.     Projects identified in the assessment for investigation and design will be presented again to the North-western area Hui. Iwi will have the opportunity to express interest in the projects and indicate how they would like to be involved in the project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     Currently there is $30,000 of the local board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) capital budget allocated in the Community Facilities work programme 2019/2020 to progress wheeled sports at Sunnynook Park.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     A lack of locally driven initiatives funding may lead to project delays and the recommendations of the service assessment not being realised. To mitigate the risk, it is recommended that funding be made available to ensure the recommended outcomes be met.  

31.     The investigation and design phase of project delivery may identify issues that require the feasibility of Sunnynook Park as a project to be reassessed.

32.     The delivery of a wheeled sports facility may not be well received by the wider community. The investigation of opportunities for a new skate park in the area received the lowest number of responses in the Sunnynook Plan 2018 public feedback process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Council’s Investigation and Design team will progress work at Sunnynook Park as part of the approved Community Facilities work programme 2019/2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Sunnynook Wheeled Sports Service Assessment

215

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

George McMahon - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

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Park naming at Oliver Reserve, situated at 44 Kawerau Avenue, Narrow Neck

File No.: CP2019/13927

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To recommend mana whenua engagement for dual naming at Oliver Reserve 44 Kawerau Avenue, Narrow Neck, in line with the Te Kete Rukuruku approach to park naming.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has received a request from Mr. Jim Eagles (descendant) requesting that Oliver Reserve be recognised as the name of the reserve situated at 44 Kawerau Avenue, Narrow Neck. Currently the reserve is reflected within Auckland Council’s internal systems as Kawerau Reserve. Historically this reserve was named Kawerau Avenue Reserve. However, the Devonport Borough Council resolved to name the reserve Oliver Reserve in 1986.

3.       Mana whenua engagement is required under the Conservation Act 1987 and Reserves Act 1977. Local boards hold allocated decision- making authority for naming community parks and facilities.

4.       Council’s Maori Language Policy was adopted by the Governing Body in 2016. The policy recognises council’s commitment to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi. This policy recognises that the Māori language is a cultural treasure and an official language of Aotearoa. It notes that the Māori language and culture forms a critical part of a Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world. Reclaiming or identifying new Māori names for community parks within the Devonport- Takapuna Local Board provides a significant opportunity to fulfil the policy intent.

5.       Mana whenua engagement will be undertaken by staff to confirm feedback on the name Oliver Reserve and whether a Māori name is appropriate for the site. Kawerau will be put forward as a name for consideration during the process, being the previous name of the reserve prior to being named Oliver Reserve.

6.       The work of Te Kete Rukuruku has sought to establish a best practice approach to Māori naming through an agreed process, in partnership between mana whenua and local boards. Through this partnership it is envisaged that relationships between mana whenua and their local boards will be strengthened. It is recommended that engagement follows the same approach as Te Kete Rukuruku.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      invite mana whenua to provide a Māori name and narrative for the reserve situated at 44 Kawerau Avenue, Narrow Neck, in line with the Te Kete Rukuruku approach to park naming.

b)      note that if through engagement with mana whenua, a name and narrative is gifted for this site, it will be adopted by the local board to enrich the story of this park, and support the Māori language to be visible, heard, spoken and learnt.

c)      note that as the park was previously named Kawerau Avenue Reserve by the Devonport Borough Council, this name will be considered by mana whenua during the engagement process.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi (Treaty of Waitangi) and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within an Auckland local government context.

8.       These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents – the Auckland Plan, the Long Term Plan, local board plans and the Unitary Plan.

9.       Te Whakaotinga 4: He wāhi whakamana arotahi, whakawhirinaki rawa ō tatou hapori (Outcome four: Our communities are empowered, engaged and inclusive). Within the Devonport- Takapuna Local Board Plan 2017 states “Partner with mana whenua and mataawaka to identify and progress areas of importance to Māori and the local community.

10.     In responding to council’s commitments and obligations to Māori in a way that will improve outcomes for all, Whiria Te Muka Tangata – The Māori Responsiveness Framework has been developed. Its purpose is to enhance and guide Auckland Council’s responsiveness to Māori. The framework articulates that council will work to ensure its policies and its actions consider:

·     the recognition and protection of Māori rights and interests within Tāmaki Makaurau

·     how to address and contribute to the needs and aspirations of Māori

11.     Auckland Council’s Māori Language Policy was adopted by the Governing Body in 2016. The policy recognises council’s commitment to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi. This policy recognises that the Māori language is a cultural treasure and an official language of Aotearoa. It notes that the Māori language and culture forms a critical part of a Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world. Reclaiming or identifying new Māori names for community parks within the Devonport- Takapuna Local Board area provides a significant opportunity to fulfil the policy intent.

12.     Key outcome areas of the Māori language policy are:

·    Te reo tē kitea – Māori language that is visible;

·    Te reo tē rongohia - Māori language that is heard;

·    Te reo tē kōreohia - Māori language that is spoken; and

·    Te reo tē ākona – Māori language that is learnt.

13.     The Māori Language Policy acknowledges that te reo Māori is an official language of Aotearoa and should receive equal status to English and NZ Sign Language.

14.     All local boards were consulted on the Māori Language Policy. Local boards hold allocated decision- making authority for naming community parks and facilities.

15.     Mr. Jim Eagles (descendant) has approached Auckland Council requesting that Oliver Reserve be recognised as the name of the reserve situated at 44 Kawerau Avenue, Narrow Neck. Currently the reserve is reflected within Auckland Council’s internal systems as Kawerau Reserve. This was the previous name of the reserve prior to the Devonport Borough Council resolving to change Kawerau Avenue Reserve to Oliver Reserve in 1986. This name change may have occurred inadvertently during the mapping of reserves for maintenance contract purposes (refer Attachment E).

16.     The land shown as Kawerau Reserve sited at 44 Kawerau Avenue, Narrow Neck, is described as Lots 91 and 92 DP 19859, comprising 1128 and 3617 square metres, and contained in NA888/52 and NA787/297 respectively (refer Attachment F). Both Lots 91 and 92 are currently held in fee simple by the Auckland Council as unclassified public reserves and subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

17.     Both Lots 91 and 92 were acquired on 7 October 1947 from the New Zealand Insurance Company Limited by the Devonport Borough Council as and for the purposes of a public reserve and recorded by Transfer No. 428453. There is no recording on Transfer No. 428453 about Lots 91 and 92 being named and gazetted. However, this action is not necessary under the Reserves Act to name a reserve.

18.     There is also a need for Lots 91 and 92 to be classified in terms of Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act as a statutory requirement under the Reserves Act. The classification of this reserve will be covered under the Local Parks Management Plan process which the local board has supported as part their 2019/2020 work programme.

Historical Context

19.     William Oliver was born in Cadnam, in the New Forest, Hampshire, United Kingdom in 1815. Aged twenty-one he went to Portsmouth and joined HM Storeship Buffalo as a cooper, which means he had previously been apprenticed as a cooper.  The Buffalo made three voyages to New Zealand, mainly taking settlers, convicts, soldiers and officials to Australia; ferrying soldiers and officials to New Zealand and collecting kauri spars and taking them back to Britain. On the third voyage, in 1840, she was wrecked at Buffalo Beach, Mercury Bay. The crew was taken to the Bay of Islands, enroute to returning home, when Governor William Hobson came on board and asked for volunteers to help found the new capital of Auckland. Oliver was one of those who did so.

20.     From 1841 he worked in the Government Store which was the first building erected in the new capital. In 1843 he married Mary Ann Oliver with whom he had two sons: William Willoughby and Henry James. In 1846 he was employed to run the dairy farm in Devonport and built what is said to have been the first proper house there. In 1849, when the first steps were taken towards local government on the North Shore, a meeting to elect Wardens of the Hundreds of Devonport was held in his house.

21.     In 1851 he was the first person to buy land in Devonport when he acquired the section where his house stood (the block where the Victoria Cinema now stands) and he bought another block in 1853. In 1847 he and his brother-in-law Tom Duder were initially accused of the gruesome murders of Lt Robert Snow, his wife and six-year-old daughter but were later exonerated. A former shipmate, Joseph Burns, was convicted of the crime and was hanged on what is now Windsor Reserve.

22.     Oliver died of tuberculosis in 1858 and was the first person to be buried in the (now closed) Mt Victoria Cemetery. The family has lived continuously in Devonport ever since. Oliver is the only one of the early settlers who has not been honoured in a street name though he does feature in the exhibition of ten Devonport pioneer families now on display at the Devonport Museum.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

23.     Auckland Council’s Archives have retrieved the Devonport Borough Council Special Order dated 15 October 1976. This special order renamed Princes Street to Kawerau. It is noted that the recommendations that the council was prepared to name the small informal reserve at the end of Princes Street “William Oliver Reserve”, as an adequate means of recognising this early settler (refer Attachment B).

24.     “We were able to find evidence that Princes Street was renamed Kawerau in 1976, after the Maori tribe. The order of the file means page 4 in the scanned attachment is the earliest page. We are confident the park they discussed is Kawarau Reserve, and that they named the road after the new reserve shortly after it was formed.” (Auckland Council Archivist).

25.     Archives have retrieved the meeting minutes from the Devonport Borough Council dated 5 August 1986. Item 14 – Kawerau Avenue Reserve, ‘Kawerau Avenue Reserve to be renamed Oliver Reserve’ was adopted (refer Attachment C, pages 1-4).

26.     Additionally, in the reserve management plan for Holloway Reserve, Oliver Reserve is highlighted in this plan (refer Attachment D).

27.     The land is held fee simple by the Auckland Council as unclassified public reserve and subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

28.     The Reserves Act 1977 is subject to the Conservation Act 1987 which requires that the Act be interpreted and administered to give effect to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. The council must consult with and have regard to the views of iwi or hapu before undertaking action and making decisions about reserves for which it is the administering body.

29.     Council’s Draft Interim Park Management Guidelines 2018 outlines within its principles that names should have strong historical, geographical, or local significance. Names should commemorate notable historical events of sites, persons or groups of people such as explorers, settlers, surveyors, geologists, both Māori and European. (refer Attachment G).

30.     Auckland Council recognizes the Māori language as a cultural treasure and official language of New Zealand and is one of the main points of difference for Auckland in the world. The Auckland Council Māori Language Policy is Council’s commitment to ensure the Māori language is seen, heard, spoken and learnt throughout Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland by actively using and integrating it in its activities and functions.

31.     Auckland Council’s Māori Language Policy was adopted by the Governing Body in 2016 (refer Attachment A). All local board were consulted on the Māori Language Policy. The policy recognises council’s commitment to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi. This policy recognises that the Māori language is a cultural treasure and an official language of Aotearoa. It notes that Māori language and culture forms a critical part of a Māori identity that is Auckland’s point difference in the world. Reclaiming or identifying new Māori name for community parks within the Devonport – Takapuna Local Board area provides a significant opportunity to fulfil the policy intent.

32.     Dual or bilingual signage for all council owned reserves and facilities is a priority for action identified in the Auckland Council Māori Language Policy (refer Attachment A). Dual naming is considered a potential stepping-stone to parks and park features finally becoming known only by their original Māori name. In general, if dual names are used, the Māori name should be stated first, followed by a forward slash (with a visible space on each side), and then the non-Māori name.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     The Community Facilities capital work programme for the financial year 2019/2020 contains a project to renew the existing playspace at Oliver Reserve. During the capital works it is recommended that park entrance signage is installed.

34.     Community Facilities is supportive of this approach and have been consulted.

35.     Auckland Council’s Legal Services department have been engaged to ensure due process is followed, as concerns have been raised as to the robustness of existing information, and if mana whenua were engaged with as a requirement of the Conservation Act 1987 and Reserves Act 1977.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     A workshop was held with the Devonport- Takapuna Local Board on 14 May 2019.

37.     Feedback and views were received from local board. The park naming process was confirmed with the local board and council’s obligation to meet legal requirements to engage with mana whenua.

38.     The local board indicated during the workshop that it would consider dual names to recognise both the European and Māori names that the reserve is currently and previously known as. This approach is supported by staff and will be confirmed through engagement with mana whenua.

39.     To enable good decision-making the local board needs to include the naming options assessed and a clear rationale for the recommended name, when a future report is presented to the local board. The local board can only approve the name of a park, park feature or facility following engagement with mana whenua and a recommendation from the Parks, Sports and Recreation Department.  

40.     There is no requirement to undertake public consultation. The local board may request this if they feel there are affected parties to the park naming process. This consultation may require funding from the local board. This shall be confirmed between parks staff and the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board if additional consultation is requested. 

41.     There is currently no park signage at Oliver Reserve. Any future park name change can be reflected to show the true and correct name of the reserve.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     The work of Te Kete Rukuruku has sought to establish a good practice approach to Māori naming through an agreed process in partnership between mana whenua and local boards. Through this partnership it is envisaged that relationships between mana whenua and their local boards will be strengthened.

43.     Mana whenua who hold mana and traditional associations with Tāmaki Makaurau, and for which Tāmaki Makaurau is their tūrangawaewae (standing place) and whakapapa (a genealogical link) are the most appropriate authority to seek Māori names from.

44.     Auckland Council has a commitment to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi. When naming or renaming reserves mana whenua engagement is required under the Conservation Act 1987 and Reserves Act 1977.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     There are no financial implications for undertaking the engagement with mana whenua.

46.     The naming process does not include any capital expenditure. Any new signage or capital works would occur as part of future works, or if the local board sets aside budget to fast track the installation of signage.

47.     It is recommended that when signage is installed at this reserve in the future, it will reflect the correct naming of the reserve.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     Where there are multiple iwi interests there may be no agreement. There are overlapping iwi interest throughout much of Tāmaki Makaurau. In recognition of this, a principle of the Te Kete Rukuruku project as agreed by mana whenua is that mana whenua will work together to provide a single name except where there is more than one traditional name for a site.

49.     As the naming of this reserve is considered low risk, there is no requirement to undertake public consultation. The local board however may request this if they feel there are affected parties to the park naming process. Mana whenua engagement will be completed and managed by staff at no financial cost to the local board.  

50.     If the park naming process is not followed, then there is potential for historical links of both European and Māori naming and history are lost.

51.     The reputation of Auckland Council to mana whenua is at risk if meaningful engagement is not undertaken.

52.     Resources from Te Kete Rukuruku may be unavailable to be included in this engagement due to the workloads that both the programme team are under and mana whenua. If this is the case, Parks staff will lead the engagement with mana whenua and manage the naming process.

53.     If correct process is not followed this may lead to decisions being made that do not fulfil or meet section four of the Conservation Act 1987.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     Staff will engage with mana whenua and invite them to provide their views and feedback on the naming of the reserve. This will include feedback on the potential to dual name the reserve.

55.     Mana whenua will be asked to consider Kawerau as a possible Māori name for the reserve, as the past name of the reserve.

56.     Those mana whenua with an interest in the park will undertake research and, where necessary, will work together to agree a single name and narrative to be gifted.

57.     A further report will be presented to the Devonport- Takapuna Local Board to confirm the name for Oliver Reserve and if deemed appropriate by mana whenua, a Māori name for the reserve. This is anticipated after engagement is completed.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maori Language Policy

325

b

Devonport Borough Council Resolution 1976

333

c

Devonport Borough Council Resolution 1986

337

d

DBC Parks Management Plan

341

e

Oliver Reserve Memorial Plaque Photo

345

f

Oliver Reserve Extent Map

347

g

Draft Interim Park Guidelines

349

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

George McMahon - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Local Board feedback on proposed Tūpuna Maunga Integrated Management Plan Strategies

File No.: CP2019/15089

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek the local boards feedback on the proposed Tūpuna Maunga Integrated Management Plan Strategies.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In June 2016, the Tūpuna Maunga Authority adopted the Tūpuna Maunga Integrated Management Plan (IMP).

3.       The IMP provides a tiered strategic framework to guide future management of the Tūpuna Maunga.

4.       This framework is being implemented in a phased manner commencing with the development of a series of overarching strategies that will apply across all Tūpuna Maunga.

5.       Once adopted the strategies will be reflected at a local level in the Individual Tūpuna Maunga Management Plans that will be prepared for each of the maunga.

6.       The strategies will assist the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to engage with the wider community to increase understanding of the importance of the Tūpuna Maunga to mana whenua and encourage unified and long-term care of these sites.

The Tūpuna Maunga Integrated Management Plan

7.       The IMP, developed in accordance with the requirements of The Nga Mana Whenua o Tamaki Makaurau Collective Redress Act 2014 replaced the separate and individual legacy reserve management plans for each of the Tūpuna Maunga.

8.       The IMP outlines the Tūpuna Maunga Authority’s long-term vision for the Tūpuna Maunga and sets out Values and Pathways to achieve integrated outcomes for all of the maunga

9.       The Values provide the tika (correct framework) for the care and protection of the maunga and the Pathways give tangible expression to the values.

10.     The Values in the IMP are:

·        Wairuatanga / Spiritual;

·        Mana Aotūroa / Cultural and Heritage;

·        Takotoranga / Landscape;

·        Mauri Pūnaha Hauropi / Ecology & Biodiversity;

·        Mana Hononga Tangata / Living Connection;

·        Whai Rawa Whakauka / Economic & Commercial; and

·        Mana Whai a Rēhia / Recreational

The Proposed Tūpuna Maunga Integrated Management Plan Strategies

11.     There are seven proposed Tūpuna Maunga Strategies. These sit alongside the values in the IMP. A brief description of the aims of each is given below. A full description of the principles and how they will be implemented is contained in the Proposed Tūpuna Maunga Integrated Management Plan Strategies 6 July 2019.  Refer to Attachment A & B to this report.

·        Education Strategy

This aims to provide opportunities and a framework for mana whenua to connect with local communities, volunteers and education providers to share the stories of the maunga and to increase knowledge and understanding of their significance.

Learning programmes created by mana whenua will be shared at hui, workshops, open days and using technology and online tools.

·        Design Strategy

This strategy provides parameters for development on the maunga to ensure it respects and responds to the underlying cultural, natural, historic and heritage values.

This strategy also guides the design and placement of structures including buildings, artworks, signage and gives direction on the development, maintenance and where appropriate removal of built assets including carparks, buildings, paths, tracks and roadways.

The management of archaeological, geological, heritage and ecological features is contemplated in this strategy together with guidance on revegetation and planting on the maunga.

·        Biodiversity Strategy

The principles of this strategy are to identify, protect and enhance the indigenous species already present on the maunga.

It encourages the recovery of lost ecosystems, native flora and fauna and cultural values associated with each maunga. It is of key importance that this strategy gives mana whenua the opportunity to fulfil their role as Kaitiaki (guardians and stewards) of the maunga. 

·        Biosecurity Strategy

This strategy promotes the removal of pest plants and animal species using efficient, effective, humane ERMA (Environmental Risk Management Authority) approved methods.

All programmes will be targeted to protect the values identified on each maunga with best practice methodologies being implemented.

·        Recreation Strategy

This strategy requires that recreation use of the maunga must recognise and respect the sacredness of the maunga and should reflect mana whenua values.

Recreation uses should not cause any erosion or other adverse effects on the landscape but should support community interaction and on the maunga.

·        Commercial Strategy

Commercial activities may be enabled if they provide opportunities to enhance the local community, public and visitor experience of the maunga.

Activities must be consistent with Tūpuna Maunga values and policies relating to vehicular access, fires, smoking and alcohol on the maunga.  The health and wellbeing of the maunga must not be compromised by any commercial activity.

Mana whenua involvement in commercial activities will be encouraged and opportunities to provide revenue streams that will support the Tūpuna Maunga Trust to maintain and enhance the maunga for future generations will be explored.

·        Monitoring Strategy.

The IMP set the foundations for how the Tūpuna Maunga are valued, protected, restored, enhanced and managed.

The IMP recognises the need for review through the monitoring strategy to ensure successful outcomes are reached.

Each of the strategies will have specific outcomes that will reviewed, measured and which will determine any actions required in the Tūpuna Maunga Operational Plan.

12.     The local board is requested to provide feedback on the proposed Tūpuna Maunga Integrated Management Plan Strategies.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the proposed Tūpuna Maunga Integrated Management Plan Strategies 6 June 2019 as outlined in Attachment A & B. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed Tupuna Maunga Intergrated Management Plan Strategies Part 1

419

b

Proposed Tupuna Maunga Intergrated Management Plan Strategies Part 2

441

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maureen Buchanan - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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20 August 2019

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14272

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2018/2019 Annual Report for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 26 September 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2018/2019 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      adopt the 2018/2019 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A.

b)      note that any proposed changes will be clearly communicated and agreed with the Chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019.

c)      note that the draft 2018/2019 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Annual Report (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report) will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2018/2019 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities, and the overall Financial Impact Statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

6.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the NZX Debt Market (quoted bonds) maintained by NZX Limited. As a result, the council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules (listing rules) and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA). Under these obligations, local boards may not release annual financial results in any form, including publishing their agenda/minutes containing their results, until council group results are released to the NZX on 27 September 2019.  Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi relates to the local board area.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area, summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved.

Funding information

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the Chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English, and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2018/2019 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2019;

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 26 September 2019;

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 27 September 2018; and

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2018/2019 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Annual Report (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

David Gurney - Manager Corporate Performance & Reporting

Authorisers

Kevin Ramsay - General Manager Corporate Finance and Property

Victoria Villaraza – Acting GM Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Chairpersons' Report

File No.: CP2019/02194

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues relevant to the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thank Chairperson G Wood for his verbal report

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Elected Members' Reports

File No.: CP2019/02201

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the members of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues they have been involved in since the July Meeting

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thank members for their verbal reports

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Ward Councillors Update

File No.: CP2019/02209

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board allocated a period of time for Ward Councillors, Chris Darby and Richard Hills, to update the board on activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      Thank Cr Chris Darby and Cr Richard Hills for their update to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Worshops July 2019

File No.: CP2019/02216

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a record of Devonport-Takapuna Local Board workshops held during July 2019

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on 02 July 2019, the board was briefed on:

·    Auckland Transport

-     Community Safety Fund

·    Planning

-     Smales Farm Private Plan Change

3.       At the workshop held on 09 July 2019, the board was briefed on:

·    Parks, Sports and Recreation

-     Third Party Assessments

-     Community Activation of Under Utilised Parks

·    Infrastructure & Environmental Services

-     Americas Cup Update

-     Takapuna Pest Plan

·    Arts, Community and Events

-     Younite

4.       At the workshop held on 23 July 2019, the board was briefed on:

·    Community Facilities

-     Draft Concept Designs for play spaces at:

Devonport Domain

Melrose Reserve

·    Arts, Community and Events

-     Milford Public Art Project

-     Ethnic and Diverse Communities

·    Plans and Places

-     Local Area Plan Monitoring Progress Update

5.       Records of these workshops are attached to this report.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      Receive the records of the workshops held in July 2019

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board workshop record - 02 July 2019

503

b

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board workshop record - 09 July 2019

505

c

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board workshop record - 23 July 2019

507

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2019/02227

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the board for 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by the local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance to staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The August 2019 governance forward work calendar for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board is provided as Attachment A.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      note the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board governance forward work calendar for August as set out in Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Governance Forward Work Calendar - August 2019

511

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator

    

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

19        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019 - Attachment a - Draft 2018/2019 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Annual Report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2019 that require final Audit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.