I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 27 August 2019

9.30am

Local Board Chambers
Pukekohe Service Centre
82 Manukau Road
Pukekohe

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Deputy Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Amanda Hopkins

 

 

Murray Kay

 

 

Niko Kloeten

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Denise  Gunn

Democracy Advisor - Franklin

 

21 August 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 237 1310

Email: denise.gunn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation: AKTIVE regarding community rugby facility planning               5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Auckland Transport - monthly report to the Franklin Local Board - August 2019 9

12        Auckland Transport - 2019/2020 Road Renewals Programme                               19

13        Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes     43

14        Local Board feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing                                                                           67

15        Grant of new community leases in the Franklin Local Board area 2019            107

16        Approval for two new road names at 18 & 21 Sai Ridge Close, Pukekohe        143

17        Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar                                151

18        Franklin Local Board workshop records                                                                155

19        Franklin Local Board term achievements 2016-2019                                            167

20        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Franklin Local Board for quarter four 2018/201                                                                               177

21        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019                                                                    219  

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

23        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               223

20        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Franklin Local Board for quarter four 2018/201

b.      Franklin Local Board Quarter Four Financial Report 2018/2019                223

21        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

a.      2018/2019 Franklin Local Board Annual Report                                           223

C1       Confidential: Proposed approach for the acquisition of land in Drury South for stormwater management purposes                                                                         223  

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 23 July 2019 as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: AKTIVE regarding community rugby facility planning

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Annette Tossell from Aktive Auckland Sport and Recreation will be in attendance to update the board on community rugby facility planning that affects the Franklin Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Aktive will be presenting some local context around the recently completed Wider Auckland Rugby Facilities Plan.  A copy of this plan will be circulated to local board members.

 

3.       An update on recent participation trends within the community rugby clubs (Beachlands-Maraetai, Bombay, Karaka, Patumahoe, Pukekohe, Puni & Waiuku) within Franklin and the facilities they currently use will be discussed.

4.       This will include implications for the demand on community sports fields used for rugby within the Franklin Local Board area, including any shortfalls or surpluses and regional comparisons.

5.       An outline what rugby is doing to align its planning across the region and the next steps will be included.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      thank Annette Tossell, Club Development Officer, and Steve Kidd, Senior Advisor, from Aktive Auckland Sport and Recreation, for their presentation and attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport - monthly report to the Franklin Local Board - August 2019

File No.: CP2019/15350

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Franklin Local Board (FLB) about transport related matters in its area including Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A decision is not required this month but the report contains information about the following matters:

·   Update on the Community Safety Fund

·   Responses to resolutions

·   Update of Cape Hill Road / Reynolds Road / Franklin Road intersection.

3.       This report also provides an update on Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the report entitled ‘Auckland Transport update to the Franklin Local Board August 2019’.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       This report addresses transport related matters in the local board area and includes information on the progress of the LBTCF projects.

5.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. It reports on a monthly basis to local boards as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting supports the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities on transport matters.

6.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important to their communities but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·   be safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

7.       AT’s Community Safety Fund (CSF) comprises $20 million in total allocated across all 21 local boards, with $5 million to be allocated during the 2019/2020 financial year and the balance of $15 million over the 2020/2021 financial year. This is a safety fund that sits within AT’s safety budget so the major component of the funding allocation formula is the Deaths and Serious Injury (DSI) numbers.

8.       The purpose of the fund is to allow local communities to address long-standing road safety issues that have yet to become regional priorities and have therefore not been addressed by AT.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

9.       Through Auckland Council’s Long Term Plan 2018-2028, LBTCF funding has been increased to a total of $20.8 million per annum across all 21 local boards.

10.     The allocation for the FLB has also increased, with the updated figures for the remainder of this electoral term reflected in Table 1 below:

            Table 1: FLB Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$2,856,450

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$2,855,965

Remaining Budget left

$485.00

 

11.     Table 2 below shows the status of projects to which LBTCF has already been committed.

Table 2: Status update on current Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects

Project

Description

Current status

Status change

Funds allocated

Upgrade of Beachlands town centre gardens

 

 

 

Completed

No

$263,063

First View Avenue, Beachlands

Installation of new kerb and channel between Sunkist Bay and Wakelin Roads (both sides)

 

Completed

No

$315,339

Second View Avenue, Beachlands

 

Installation of new kerb and channel between Puriri and Cherrie Roads (north side)

 

Completed

No

$331,265

Station Road parking and pedestrian improvements

A project to formalise and improve parking on Station and Birch Roads, and improve pedestrian safety by providing new footpath on Station Road, Pukekohe.

On 25 September 2018, the FLB approved $181,104

A firm order of costs was completed and presented to the local board at a workshop on 9 April 2019.

A funding shortfall was identified and the local board requested that AT seek alternative funding to complete this project.

 

At the 23 June 2019 meeting, the FLB allocated the balance of the shortfall $320,000 from its Community Safety Fund.

This project is now being progressed for delivery.

No

$181,104

Beachlands Kerb and Channel

 

Improvements

project to install kerb and channel in Beachlands on following roads:

· Shelley Bay Road

· Karaka Road

· First View Ave

· Second View Ave

The local board approved project ROC estimate up to $1.18m to progress to detailed design and report back with Firm Estimate of Cost (FEC).

A consultant has been engaged to carry out the design for the 4 sites listed.  To date, 100 per cent of the topographical survey has been completed.  Preliminary design work has now begun.

The Design and FEC will be presented to the board at their February 2020 workshop.

Yes

$1.18m

Tourist Road-Monument Road intersection electronic warning signage

 

Installation of electronic warning signage on each and smart studs on the Tourist Road.

The local board approved project ROC estimate up to $80,000 to progress to detailed design and report back with Firm Estimate of Cost.

Follow up with NZTA resulted in advice that their trial is not accepting further sites.

At the 23 July 2019 meeting the local board resolved that the $80,000 Local Transport Capital Funding allocated to this project be reserved until such time NZTA confirms the outcome of its trial.

No

$80,000

 


 

Community Safety Fund

12.     At its meeting on 23 July 2019, the FLB resolved the following priority for projects nominated for construction using AT’s Community Safety Fund (CSF) (FR/2019/103):

i.    Clevedon Town Centre pedestrian crossing

ii.   Gun Club Road/ Patumahoe intersection improvements

iii.  Hart / Gun Club Road intersection improvements

iv.  Queen street and Victoria Avenue intersection improvements

v.   Racecourse/ Kitchener Road intersection improvements

vi.  Station Road parking upgrade

vii. Taurangaruru Road safety improvements

viii. Woodhouse Road pedestrian crossing.

13.     Design work is now progressing on these projects and it is anticipated that those funded through the CSF process will be completed during the 2020/2021 financial year.

14.     As advised previously, the CSF is a finite fund that must be spent by June 30, 2021. If final pricing for a particular project (post tender) exceeds the available budget, local boards will have the options of either re-allocating some of their CSF budget (meaning not doing another of the CSF projects chosen by the local board) or using their Local Board Transport Capital Fund to top-up the budget, as opposed to being unable to fund the project. This will allow each local allocation of the CSF to be fully utilised.

15.     Progress on these projects will be provided via the AT monthly report to the local board.

Responses to resolutions

16.     At the FLB July 2019 business meeting the local board passed the following resolution:

            Resolution number FR/2019/103

            That the Franklin Local Board:

c)    request that AT reassess Priority 2 projects according to local board feedback and return to the board with advice on which additional projects could be funded from any remaining Community Safety funding and Local Transport Capital funding.

17.     This will be reviewed and reported to the local board once details of the costs of the projects have been confirmed.

d)      request clarification from AT on the criteria and process for allocating regional funding toward significant rural road safety projects, noting that there are a number of on-going and significant safety projects for rural areas identified that do not meet the Transport Community Safety fund criteria.

18.     This information will be provided to the local board at their September meeting.

f)       note the board requests that, on the Whitford-Maraetai-Henson Road bend, AT consider signage to alert drivers to the dangerous/high risk bend, and to slow down, as an interim measure.

19.     This request is being considered alongside roading upgrades around this section of the road. A decision is expected to be made by October this year.


 

            Resolution number FR/2019/104

e)    request an update on the Self Explaining Rural Roads (SERR) project, noting that the south-east package was due for completion in June and the Glenbrook package was due to commence in June.

20.     The SERR is nearly completed with 18 of the 25 roads done and the remaining seven roads due to be completed by 16 August.

21.     The road markings are 65 per cent complete with the remaining roads expected to be completed by 30 September.

22.     The Glenbrook package is progressing well and is expected to be completed by the 30 August 2019.

f)       request that AT deliver local communications on the Self Explaining Rural Roads and Rural Delineations programmes that explain the purpose and rationale for new road markings and other interventions.

23.     Follow up will be reported back to the local board next month.

g)      request that previous local board feedback on rural road safety interventions be reviewed by appropriate AT staff and contractors prior to commencement of further Self Explaining Rural Roads and Rural Delineations projects packages, to ensure that agreed improvements to the approach are consistently implemented.

24.     A workshop is to be arranged with the road safety team to provide an update and feedback, and to address specific issues raised by local board members.

Local projects issues

Cape Hill Road / Reynolds Road / Franklin Road intersection

25.     There is a current proposal to upgrade at the Cape Hill Road / Reynolds Road / Franklin Road intersection to a roundabout, to address the operation and safety issues at this intersection.

26.     We are currently preparing the concept design. Plans are expected to be available for consultation around September this year.

27.     Construction is planned for the 2020/2021 financial year.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Auckland Transport consultations

Local board consultations

29.     Auckland Transport provides the FLB with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in the local board area.

30.     The local board’s views on any proposed schemes are taken into account during consultation on those proposals.

31.     In the reporting period from July 2019, one proposal was put forward for comment by the FLB. The local board transport representative’s views and ongoing communication are recorded in the table below.

 

Table 3: Local Board Consultations

Location

Proposal

Details and Local Board Feedback

Ararimu Road

Pedestrian safety improvements accessing Ramarama School

This was circulated to the FLB transport representatives on 11 July. The proposed safety improvements include a pedestrian crossing with traffic signals outside Ramarama Primary School, a new footpath and associated facilities on both sides of Ararimu Road, safer designated parking on Ararimu Road, including redesigning the school car park, red ‘School’ road markings to raise driver awareness and a flashing warning sign indicating the nearby signalised pedestrian crossing, raised speed tables on McEldownie and Hillview Roads. No objections were received.

Beachlands & Maraetai Bus Stops – specifically Maraetai Drive bus stop

Proposed bus stop and shelters and pedestrian crossings.

This was circulated to the FLB transport representatives on 26 April. The local board reps have concerns about the proposed bus stop on Maraetai Drive and objected to its location. The reps are concerned about maintaining existing parking, which is used by cars and trailers accessing the nearby boat ramp and requested that the bus stop be relocated.

A response is still being considered and will be reported to the local board once a decision has been made.

            Traffic Control Committee resolutions

32.     Traffic Control Committee decisions within the FLB area are reported on a monthly basis. The decisions within the local board area in the period of June and July are included in this report to the local board.

            Table 4: TCC Decisions


Decision

Report Type

Nature of Restriction

Decision

Belmont Road / Taikaranga Street / Te Manaki Street / Hemopo Street / Kapia Street / Koropupu Street / Kare Ariki Place

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

Shared Path, No Stopping At All Times, Traffic Island, Road Hump, Pedestrian Crossing, Give-Way control, Roundabout

Approved in Principle

Monument Road / Benjamin Place

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times, Footpath, Give-Way control, Lane Markings

Approved in Principle

Puhitahi Hill Road / Jonah Lomu Drive / Te Paea Avenue / Simmonds House Road / Fetter Lane / Walter Lawry Road / School House Road / Buddle Road / Lauti Lane / Wesleyan Street

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times, Bus Stop, Cycle Path, Road Hump, Give-Way control, Stop control

Approved in Principle

Jonah Lomu Drive / Te Paea Avenue / Simmonds House Road / Fetter Lane / Walter Lawry Road / School House Road / Buddle Road / Lauti Lane / Wesleyan Street / Puhitahi Hill Road

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times, Bus Stop, Cycle Path, Road Hump, Give-Way control, Stop control

Approved in Principle

Manukau Road, Customs Street

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

Lane Arrow Markings, Cycle Lane, No Stopping At All Times, P60 Parking, Footpath, Traffic Signal Control, Flush Median

Carried

Papakura-Clevedon Road, Dominion Road, Hamlin Road, Okawa Avenue, Mullins Road, Petersons Road, Ardmore Quarry Road, Heard Road, Bullens Road, Clevedon-Takanini Road

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

Lane Arrow Markings, Traffic Islands, Stop Control, Flush Median, Edge Lines, Give-Way Control, Shoulder Markings, No Passing, Wide-Centre Lines

Approved with Conditions

Upper Queen Street, Laurelwood Avenue, Bilkey Avenue

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times, Footpath, Give-Way Control

Carried

Whitford Road, Somerville Road, Point View Drive, Broomsfield Road, Griggs Road, Wades Road

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

Lane Arrow Markings, No Stopping At All Times, Traffic Islands, Stop Control, Give-Way Control, Roundabout Controlled by Give-Way, Flush Median, Edge Lines, No Passing, Shoulder Markings, Road Markings for Speed Management

Carried

Whitford-Maraetai Road, Trig Road, Maraetai School Road, Clifton Road, Turanga Road, Henson Road, Waikopua Road, Matthias Place, Okaroro Drive, Jack Lachlan Drive, Omana Beach Road

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

Lane Arrow Markings, Traffic Islands, Stop Control, Give-Way Control, Flush Median, Edge Line, No Passing, Shoulder Markings, Wide Centre Line, Road Markings for Speed Management, Passing Lane

Approved with Conditions

Maketu Road, Unnamed Streets, Ararimu Road, McEldownie Road

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

Lane Arrow Markings, Cycle Path, No Stopping At All Times, Traffic Island, Footpath, Traffic Signal Control, Stop Control, Roundabout controlled by Give-Way, Flush Median, Edge Line

Approved in Principle

Jutland Road, Raoriki Road, Whakapono Road

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times, Give-Way Control

Approved in Principle

Unnamed Streets, Drury

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

Lane Arrow Markings, No Stopping At All Times, Traffic Islands, Footpath, Give-Way Control, Flush Median, Lanes

Approved in Principle

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     The proposed decision of receiving the report or requesting cost estimates has no impacts or opportunities for Māori.  Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     AT will provide another update report to the board at the next monthly meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kenneth Tuai, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Manager Unit, Auckland Transport

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport - 2019/2020 Road Renewals Programme

File No.: CP2019/11492

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To advise the Franklin Local Board about the 2019-20 Road Renewals Programme including road resurfacing, road pavement rehabilitation, kerb and channel renewals and footpath renewals in the Franklin Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides the local board with information on the 2019-20 Road Renewals Programme including road resurfacing, road pavement rehabilitation, kerb and channel renewals and footpath renewals in the Franklin Local Board area.

3.       A decision is not required as the information is presented for information only.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the report entitled “Auckland Transport 2019-20 Road Renewals Programme August 2019”.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for the maintenance of the road network throughout the Auckland region, excluding state highways.

5.       To maintain the road network AT carries out regular maintenance and renewal works to maintain the road network in an acceptable condition as defined by AT’s Asset Management Plan (AMP) and the New Zealand Transport Agency’s (NZTA) policies and standards.

6.       The maintenance and renewal strategies are outlined in AT’s Asset Management Plan, which is reviewed and approved by council every three years.

7.       The total 2019/20 road maintenance and renewal budget allocated to the Franklin Local Board area is $19,978 million, which is consistent with the level of funding allocated over the past eight years as shown in Table 1.

 

Year

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Total Expenditure ($)

 $ 19,207,223

$ 18,975,839

 $ 18,659,829

 $ 15,727,061

 $   17,442,771

 $   18,920,300

 $    26,850,386

 $ 19,409,879

Table 1 Road Maintenance / Renewal Budget 2011-2018

 

8.       The annual budget varies from year to year depending on the renewal programmes, which are determined from asset condition inspections and prioritised on a regional basis. As a result, more renewal works may be required in another area, depending on the network condition and need.

9.       The annual budget / expenditure can also vary due to storm damage.  In the Franklin area, storm damage has been a major issue due to the severe storms experienced in March – April 2017 and June/July – August 2018.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Road Network Statistics

 

The total length of the road network within the Franklin Local Board area is 1,238 km.

77 per cent are rural roads with a total length of 951 km and 23 per cent are urban roads with a total length of 287 km. There are 1189 km of sealed roads and 49 km of unsealed roads.

Figure 1 Franklin Road Network

 

10.     The urban network length has grown by approximately 3—5 per cent in the past six years due to development.

11.     In the past few years, traffic has increased significantly in Franklin due to increased activities, such as urban development in rural areas, and increased quarry, landfill and forestry traffic on rural roads. 

12.     A large number of housing developments are currently underway in Paerata, Karaka, Clevedon, Beachlands and Drury areas.  Increased heavy commercial traffic from trucks servicing these developments and increased quarry and landfill operations are placing large demands on the road network, leading to rapid pavement deterioration.

Road Network Condition and Trends

13.     AT’s 2018-21 Statement of Intent (SOI) specifies performance measures regarding road and footpath maintenance as outlined in Table 2.

Table 2 Statement of Intent Measures

14.     Currently, 94 per cent of the road network across the Auckland region is in an acceptable condition, i.e. very good to moderate condition, compared to the SOI target of 95 per cent. The current network condition of the Franklin road network is 92 per cent, which indicates that the Franklin network is being maintained to a similar standard as the wider regional network.

15.     The quality of the road network is measured by the road roughness and is expressed as the Smooth Travel Exposure (STE). This measure is used throughout New Zealand (NZ), by NZTA to gauge the overall condition of the road network. STE is essentially a measure of how rough roads are for drivers. The higher the STE, the better condition the road is.

16.     As shown on Figure 1, the STE on urban roads in the Franklin area is 84 per cent, which is above the SOI target of 81 per cent. The Franklin urban road network condition is slighter below the regional urban road average STE of 87 per cent.

 

             Figure 1 – Urban Smooth Travel Exposure

 

17.     As shown on Figure 2 the STE on rural roads in the Franklin area is 92 per cent, which is on the SOI target of 92 per cent. The Franklin rural road network condition is slighter below the regional rural road average STE of 94 per cent.

 

             Figure 2 – Rural Smooth Travel Exposure

 

18.     The overall network condition is also measured against the NZTA One Network Road Classification (ONRC) performance requirements, which have a target average roughness levels for different types of road. The NZTA ONRC performance requirements are used as a benchmark for all roads throughout NZ. Average roughness is used to measure the overall road condition. Roads carrying higher traffic volumes (arterial roads) are required to be maintained to a higher standard (i.e. lower roughness) than roads with lower traffic volumes (local roads). Figure 3 below shows that the Franklin road network is being maintained to the recommended NZTA ONRC target roughness.

 

             Figure 3 NZTA ONRC Target Roughness

19.     The annual road condition survey generally shows the road network condition to be generally steady across most fault types for road pavements and surface water channels as shown in Table 3 below. Shoving is a sign that the road pavement is under stress due to heavy commercial traffic. Scabbing is a surface defect, again caused by heavy traffic. Edge break is mainly due to narrow sealed width and insufficient shoulder support along the edge of the road.

             Table 3 Road Condition Trends by Fault Types.

Sealed Road Maintenance and Resurfacing

20.     The majority of roads throughout NZ and the Franklin area are constructed on granular pavement layers with a thin chip seal or asphaltic concrete surface.  This type of construction is very cost effective; however, the roads need regular maintenance and resurfacing to maintain the road pavement structural integrity and serviceability.

21.     The roads are generally resurfaced at 12 to 14 year intervals to maintain the waterproofness and skid resistance of the road surface. With regular resurfacing the road pavement life can be extended to typically 70 to 90 years before the road pavement needs rehabilitation or reconstruction.

22.     In 2019-20 it is proposed to resurface 2.3 km with asphaltic concrete (AC) and 70.4 km of chip seal of the road network which is 6.1 per cent of the sealed road network.  This level of resurfacing is above the SOI target of 5.8 per cent.

23.     The proposed 2019-20 AC and Chip Seal resurfacing programmes are attached as Attachments A and B to this report. 

24.     The sites are determined based on the condition of the road surface.  AC is generally used in urban roads with traffic volumes greater than 10,000 vehicles per day, and on high stress areas such as intersections and cul-de-sac heads where rubbish trucks can damage the road surface.  AC can also be used on rural roads carrying high traffic loading or on corners where traffic stresses causes damage to the road surface.

25.     In addition to the road resurfacing programme, it is proposed to rehabilitate approximately 3.8 km of roads within the Franklin area in 2019/20, as shown in Attachment C. This work involves reconstructing the road pavement to strengthen it.

Kerb and Channel and Surface Water Channel - Maintenance and Renewal

26.     Kerb and channel (K&C) provides lateral support to the road edge and the collection of surface water from the road. There is 420 km of kerb and channel within the Franklin area, which is predominantly in urban areas.

27.     Surface water channels (SWC) are constructed alongside the edges of the road to collect surface water and are in the rural areas. There is 1654 km of SWC’s within the Franklin area. SWC’s are prone to erosion and scour during periods of high rainfall.  The severe storm events in 2017 and 2018 have caused considerable damage to the SWC’s due to erosion and scour.

28.     AT carries out regular condition assessments of the K&C and SWC within the road network to determine the asset condition and future maintenance and renewal needs. A summary of the current condition is shown in Table 4.

             Table 4 Kerb and Channel and Surface Water Condition

29.     In 2019/20 it is proposed to renew approximately 550 m of K&C throughout the area. Sites will be validated before commencement of construction. The indicative programme is shown in Attachment D to this report. In addition to this, a further 550 m of K&C will be repaired under the maintenance budget, which will generally be short lengths.

Footpath Maintenance and Resurfacing

30.     There are 305 km of footpaths throughout the Franklin area. The majority of these are within the urban areas and the concrete is predominantly used for footpath construction. Special paved surfaces are used in town centres such as the Pukekohe and Waiuku town centres.

31.     Footpaths are maintained in accordance with AT’s Footpath Asset Management Strategy.

32.     AT carries out condition rating of footpaths at 2 -3 yearly intervals to ensure that they are being maintained in acceptable condition. In addition to this AT’s contractors carry out regular inspections and carry out repairs as required.

33.     Each section of footpath is given a 1 to 5 grading, as follows; 1 = very good, 2 = good, 3 = average, 4 = poor and 5 = very poor condition. Only grade 4 and 5 sections are programmed for repair, however the amount of repair carried out depends on the budget available.

34.     The overall condition of the footpaths varies from year to year, according to damage caused by third parties, vehicles driving / parking on footpaths, utility excavations, tree root damage, seasonal ground movement and repairs carried out.

35.     The condition of the Franklin footpath network compared to the region is shown in Figure 4. 

             Figure 4 Footpath Condition Across the Auckland region

36.     Currently, 96.4 per cent of the network is in an acceptable condition, which is above the SOI target of 95 per cent.

37.     In 2019/20 it is proposed to renew 3.00 km of footpaths as per the programme attached as Attachment E.

Storm Damage Repairs

38.     Over the past two years, there have been many slips throughout the rural area due to high rainfall, steep terrain and coastal erosion, particularly along East Coast Rd. As result, a number of retaining walls or slip stabilisation works have been constructed to support the road formation from further damage.

39.     In 2018/19 the following retaining walls were constructed:

·    East Coast Road RP1495 -$570,000

·    East Coast Road RP2000 - $554,000

·    East Coast Road RP2395 - $648,000

·    East Coast Road RP2950 - $174,000

·    East Coast Road RP3090 - $593,000

·    East Coast Road RP3200 - $816,000 (HDC contributed approx. 50 %)

·    Clevedon Kawakawa Road RP14250 - $120,000

·    Hunua Road RP6925 - $800,000

·    Kawakawa Orere Road RP3371 - $133,000

·    North Road RP6550 - $119,000

·    Corner of Runciman Rd and Pukekohe East Road - $40,000

40.     In 2019/20 it is proposed to construct the following retaining walls or carry out slip repairs

·    Whitford Maraetai Rd – Top of Siberia Hill-slip repair     $500,000

·    Orere – Matingarahi Rd – RP 3560 - slip repair               $500,000

·    Ardmore Quarry Rd – RP2814 – slip repair                     $TBC

·    McGregor Rd – RP1720 – slip repair                               $200,000

·    Laing Road Culvert Replacement                        $220,000

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the council group.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     The proposed decision of receiving the report or requesting cost estimates has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

45.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     Three-monthly updates will be provided to the local board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Asphalt Concrete Road Resurfacing Programme 2019/2020

29

b

Chipseal Road Resurfacing Programme 2019/2020

31

c

Road Rehabilitation Programme 2019/2020

35

d

Kerb Channel Road Rehabilitation 2019/2020

37

e

Footpath Renewal Programme 2019-2020

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kenneth Tuai, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Manager Unit, Auckland Transport

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes

File No.: CP2019/14436

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, and to provide feedback on the recommended changes to the document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is currently reviewing the Auckland Film Protocol.  The Auckland Film Protocol sets out:

·    the commitment of the council group to supporting filming in Auckland;

·    expectations and rules that filmmakers must abide by when filming in Auckland; and

·    provides guidance for filmmakers on the process for approval to film in Auckland.

3.       The purpose of the review was to ensure that the Auckland Film Protocol is up-to-date and to identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities that should be addressed.  Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Auckland Film Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications from across the council group was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol. 

4.       A revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in June 2019 for consideration and was approved for public consultation (resolution number ENV/2019/73). 

5.       The following is a summary of the key changes made to the Auckland Film Protocol before public consultation was undertaken:

·    Native species: new content added stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·    Kauri dieback: new content added providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·    Drones: new content added stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·    Historic heritage: new content added stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·    Health and safety: new content added to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·    Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was updated to reflect current policy, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council.  Some structural and editorial amendments were also made to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

6.       Public consultation was undertaken over a three week period between 21 June and 12 July 2019.

7.       A total of 74 submissions were received during the public consultation period.  Franklin Local Board residents provided a total of zero submissions on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, representing zero percent of all submissions.  The views of Franklin Local Board submitters were insufficient to determine / compare local views to regional views.  Staff are proposing some changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address submitter concerns; the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film protocol are shown in track changes in Attachment B.

8.       This report provides a summary of public feedback and of proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address feedback.  The following is a high‑level summary of the key changes proposed to the Auckland Film Protocol in response to public consultation:

·    Natural environment: include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed

·    Native species: include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed

·    Kauri dieback: amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present

·    Drones: include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties

·    Impact on access to public open space: include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space

·    Compliance and enforcement: include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with the Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

9.       Submission themes and proposed changes are summarised in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol

b)      provide feedback on the recommended changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol

c)      note that local board feedback will be included in a report to the Environment and Community Committee in September 2019, seeking approval for the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The first version of the Auckland Film Protocol (the protocol) was adopted by the Regional Development and Operations Committee (resolution number RDO/2013/27) on 14 March 2013.  A review of fees for filming in the Auckland Region was undertaken in 2014 and a new set of region‑wide charges was recommended; providing a simplified and harmonised range of charges.  The Governing Body adopted a region‑wide schedule of film fees and revised Auckland Film Protocol on 28 May 2015 (resolution number GB/2015/36).

11.     Since the Protocol was adopted in 2015 there have been a number of changes to legislation and to Auckland Council’s policy and planning framework. The purpose of the review of the Protocol was to:

·    ensure that the Protocol is up-to-date; and

·    identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities to be addressed in the Protocol.

12.     Content of the Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.

13.     Workshops were held in September and October 2018 to engage with local boards that experience a high volume of filming.

14.     Engagement to inform the preparation of the revised draft Protocol was also undertaken with:

·        mana whenua: mana whenua interests are represented by 19 iwi (tribal) authorities in Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland.  The 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review of the Protocol

·        staff of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to inform the review

·        the screen sector: the screen sector was invited to participate in a survey in April 2019 to inform the review. The survey asked a series of general questions about the Protocol and experiences of filming in public open space in Auckland

·        the public: the People’s Panel in September 2018; a total of 4,762 responses were received. The survey asked a series of questions on views and experiences of filming in Auckland. 

15.     A high-level summary of feedback (including local board feedback) is provided in Attachment C.

16.     The review recommended that a range of changes be made to the Auckland Film Protocol, the following is a summary of the key changes proposed to the Environment and Community Committee:

·    Native species: include new content stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·    Kauri dieback: include new content providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present

·    Drones: include new content stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions

·    Historic heritage: include new content stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites

·    Health and safety: include new content to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan

·    Filming on Tūpuna Maunga: update content to reflect that applications to film on Tūpuna Maunga are assessed by the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority

·    Updates to content: update content to reflect current policy (e.g. smokefree policy), plans (Auckland Unitary Plan) and bylaws of Auckland Council

·    Structural and editorial: amend some parts of the document to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

17.     The revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was approved by the Envrionment and Community Committee for public consultation in June 2019 (resolution number ENV/2019/73).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Consultation on the revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol took place from 21 June to 12 July 2019.  A total of 74 submissions were received; this represents a substantial increase on the 21 submissions that were received in response to the 2015 review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  Of the submissions received, 72 were submitted using the online form and 2 non‑form hardcopy submissions were received. 

19.     Submitters were asked to identify if they worked in the screen sector or not, with:

·    29 submissions (39 per cent) received from individuals or organisations that identified themselves as working in the screen sector

·    45 submissions (61 per cent) received from individuals or organisations that do not work in the screen sector.

20.     The questions included in the online form varied depending on whether the submitter identified themselves as working in the screen industry or not.

21.     A breakdown of all submissions received by local board area is shown in Table 1 below.  The small number of responses from individual local board areas means that an analysis of views by local board area was not possible for all local board areas.

 

Table 1: Breakdown of submissions made by local board area.

Local Board Area

Number of respondents

Percentage of respondents

Waitākere Ranges

17

23.0%

Albert-Eden

9

12.2%

Waitematā

8

10.8%

Rodney

6

8.1%

Upper Harbour

5

6.8%

Ōrākei

5

6.8%

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

4

5.4%

Devonport-Takapuna

4

5.4%

Henderson-Massey

3

4.1%

Kaipātiki

3

4.1%

Howick

2

2.7%

Whau

2

2.7%

Māngere-Ōtahuhu

1

1.4%

Puketapapa

1

1.4%

Hibiscus and Bays

1

1.4%

Papakura

1

1.4%

Franklin

0

0%

Great Barrier

0

0%

Ōtara‑Papatoetoe

0

0%

Manurewa

0

0%

Waiheke

0

0%

Don't Know

1

1.4%

Outside Auckland

1

1.4%

Total

74

 

 

22.     A series of closed questions were asked of non‑screen sector individuals and organisations; a summary of the responses to these questions is shown in Table 2 below.  Table 2 shows that:

·    most respondents are supportive of Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach and that;

·    most respondents think that the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on residents and businesses, on public open space and historic and cultural heritage.

Table 2: Feedback on the Auckland Film Protocols management of the impacts of filming

Question

Response

Percentage of regional submissions

(number of respondents is shown in brackets)

Do you support Auckland Council's film‑friendly approach?

Yes

75% (33)

Partially

20% (9)

No

5% (2)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on residents and businesses?

Yes

56% (18)

Partially

19% (6)

No

25% (8)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on our public open space and environment?

Yes

53% (23)

Partially

33% (14)

No

14% (6)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on our historic and cultural heritage?

Yes

62% (26)

Partially

29% (12)

No

10% (4)

 

23.     The main reasons given by those who supported Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach are shown in Table 3.

Table 3: Summary of key reasons for supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Economic

·      generates employment and economic growth;

·      benefits communities and local businesses;

·      benefits a broad range of trades and industries;

·      attracts investment and businesses to Auckland.

Cultural and creative

·      has cultural benefits allowing and supporting the telling of stories visually;

·      supports the creative economy and enables people to find a future in the creative industries;

·      It’s fun and exciting to see Auckland on the screen.

Promotion and tourism

·      promotes and showcases Auckland to the world;

·      creates a positive image of Auckland.

 

24.     Table 4 shows the key reasons that respondents gave for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Table 4: Summary of key reasons given for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Access

·      the impacts on resident, including parking restrictions, road closures and ability to use public open space while filming is taking place need to be considered and managed;

·      need to ensure that film‑makers are respectful of other users of public open space.

Notification

·      there needs to be sufficient notification to ensure that residents and businesses are aware of open space being used for filming and are not inconvenienced.

Balance

·      need to consider and manage the impact that filming has on the environment and impacted residents;

·      need to balance the cumulative impacts of filming.

Equity

·      need to ensure that fees for commercial use of public places are fair.

 

25.     The key reasons given for not supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach were:

·    the cost to ratepayers of enabling filming;

·    that there is not enough protection for individuals, businesses and residents affected by filming being carried out on private property.

26.     A series of open‑ended questions were also included to elicit further information about responses to these questions and about a range of other topics.  Staff have worked through submissions to determine any changes to be recommended for the final revised Auckland Film Protocol.  Attachment A identifies key themes and submission points along with proposed staff responses.  

A summary of the most common submission themes and the proposed staff responses are shown in table 5.

Table 5: Summary of key submission themes and proposed staff responses.

Key themes

Summary of proposed responses

Use of drones for filming

Include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

Impact on natural environment

Include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Kauri dieback

Amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

Impact on native species

Include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Impact on access to public open space

Include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

Compliance and enforcement

Include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

Health and safety

Amend to enable production companies to arrange alternative timeframes for the submission of a site specific health and safety plan by agreement with Screen Auckland.

Notification

Screen Auckland to consider operational approaches to achieving wider public notification.

Impact on business

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  The protocol is intended to provide a framework that enables decisions to be made on a case‑by‑case basis.

Equity

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  Fees for commercial use of public open space are set under the Auckland Council Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 and amended through the long term plan and annual plan.

 

27.     This report seeks formal feedback from the board at its August 2019 business meeting on the recommended changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol in response to consultation feedback.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.  This included engagement with Auckland Transport, Panuku Development Auckland, and with Auckland Council community facilities, region‑wide planning, social policy and bylaws, visitor experience and heritage

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Role of local boards in film permitting

29.     Landowner approval is required to film on any public open space in the Auckland region.  Local boards are responsible for landowner approvals for local parks and reserves.  Engagement with local boards that experience a high volume of applications for film permits was undertaken in September and October 2018 to inform the review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  A summary of the key engagement themes is included in Attachment C and was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

30.     A key theme from local board engagement was that the film permit timeframes mean that landowner approval timeframes are very tight, particularly when considering complex or contentious applications. It was also noted that the current timeframes do not allow sufficient time to consider applications at full board meetings or to consult key stakeholders. Given this, the following options on film permit timeframes were presented to the Environment and Community Committee at a workshop in May 2019 and at the June 2019 meeting.

Option one: Status Quo

Option two: amend the permit timeframes

·    Option 2(a) the permit time frame is amended to be “up to five working days”.

·    Option 2(b) the permit time frame is increased to 5‑7 working days.

31.     Following direction from the Committee that increasing timeframes could act as a disincentive making Auckland internationally uncompetitive, the status quo option was retained in the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     ATEED has an ongoing relationship with several mana whenua and mataawaka groups, across its whole portfolio of activity.  To inform the review of the Protocol the 19 Iwi Authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review.  In relation to film permit applications, Māori views and input may be obtained in several ways where there is a potential impact on particular land or sites. This is usually coordinated either by the film facilitator, or through the relevant parks manager.

33.     Specific processes are in place for the tūpuna maunga, with all commercial filming on the maunga requiring the approval of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority).  Screen Auckland facilitates all requests for approval to film on the tūpuna maunga.  Approval to film will be subject to conditions and restrictions set by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.  Meetings were held with staff of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to inform the review and ensure that proposed amendments are consistent with the policy of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     The proposed amendments to the Protocol do not impact on existing levels of service and will not impact on operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     There are no significant risks arising from the board giving feedback on the proposed changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol at this time.

36.     If adoption of the revised Auckland Film Protocol is delayed this would impact on council’s ability to implement the proposed changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Public feedback and proposed amendments to the Auckland Film Protocol will be presented to the Environment and Community Committee for approval.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key submission themes and responses

53

b

Draft 2019 Auckland Film Protocol (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Summary of preconsultation engagement

63

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Marie Jenkins, Screen Facilitation Manager, ATEED

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza, Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

Local Board feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing

File No.: CP2019/13163

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to formally provide feedback on the Productivity Commission’s (the commission) inquiry into local government funding and financing.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 4 July 2019, the commission released its draft report relating to its local government funding and financing inquiry.

3.       The inquiry’s key aim is establishing whether the existing funding and financing arrangements are suitable for enabling local authorities to meet current and future cost pressures.

4.       The commission’s draft report:

·    raises eight questions

·    highlights 67 findings

·    makes 30 recommendations.

5.       Local boards were advised that their views and feedback for staff to consider when drafting the submission needed to be received by Monday, 29 July 2019.

6.       Auckland Council will make a submission on the draft report. Staff will prepare a submission for the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration at its meeting on 20 August 2019. Submissions on the inquiry close on 29 August 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Central government asked the commission to conduct an inquiry into local government funding and financing in July 2018. The inquiry’s terms of reference require the commission to examine the adequacy and efficiency of the current local government funding and financing framework and, where shortcomings in the current system are identified, examine options and approaches for improving the system.

8.       The inquiry’s terms of reference do not call for an assessment of, or changes to the current scope and responsibilities of local government.

9.       The commission’s issues paper was released on 6 November 2018. The council made a submission on the issues paper which was approved by the Finance and Performance Committee. The council’s submission to the issues paper can be found as Attachment A.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The draft report is available on the commission’s website

11.     The commission’s ‘At a glance’ document can be found as Attachment B and its ‘A3 overview’ is at Attachment C.

12.     The draft report states that:

·    the current funding and financing framework is broadly sound but councils need new tools to help them deal with some specific cost pressures

·    if councils struggle to deal with rising costs, or are not incentivised to improve their performance, communities are unlikely to reach their potential

·    the funding and financing framework for local government must incentivise good performance and enable local authorities to deliver quality amenities and services that reflect the preferences and aspirations of their communities.

13.     The commission has found that the existing funding model is insufficient to address cost pressures in the following four areas and that new tools are required:

·    supplying enough infrastructure to support rapid urban growth

·    adapting to the impacts of climate change

·    coping with the growth of tourism

·    the accumulation of responsibilities placed on local government by central government.

14.     The commission also considers the three-waters sector an important area for investigation.

15.     The inquiry’s terms of reference have also been amended to require the commission to consider whether a tax on vacant land would be a useful mechanism to improve the supply of available housing. The addition is a result of the Tax Working Group’s final report to the government.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     The council group’s impact and views will be developed and presented for the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration at its meeting on 20 August 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are advised that their views and feedback for staff to consider when drafting the submission, need to be received by Monday, 29 July 2019.

18.     Any formal feedback received after 29 July and before 19 August 2019 will be provided to the Finance and Performance Committee to seek their endorsement to incorporate in the council’s submission. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Staff will also seek input from the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     There are no financial implications in deciding to make a submission. However, there may be positive or negative financial implications if the government decides to implement any of the recommendations made by the Productivity Commission. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     If the local board does not contribute to the submission, then there is a risk that the Auckland Council family’s position on this inquiry will not reflect issues that are important to the local community.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     The council will make a submission on the draft report. Staff will prepare a submission for the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration at its meeting on 20 August 2019.

23.     A workshop to discuss the draft council submission with the Finance and Performance Committee has been scheduled for 15 August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Council submission on the issues paper - approved by the Finance and Performance Committee on 6 November 2018

71

b

'At a glance' - Local government funding and financing

101

c

'At a glance' - A3 briefing

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrew Duncan, Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Ross Tucker, General Manager Financial Strategy and Planning

Louise Mason, General Manager, Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

Grant of new community leases in the Franklin Local Board area 2019

File No.: CP2019/13633

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant new community leases to existing groups:

·     Bombay Rugby Football Club Incorporated

·     Clarks Beach Bowling Club Incorporated

·     Clevedon Lawn Tennis Club Incorporated

·     Grahams Beach Bowling Club Incorporated

·     Rescare Auckland Incorporated

·     The Scout Association of New Zealand (Clevedon and Te Puru).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report and attachments include details of seven groups within the Franklin Local Board area whose leases have expired. It is recommended that new community leases be granted to these groups under the terms and conditions specified. The terms align with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the relevant legislation for each piece of land.

3.       For the recommended leases a process has been followed which includes a review of the lessees’ performance, that the organisation is sustainable, the services and programmes offered are beneficial to the community and that they align with objectives stated in the Auckland Plan and Franklin Local Board Plan 2017.

4.       Site Plans are attached (Attachments A, B, C, D, E, F and G) and Community Outcomes Plans have been negotiated with the groups and will be an attachment to the lease subject to approval by the local board (Attachments H, I, J, K, L, M and N).

5.       Some of the new leases require public notification and iwi consultation. This will be carried out if the local board resolves to grant the leases, with implementation of the lease subject to this.

6.       The recommendations include specific clauses in relation to two leases where council and the group own separate parts of the buildings and responsibilities are shared, approval for a sublease under one lease, a clause to allow overnight accommodation on a reserve for one lease, a notice clause where future plans on the park may affect the leased area for one lease and the classification of three unclassified reserves to enable leases to be granted. Details of these matters are included in the report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      grant a new community lease to Bombay Rugby Football Club Incorporated at Bombay War Memorial Hall, Paparata Road, Bombay (Attachment A) for 10 years commencing 1 October 2019 with one 10 year right of renewal, rent of $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested and a maintenance fee for the council owned portion of the building of $500.00 plus GST per annum

b)      grant a new community lease to Clarks Beach Bowling Club Incorporated for a portion of 40A Torkar Road, Clarks Beach (Attachment B) for 10 years commencing 1 October 2019 with one 10 year right of renewal, rent of $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested

i)        provide approval for Clarks Beach Bowling Club Incorporated to grant a sublease to Clarks Beach Playgroup for use of one of the group-owned buildings for a term not exceeding the term of the community lease

c)      grant a new community lease to Clevedon Lawn Tennis Club Incorporated for a portion of Clevedon Showgrounds Reserve, 73R Monument Road, Clevedon (Attachment C) for 10 years commencing 1 October 2019 with one 10 year right of renewal and rent of $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested

i)        approve the classification of the Clevedon Showgrounds Reserve, 73R Monument Road, Clevedon as a recreation reserve

d)      grant a new community lease to Grahams Beach Bowling Club Incorporated at Grahams Beach Domain Recreation Reserve, Grahams Beach Road, Awhitu (Attachment D) for 10 years commencing 1 October 2019 with one 10 year right of renewal, rent of $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested and a maintenance fee for a council owned building on the site of $250.00 plus GST per annum

e)      grant a new community lease to Rescare Auckland Incorporated at 180R and 181 Maraetai Coast Road, Maraetai (Attachment E) for 10 years commencing 1 August 2019 with one 10 year right of renewal and rent of $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested

i)        approve the classification of 180R Maraetai Coast Road, Maraetai as a local purpose (community buildings) reserve

f)       grant a new community lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand for Clevedon Scouts for a portion of Clevedon Scenic Reserve, 30R Thorps Quarry Road, Clevedon (Attachment F) for 10 years commencing 1 August 2018 with one 10 year right of renewal and rent of $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested

i)        approve the classification of the Clevedon Scenic Reserve, 30R Thorps Quarry Road, Clevedon as a recreation reserve

ii)       endorse pursuant to section 44(1) of the Reserves Act 1977, that overnight accommodation at Clevedon Scenic Reserve can be a provision of the lease

g)      grant a new community lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand for Te Puru Sea Scouts for a portion of Te Puru Park, 954R Whitford Maraetai Road, Maraetai (Attachment G) for 10 years commencing 1 October 2019 with one 10 year right of renewal and rent of $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested

i)        approve the inclusion of a clause that the landlord may give 12 months’ notice if plans for the park proceed during the lease term and affect the leased area

h)      approve all other terms and conditions to be in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977 or Local Government Act 2002 depending on the status of the land

i)        approve Community Outcomes Plans for each lease (Attachments H, I, J, K, L, M and N) to be attached as a schedule to the agreements

j)        approve the grant of leases subject to public notification and iwi consultation where required by legislation and appoint a hearings panel of its members to consider and decide on any objections received.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The following table includes the details of groups within the Franklin Local Board area with expired leases. It is recommended new community leases be granted for these groups under the terms and conditions specified.

8.       All seven groups own part or all of their buildings. The Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 allow that where a group owns its own building it may automatically apply for a new lease upon expiry of the old lease. The recommended term of lease is 10 years with one 10 year right of renewal. The recommended rental is $1.00 plus GST per annum, if requested. The groups are responsible for maintenance and utilities costs for these buildings.

9.       Two of the group, Bombay Rugby Football Club Incorporated and Grahams Beach Bowling Club Incorporated, occupy both council owned and group owned buildings on the leased sites. In these cases, the leases will specify in a maintenance schedule attached to the agreement the responsibilities of each party in terms of the council owned parts of the buildings.

10.     It is recommended the terms of the two leases would be 10 years with a renewal term of 10 years to keep the leases in alignment with the group owned parts of the buildings. The recommended rental is $1.00 plus GST per annum, if requested and a subsidised maintenance fee would be charged to acknowledge that council undertakes key maintenance on the council owned buildings.  The fee is dependent on the size of the building.

11.     The Clarks Beach Bowling Club Incorporated have a playgroup that use one of its buildings on the site. The playgroup pays a small monthly rental and look after the maintenance of the building and play area it uses. It is recommended this is allowed for in the lease by way of an approved sublease to the playgroup.

12.     Camp Sladdin, operated by The Scout Association of New Zealand at Clevedon Scenic Reserve, provides overnight dormitory and camping accommodation. Pursuant to section 44(1) of the Reserves Act 1977 any overnight accommodation on a reserve must be endorsed. Endorsement by the Franklin Local Board will enable the General Manager of Community Facilities to approve that accommodation may be provided for under the community lease.

13.     In future a concept plan will be prepared for Te Puru Park, Beachlands, to determine the best use and layout of buildings on the park. The concept plan will consider all present and future use. Future plans may or may not affect leased sites. To allow for future plans it is recommended a clause be added to the lease for The Scout Association of New Zealand (Te Puru) to allow council to give 12 months’ notice if the leased area is to be affected during the term of the lease.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     This report recommends the Franklin Local Board grant new community leases to the seven existing groups with expired leases as set out in the table below.

15.     Checks have been undertaken to confirm the land classification for each of the sites and land information is included. Three of the sites; Clevedon Scenic Reserve, Clevedon Showgrounds Reserve and 180R Maraetai Coast Road are unclassified reserves under the Reserves Act 1977. In order to enable leases on reserve land it is required to be classified. It is recommended the reserves be approved to be classified.

16.     Site Plans are attached for each group. Community Outcomes Plans have been negotiated and will be an attachment to the lease subject to approval by the local board.

 

Group, location and land information

Last lease information

New lease information

Key services provided by group

Lease notes and additional matters

Bombay Rugby Football Club Incorporated

Bombay War Memorial Hall, Paparata Road, Bombay

 

Part Allotment 13 Parish of Mangatawhiri held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002

 

9-year lease plus 9-year renewal expired 31 March 2017

(The group have been holding over on the old lease until now, so a new lease can start from now.)

 

Rent $150 plus GST per annum

 

10-year lease commencing 1 October 2019 plus one 10 year right of renewal

 

Rent $1 plus GST per annum if requested

 

Maintenance fee $500 plus GST per annum for council owned portion of building

 

The club was established in 1888 and in a growing area has 200 junior and 300 senior members. It has a 30% Maori demographic and 24% other ethnicities reflecting diversity in the area. It has a strong committee and the club, through trusts, owns the adjoining sports fields.

 

The clubrooms are well used three nights per week and in the weekends in rugby season and by the community at other times including for farm meetings, Lions, indoor bowls, courses, trainings, after school activities and functions.

 

The hall is a council owned building with a group owned clubrooms extension added in the 1980’s.

 

Under the last lease the club were responsible for the maintenance. Under a new lease this will be shared. There is historical maintenance to be done and council and the club are working through the responsibilities for this under the lease.

Clarks Beach Bowling Club Incorporated

40A Torkar Road, Clarks Beach

 

Lot 77 DP 101289, Lot 4 DP 106872 and part Lot 83 DP 43200 held as a recreation reserve by Auckland Council and subject to the Reserves Act 1977

 

10-year lease plus 10-year renewal expired 31 March 2017

(The group have been holding over on the old lease until now, so a new lease can start from now.)

 

Rent $307.20 per annum

 

10- year lease commencing 1 October 2019 plus one 10 year right of renewal

 

Rent $1 plus GST per annum if requested

 

The club was formed in 1974 and established bowling greens and clubrooms on the site. It is a strong club in a rural area with 138 members and open to all. It is affiliated with Counties Manukau Bowls and is well represented in tournaments.

 

The club plays three days per week and on the weekends and the rooms are also used for community meetings and functions.

 

Group owned building and improvements

 

The Clarks Beach Playgroup use one of the buildings and a play area. This use can be allowed by approving the issue by the bowling club of a sublease for a term not exceeding the term of the community lease.

Clevedon Lawn Tennis Club Incorporated

Clevedon Showgrounds Reserve, 73R Monument Road, Clevedon

 

Lot 1 DP 67852 held as an unclassified recreation reserve by Auckland Council and subject to the Reserves Act 1977

 

10-year lease expired 30 June 2017

(The group have been holding over on the old lease until now, so a new lease can start from now.)

 

Rent $0.10 per annum

 

10-year lease commencing 1 October 2019 plus one 10 year right of renewal

 

Rent $1 plus GST per annum if requested

 

The club has been operating in the area for 126 years. It has 220 junior and senior members and continues to grow in a growing area. It has a dedicated committee who have recently resurfaced the courts which are used every day. It has future plans for new courts.

 

The club has a strong coaching programme, holds regular open nights and encourages locals to use the courts. It is affiliated with Tennis Auckland and plays in tournaments with neighbouring clubs. The clubrooms are used by other sports codes on the park at times.

 

Group owned building and improvements

 

The land is an unclassified recreation reserve. In order to enable leases on the site the land should be classified. This can be approved by the local board and staff will undertake the subsequent classification process.

Grahams Beach Bowling Club Incorporated

Grahams Beach Domain Recreation Reserve, Grahams Beach Road, Awhitu

 

Allot 202 Parish of Awhitu held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation as a recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 and vested in Auckland Council in trust for this purpose

 

10-year lease expired 30 November 2011.

(The group have been holding over on the old lease until now, so a new lease can start from now.)

 

Rent $150 plus GST per annum

 

10-year lease commencing 1 October 2019 plus one 10 year right of renewal

 

Rent $1 plus GST per annum if requested

 

Maintenance fee $250 plus GST per annum for council owned building on site

 

The club was established in 1953 and developed a bowling green on disused school land vested in council. It is a small club but serves 30 local members plus holiday players. Maintenance is carried out by locals and volunteers.

 

Bowls takes place twice per week and the facility is used for local meetings and social functions

 

Group owned buildings and improvements and one council owned building (old school house)

 

Rescare Auckland Incorporated

180R and 181 Maraetai Coast Road, Maraetai

 

Lot 1 DP 31974 held in fee simple as an unspecified reserve by Auckland Council and subject to the Reserves Act 1977 and Lot 2 DP 31974 held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002

 

1- year lease expired 31 July 2019

 

Rent $0.10 per annum

 

10-year lease commencing 1 August 2019 plus one 10 year right of renewal

 

Rent $1 plus GST per annum if requested

 

The society operates a respite care home at the site providing a change of scenery and holiday break for 140 severely disabled people living in 20 Rescare homes throughout the community. It provides much needed, safe, community based time away on a rostered basis through the year for Rescare residents, their caregivers and families along with the chance for local interaction and integration.

 

The trust has an ongoing maintenance plan for the purpose built building and provides a caregiver and specialist equipment.

 

Group owned building

 

A portion of the land is an unspecified reserve. In order to enable a lease on the site it needs to be classified. This can be approved by the local board and staff will undertake the classification process.

The Scout Association of New Zealand (Clevedon Scouts / Camp Sladdin)

Clevedon Scenic Reserve, 30R Thorps Quarry Road, Clevedon

 

Allotment 92 Parish of Wairoa held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation as an unclassified recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 and vested in Auckland Council in trust for this purpose

 

10-year lease expired 31 July 2018

 

Rent $0.10 per annum

 

10-year lease commencing 1 August 2018 plus one 10 year right of renewal

 

Rent $1 plus GST per annum if requested

 

The site is used for the Clevedon Scout group and as a camp for hire for scouts and other groups. Clevedon has 60 youth members following rapid growth with a new leadership team.

 

The camp can hold 80 people in dormitories and scouts also tent in the grounds. Walking tracks and nature reserves are utilised. It is used for training courses, functions, church and youth groups and has been used as a Red Cross disaster relief post. The committee have a plan in place for ongoing maintenance.

 

Group owned building

 

The land is an unclassified recreation reserve. In order to enable a lease on the site the land should be classified. This can be approved by the local board and staff will undertake the classification process.

 

Overnight camping takes place on the site. This can be allowed for under the Reserves Act 1977 provided it is endorsed.

The Scout Association of New Zealand (Te Puru Sea Scouts)

Te Puru Park, 954R Whitford Maraetai Road, Maraetai

 

Lot 1 DP 190769 held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002

 

5-year lease expired 31 December 2014.

(The group have been holding over on the old lease until now, so a new lease can start from now.)

 

Rent $0.10 per annum

 

10-year lease commencing 1 October 2019 plus one 10 year right of renewal

 

Rent $1 plus GST per annum if requested

 

The group has been at the site since 1991 and is well established, operating every night of the week with Keas, Cubs, Scouts and Venturers. It has 160 youth members and 40 leaders and this continues to grow. It has a strong management team and committee.

 

The hall is used for teaching, recreation, meetings, by other scout groups and for boat storage. It is also used by a church group, home school group, Girl Guides, the Te Puru Community Trust and local sports teams.

 

Group owned building

 

Future plans for Te Puru Park by way of a concept and design process may affect leased sites. This can be allowed for by the inclusion of a clause in the lease that 12 months’ notice can be given if plans effect the leased area within the term of the lease.

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     For each of the leases a process has been carried out which includes a review of the lessees’ performance to ensure that lease conditions are being met, that the organisation is financially sustainable, the services or programmes offered align with objectives stated in the Auckland Plan and Franklin Local Board Plan 2017, that compliance requirements are met and the facility is well maintained.

18.     Input has been sought from relevant council departments and no concerns were raised. The proposed leases have no identified impacts on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The recommendations in this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sports and community facilities.

20.     Work on the new community leases has been approved as part of the Community Facilities work programme.  Progress made on the new leases has been reported in monthly updates when appropriate to keep local board members informed.

21.     The recommendations support the Franklin Local Board Plan 2017 Outcome Five: Communities feel ownership and connection to their area; we support community participation in helping to shape people’s quality of life, creativity, health and wellbeing.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2018-2028, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework and local board Plans.

23.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups and are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests and priorities. They create local benefits for many communities, including Māori and Māori are beneficiaries of the services provided by these groups.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     All costs involved in the preparation of the lease documents are borne by Auckland Council. Costs for public notification of the intention to grant new leases where required are borne by council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The granting of new community leases to these existing groups allows them to continue to provide services to their local communities. If new community leases are not granted the groups have no security of tenure over the premises which can inhibit their ability to apply for funding, develop programmes, maintain their buildings and deliver services.

26.     There are no risks associated with the granting of new community leases to the groups.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Subject to the grant of new community leases, staff will work with the groups to finalise the lease agreements. Where public notification and iwi consultation is required this will be carried out. The grant of the leases is subject to this notification and the Franklin Local Board is asked to appoint a hearings panel of its members to consider and decide on any objections received.

28.     In respect of the three sites that require classification under the Reserves Act 1977 if approved, staff will complete the process for this to be recorded on the title of the land.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Bombay Rugby Football Club Inc Site Plan

115

b

Clarks Beach Bowling Club Inc Site Plan

117

c

Clevedon Lawn Tennis Club Inc Site Plan

119

d

Grahams Beach Bowling Club Inc Site Plan

121

e

Rescare Auckland Inc Site Plan

123

f

The Scout Assoc of NZ Clevedon Scouts Camp Sladdin Site Plan

125

g

The Scout Assoc of NZ Te Puru Sea Scouts Site Plan

127

h

Bombay Rugby Football Club Inc Community Outcomes Plan

129

i

Clarks Beach Bowling Club Inc Community Outcomes Plan

131

j

Clevedon Lawn Tennis Club Inc Community Outcomes Plan

133

k

Grahams Beach Bowling Club Inc Community Outcomes Plan

135

l

Rescare Auckland Inc Community Outcomes Plan

137

m

The Scout Assoc of NZ - Clevedon Community Outcomes Plan

139

n

The Scout Assoc of NZ - Te Puru Community Outcomes Plan

141

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Christine Benson - Community Lease Advisor South

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

Approval for two new road names at 18 & 21 Sai Ridge Close, Pukekohe 

File No.: CP2019/14831

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to name two new private roads, both being commonly owned access lots, created by way of a subdivision development at 18 & 21 Sai Ridge Close, Pukekohe.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       The developer and applicant, Mike Greer Homes South Auckland Ltd, has proposed the following names for consideration by the local board:

 

Table 1: 18 & 21 Sai Ridge Close Proposed Road Names

 

OPTION 1

(Applicant Preferred)

OPTION 2

(Alternative name)

OPTION 3

(Alternative name)

COAL 1

Paddock Lane

Mātanga Lane

Pratia Lane

COAL 2

Roto Lane

Mahogany Lane

Sedge Lane

4.       Any of the six proposed road name options would be acceptable for the local board to approve for use in this location, having been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards have been met and the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region.

5.       Mana Whenua were also consulted and Ngai Tai ki Tamaki Tribal Trust supported all the proposed names.  It is up to the local board to decide upon the thematic suitability of the names within the local context.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

6.       Approve two names for the following new roads at 18 & 21 Sai Ridge Close, Pukekohe, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60332854 and SUB60332855):

·    COAL 1: (local board to insert chosen name)

·    COAL 2: (local board to insert chosen name)

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Resource consent BUN60332854 (including subdivision consent reference SUB60332855) was issued March 2019 for the construction of 12 residential dwellings on 12 new lots, as well as two commonly owned access lots (COALs).

8.       In accordance with the National Addressing Standards for road naming (the AS/NZS 4819-2011 standard), COAL 1 requires a road name because it serves more than 5 lots. COAL 2 requires a road name even though it only serves 5 lots, because the road will be private and so cannot be extended from existing public road Sai Ridge Close for private ownership and maintenance reasons.

9.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B respectively.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named, as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

11.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

·    a historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·    a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·    an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     The applicant’s proposed names and meanings are set out in the table below:

Table 2: 21 & 18 Sai Ridge Close, Pukekohe Proposed Road Names & Meanings

Road Number

Applicant’s Proposed Names & Preferences

Meaning

(as described by applicant)

COAL 1:

 

Paddock Lane

(Applicant preferred)

Reference to the town of Pukekohe West, also known as the ‘Paddock Settlement’, which was surveyed and established in 1865.

1.      

Mātanga Lane

(alternative 1)

Māori word meaning: Sophisticated

[According to the applicant] “The development is a newly established, sophisticated area with high spec architectural builds”.

Pratia Lane

(alternative 2)

Native white flowering groundcover plant that applicant / developer Mike Greer Homes are planting at the site.

COAL 2:

 

Roto Lane  

(Applicant preferred)

Maori word meaning: lake

In reference to the Anselmi Ridge Drainage Reserve that is to the east of the development.

1.      

Mahogany Lane

(alternative 1)

The Māori word pukekohe means "hill of the kohekohe", New Zealand's native mahogany. 

Sedge Lane

(alternative 2)

Grass-like plant with triangular stems and inconspicuous flowers; a plant species that Mike Greer Homes are planting at the site.

 

 

13.     Assessment: The names proposed by the applicant have been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met and the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region, therefore it is up to the local board to decide upon the thematic suitability of the names within the local context.

14.     Theme: The proposed names have a local theme and appear to be well-researched in terms of the local context, including native plant names, Te Reo names, and names that are drawn from the local history of the area.

15.     Iwi Consultation: All relevant local iwi were written to (via email) and invited to comment. Ngai Tai ki Tamaki Tribal Trust responded in support of all the applicants proposed names. No other iwi provided responses or comments. It is therefore implied that no other iwi were opposed to the use of any of the proposed names in this location for these two small private roads.

16.     Community Consultation: The applicant contacted the Pukekohe Library for road naming suggestions relating to the history of Pukekohe. After reviewing the research information provided by the Senior Library Assistant for Local History, the applicant chose a selection of names that they felt represented the history of the area.

17.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all the proposed names are acceptable and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

18.     Road type: ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new private roads, suiting the form and layout of the roads, as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The review sought from the Franklin Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity. Three Maori road name options have been proposed for this application.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Plan

147

b

Attachment B - Location Plan

149

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2019/11494

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To consider the monthly update of the Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       This report provides an update on the Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar. A schedule of key decisions that will come before the board at business meetings over the next year is attached (Attachment A).

3.       The calendar aims to support the local board’s governance role by:

i)          Ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

ii)         Clarifying what advice is required and when

iii)         Clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be regularly updated to ensure that formal reporting milestones for new projects are added to the schedule. Sitting behind the publicly reported calendar is a less formal but more detailed meeting schedule, which will help to coordinate the work of staff on local board projects and ensure that previous resolutions are acted upon.

5.       At its business meeting on 6 June 2017, Franklin Local Board resolved that the governance forward work calendar would be reported monthly to enable greater public transparency on forthcoming local board key decision timescales (Resolution number FR/2017/82).

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the August 2019 update of the Franklin governance forward work calendar (Attachment A to the report entitled ‘Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar).

 

Horopaki / Context

6.       The governance forward work calendar brings together reporting on all of Franklin Local Board’s projects and activities previously approved in the local board plan, long-term plan, departmental work programmes and through other board decisions. It includes governing body policies and initiatives that call for a local board response. Inclusion on a formal business meeting agenda will allow greater transparency for the public.

7.       Sitting behind the publicly reported calendar is a more detailed meeting schedule, which will help to coordinate the work of staff on local board projects and ensure that previous resolutions are acted upon.

8.       The forward work calendar is arranged in three columns: ‘Topic’, ‘Purpose’ and ‘Governance Role’:

i.)         Topic describes the items and may indicate how they fit in with broader processes such as the annual plan.

ii.)        Purpose indicates the aim of the item, such as formally approving plans or projects, hearing submissions or receiving progress updates.

iii.)        Governance role is a high-level categorisation of the work of local boards.

9.       At its business meeting on 6 June 2017, Franklin Local Board resolved that the governance forward work calendar would be reported monthly to enable greater public transparency on forthcoming local board key decision timescales (Resolution number FR/2017/82).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     This report is an information report providing the governance forward work programme for the next six months.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

11.     All local boards have been receiving governance forward work calendars on their business meeting agendas. This will support more effective management of the local board’s governance work.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

12.     The projects and processes referred to in the governance forward work calendar will have a range of implications for Māori which will be considered when the work is reported.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

13.     There are no financial implications relating to this report.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

14.     This report is a point in time of the governance forward work calendar. It is a living document and updated month to month.  It minimises the risk of the board being unaware of planned topics for their consideration.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

15.     Staff will review the calendar each month and will report an updated calendar to the board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar

153

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor - Franklin

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

Franklin Local Board workshop records

 

File No.: CP2019/11495

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for workshops held on 16, 23 and 30 July, and 6 and 13 August 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Workshop records for the Franklin Local Board are attached for 16, 23 and 30 July, and 6 and 13 August 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for 16, 23 and 30 July, and 6 and 13 August 2019

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board workshop record 16 July 2019

157

b

Franklin Local Board workshop record 23 July 2019

159

c

Franklin Local Board workshop record 30 July 2019

161

d

Franklin Local Board workshop record 6 August 2019

163

e

Franklin Local Board workshop record 13 August 2019

165

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor - Franklin

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

Franklin Local Board term achievements 2016-2019

File No.: CP2019/12882

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the board an overview of the progress on achieving outcomes and priorities in the Franklin Local Board Plan 2017 during the current electoral term.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board Plan 2017 (the plan) sets out the aspirations, required outcomes and priorities for the Franklin community over a three-year period, including projects and areas of advocacy that the board undertakes on behalf of the community.

3.       The board undertook community consultation to develop the local board plan, which it adopted in September 2017. The plan contained the following aspirational outcomes for the Franklin community:

·    A well-cared for natural environment- enhance, protect and maintain our diverse natural environment and make sure it’s able to be enjoyed

·    A thriving local economy- Franklin has a strong economy that attracts people to live, work locally and visit its attractions

·    An improved transport system- continue to work towards better public transport and safer roads in Franklin

·    Growth is dealt with effectively- make full use of existing outdoor space and community facilities before developing new

·    Communities feel ownership and connection to their area- support community participation in helping to shape people’s quality of life, creativity, health and wellbeing.

4.       During each of the three financial years, local board agreements were entered into with the governing body, which included areas for advocacy and budgets to deliver key projects and initiatives in the local board plan.

5.       As part of the local board agreement, a list of advocacy initiatives was developed, identifying each area of advocacy and the entity that the board will advocate to for the progression of initiatives- either the governing body or a council-controlled organisation.

6.       Over the last three years, many of the projects and advocacy initiatives have been achieved by the board (see Attachment A). Some of these achievements include:

·    The Pest Free Franklin programme, which involves council staff working to empower community groups on pest control

·    The Waiuku Trails Plan was adopted in December 2017 and community led delivery began in March 2019

·    The Wairoa River Action Plan was endorsed by the board in 2017, and won the ‘most improved Auckland river’ category at the New Zealand river awards in 2017

·    As a result of the board’s advocacy, the Governing Body endorsed Pukekohe becoming an Unlock location in October 2018, and since then the board has worked closely with Panuku to contribute ideas on the development of vision, goals and key moves for the regeneration of the Pukekohe Town Centre

·    The Hunua Trail received New Zealand Heartland Trail status in 2018. The Aspirational Hunua Trail Plan was endorsed by the board in March 2019 and by the Governing Body in July 2019

·    Ongoing advocacy from the board facilitated the inclusion of the Pukekohe Station and electrification as part of the Regional Land Transport Plan.

7.       In 2020, working closely with, and consulting the community, a new local board plan will be developed. This will offer the opportunity to review existing outcomes and confirm future priorities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Franklin Local Board term achievements 2016-2019 report (see attachment A).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board term achievements 2016-2019

169

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vilecea Naidoo - Local Board Advisor - Franklin

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Franklin Local Board for quarter four 2018/201

File No.: CP2019/13530

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Franklin Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter four, 1 April – 30 June 2019, and the overall performance for the financial year, against the agreed 2018/2019 local board work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Franklin Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2018/19 financial year.

3.       Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/20 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

4.       128 activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. 15 activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred and 21 projects/activities have not progressed as expected during 2018/19.

5.       Key highlights for quarter four include:

·    The Pest Free Franklin programme expanded the community-led pest-free network across the Franklin Local Board area.

·    a 10 per cent reduction of litter at litter-count sites since board-funded ‘Be a Tidy Kiwi’ signs were installed across the Franklin Local Board area.

·    The ‘Strengthening Neighbourhoods’ programme has enabled a number of community initiatives and the Pukekohe CCTV network has been handed over to Auckland Transport.

Key activity achievements from the 2018/19 work programme include:

·    year-one Waiuku Trails physical works were completed

·    the Hunua Trail Aspirational Plan was completed

·    new playgrounds were delivered at Beachlands and Awhitu

·    Sandspit Reserve seawall was renewed

·    $227,893.30 was distributed through community grants and $63,328.37 was granted to coastal rescue services.

6.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·    the renewal of Beachlands Domain toilet/changing rooms and fence (WP ID 1482) is delayed allowing the scope of the project to be reconfirmed. Scope has now been confirmed by the board and the project is now progressing with physical works scheduled to commence within the 2019/20.

·    scheduled renewals of Clarks Beach play spaces, land fixtures (WP ID 1963) and skatepark (WP ID 1992) has not progressed as scheduled to enable assessment of future needs. This service needs assessment, to be delivered through the 2019/20 work programme, will enable the board to make informed decisions on the scope of these scheduled projects. These projects are now scheduled for delivery from 2020/21.

·    the scheduled renewal of the Te Puru skate park (WP ID 1989) has not progressed as scheduled to enable delivery of an assessment of future needs (a service needs assessment) and development of a concept plan. It is anticipated that planning work will inform the location and scope of the scheduled skatepark renewal, which is now planned to commence from 2020/21.

·    endorsement of an updated Karaka Sports Park Masterplan and prioritisation of actions was not completed in 2018/19. Parks, Sport and Recreation staff intend on providing advice on priorities and seeking board endorsement for the plan in quarter one of 2019/20.

7.       The 2018/2019 financial performance report is attached (Attachment B), but under confidential cover. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX. Results are expected to be made public 30 September 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter and year ending 30 June 2019.

b)      note that the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain          confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2018/19 are released to the NZX, which are expected to be made public 30 September 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Franklin Local Board has an approved 2018/2019 work programme for the following operating departments:

·    Community Services (Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; Parks, Sport and Recreation; and Service Strategy and Integration) approved on 26 June 2018/ resolution FR/2018/99

·    Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew and Community Leases, approved on 26 June 2018 / resolution FR/2018/100

·    Infrastructure and Environmental Services, approved on 26 June 2018/ resolution FR/2018/98

·    Local Economic Development, approved on 5 June 2018 /resolution FR/2018/74

·    Plans and Places (Waiuku Spatial Planning – scoping exercise), approved on 5 June 2018/ resolution FR/2018/75.

9.       Youth Connection activities moved from the Arts, Community and Events to The Southern Initiative work programme in quarter two.

10.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet local board plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

 

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

11.     Operating departments have provided the last quarter delivery update against their work programme (Attachment A).

Key highlights for quarter four

12.     The key achievements to report from the quarter four period include:

·    The Pest Free Franklin programme (WP ID 2698) was bolstered by additional funding from the local board enabling the purchase of additional materials and equipment and the expansion of the community-led pest-free network across the Franklin Local Board area.

·    Litter counts at three ‘Be a Tidy Kiwi’ signage sites have indicated a 10 per cent reduction of litter since signs were installed across the Franklin Local Board area as part of the Franklin Litter Prevention Plan (WP ID 1465). NZTA have engaged in the programme, agreeing to install four additional signs at southern motorway on-ramps.

·    The ‘Strengthening Neighbourhoods’ programme (WP ID 986) enabled the following activities within the Pukekohe sub-division;

1.   Street Jam and Street Champ after school activities by Mana Wahine in Pukekohe neighbourhood parks

2.   the Pa Hop fundraising group to raise $10,000 at the Waiau Pa Hop for distribution to local community groups.

3.   The handover of the Pukekohe CCTV network to Auckland Transport.

Overall performance against the Franklin Local Board 2018/2019 work programme

13.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected (completed by the end of July 2019) or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

14.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each department’s work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

15.     The table below shows the overall performance of work programme activities (RAG status and activity status by work programme).

Table 1: End of year Local Board Work Programmes Status

Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme

16.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2018/19 include:

·    the Waiuku Trails Committee completed delivery of year-one Waiuku Trails physical works. The community-led delivery approach that was requested by the board required amendments to the Auckland Council project management approach and has created a precedent that could enable other similar community-led projects in the future. 

·    the Hunua Trail Aspirational Plan was completed (WP ID 1782) and endorsed as a ‘Heartland Ride’ within the NZ Cycle Trail network. The approach to project governance and delivery will continue to be developed in quarter one of 2019/20.

·    new playgrounds were delivered at Constellation Drive in Beachlands (WP ID 2898) and at Matakawau Point, Awhitu (WP ID 3042).

·    The renewal of the seawall at Sandspit Reserve, Waiuku (WP ID 1987) was completed.

·    A total of $227,893.30 was distributed through community grants (WP ID 337) to support local community initiatives across the Franklin Local Board area, with an additional $63,328.37 allocated to coastal rescue services.

Overview of work programme performance by department

Arts, Community and Events work programme

17.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 20 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green) and two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber). Activities that are not fully delivered are discussed below.

 

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Local Maori Responsiveness Action Plan

Amber

In progress

Project deliverables have not been completed within the financial year. The budget has been carried forward. Completion of this deliverable (review of existing local board commitment to local Maori) will be completed by Q3 of 2019/20. Completion of this project will be important in considering Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and priorities.

Strengthening Neighbourhoods and Town Centres

Amber

In progress

Programme budget has not been fully allocated due to community-delivery capacity restrictions and an underspend in CCTV maintenance. The budget has been carried forward to the 2019/20 budget. Baseline 2019/20 budget was reallocated for this programme line to reflect this anticipated carry-forward.

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

18.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are 12 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), three activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber) and one activity that is significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red). Activities that are delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

 

 

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Wai-o-maru Reserve; develop a plan

Red

In progress

There are complexities to some cultural and heritage elements of the management plan that require extension into 2019/20.

Karaka Sports Park Masterplan prioritisation

Amber

In progress

This is part of a multi-year project, and while the specific delivery of this element of the project has not progressed, the project itself has progressed at the governing body level with the completion of a detailed business case assessment phase. This deliverable is included in the 2019/20 work programme and scheduled to be completed by Parks Sport and Recreation in quarter one.

Develop Franklin Trails Plan

Amber

In progress

The scope of this project was amended in quarter three. Unallocated budget has been carried forward and the project has been included in 2019/20 work programme. Completion of this year’s deliverable (production of the mapping exercise) is now anticipated in quarter one 2019/20.

Ecological volunteers and environmental programme

Amber

In progress

Weather has delayed some planned events including the Karioitahi beach cleanup with NZ Steel. These events will be rescheduled until spring and unspent budget has been deferred. This is an ongoing programme and is included in the 2019/20.

 

Libraries and Information work programme

19.     In the Libraries and Information work programme, there are 8 activities. All were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green).

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

20.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 70 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), seven activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), five activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and five activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.


 

 

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Beachlands Library renewal

Red

On hold

This project is on hold as the board, based on officer advice, indicated that this is not an immediate priority. The renewal has been rescheduled until 2021/22.

Clarks Beach play space and land fixtures renewal

Red

On hold

This project is on hold pending the completion of a Clarks Beach parks service need assessment which will be completed in 2019/20. Planning for this renewal will recommence upon completion of the overall assessment and is included in the 2019/20 work programme.

Clarks Beach skate park renewal

Red

On hold

This project is on hold pending the completion of a Clarks Beach parks service need assessment which will be completed in 2019/20. Planning for this renewal will recommence upon completion of the overall assessment and is included in the 2019/20 work programme.

Te Puru Park skate park renewal

Red

On hold

This project is on hold pending the completion of a Te Puru Recreation Reserve service need assessment which will be completed in 2019/20 by Parks Sport and Recreation, and development of a Te Puru Recreation Reserve concept plan which will be led by Community Facilities in consultation with the public, mana whenua and stakeholders. Planning for this renewal will be informed by this planning work. This renewal is now scheduled to commence in 2020/21.

Kitchener Road carpark renewal

Red

On hold

This project is on hold pending a review of project scope noting that budget allocated in 2018/19 was not sufficient. An amended delivery schedule will be reported at the 2019/20 work programme quarter one report.

Beachlands Domain toilet and fence renewal

Amber

In progress

This renewal has been delayed due to allowing the scope of the project to be reconfirmed. Scope has now been confirmed by the board and the project is now progressing with physical works scheduled to commence within the 2019/20.

Franklin Sports field renewals

Amber

In progress

The Bledisloe Park cricket nets and Karaka Sports Park cricket pitch renewals were not completed within the 2018/19 year due to weather delays. The projects are scheduled for completion mid-August or as weather allows.

Glenbrook Beach boat ramp and seawall renewals

Amber

In progress

Project has not progressed as anticipated due to delays in the professional services contracting process. Investigation and preliminary design phase is expected to be completed within 2019/20 with delivery scheduled to commence in 2020/21.

Park Run Routes – establish and signpost park run routes

Amber

In progress

Project delivery has been delayed as Te Puru Park Trust and Waiuku Sportspark user groups input on proposed routes has prompted a review of the project scope. Delivery is now anticipated through the 2019/20 work programme with an update on the project anticipated through the 2019/20 work programme quarter one report.

Karaka Sports Park civil design works

Amber

In progress

Scheduled project deliverables are incomplete due to changes in the scope delaying the consent application. The consent was at the time of report expected to be submitted in July.

 

 

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Clevedon Scenic Reserve western track renewal

Amber

In progress

This project was delayed to enable the Kauri Dieback issue and risk to the project to be assessed and managed. Construction is scheduled to commence in quarter one of 2019/20.

Growers (Pukekohe) Stadium slip remediation

Amber

In progress

At the time of report, this remediation is awaiting strategic advice from geotechnical engineers and healthy waters on stormwater works to inform an appropriate solution. Direction from the local board on next steps will be sought once advice is complete.

Franklin the Centre lighting renewal

Grey

Cancelled

Now included within the scope of the Pukekohe Library renewal.

Green Bay Reserve platform renewal

Grey

Cancelled

Reassessed as a low priority by the board with advice from staff.

Pohutukawa Road Reserve stormwater

Grey

Cancelled

Cancelled on advice from Panuku Development Auckland.

Jubilee Pool pool-side tile replacement

Grey

Deferred

Project not completed within the 2018/19 financial year but is scheduled for progress in 2019/20.

Shelly Bay Reserve retaining Wall

Grey

Cancelled

At the time of report this project was cancelled. Since the report, staff have reassessed the issue and while this project as described in the report is cancelled, an alternative solution delivered in consultation with the adjacent private landowners is progressing.

 

Community Leases work programme

21.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are six activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), two activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and eight activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

 

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Puni Recreation Reserve lease

Red

On hold

Renewed ground lease is on hold while Puni Rugby Football Club establishes itself as a legal entity.

Racecourse Recreation Reserve lease

Red

On hold

On hold pending completion of a Regional Golf Facilities Management Plan which is scheduled to be completed in 2019/20.

Whitford Domain lease

Grey

Deferred

Application from Whitford Pony Club for a new ground lease has not been received within the 2018/19 financial year. Application is expected in 2019/20.

Massey Park lease

Grey

Deferred

Application from Waiuku Search and Rescue for a new ground lease has not been received within the 2018/19 financial year. Application is expected in 2019/20.

Matakawau Domain Recreation Reserve

Grey

Deferred

Application from Counties Playcentre for a new ground lease has not been received within the 2018/19 financial year. Application is expected in 2019/20.

Beachlands Log Cabin

Grey

Deferred

Application from the Beachlands Community Trust was received in quarter four. Completion of the due diligence and approval process is deferred to 2019/20.

14R Monument Road

Grey

Deferred

Application from the Counties Manukau Kindergarten Association was received in quarter three. Completion of the due diligence and approval process is expected in 2019/20.

Wellington Street Recreation Reserve

Grey

Deferred

Application from Parkside School Board of Trustees for a lease renewal has not been received within the 2018/19 financial year. Application is expected in 2019/20.

Paparata Road Local Purpose Reserve

Grey

Deferred

Application from Counties Playcentre for a new ground lease has not been received within the 2018/19 financial year. Application is expected in 2019/20.

89 Ardmore Quarry Road

Grey

Deferred

New ground lease discussions continue with Manukau Trail Riders and new lease completion is deferred to the 2019/20 work programme.

 

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

22.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are eight activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green) and one activity is in progress but is delayed (amber); the Manukau Harbour Forum activity (WP ID 53).

23.     Implementation of the Manukau Harbour Forum work programme, scheduled for 2018/19, was delayed by a June 2019 commencement of the governance and management review. Work programme implementation budget has been carried over to the 2019/20 financial year.

 

Local Economic Development work programme

24.     In the Local Economic Development work programme, there are two activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green) and two activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are deferred (grey) are discussed below.

 

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Supporting the Franklin tourism sector

Grey

Deferred

Implementation of recommendations of the motor home research and Hunua catchment visitor amenity research was delayed pending governing body endorsement of the Hunua Trail aspirational plan. This work and associated budget have been deferred to 2019/20. This has been anticipated in allocating new budget in the 2019/20 work programme.

Co-ordination of the Franklin Skilled Network

Grey

Cancelled (activity status is incorrect in the attachment)

ATEED delivery of this project has been cancelled with 2018/19 budget reallocated by the board to ‘supporting the Franklin Tourism Sector’ and Hunua Trail budget lines through the quarter 3 report. Franklin Skills Network co-ordination is now the responsibility of TSI and included in the TSI 2019/20 work programme.

 

Plans and Places work programme

25.     In the Plans and Places work programme, there is one activity completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green); Planning scoping for Waiuku. This project continues in 2019/20 with mana whenua and wider community engagement. The final outcome will be workshopped with the local board and reported to a business meeting in 2019/20 quarter two.

Deferred activities

26.     As part of the local board funding policy, activities funded through the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operating fund that were not delivered in 2018/19 will be deferred into 2019/20 work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     When developing the work programmes, council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     This report informs the Franklin Local Board of the performance for the quarter ending 30 June 2019 and the performance for the 2018/19 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     The following activities delivered Maori outcomes in quarter four;

·   WP ID 226: 2 of the 18 programmes delivered by the Franklin Arts Centre are reported as having Maori outcomes

·   WP ID 1096: Matariki was celebrated at both Pukekohe and Waiuku Libraries, including a Matariki storytime at Waiuku attended by View Road school, Little Ants, Otaua Playcentre, Puna and others as well as demonstrations from Te Korowai Weavers, Whariki O Te Ao at Pukekohe.

·   WP ID 885: operational work was authorised and completed involving the removal of minor wilding trees from Wai-o-Maru. Work to develop the Wai-o-Maru Reserve plan continues.

·   WP ID 985: a review of current local board commitments to local Maori as part of the Local Maori Responsiveness Action Plan continues and is included in the 2019/20 work programme.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     This report is provided to enable the Franklin Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2018/19 work programmes and to report this to the public. This report is for information only and therefore there are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

31.     Auckland Council currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September. Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is excluded from the public.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

33.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/20 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Quarter Four Work Programme Update 2018/2019

189

b

Franklin Local Board Quarter Four Financial Report 2018/2019 - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Georgina Gilmour - Senior Advisor, Franklin Local Board Services

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 



Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/15521

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2018/2019 Annual Report for the Franklin Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 26 September 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2018/2019 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      adopt the 2018/2019 Franklin Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A.

b)      note that any proposed changes will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019.

c)      note that the draft 2018/2019 Franklin Local Board Annual Report (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report) will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2018/2019 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities, and the overall Financial Impact Statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

6.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the NZX Debt Market (quoted bonds) maintained by NZX Limited. As a result, the council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules (listing rules) and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA). Under these obligations, local boards may not release annual financial results in any form, including publishing their agenda/minutes containing their results, until council group results are released to the NZX on 27 September 2019.  Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi relates to the local board area.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area, summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved.

Funding information

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English, and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2018/2019 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2019

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 26 September 2019

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 27 September 2018

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2018/2019 Franklin Local Board Annual Report - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David Gurney - Manager Corporate Performance & Reporting

Authorisers

Kevin Ramsay - General Manager Corporate Finance and Property

Victoria Villaraza, Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager

      

 


Franklin Local Board

27 August 2019

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Franklin Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

20        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Franklin Local Board for quarter four 2018/201 - Attachment b - Franklin Local Board Quarter Four Financial Report 2018/2019

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains financial information that is not due to be released until the Auckland Council Group results are released to NZX on approximately 30 September 2019 .

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

21        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019 - Attachment a - 2018/2019 Franklin Local Board Annual Report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains information that needs to remain confidientail until after the Auckland Council group results for 2018/2019 are released to the NZ Stock Exchange, which is expected to be by 30 September 2019..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C1       Confidential: Proposed approach for the acquisition of land in Drury South for stormwater management purposes

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains information relating to land acquisition that could prejudice council's position in discussions with landowners and stormwater suppliers.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report contains information relating to land acquisition that could prejudice council's position in discussions with landowners and stormwater suppliers.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains information relating to land acquisition that could prejudice council's position in discussions with landowners and stormwater suppliers.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.