I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 21 August 2019

4.30pm

Council Chamber, Orewa Service Centre, 50 Centreway Road, Orewa

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Janet Fitzgerald, JP

 

Members

Chris Bettany

 

 

David Cooper

 

 

Gary Holmes

 

 

Caitlin Watson

 

 

Vicki Watson

 

 

Mike Williamson

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Vivienne Sullivan

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

16 August 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 427 3317

Email: vivienne.sullivan@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

DELEGATIONS HIBISCUS AND BAYS LOCAL BOARD 2016-2019

 

 

Portfolio

Description

Resolution

Local Board Members

Minor landowner approvals and landlord approvals including events

To confirm if the matter is minor for staff to exercise their delegation for landowner approvals

To approve minor landlord approvals

HB/2016/190

Julia Parfitt -Chairperson

Janet Fitzgerald - Deputy Chairperson  

Gary Holmes - Alternate

Transport Information Group

Discuss transport issues/projects

HB/2016/190

Julia Parfitt -Chairperson

Janet Fitzgerald - Deputy Chairperson  

David Cooper - Alternate

Resource consent applications 

Input into notification decisions for resource consent applications 

HB/2016/190

Gary Holmes 

Janet Fitzgerald  - Deputy Chairperson

David Cooper - Alternate

Notified Resource Consents

Notified Plan Changes

Notices of Requirement

To prepare and submit local board views and speak to those local board views at any hearings

HB/2018/55

Gary Holmes or

Julia Parfitt –Chairperson or

Janet Fitzgerald - Deputy Chairperson  

 

Urgent Decision Making

To make decisions on matters that cannot wait until the next ordinary meeting of the local board

HB/2016/195

Julia Parfitt – Chairperson

Janet Fitzgerald-Deputy Chairperson

Christina Bettany - Alternates

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

To approve minor changes to 2019/2020 work programme

HB/2019/96

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Community Services

To approve minor changes to 2019/2020 work programme

HB/2019/97

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Parks, Sport and Recreation

To approve minor changes to 2019/2020 work programme

HB/2019/90

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Service, Strategy and Integration

To approve minor changes to 2018/2019 work programme

HB/2019//97

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Economic Development

To approve minor changes to 2019/2020 work programme

HB/2019/95

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Community Facilities and CF: Leases

To approve minor changes to 2019/2020 work programme/s

HB/2019/90

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

Silverdale Led Heritage Character Design Guidelines

To approve any minor changes

 

Janet Fitzgerald – Deputy Chairperson

Caitlin Watson

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Annual Report 2017/2018

To approve any minor changes

 

Janet Fitzgerald – Deputy Chairperson

 


 

 

Appointments to outside organisations

 

Organisation

Local Board Member

Vaughan Homestead (Torbay Historical Society)

Julia Parfitt - Chairperson

Chris Bettany - Alternate

Victor Eaves Management Committee

Mike Williamson

Local Government New Zealand Zone One (Auckland and Northland)

Janet Fitzgerald  - Deputy Chairperson

 

Business Improvement Districts (BIDS)

 

Destination Orewa Beach

Vicki Watson

David Cooper - Alternate

Torbay

Chris Bettany

Julia Parfitt - Chairperson- Alternate

Browns Bay

Chris Bettany

Gary Holmes - Alternate

Mairangi Bay

David Cooper

Julia Parfitt - Chairperson- Alternate

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         7

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          7

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       7

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          7

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    7

8.1     New Zealand Walk of Fame Relocation of Stars on the Orewa Boulevard   7

8.2     The Safety Brains Trust                                                                                      8

8.3     Curley Avenue, Silverdale                                                                                   8

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  8

9.1     Orewa Sea Scouts                                                                                                8

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                9

11        Grant of landowner approval to Hatfields Beach Trust and Ngahere Views Trust for pest species removal and replanting within Hatfields Esplanade Reserve                  11

12        Moana Reserve water feature renewal                                                                      57

13        Auckland Transport - Local Board Transport Capital Fund Project 578, Orewa Boulevard Stage 3                                                                                                                          65

14        Auckland Transport Update to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board August 2019    71

15        Hibiscus and Bays Open Space Network Plan                                                        97

16        Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development six monthly report to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board                                                                               103

17        Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes    111

18        New road names in the Build Rich Limited subdivision at 2182 East Coast Road, Silverdale                                                                                                                    135

19        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019                                                                    143

20        Auckland Council's Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019                                                                  147

21        Ward Councillors Update                                                                                         193

22        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     195

23        Record of Workshop Meetings                                                                                199  

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

25        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               213

19        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

a.      Draft 2018/2019 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Annual Report               213

20        Auckland Council's Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

b.      Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Quarterly Performance Report June 2019 - Financial Appendix performance financial summary                                                   213  

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 17 July 2019, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       New Zealand Walk of Fame Relocation of Stars on the Orewa Boulevard

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Mr Gary Brown has requested a deputation to present two options to the local board for the moving of the stars on the Orewa Boulevard.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Mr Brown for his presentation on the moving of the stars on the Orewa Boulevard.

 

 

 

8.2       The Safety Brains Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Mr Greg Matten from The Safety Brains Trust has requested a deputation to introduce the SOFt approach to local board members.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Mr Matten for his presentation on the SOFt approach.

 

 

 

8.3       Curley Avenue, Silverdale

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Mr Alastair White has requested a deputation to discuss the extension of Curley Avenue, Silverdale.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Mr White for his presentation on Curley Avenue, Silverdale.

Attachments

a          Powerpoint Presentation...................................................................... 217

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Orewa Sea Scouts

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Ms Gwenda Holster-Dowler from Orewa Sea Scouts will be in attendance to make a brief presentation to the local board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Ms Gwenda Holster-Dowler from Orewa Sea Scouts for her presentation.

 

 


 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Grant of landowner approval to Hatfields Beach Trust and Ngahere Views Trust for pest species removal and replanting within Hatfields Esplanade Reserve

File No.: CP2019/13649

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request landowner approval from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for planting and pest species removal at Hatfields Beach Esplanade Reserve and accessway.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The applicants, Hatfields Beach Trust and Ngahere Views Trust, have requested landowner approval to remove pest species and to plant within the Hatfields Esplanade Reserve and adjoining accessway to 515A Hibiscus Coast Highway.

3.       The proposed parcels of land for species removal and replanting are both within the Hatfields Beach Esplanade Reserve and are legally described as Lot 3 DP 87622 and Lot 17 DP 53193. Historically Lot 17 DP 53193 was used as an accessway, but access is very limited, being impassable in sections due to the extensive bush cover. 

4.       The accessway and esplanade reserve overstorey canopy trees within the site are a mix of naturally occurring native species and exotic trees planted for amenity. The understorey within the site is partially regenerating native species mixed with pest plants and weed species. The vegetation on this site, while weedy in places, provides important habitat for native fauna and protection to the coastal environment.

5.       Staff recommend that Hibiscus and Bays Local Board grants landowner approval to Hatfields Beach Trust and Ngahere Views Trust for the proposed pest species removal and replacement planting to be undertaken in accordance with the applicants’ ecologists report, 515A Hibiscus Coast Highway: Assessment of Ecological Effects, dated 18 June 2019 by Ecology New Zealand that is attached as Attachment A to this report.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the land owner application from Hatfields Beach Trust and Ngahere Views Trust for the removal of pest species and replacement planting within the Hatfields Beach Esplanade Reserve, outlined in the applicants’ ecologist report, 515A Hibiscus Coast Highway: Assessment of Ecological Effects, dated 18 June 2019 by Ecology New Zealand. The land parcels are legally described as Lot 3 DP 87622 and Lot 17 DP 53193.

Horopaki

Context

Site details

6.       The council land is within Hatfields Esplanade Reserve and includes two parcels legally described as Lot 3 DP 87622 and Lot 17 DP 53193. Lot 3 DP 87622 is held by Auckland Council as an unclassified reserve for local purpose (esplanade) and is subject to the Reserves Act 1977. It was vested on subdivision in 1979. Lot 17 DP 53193 is held in fee simple by Auckland Council and is a classified recreation reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

7.       The land has a significant ecological overly identified and is zoned open space - conservation zone under the Auckland Unitary Plan- Operative in Part.

Proposal – vegetation clearance and replanting

8.       It is proposed to undertake pest plant removal and planting within the accessway and esplanade reserve. This planting will include revegetation planting, infill and underplanting. A map indicating the location for the proposed planting within the council reserve land is indicated in Figure 1 and is highlighted light green with the pest removal being indicated as brown.

9.       All pest species removal and replanting will be in accordance with the applicants’ ecologist report, 515A Hibiscus Coast Highway: Assessment of Ecological Effects, dated 18 June 2019 by Ecology New Zealand. This has been reviewed and approved by Auckland Council’s senior arboriculture and eco specialist.

10.     Plant maintenance and continued weed control is important to ensure that a 95% plant survival rate of all new mitigation and infill planting is achieved and that the site is weed free for two years during plant establishment. All plantings will be monitored and maintained by the applicant for a minimum of three consecutive years immediately after planting. Any dead or dying plants that had originally been planted should be replaced during this period.

Figure 1: Ecological Management Plan

 

11.     Table 1 below indicates the infill planting proposed in the reserve on the cliff side covering 215m2.

Table 1: Infill planting within the council reserve – cliff side

12.     Table 2 indicates infill and underfill planting within the council reserve along the northern boundary of the site (referred to as the accessway in this report).

Table 2: Infill planting within the council reserve - accessway

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The options for the local board are to approve or decline the landowner request for the pest species removal and replanting within the Hatfields Beach Esplanade Reserve.

14.     The advantages of approving the landowner application are that: 

·        ecological linkages will be maintained with protective native bush increased and weed species removed

·        the cliff edge will be retained with an increase of plants

·        the proposal does not impact on the public use of the reserve as the accessway is largely inaccessible due to the growth of both the weed and native species and the steep cliff face that has eroded in parts during a previous storm event

·        all works will be carried out utilising best arboricultural and ecological practices in accordance with the applicants’ arborist rereport.

Land use and specialists’ comments/consultation 

15.     Auckland Council’s senior maintenance coordinator, parks and places specialist, arboriculture and eco specialist have reviewed the proposal and are in support of this pest species removal and revegetation with natives. The conditions in the applicants’ ecologist report will adequately mitigate the risks associated with the proposed works.  

16.     If the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board declines the landowner application pest species removal and enhancement planting will not proceed and this will reduce the ecological connectivity. This option is not recommended by staff.

Recommendation

17.     The recommendation to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is to approve the application for revegetation planting and weed species removal within the esplanade reserve.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     There are no council controlled organisations with an interest in the proposal. The five-lot subdivision is being reviewed by the resource consents team and is not considered part of this landowner application.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The local board has not reviewed this item previously to enable assessment or feedback. This aligns with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2017 “Outcome 5 - a flourishing and resilient natural environment that contributes to our health and economy” as outlined above.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     There are no sites of value or significance to mana whenua identified in the Auckland Unitary Plan in relation to the application. Iwi consultation was therefore not undertaken as there are no readily identifiable impacts on Māori and any impacts will be no different to those on others.  

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     There are no financial operational implications for the local board over and above the existing maintenance requirements of this reserve land.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     If the proposal is declined the weed/pest species will continue to proliferate in both the accessway and esplanade reserve. The replacement planting will enhance the connectivity with the surrounding native vegetation, increase the biodiversity and decrease edge effects. 

23.     Areas where pest species removal is undertaken will be replanted with suitable indigenous, plant species of a suitable size and a maintenance schedule will be implemented in accordance with the applicants’ arborist report.

24.     Any risks associated with the granting of landowner approval are considered to be relatively minor if implemented in compliance with the conditions listed in the applicants’ ecologist report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     If the application is approved the decision will be communicated to the applicant with a formal land owner approval letter. Conditions will be placed on the land owner approval regarding (but not limited to): 

·        health and safety conditions

·        ensuring the applicant controls rubbish at the site 

·        planting and maintenance schedule to be provided to the council’s senior arboriculture and eco specialist for approval

·        compliance with all regulatory requirements.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

515A Hibiscus Coast Highway: Assessment of Ecological Effects, dated 18 June 2019 by Ecology New Zealand

17

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Raewyn  Sendles - Land Use Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Moana Reserve water feature renewal

File No.: CP2019/14479

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To summarise the progress of the early design and consultation stages of the water feature sculpture project at Moana Reserve, Orewa and to gain formal approval for detailed design of the two most popular choices from the community.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Moana Reserve water feature has been non-operational since early 2017 and several options have been discussed with the local board in 2018 and 2019.

3.       Community consultation has been completed on the final five options, with 180 votes being received. The sculpture Airborne is the most popular, with Fleet coming in second.

4.       Staff propose to take the Airborne and Fleet design through the next detailed stage. This will involve structural design, safety in design review, cost estimates and a building consent review.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the two water feature sculpture designs that were the two most popular choices from the community, Airbourne (Attachment A to the agenda report) and Fleet (Attachment B to the agenda report

b)      request staff progress the project through to detailed design for approval.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Moana Reserve water feature has been non-operational since early 2017, due to failed plant and control equipment. Renewal options were presented to the local board in July 2018. These ranged between $60,000.00 and $300,000.00. The local board suggested that the Millwater Gallery and the Estuary Arts Centre were engaged to provide sculptural options that may be able to utilise some of the existing water feature infrastructure. The Estuary Arts Centre have since withdrawn from the project steering group.

6.       Millwater Gallery presented three concept designs to the local board in November 2018 and following feedback a further seven designs in February 2019. Five designs were chosen for community consultation. The estimated costs range from $112,000 to $143,000.

Options assessment

7.       Three options were investigated and reviewed:

·        Do nothing.

·        Repair the existing water feature.

·        Renew to today’s standards.

8.       Option 3: Renew to today’s standards was identified as the preferred option. This encompasses a sculpture with a water element that has pumps protected from the salt winds and sand, and that reflects the Orewa beachfront location.

Progress

9.       A “Have Your Say” online survey and two drop-in sessions at the Estuary Arts Centre were under-taken in June 2019. Attachment C, Moana Sculpture Feedback Form is a copy of the consultation survey, including the details of the five designs. 114 people completed the “Have Your Say” survey and 66 individuals voted at the drop-in sessions, making a total of 180.

10.     There were 14 positive comments recorded. Some examples are “This really compliments the beach location” and “It is very Orewa”. There were four negative comments including “This is a total waste of money and not necessary”, and “They are all 'ugly' and out of place. They obstruct the sea view”.

11.     The votes for the designs were combined from the drop-in session and the Have Your Say survey and the results are as follows:

Answer

Count

%

Rank

Option 1 - Fleet

43

24

2

Option 2 - Airborne

79

44

1

Option 3 - Harp

16

9

3

Option 4 - Bloom

13

7

5

Option 5 - Pacific Motion

12

7

5

No vote recorded

17

9

3

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Staff propose to take the two most popular community choices, Airborne and Fleet, through to the next detailed design stage. Staff consider that the most popular choice, Airbourne, will have considerable challenges to make it structurally strong enough to be in a public reserve.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     The Operational Management and Maintenance Team supports the renewal as it will improve the quality of the reserve and reduce the cost of maintenance. Other units across council are not affected by the project.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     Most of the local community who expressed an opinion are supportive of installing a new water feature sculpture in Moana Reserve. nine per cent of respondents did not support it or did not vote for one of the options available.

15.     Hibiscus and Bays Local Board members have been kept informed through discussions at various workshops.

16.     The local board have requested that the preferred sculpture be installed as soon as possible, preferably before the peak summer season.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     The project was discussed at the Northern Hui in December 2018 and no iwi groups expressed an interest.

18.     During the most recent public consultation Ngaitai Ki Tamaki have been in touch expressing disappointment that they were not involved in the design stage. Unfortunately, this was too late in the design process to be accommodated.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The cost estimates for both Airbourne and Fleet are close to the current budget. This will be reviewed once detailed design is complete.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     Community and reserve users expectations – extensive public consultation has been undertaken. 

21.     Negative comments – five submitters have raised the possible loss of sea views as a concern. four submitters think the money should be used elsewhere. However, 91 per cent of submitters were supportive.

22.     Consents – a resource consent and building consent may be required, depending on the final detailed design.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

23.     The two most popular community choices will be taken through the detailed design stage. This will involve structural design, safety in design review, cost estimates and a building consent review.

24.     Once this phase is complete the most appropriate sculpture design option will be bought back to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for approval.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Moana Airbourne Image

61

b

Moana Fleet Image

63

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarah Jones – Principal Project Manager

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport - Local Board Transport Capital Fund Project 578, Orewa Boulevard Stage 3

File No.: CP2019/14752

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to resolve on its preferred option for Local Board Transport Capital Fund Project 578, Orewa Boulevard Stage three, so that Auckland Transport staff can proceed with public consultation for the project. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects they believe are important to their communities but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must be:

·   safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   in the road corridor (although projects in parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome)

3.       Local boards are able to use the Local Board Transport Capital Fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      advise Auckland Transport which of the following design options it prefers for its Local Board Transport Capital Fund Project 578, Orewa Boulevard Stage three:

i)    Option one with no shared pedestrian/cycle path on the seaward side;  or

ii)   Option two with a shared pedestrian/cycle path on the seaward side.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has chosen to commit funding from its Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) to extend the Orewa Boulevard concept from Riverside Road to Empire Road, allocating $1,330,000 to the project at its meeting on 24 April 2018 (HB/2018/42).

5.       The local board was presented with draft detailed design options and cost estimates for LBTCF Project 578, Orewa Boulevard Stage three at a workshop on 2 May 2019. The options presented were the result of feedback received from members at a workshop on 25 October 2018 and further internal discussions with Auckland Transport (AT) stakeholders. 

6.       The two options presented to the local board for consideration are appended to this report as Attachment A.

7.       The local board is now invited to indicate its preferred option to enable the project to proceed to public consultation.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The following potential options were considered for LBTCF Project 578, Orewa Boulevard Stage three at a local board workshop held on 2 May 2019:

a)      Option one with no shared pedestrian/cycle path on the seaward side;

b)      Option two with a shared pedestrian/cycle path on the seaward side.

9.       The two options presented are appended to this report as Attachment A.

10.     The estimated cost for Option one is very close to the budget of $1,330,000 allocated to the project at the local board’s meeting on 24 April 2018. The estimated cost for Option two is $1,467, 000.  These estimates include the cost for all physical works, professional services and staff time but exclude resource consent processing fees, re-designs and relocation of utility services.

11.     At its workshop on 2 May 2019 members present chose to defer providing an indication as to which of the two options they preferred pending discussion of an assessment of service provision and community outcomes at Orewa Reserve, scheduled for a workshop on 23 May 2019 and being presented by Auckland Council’s Community Services Parks and Places Specialist.

12.     Discussions with Auckland Council’s Community Services Parks and Places Specialist team in June 2019 have highlighted a genuine concern regarding what can be planned for the space within the Orewa Beach Reserve.  A decision on the preferred long-term management option needs to take into account the effects of predicted sea level rise.   One of the scenarios discussed is that the type of remedial works proposed would reduce the available space/area within the Orewa Beach Reserve that can be developed.  It is therefore likely that any new or existing infrastructure would be relocated or located closer to or within the road reserve. In addition, the outcome of a pending Environmental Court decision on coastal management further north of the subject site will have a bearing on future management of Orewa Beach Reserve.

13.     Based on the above, Auckland Council’s Community Services Parks and Places Specialist team supports the location of the shared path within the road reserve (Option two).

14.     The shared path in Option two terminates at the crossing point nearest to Empire Road.  To continue the shared path to the surf club entrance will require an additional $130,000, increasing the cost from $1,467,000 to $1,597,000.

15.     Concerns were raised by members regarding the proposed shared path on the landward side.  AT draws the local board’s attention to the fact that a majority of the footpath between Empire Road and Riverside Road is sealed/concreted from the property boundary to the curb.  It consists of a number of surfacing types, i.e. concrete, chip seal and different coloured paving stones.  As part of this project it is proposed that the existing footpath be removed and replaced with one single surfacing type, i.e. the yellow pavers used from Riverside Road to the village.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is/are confined to the local board and Auckland Transport and do/does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local board members were invited to provide their views on the two design options for LBTCF Project 578, Orewa Boulevard Stage three. However, they chose to defer their decision pending discussion of an assessment of service provision and community outcomes at Orewa Reserve.

18.     To be able to draft the consultation documentation, AT staff require a formal resolution from the local board indicating its preferred option.  AT is required to carry out external consultation before finalising the detailed design and providing the local board with a final cost estimate for the project. Consultation should involve just one design to provide the community with the local board’s preferred option.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The proposed decision has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out by AT staff.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     The local board allocated $1,330,000 to the project at its meeting on 24 April 2018. The proposed decision therefore has no further financial implications at this stage.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     AT has risk management strategies in place for transport projects undertaken in the local board area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Once the local board has provided an indication as to its preferred option for the design of LBTCF Project 578, Orewa Boulevard Stage 3, consultation documents will be prepared. Following analysis of the feedback received to the consultation, detailed design will be completed and this and a firm cost estimate will be reported back to the local board.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport Orewa Boulevard Stage 3 Hibiscus Coast Highway

69

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ellen Barrett, AT Elected Member Relationship Manager

Reg Cuthers, AT Principal Project Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport Update to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board August 2019

File No.: CP2019/15199

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board members on transport related matters in their area, including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund and Auckland Transport’s Community Safety Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report covers:

·        A summary of the local board’s transport capital fund

·        Auckland Transport’s Community Safety Fund

·        A summary of consultation activity

·        Traffic Control Committee resolutions

·        An update on issues raised

·        Silverdale Town Centre Signage.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport August 2019 update report

b)      endorse the final designs in Attachments A and B appended to this report for improvements in the town centres of Torbay and Mairangi Bay, to be constructed from the Local Board’s Transport Capital Fund under Project 580 – Town Centre Slow Zones

c)      to maximise the use of the Community Safety Fund on construction of the projects agreed to at the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board meeting on 19 June 2019 (HB/2019/91), authorise top-up funding from the Local Board’s Transport Capital Fund, if required, for construction of the final project, to meet any shortfall in funding.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       This report updates the local board on Auckland Transport (AT) projects and operations in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area, it summarises consultations and Traffic Control Committee decisions, and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

4.       AT is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play in the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects they believe are important to their communities but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·   be safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   be in the road corridor (although projects in parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

6.       AT’s Community Safety Fund (CSF) comprises $20 million in total allocated across all 21 local boards, with $5 million to be allocated during the 2019/2020 financial year and the balance of $15 million over the 2020/2021 financial year. This is a safety fund that sits within AT’s safety budget so the major component of the funding allocation formula is the Deaths and Serious Injury (DSI) numbers.

7.       The purpose of the fund is to allow local communities to address long-standing road safety issues that have yet to become regional priorities and have therefore not been addressed by AT.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

8.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s share of the LBTCF allocated with effect from 1 July 2018, as per the Local Board Funding Policy, is $1,237,015 per annum.

9.       The total remaining in the current electoral term to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is $1,350,304.

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$4,193,075

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$2,842,771

Remaining Budget

$1,350,304

 

10.     The table below reflects the status of projects to which LBTCF has already been committed during this political term:

 

Status update on current of Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects

 

Project

Description

Current status

Changes since last  update

Funds allocated in current political term

091 – Mairangi Bay Art Walk

Construction of footpath amenities on Hastings Road, Mairangi Bay from the retail centre to Mairangi Bay Reserve.

 

Completed

No

$17,508

411 – Torbay Revitalisation

Upgrade of Torbay town centre.

Completed

No

$602,537

558 - Orewa Pedestrian Crossings

Facilities to improve pedestrian safety at the intersections of Moana and Moenui Avenues with the Hibiscus Coast Highway.

Completed

No

$127,510

578 - Orewa Boulevard Stage 3

Extension of existing Boulevard concept from Riverside Road to Empire Road.

A second workshop was held on 9 May 2019.

Yes

$1,330,000

579 - Torbay Parking Stage 2

Construction of 5 car park spaces on the Auckland Council reserve at 1022 Beach Road, Torbay.

 

Completed

Yes

$69,024

580 – Town Centre Slow Zones

Traffic Calming in the town centres of Mairangi Bay and Torbay.

Discussed at a workshop on 14 March 2019.

Yes

$689,731

581 – Seat Upgrades, Orewa

Supply and installation of 14 arm rests on seven seats located in the area between 292 and 350 Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa.

Completed

Yes

$5,306

644 – Centennial Park Path, Campbells Bay

Auckland Council led Greenways project

in Centennial Park, Campbells Bay.

Discussed at a workshop on 4 April 2019.

Yes

$1,155

Totals

 

 

 

$2,842,771

 

11.     A speed reduction on Hibiscus Coast Highway and those roads intersecting within the Orewa Boulevard area associated with Project 578 - Orewa Boulevard Stage 3, was included in AT’s Speed Limit Bylaw Review which was subject to public consultation until 31 March 2019. Further discussions on the design options and costings for the project took place on 9 May 2019, following completion of the detailed designs. A separate report on the agenda for this meeting asks the local board to indicate its preferred option for this project.

12.     Speed reductions in the Mairangi Bay and Torbay town centres associated with Project 580 – Town Centre Slow Zones, were included in AT’s Speed Limit Bylaw Review which was subject to public consultation until 31 March 2019. A discussion on the design options to limit speeds within the town centres took place at workshops on 14 March and 8 August 2019. Further updates will be provided as the projects progress.

 

Community Safety Fund

13.     At its meeting on 19 June 2019, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board resolved the following priority for projects nominated for construction using AT’s Community Safety Fund (CSF) monies (HB/2019/91):

i)        20 Ramsgate Terrace – conversion of existing raised table to a zebra crossing;

ii)       214 Hibiscus Coast Highway – toucan crossing (signalised crossing for pedestrians and cyclists) linking shared paths across Hibiscus Coast Highway;

iii)      Hatfields Beach pedestrian crossing to public toilet;

iv)      Saddleback Rise pedestrian crossing.

14.     Design work is now progressing on these projects and it is anticipated that those funded through the CSF process will be completed during the 2020/2021 financial year.

15.     As advised previously, the CSF is a finite fund that must be spent by June 30, 2021. If final pricing for a particular project (post tender) exceeds the available budget, local boards will have the options of either re-allocating some of their CSF budget (meaning not doing another of the CSF projects chosen by the local board) or using their LBTCF to top-up the budget, as opposed to being unable to fund the project. This will allow each local allocation of the CSF to be fully utilised.

16.     Members are therefore encouraged to indicate their willingness to provide top-up funding from their LBTCF to cover this situation by way of the recommendation in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is/are confined to AT and do/does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Over the last reporting period, AT has invited the local board to provide its feedback on the following proposals:

Location

Proposal

Details and Local Board Feedback

142 Whangaparāoa Road, Red Beach

Proposed bus shelter at 142 Whangaparāoa Road, Red Beach. 

Documentation explaining the installation of a bus shelter at the existing bus stop outside the Bupa Retirement Village at 142 Whangaparāoa Road, Red Beach, was sent to members on 11 June 2019. No objections to the proposal were received.

Caldera Drive, Long Bay

Proposed NSAAT restrictions on Caldera Drive, Long Bay.

Documentation explaining a proposal to install NSAAT restrictions on Caldera Drive, Long Bay, to respond to requests from the community to improve visibility issues created by vehicles parking on the blind corner, was forwarded to East Coast Bays subdivision members on 12 July 2019. No objections to the proposal were received.

 

Traffic Control Committee decisions

19.     AT's resolution and approval process ensures the most appropriate controls and restrictions are put in place and can be legally enforced. Decisions made by AT’s Traffic Control Committee in relation to regulatory processes relevant to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board during May and June 2019 are shown below.


Decision

Report Type

Nature of Restriction

Decision

Maurice Kelly Road, Archibald Drive, Walsh Road, Pampas Drive, Carthey Road, Snowden Street, Ahutoetoe Road, Unnamed Streets, Wainui

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

Cycle Lane, No Stopping At All Times (NSAATs) Restrictions, Bus Stop, Traffic Islands, Road Hump, Give-Way Control, Flush Median, Edge Lines

Approved in Principle

Ashley Avenue, Glenvar Ridge Road, Vaughans Road Extension, Te Oneroa Way, Unnamed Street, Long Bay

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

NSAATs, Bus Stop, Cycle Lane, Shared Path, Bus Shelter, P90 Parking, P120 Parking, P30 Parking, Loading Zone, Angle Parking, Flush Median, Traffic Island, Delineators, Pedestrian Crossing, Roundabout Controlled By Give-Way, Give-Way Control

 

 

 

 

 

Carried

Laurence Street, Cross Street, Manly

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

NSAATs, Bus Stop, Give-Way Control

Carried

Matipo Road,  Galaxy Drive, Centreway Road, Weiti Road, Orewa

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

NSAATs, Bus Stop, Bus Shelter, Removal of Bus Shelter, Give-Way Control, Traffic Island, Pedestrian Crossing, Road Hump, Edge Line      

Carried

Painton Road, Silverdale

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes

Bus Shelter

Carried

 

Issues Raised by Elected Members

20.     Most issues raised by elected members and local board staff are resolved promptly by AT’s Elected Member Relationship Manager. Those which require further investigation are responded to by the relevant department of AT through its customer response team. The following list summarises these issues to 5 August 2019:


 

 

 

 

 

Issue

 

 

Location

 

Status

1

Spur / Duck Creek Roads, Stillwater

Request for safety improvements on Spur / Duck Creek Roads, Stillwater.

Member Parfitt asked on behalf of the Stillwater Community Association that the road into Stillwater from East Coast Road (Spur/Duck Creek) be double yellow lined all the way, making it a no passing road. The Association also asked for the selective placement of speed humps, the installation of No Overtaking signage at strategic points along the road, the installation of signage to warn motorists against cutting corners, and a focused social media campaign to get this message across, offering to assist with this possible.  On 26 July Members were advised that the posted speed limit for these roads is 80km/h, however the safe and appropriate speed for Duck Creek Road is estimated to be 60km/h, based upon data provided by NZTA as part of the Safer Speeds Programme. Duck Creek Road is part of the next tranche of changes and will the subject of investigation and consultation later this year. An investigation was carried out following a recent fatality on this road and a number of recommendations made in the crash investigation report will be implemented in the near future, including improvements to signage and sightlines through the trimming of vegetation. Duck Creek Road has also been identified for inclusion in AT’s wider Rural Road Delineation Programme, which aims to provide consistent signage and delineation methods across the rural road network. The design work for this will be completed during the 2019/2020 financial year and will include bend warning signage and road markings to improve delineation and hazard identification. With regard to the request for a safety campaign, Member Parfitt was advised that AT’s community transport team was supportive of a community-based social media campaign promoting road safety and will contact her to discuss how this might be delivered.

 

2

Hastings and Beach Roads, Mairangi Bay

Request for 'No Right Turn' sign at the corner of Hastings and Beach Roads, Mairangi Bay.

Member Parfitt requested a 'No Right Turn' sign at the corner of Hastings and Beach Roads, Mairangi Bay, so that motorists will turn left and use the roundabout at Montrose Terrace to turn back onto Beach Road. On 26 July 2019 members were advised that the engineers had completed their investigation and advise that there is an existing ‘Turn left only at peak times’ sign at the intersection. Numerous site visits during peak periods showed that the majority of vehicles were turning left, and queueing was not significant along Hastings Road. A ‘No Right Turn’ sign is therefore considered unnecessary because, outside of these hours, there are sufficient gaps to easily and safely turn onto Beach Road. There have also been no reported crashes in the last five years related to right turning movements at this intersection. The engineers later advised that the current signage can be improved with the installation of a supplementary sign specifying the hours of the day this movement is not permitted. The new signage will be subject to a resolution process and approval by AT’s Traffic Control Committee so that enforcement can take place and it may therefore be some months before this process is completed.

3

Manly Esplanade, Browns Bay

Request for time restricted parking on Manly Esplanade, Browns Bay.

Member Bettany asked that some of the parking on Manly Esplanade, Browns Bay, be restricted to 3 – 4 hours to deter all-day parking by commuters in this area. On 5 June 2019 Member Bettany was advised by AT's Group Manager, Parking Services and Compliance that AT had received multiple complaints and concerns from the local residents in relation to Manly Esplanade over the past few years. Accordingly, AT carried out an investigation, including occupancy surveys, visual observations and engagement with stakeholders in the area. In 2016, the last parking occupancy survey highlighted that the average parking occupancy along Manly Esplanade was 57%, therefore significantly below the 85% threshold at which changes would be recommended.

 

 

 AT is aware that there had been a number of recent parking issues due to construction works occurring further down the road and is expecting that once this development is completed, the occupancy should significantly decrease. However, in the interim, AT will add P120 time restricted parking spaces to assist with vehicle turnover, carrying out a subsequent review once the construction activities have been completed. If parking availability issues continue, AT will then directly consult with the affected stakeholders on possible interventions.

4

Beach Road, Torbay

Request for one-way traffic system on the property at 1022 Beach Road, Torbay.

In February 2018 AT’s engineers considered a request from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for the introduction of a one-way system for the service lane located behind the Torbay shops, noting at that time that on-site observations indicated it was well self-regulated and no vehicles had any difficulties negotiating this section of road. For this and other reasons, they were unable to justify any changes at that point in time. Member Bettany asked on 21 May 2019 how, as the local board manages the access way to the turn behind the shops, AT engineers would manage the situation if the local board allowed the entrance into the property at 1022 Beach Road, Torbay, to be one-way, so that cars exited between the properties at 1042 and 1054 Beach Road. Member Bettany was advised on 30 May that, although the configuration of the section of driveway on 1022 Beach Road connecting to the AT-administered service lane was up to the property owner, AT's previous advice that the current two-way system created a low speed environment, was well self-regulated, and that no vehicles had any difficulties accessing and egressing the parking area, were reiterated. There were concerns that the introduction of a one-way system may result in increased speeds, not just on the service lane, but also on the entry off Beach Road, and these would be a hazard to pedestrians on the footpath. As such it would still not be considered appropriate, especially as this section is on a downhill slope.

Furthermore, a one-lane section at 1022 Beach Road leading to a two-way operation on the remainder of the service lane would create needless confusion for drivers. It was therefore recommended that the two-way configuration throughout the length of the service lane be retained.

5

Hibiscus Coast and Albany

Bus Services on the Hibiscus Coast and to Albany.

On behalf of Members Parfitt and Fitzgerald, local board staff suggested on 21 May 2019 that the feeder bus services to the Albany Park and Ride were not working and many residents who live within a 5 km radius of the park and ride are not using the feeder bus services, suggesting that there needs to be some sort of financial incentive to use feeder buses, and that the feeder services be reviewed. On 18 June 2019 members were advised in relation to the provision of a financial incentive to encourage people to use the feeder services, the nature of AT’s existing public transport fare structure generally means that feeder services to the nearest hubs/busway station are already free. Essentially, a person paying with an AT HOP card pays for the number of zones they travel through, not for their individual bus (or train trips). For example, someone traveling from Glamorgan Drive can drive to Albany Station and then take the NX1 or NX2 into the City. This would be a 3-zone fare, so $4.90. Alternatively, that same person could take the 861 to Albany Station and then transfer to the NX1/NX2. This would still be a 3-zone fare of $4.90. With regards to the request for a more direct feeder service on Whangaparāoa Peninsula, there is always a trade off when designing bus routes – directness vs accessibility. Generally, the more direct a bus service is, the fewer potential customers live within easy access of the service. By running along Brightside Road the 982 serves the people who live on or near this road. If AT was to introduce an additional, direct service that ran along Whangaparāoa Road only, all the services on the Hibiscus Coast would have to run less frequently as a result of limited resources. A new direct service would therefore probably disadvantage more people than it would help.

 

People who live further away from Hibiscus Coast Station and towards the eastern end of the peninsula have the additional option of the Gulf Harbour ferry (and the 988 feeder service from The Plaza) for travel into the City Centre.

6

Hibiscus Coast

Request for relocation of temporary bus shelters to other sites on the Hibiscus Coast.

The Hibiscus Coast Busway Station building is due for construction in late 2019/early 2020. Member Fitzgerald noted that, with six additional shelters being installed before winter, the ten shelters on site will no longer be required at the Busway Station, asking that these be relocated to bus stops on the Hibiscus Coast where there currently are no shelters. On 29 May 2019 Member Fitzgerald was advised that three new shelters were being added to the existing four shelters within the Hibiscus Coast area and that if she wished to provide specific address details for the shelter requests, these would be investigated for suitability. It was noted that the installation of a bus shelter is subject to consultation with the owner and/or occupier of the property adjacent to the new bus shelter in accordance with Section 339 of the Local Government Act so relocation of these shelters will be subject to this process.

7

2/301 Beach Road, Campbell’s Bay

Request to upgrade the pedestrian crossing located at 2/301 Beach Road, Campbell’s Bay.

A presentation was made to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board at its meeting on 17 July 2019 for an upgrade of the pedestrian crossing located opposite 2/301 Beach Road (near the intersection of Park Rise and Huntly Road), Campbell’s Bay, to improve the safety of the crossing, particularly for children. Referred to Road Safety for investigation and response.

 

Silverdale Town Centre Signage

21.     AT is responsible for the installation and maintenance of all road signs on the road network, excluding signs on the motorway and state highway networks and signs providing direction to private or commercial locations (e.g. motels, shops etc.). Naming conventions for advanced directional signage (ADS) provide clear and consistent wayfinding for drivers on the road network.

 

22.     The Silverdale Centre Plan November 2015 includes the Silverdale retail area and refers to:

the older Silverdale Town Centre, the new Silverdale retail area to the north-east of Wainui Road and the retail land extending to Millwater Parkway.

23.     The use of ‘town centre’ is used in reference to the established retail area on Silverdale Street in Key Move 1. This describes clearly the extent of the town centre and is accompanied by photos.

24.     Following discussions and agreement with the Silverdale Business Association (SABA) and Local Board representatives, who recognised the need for consistency in the naming convention used for the area that includes the old village and the new retail development in the Silverdale area to avoid confusion for drivers, AT replaced the Advanced Directional Signage (ADS) on Hibiscus Coast Highway to read ‘Silverdale Centre’. More recently AT has installed pedestrian wayfinding signs at the Tavern Road underpass at the request of the Local Board which refers to this area as ‘Town Centre’, in accordance with wayfinding terminology. AT is also currently actioning a request from SABA for better signage at the Wainui and Silverdale Roads roundabout.

25.     It has come to our attention that signage installed by AT the entrance to Silverdale Street from the Hibiscus Coast Highway following these discussions was recently modified for a second time to read ‘Silverdale Village’ by persons unknown.

26.     This change is providing inconsistent messaging for drivers and the modified and non-compliant signage will need to be replaced to ensure that there is clarity for road users as. It needs to be noted that installing and maintaining ADS signage is expensive on an arterial road such as Hibiscus Coast Highway. Correcting unauthorised changes therefore comes at the expense of other projects on AT’s programme.

27.     It is an offence to modify, damage or interfere with a traffic control device under clause 13.7 of Land Transport Rule: Traffic Control Devices 2004. This is an infringement offence, meaning that, if there is sufficient evidence, the Police may issue an infringement notice to the offender/s.

28.     AT and the business association are currently investigating this matter to provide evidence for an infringement notice to be issued.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     There are no financial implications in receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     AT will provide a further report to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board at its next meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Torbay Village Centre Plans

85

b

Mairangi Bay Village Centre Plans

89

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ellen Barrett, Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Open Space Network Plan

File No.: CP2019/11887

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Hibiscus and Bays Open Space Network Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Adoption of the open space network plan will assist local board decision-making and provide a framework for the development of open space over the next 10 years.

3.       The purpose of the open space network plan is to set out actions to deliver a sustainable, quality open space network that can respond to and accommodate anticipated population growth.

4.       The open space network plan will provide the community with access to a range of recreational, social, cultural and environmental experiences.

5.       The open space network plan includes:

·        the current state of the network and its challenges

·        five key moves that provide the framework to deliver a sustainable quality open space network

·        prioritised actions that will deliver the key outcomes.

6.       The open space network plan has been developed concurrently with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan to ensure a coherent approach to the management and development of the open space network.

7.       There is no additional funding to implement projects in the open space network plan beyond renewal of existing assets and planned capital expenditure.

8.       The lack of funding to implement all identified actions could create a reputational risk. The local board can use the open space network plan to advocate for increased funding as part of Annual and Long-term Plan processes, or to help inform prioritisation of its locally driven initiative capital budgets.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      adopt the Hibiscus and Bays Open Space Network Plan (Attachment A to the agenda report)

b)      delegate approval of any minor amendments to the Chairperson of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       An open space network plan (the plan) has been prepared for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

10.     This plan outlines the local board’s aspirations and priorities for the future development of local parks and open spaces.

11.     The plan responds to growth and increasing diversity anticipated in the Hibiscus and Bays area, including changes in demographics and patterns of usage.

12.     A statutory Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan is being developed concurrently with the plan (due for completion early 2020). This is an omnibus management plan for all parks within the local board area and will replace existing reserve management plans. This plan will guide how individual parks are managed.

13.     The plan will help guide the development of the local parks management plan with both plans sharing the same key moves.

14.     Aligning both plans will ensure that the local board takes a coherent and consistent approach to the development, utilisation and management of parks and open spaces across the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

15.     The plan was prepared in consultation with the local board, partners and key stakeholders. It is informed by any Hibiscus and Bays parks research that has been conducted in 2017 and 2018.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The plan analyses the current state of the Hibiscus and Bays open space network and sets out five key moves. The moves provide the framework for actions covering future development and management of the open space network over the next 10 years.

17.     The plan is strategically aligned to three Auckland Plan focus areas:

Belonging and Participation - Focus area 1

Create safe opportunities for people to meet, connect, participate in and enjoy community and civic life.

Belonging and Participation - Focus area 7                                                            Recognise the value of arts, culture, sport and recreation to quality of life.

Homes and Places - Focus area 5                                                                                 Create urban places for the future.

Hibiscus and Bays Open Space Network Plan

Current state

18.     The main strengths of the existing open space network include:

·        high satisfaction rating by parks users

·        a good network of coastal walkways

·        a community that treasures the environment and works to protect and enhance the waterways

·        good coastal access to boat ramps, beaches, and the foreshore for recreation.

19.     The main challenges relating to existing open space include:

·        limited opportunities for diverse play to cater to all ages and abilities

·        a large number of coastal parks that are threatened by the impact of sea level rise, coastal inundation and erosion

·        significant population growth that will place pressure on the open space network

·        shortfalls in the provision of neighbourhood parks and sports fields

·        changing sport and recreation trends and preferences.

 

 Key moves

20.     Five key moves respond to the issues and opportunities identified through the current state analysis and help formulate actions to develop Hibiscus and Bays’ open space network:

·        Quality parks and open space network.

·        Protecting and enhancing the environment.

·        Inclusive local communities.

·        Creating healthy lifestyles and wellbeing.

·        Connecting our communities.

21.     The long-term goal is to provide a sustainable, quality parks and open space network.

Principles, advocacy, decision-making and actions

22.     The primary purpose of the plan is to prioritise actions to improve the open space network.

23.     Prioritisation principles provide direction for planning and implementing park development. The following list of principles assist in prioritising the actions:

·        existing capital works programmes and contractual commitments

·        areas zoned for high growth (metropolitan centre, town centres, local centres, mixed use, terrace housing and apartments) and where there is an identified gap in provision

·        areas of deficiency and/or underutilised open space prioritised over areas of good provision and/or well-used open space

·        cost benefit of individual actions

·        planning and funding cycles and other influences such as land acquisitions, large infrastructure projects, integrated planning with neighbouring local boards and other stakeholders, such as Environmental Services and Healthy Waters

·        changes and trends in sport and recreation.

24.     Focus areas and actions have been prioritised according to the principles.

25.     The following actions relate to projects that are across Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area:

Table1: Overview of key moves and focus areas for prioritised actions

 

Key moves

           Focus areas

Quality parks and open space network

 

·         provide and promote a range of open space experiences for the community to play in and enjoy

·         optimise existing open space including coastal and beach locations

·         cater for growth

·         develop distinctive parks.

 

Protecting and enhancing the environment

·         ensure sustainable management of open space

·         manage and improve water quality

·         improve biodiversity.

 

Inclusive local communities

·         reflect Māori identity, culture and heritage

·         celebrate the community’s diversity and identity

·         respond to the needs of the community equitably.

 

 

Create healthy lifestyles and wellbeing

·         support the community to “get active” and develop healthy lifestyles

·         improve awareness of open space

·         encourage appropriate use of parks and open space.

 

Connecting our communities

·         improve connectivity between communities, places and recreation opportunities

·         connect people to nature and enhance ecological corridors

·         improve awareness of connections.

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     The plan has been developed in consultation with relevant council departments. Their views are reflected in this plan. 

27.     Customer and Community Services, Auckland Transport and Environmental Services will implement the network plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     Local communities will benefit from the actions in this plan. These include increased sport and recreation participation opportunities, leading to improved health and wellbeing.

29.     Staff engaged with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board in the preparation of the plan through a series of workshops:

Milestone

Date

Local board workshop 1

·         Introduce the open space network plan and process.

15 February 2018

Local board workshop 2

·         Results of open space network community engagement survey.

5 April 2018

Local Board workshop 3

·         Discuss the open space network and identify key moves and focus areas.

7 June 2018

Report to adopt key moves and focus areas.

17 October 2018

Local board workshop 4

·         Identify prioritisation principles and decision-making tools.

28 March 2019

Local board workshop 5

·         Review of final draft open space network plan.

23 May 2019

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     Māori identity and well-being are an important outcome in the Auckland Plan. The implementation of the plan responds to and supports the following focus areas:

Māori identity and well-being - Focus Area 1

Meet the needs and support the aspirations of tamariki and their whanau.

 

Māori identity and well-being - Focus area 7

Reflect mana whenua mātauranga and Māori design principles throughout Auckland.

31.     Quality parks and open spaces help to facilitate Māori participation in sport and recreation.

32.     Staff engaged with mana whenua on 4 April 2018 to seek their views and values in relation to the open space network in Hibiscus and Bays.

33.     The key issues raised by iwi are outlined below:

·        mana whenua support the local board’s interest to work closely together on open space and they have suggested two approaches:

i)       scheduling an ongoing engagement process with mana whenua

ii)       sharing best practice management, conservation, promotion and preservation methodologies from a cultural perspective to support Māori heritage in the area

·        Te Aranga design principles in all park design and development

·        Māori naming, wayfinding, cultural narratives.

34.     These views have been incorporated into the key moves and prioritised actions of the plan.

35.     The final open space network plan includes project opportunities for working closely with mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     Actions identified within the plan will need to be accommodated within existing budgets. No additional funds have been allocated.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     The lack of funding to implement all identified actions could create a reputational risk. The local board can use the plan to advocate for increased funding as part of Annual and Long-term Plan processes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     It is anticipated that the plan will be implemented over the next 10 years as budgets allow.

39.     It is anticipated that the delivery of specific projects will draw on a wide range of potential partners who can contribute advice, assistance, funding and support.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Open Space Network Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Paul Clark - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Andrew Wood - Parks and Recreation Policy - Kakariki Team Leader

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development six monthly report to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

File No.: CP2019/14981

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present highlights of Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development’s activities in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area as well as Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development’s regional activities for the six months 1 January to 30 June 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with relevant information on the following Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development’s activities: 

·        Locally driven initiatives: Hibiscus and Bays eco-tourism plan development, supporting business associations to enhance the economic performance of town centres, work with the Silverdale Business Association to facilitate employment in Silverdale, Pop-Up Business School North

·        Supporting local business growth

·        Filming activity

·        Young Enterprise Scheme

·        Youth employment pathways

·        Youth connections

·        Offshore talent attraction

·        Local and regional destination management and marketing

·        Delivered, funded and facilitated event

3.       This report should be read in conjunction with Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development’s Quarter 3 report to Auckland Council (available at www.aucklandnz.com) and the forthcoming Quarter 4 report to the Auckland Council Finance and Performance Committee (available 17 September 2019). Although these reports focus primarily on the breadth of Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development’s work at a regional level, much of the work highlighted has significant local impact.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development six monthly report.

 


 

Horopaki

Context

4.       Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) has two areas of focus:

Economic Development

including business support, business attraction and investment, local economic development, trade and industry development, skills employment and talent and innovation and entrepreneurship.

Destination

supporting sustainable growth of the visitor economy with a focus on destination marketing and management, major events, business events (meetings and conventions) and international student attraction and retention.

5.       These two portfolios also share a common platform relating to the promotion of the city globally to ensure that Auckland competes effectively with other mid-tier high quality of life cities.

6.       ATEED works with local boards, council and council controlled organsiations (CCOs) to support decision-making on local economic growth and facilitates or co-ordinates the delivery of local economic development activity. ATEED ensures that the regional activities that ATEED leads or delivers are fully leveraged to support local economic growth and employment.

7.       In addition, ATEED’s dedicated Local Economic Development (LED) team works with local boards who allocate locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget to economic development activities. The LED team delivers a range of services[1] such as the development of proposals, including feasibility studies that enable local boards to directly fund or otherwise advocate for the implementation of local initiatives.

8.       ATEED delivers its services at the local level through business hubs based in the north, west and south of the region, as well as its central office at 167B Victoria Street West.

9.       Additional information about ATEED’s role and activities can be found at www.aucklandnz.com/ateed

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     As at 30 June 2019, 3303 businesses had been through an ATEED intervention or programme. Of these, 116 businesses were in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area – 17 businesses went through Destination-related programmes and 99 businesses went through Economic Development-related programmes.

Economic Development

Locally Driven Initiatives:

11.     Hibiscus and Bays eco-tourism plan development: During the period, the New Zealand Tourism Research Institute (NZTRI) completed the research. The findings report will be presented to the Local Board in August 2019.

12.     Pop-Up Business School North: The Pop-Up Business School ran in March 2019 at AUT Millennium. A report on participation and outcomes of the event was shared with the Local Board in Q4.

 

Supporting Local Business Growth

13.     This area is serviced by the Business and Enterprise team in the North hub, based in the B:Hive at Smales Farm. The team comprises of two Business and Innovation Advisors and administration support. The role of this team is to support the growth of Auckland’s key internationally competitive sectors and to support to provide quality jobs.

14.     A key programme in achieving this is central government’s Regional Business Partnership Network (RBPN). This is delivered by ATEED’s nine Business and Innovation Advisors (BIA), whose role is to connect local businesses to resources, experts and services in innovation, R&D, business growth and management. 

15.     ATEED’s BIAs engage 1:1 with businesses through a discovery meeting to understand their challenges, gather key data, and provide connections / recommendations via an action plan.

16      Where businesses qualify (meet the programme criteria and/or align to ATEED’s purpose as defined in the SOI) the advisors facilitate government support to qualifying businesses, in the form of:

·        Callaghan Innovation R&D grants (including Getting Started, project and student grants (https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/grants)

·        Callaghan Innovation subsidised innovation programmes

(https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/innovation-skills)

·        RBPN business capability vouchers (NZTE), where the business owner may be issued co-funding up to $5,000 per annum for business training via registered service providers. Voucher co-funding is prioritised to businesses accessing this service for the first time, in order to encourage more businesses to engage with experts to assist their management and growth.

·           NZTE services such as Export Essentials (https://workshop.exportessentials.nz/register/)

·           Referrals to NZ Business Mentors via The Chamber of Commerce.

17.     During the reporting period, ATEED Business and Innovation Advisors met with 31 businesses in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area, two for innovation advice and services and 30 for business growth and capability advice and services (seven were returning clients). From these engagements:

·        Twenty RBPN vouchers were issued to assist with business capability training

·        Eight connections were made to Callaghan Innovation services and programmes

·        Seven referrals were made to Business Mentors New Zealand

·        Four connections were made to ATEED staff and programmes

·        More than 170 connections were made to other businesses or programmes.

Other support for new businesses

18.     During the period, ATEED also ran workshops and events aimed at establishing or growing a new business and building capability. Nine people from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area attended an event below:

·        Business clinic – four

·        Innovation clinic – five


 

 

 

Filming activity within the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area

19.     ATEED’s Screen Auckland team provides film facilitation services as part of ATEED’s support for the screen and digital sector of Auckland’s economy. Screen Auckland facilitates, processes and issues film permits for filming activity in public open space. This activity supports local businesses and employment, as well as providing a revenue stream to local boards for the use of local parks.

20.     Between 1 January and 30 June 2019, 305 film permits were issued in the Auckland region across 379 locations and 404 days of filming. Of these, four permits were issued in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area’s share of film permit revenue was $869.56 for the period (total for all boards combined was $51,191.30). Scenes of the Power Rangers were filmed in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

23.     On average, 37 crew work on each shoot day. This does not reflect filming that also takes place in studios, private property or low impact activity that wouldn’t have required a permit. During the period, 81 permits were issued for television commercials (TVC), making up 27 per cent of permits issued. A quarter of the TVC permits were destined for an international market.

24.     Auckland is becoming a popular destination for international television networks to pilot an episode of a new TV series to allow them to gauge if a series will be successful. Permits were issued for locations across the Auckland region earlier this year for two new US pilots.

Young Enterprise Scheme (YES)

25.     The Auckland Chamber of Commerce has delivered the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) since January 2018. ATEED maintains a strategic role. During the period, there were 58 schools participating in the Auckland YES programme, representing 1376 students completing the programme. Kingsway School, Long Bay College and Whangaparāoa College are the three schools from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area participating in the YES programme.

Youth employment pathways

26.     The Go with Tourism campaign was successfully launched on 5 April 2019, attracting 170 employers and more than 700 youth by year-end. The campaign is designed to shift perceptions many young people have about careers in tourism and address the skills gap in the industry.

27.     ATEED delivered the Future Ready Summit on 26 June 2019 at the Vodafone Events Centre in Manukau. Approximately 250 employers, 40 young people and 20 speakers (eight under the age of 24) attended. The Youth Employer Pledge partners were the primary audience. The Future Ready Auckland: Driving economic development through technology and transformation insights paper was also released, attracting strong media attention - including a lead story on Radio NZ Nine to Noon.  The research insights aims to better understand Auckland’s future skill needs, including future growth sectors. ATEED is currently working with pledge partners to harness the network, with a focus on south and west Auckland now that Youth Connections has transferred to The Southern Initiative.

 


 

 

Local Jobs and Skills Hubs

28.     ATEED is the regional partner for the network of Auckland Jobs and Skills Hubs. These multi-agency hubs support employers at developments where there is a high and sustained demand for local labour and skills development. The Auckland network includes Ara (Auckland Airport development), City Centre and Tāmaki hubs. As at 30 June 2019, 377 people had been placed into employment via the ATEED-facilitated CBD hub, 1,914 training outcomes were delivered, and 11 apprenticeships were facilitated. About 36 per cent of those employed are Māori, against a target of 40 per cent. ATEED has developed a school engagement pilot programme with interested employers and schools aimed at engaging students with career opportunities in the construction and infrastructure sector. ATEED also provided funding to a Progressive Employment Programme for at-risk youth, supporting cadet training and developing youth-ready capability within businesses working on the City Rail Link. The City Centre hub is a training partner for this programme.

Offshore talent attraction

29.     The Auckland. We’re Hiring campaign ran from January to March 2019. The campaign is designed to attract high-skilled offshore construction and technology talent to Auckland. The campaign resulted in 2295 job applications.

Destination

Local destination management and marketing activity

30.     ATEED continued to attract media and writer’s interest in Hibiscus and Bays. As a result, the Deputy Editor of Kia Ora magazine profiled several cafes and restaurants in Orewa for their 'On the Menu' feature for the September issue. The 2-3-page spread is dedicated solely to Orewa's food and beverage scene.

Regional destination management and marketing activity

31.     The Elemental AKL winter festival website went live on 29 April 2019. The festival ran from 1-31 July 2019 and is developed to promote sustainable tourism growth by encouraging visitation more evenly throughout the year, and dispersing visitors across the region. The programme included more than 60 free and ticketed events across the themes of light, food, entertainment, and culture. Elemental Feast went live on 4 June 2019, with 120 restaurants participating in plating up unique festival dishes using ingredients sourced from the Auckland region and inspired by the elements. Nine events were held in the northern part of the city.

32.     The Short Break campaign, aimed at leisure travellers on Australia’s eastern seaboard, ran during Q3 and Q4. There were three bursts of the campaign, focused on themes of nature, food and wine, and ultimate things to do in Auckland featuring different parts of the region. As part of the campaign, ATEED hosted news.com.au and lifestyle.com.au in Auckland, showcasing the city’s unique offering that is promoted in the campaign. News.com.au has a reach of six million and will produce a dedicated feature on Auckland as well as share one article on Facebook with their 1.1m followers. Lifestyle.com.au has a reach of 1.2m unique viewers and will produce two dedicated online features.

Delivered, funded and facilitated events

33.     During the period, ATEED delivered the 2019 Auckland Lantern Festival at the Auckland Domain. Customer satisfaction was 89 per cent, an increase of nine per cent compared to the previous year. Some key findings from the customer survey found that respondents were very positive about what the event meant for the city, with 96 per cent of respondents agreeing that Auckland Council should continue to support events like the Lantern Festival and 94 per cent saying that the event brought people from different ethnic and cultural groups together (compared to 95 per cent and 91 per cent respectively in the previous year). The Auckland Lantern Festival’s sustainability objectives through the Cultural Festivals Strategy resulted in 62 per cent of waste being diverted from landfill. This has nearly doubled in two years, with the diversion being 34 per cent in 2017.

34.     Given the need to prioritise police resourcing following the events in Christchurch on 15 March 2019, the 2019 Pasifika festival, which was due to run on 23 and 24 March 2019, was cancelled. Although the festival would have been an opportunity to bring Auckland’s communities together at a time of national mourning, given the unprecedented nature of what happened and after discussions with the New Zealand Police, it was agreed that the New Zealand Police must prioritise resourcing to ensure the safety of communities across the city.

35.     During the period, residents of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area were also able to enjoy events funded or facilitated by ATEED across the Auckland region, including the ASB Classic, Splore Music and Arts Festival, Sculpture on the Gulf, the New Zealand Comedy Festival, the Auckland Writers Festival, the Auckland Art Fair, Warhorse, and Auckland Wine Week.

36.     A full schedule of major events is available on ATEED’s website, aucklandnz.com

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     ATEED assesses and manages our initiatives on a case-by-case basis and engages with the Council group where required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     Local Board views are not sought for the purposes of this report. Local board views were sought for some of the initiatives described in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds to any impact that our initiatives may have on Māori on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with our initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     ATEED will provide the next six-monthly report to the local board in February 2020 and will cover the period 1 July to 31 December 2019.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Samantha-Jane Miranda, Operational Strategy Advisor (ATEED)

Authorisers

Quanita Khan, Manager Operational Strategy and Planning (ATEED)

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes

File No.: CP2019/14426

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, and to provide feedback on the recommended changes to the document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is currently reviewing the Auckland Film Protocol.  The Auckland Film Protocol sets out:

·        the commitment of the council group to supporting filming in Auckland;

·        expectations and rules that filmmakers must abide by when filming in Auckland; and

·        provides guidance for filmmakers on the process for approval to film in Auckland.

3.       The purpose of the review was to ensure that the Auckland Film Protocol is up-to-date and identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities that should be addressed.  Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Auckland Film Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Auckland Film Protocol. 

4.       A revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in June 2019 for consideration and was approved for public consultation (resolution number ENV/2019/73). 

5.       The following is a summary of the key changes made to the Auckland Film Protocol before public consultation was undertaken:

·        Native species: new content added stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: new content added providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: new content added stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: new content added stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: new content added to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was updated to reflect current policy, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council.  Some structural and editorial amendments were also made to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

6.       Public consultation was undertaken over a three week period between 21 June and 12 July 2019.

7.       A total of 74 submissions were received during the public consultation period.  The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board residents provided a total of one submission on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, representing 1% percent of all submissions.  Staff are proposing some changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address submitter concerns. The proposed changes are shown in track changes in Attachment B.

8.       This report provides a summary of public feedback and of proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address feedback.  The following is a high‑level summary of the key changes proposed to the Auckland Film Protocol in response to public consultation:

·        Natural environment: include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Native species: include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Kauri dieback: amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

·        Impact on access to public open space: include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

·        Compliance and enforcement: include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with the Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

9.       Submission themes and proposed changes are summarised in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol

b)      provide feedback on the recommended changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol

c)      note that local board feedback will be included in a report to the Environment and Community Committee in September 2019, seeking approval for the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The first version of the Auckland Film Protocol (the Protocol) was adopted by the Regional Development and Operations Committee (resolution number RDO/2013/27) on 14 March 2013.  A review of fees for filming in the Auckland Region was undertaken in 2014 and a new set of region‑wide charges was recommended; providing a simplified and harmonised range of charges.  The Governing Body adopted a region‑wide schedule of film fees and revised Auckland Film Protocol on 28 May 2015 (resolution number GB/2015/36).

 

11.     Since the Protocol was adopted in 2015 there have been a number of changes to legislation and to Auckland Council’s policy and planning framework. The purpose of the review of the Protocol was to:

·        ensure that the Protocol is up-to-date; and

·        identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities to be addressed in the Protocol.

12.     Content of the Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.

13.     Workshops were held in September and October 2018 to engage with local boards that experience a high volume of filming.

14.     Engagement to inform the preparation of the revised draft Protocol was also undertaken with:

·        mana whenua: mana whenua interests are represented by 19 iwi (tribal) authorities in Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland.  The 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review of the Protocol.

·        staff of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to inform the review.

·        screen sector: the screen sector was invited to participate in a survey in April 2019 to inform the review.  The survey asked a series of general questions about the Protocol and experiences of filming in public open space in Auckland. 

·        public: the People’s Panel in September 2018; a total of 4,762 responses were received.  The survey asked a series of questions on views on and experiences of filming in Auckland. 

A high-level summary of feedback (including local board feedback) is provided in Attachment C.

15.     The review recommended that a range of changes be made to the Protocol, the following is a summary of the key changes proposed to the Environment and Community Committee:

·        Native species: include new content stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: include new content providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include new content stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: include new content stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: include new content to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Filming on Tūpuna Maunga: update content to reflect that applications to film on Tūpuna Maunga are assessed by the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority.

·        Updates to content: update content to reflect current policy (e.g. smokefree policy), plans (Auckland Unitary Plan) and bylaws of Auckland Council.

·        Structural and editorial: amend some parts of the document to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

16.     The revised draft of the Protocol was approved by the Environment and Community Committee for public consultation in June 2019 (resolution number ENV/2019/73).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     Consultation on the revised draft of the Protocol took place from 21 June to 12 July 2019.  A total of 74 submissions were received; this represents a substantial increase on the 21 submission which were received in response to the 2015 review of the Protocol.  Of the submissions received, 72 were submitted using the online form and 2 non‑form hardcopy submissions were received. 

18.     Submitters were asked to identify if they worked in the screen sector or not, with:

·        29 submissions (39%) received from individuals or organisations that identified themselves as working in the screen sector

·        45 submissions (61%) received from individuals or organisations that do not work in the screen sector.

The questions included in the online form varied depending on whether the submitter identified themselves as working in the screen industry or not.

19.     A breakdown of all submissions received by local board area is shown in Table 1 below.  The small number of responses from individual local board areas means that an analysis of views by local board area was not possible for all local board areas.

Table 1: Breakdown of submissions made by local board area.

Local Board Area

Number of respondents

Percentage of respondents

Waitākere Ranges

17

23.0%

Albert-Eden

9

12.2%

Waitematā

8

10.8%

Rodney

6

8.1%

Upper Harbour

5

6.8%

Ōrākei

5

6.8%

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

4

5.4%

Devonport-Takapuna

4

5.4%

Henderson-Massey

3

4.1%

Kaipātiki

3

4.1%

Howick

2

2.7%

Whau

2

2.7%

Māngere-Ōtahuhu

1

1.4%

Puketapapa

1

1.4%

Hibiscus and Bays

1

1.4%

Papakura

1

1.4%

Franklin

0

0%

Great Barrier

0

0%

Ōtara‑Papatoetoe

0

0%

Manurewa

0

0%

Waiheke

0

0%

Don't Know

1

1.4%

Outside Auckland

1

1.4%

Total

74

 

 

20.     A series of closed questions were asked of non‑screen sector individuals and organisations; a summary of the responses to these questions is shown in Table 2 below.  Table 2 shows that:

·        most respondents are supportive of Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach and that;

·        most respondents think that the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on residents and businesses, on public open space and historic and cultural heritage.

Table 2: Feedback on the Auckland Film Protocols management of the impacts of filming

Question

Response

Percentage of regional submissions

(number of respondents is shown in brackets)

Do you support Auckland Council's film‑friendly approach?

Yes

75% (33)

Partially

20% (9)

No

5% (2)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on residents and businesses?

Yes

56% (18)

Partially

19% (6)

No

25% (8)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on our public open space and environment?

Yes

53% (23)

Partially

33% (14)

No

14% (6)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on our historic and cultural heritage?

Yes

62% (26)

Partially

29% (12)

No

10% (4)

 

21.     The main reasons given by those who supported Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach are shown in Table 3.

Table 3: Summary of key reasons for supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Economic

·         generates employment and economic growth;

·         benefits communities and local businesses;

·         benefits a broad range of trades and industries;

·         attracts investment and businesses to Auckland.

Cultural and creative

·         has cultural benefits allowing and supporting the telling of stories visually;

·         supports the creative economy and enables people to find a future in the creative industries;

·         It’s fun and exciting to see Auckland on the screen.

Promotion and tourism

·         promotes and showcases Auckland to the world;

·         creates a positive image of Auckland.

 

22.     Table 4 shows the key reasons that respondents gave for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Table 4: Summary of key reasons given for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Access

·    the impacts on resident, including parking restrictions, road closures and ability to use public open space while filming is taking place need to be considered and managed;

·    need to ensure that film‑makers are respectful of other users of public open space.

Notification

·    there needs to be sufficient notification to ensure that residents and businesses are aware of open space being used for filming and are not inconvenienced.

Balance

·    need to consider and manage the impact that filming has on the environment and impacted residents;

·    need to balance the cumulative impacts of filming.

Equity

·    need to ensure that fees for commercial use of public places are fair.

 

23.     The key reasons given for not supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach were:

·        the cost to ratepayers of enabling filming;

·        that there is not enough protection for individuals, businesses and residents affected by filming being carried out on private property.

24.     A series of open‑ended questions were also included to elicit further information about responses to these questions and about a range of other topics.  Staff have worked through submissions to determine any changes to be recommended for the final revised Protocol.  Attachment A identifies key themes and submission points along with proposed staff responses.  

A summary of the most common submission themes and the proposed staff responses are shown in table 5.

 

Table 5: Summary of key submission themes and proposed staff responses.

Key themes

Summary of proposed responses

Use of drones for filming

Include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

 

Impact on natural environment

Include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Kauri dieback

Amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

Impact on native species

Include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Impact on access to public open space

Include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

Compliance and enforcement

Include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

Health and safety

Amend to enable production companies to arrange alternative timeframes for the submission of a site specific health and safety plan by agreement with Screen Auckland.

Notification

Screen Auckland to consider operational approaches to achieving wider public notification.

Impact on business

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  The protocol is intended to provide a framework that enables decisions to be made on a case‑by‑case basis.

Equity

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  Fees for commercial use of public open space are set under the Auckland Council Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 and amended through the long term plan and annual plan.

 

25.     This report seeks formal feedback from the board at its August 2019 business meeting on the recommended changes to the revised draft Protocol in response to consultation feedback.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.  This included engagement with Auckland Transport, Panuku Development Auckland, and with Auckland Council community facilities, region‑wide planning, social policy and bylaws, visitor experience and heritage.


 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Role of local boards in film permitting

27.     Landowner approval is required to film on any public open space in the Auckland region.  Local boards are responsible for landowner approvals for local parks and reserves.  Engagement with local boards that experience a high volume of applications for film permits was undertaken in September and October 2018 to inform the review of the Protocol.  A summary of the key engagement themes is included in Attachment C and was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

28.     A key theme from local board engagement was that the film permit timeframes mean that landowner approval timeframes are very tight, particularly when considering complex or contentious applications.  It was also noted that the current timeframes do not allow sufficient time to consider applications at full board meetings or to consult key stakeholders.  Given this, the following options on film permit timeframes were presented to the Environment and Community Committee at a workshop in May 2019 and at the June 2019 meeting.

Option one: Status Quo

Option two: amend the permit timeframes

·        Option 2(a) the permit time frame is amended to be “up to five working days”.

·        Option 2(b) the permit time frame is increased to 5‑7 working days.

29.     Following direction from the Environment and Community Committee, that increasing timeframes could act as a disincentive making Auckland internationally uncompetitive, the status quo option was retained in the draft Protocol.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) has an ongoing relationship with several mana whenua and mataawaka groups, across its whole portfolio of activity.  To inform the review of the Protocol the 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review.  In relation to film permit applications Māori views and input may be obtained in several ways where there is a potential impact on particular land or sites. This is usually coordinated either by the film facilitator, or through the relevant parks manager.

31.     Specific processes are in place for the tūpuna maunga, with all commercial filming on the maunga requiring the approval of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority).  Screen Auckland facilitates all requests for approval to film on the tūpuna maunga.  Approval to film will be subject to conditions and restrictions set by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.  Meetings were held with staff of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to inform the review and ensure that proposed amendments are consistent with the policy of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The proposed amendments to the Protocol do not impact on existing levels of service and will not impact on operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     There are no significant risks arising from the local board giving feedback on the proposed changes to the revised draft Protocol at this time.

34.     If adoption of the revised Protocol is delayed this would impact on council’s ability to implement the proposed changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Public feedback and proposed amendments to the Protocol will be presented to the Environment and Community Committee for approval.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key submission themes and responses

121

b

Draft 2019 Auckland Film Protocol (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Summary of preconsultation engagement

131

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Marie Jenkins, Screen Facilitation Manager, ATEED

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza, Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

New road names in the Build Rich Limited subdivision at 2182 East Coast Road, Silverdale

File No.: CP2019/14259

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for the new road names for five new public roads in the Build Rich Limited subdivision at 2182 East Coast Road, Silverdale.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       The applicant, Build Rich Limited, has submitted the following names for the new public roads serving the subdivision at 2182 East Coast Road, Silverdale:

Preferred Names

Alternative Names

Road 1. Goldwater Drive

Silverheight Drive

Road 2. Silverwater Drive

Goldenheight Drive

Road A. Claret Ash Road

Kea Road

Road B. Mita Road

Kea Road

Road C. Pohewa Road

Kea Road

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the new road names for five public roads in the Build Rich Limited subdivision at 2182 East Coast Road, Silverdale, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 and as referenced in Attachments A and B to the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       This staged subdivision creating super-lots for the eventual subdivision into 120 residential and mixed- use lots at 2182 East Coast Road, Silverdale has been approved and the council reference is BUN60316008.

5.       A condition of the subdivision consent was to suggest to council names for the new roads.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

7.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

·        A historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·        A particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·        An existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

·        The use of Māori names is actively encouraged.

8.       After much discussion and correspondence requesting that the developer suggest more appropriate names, the applicant has submitted the following names for consideration.

Preferred Name

Meaning

Road 1. Goldwater Drive

Acknowledgement of the Goldwaters, reputable winemakers on Waiheke and linking to the theme of Silverwater (below Road 2).

Road 2. Silverwater Drive

Inspired by the local name Silverdale and the local Weiti (Wade) River.

Road A. Claret Ash Road

Inspired by the name of the street tree species designed for Road A

Road B. Mita Road

Name suggested by iwi, translates to rhythm, intonation, pronunciation and sound of a language, accent, diction, elocution and dialect.

Road C. Pohewa Road

Name suggested by iwi, translates to vision or apparition.


Alternative Names

Meaning

Silverheight Drive/Road

Inspired by the local name Silverdale and the surrounding terrain.

Goldenheight Drive/Road

Linking to the theme of Silverheight and the surrounding terrain.

Kea Drive/Road

A common New Zealand bird

 

9.       The applicant has contacted Ngati Whanaunga and sought their comment. They have advised that they actively encourage the use of Māori names for new roads. The chosen theme relates to the use and delivery of the Māori language, how it is emphasized, used to create images and how it is spoken.

10.     The officer acknowledges that where possible the use of Māori names is encouraged in the Auckland Plan.

11.     Land Information New Zealand has confirmed that the proposed road names are unique and acceptable.

12.     The proposed names are deemed to meet the council’s road naming guidelines and the officer’s recommendation is that the local board approve five names from the above list.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger the significance policy and is not considered to have any immediate impacts on any council groups.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger the significance policy and is not considered to have any immediate impacts on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     The applicant has contacted Ngati Whanaunga and sought their comment. They have advised that they actively encourage the use of Māori names for new roads.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2182 East Coast Road, Scheme Plan

139

b

2182 East Coast Road, Locality Map

141

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Frank Lovering – Senior Subdivison Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14278

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2018/2019 Annual Report for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 26 September 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2018/2019 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange Debt Market maintained by New Zealand Stock Exchange Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the New Zealand Stock Exchange Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013, local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      adopt the 2018/2019 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      note that any proposed changes will be clearly communicated and agreed with the Chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019

c)      note that the draft 2018/2019 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Annual Report (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report) will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2018/2019 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities, and the overall Financial Impact Statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.


 

 

6.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market (quoted bonds) maintained by NZX Limited. As a result, the council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules (listing rules) and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA). Under these obligations, local boards may not release annual financial results in any form, including publishing their agenda/minutes containing their results, until council group results are released to the NZX on 27 September 2019.  Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi relates to the local board area.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area, summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved.

Funding information

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English, and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2018/2019 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2019

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 26 September 2019

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 27 September 2018

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2018/2019 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Annual Report (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David Gurney - Manager Corporate Performance and Reporting

Authorisers

Kevin Ramsay - General Manager Corporate Finance and Property

Victoria Villaraza – Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Council's Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14565

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter four, 1 April – 30 June 2019, and the overall performance for the financial year, against the agreed 2018/2019 local board work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2018/2019 financial year.

3.       Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

4.       One hundred and nine activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Seven activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred and nineteen projects/activities have not progressed as expected during 2018/2019.

5.       Key highlights for quarter four include:

·        Centrestage Theatre had a strong operating quarter with two performances.  FAME was highly successful with crowds wowed, and the third annual cabaret of ABBA sold out prior to opening leading to three additional shows.

·        The Deep Creek Reserve development was completed resulting in sand slit drainage, lighting and irrigation installation, and the construction of a public toilet and carpark.

·        The large slip at the Lotus Walk was remediated which was a significant and dangerous task.  Contractors working on the project have since won a national award acknowledging the difficulties of the site and their workmanship.

·        The Orewa Citizens Advice Bureau facility refurbishment was completed to ensure the facility remains fit for purpose and to replace the failing heating ventilation and air conditioning system. Volunteers to the Bureau were very happy to use their new facilities and it now allows them to operate better with their communities.

6.       Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme include:

·        New field lights were installed at Freyberg Park and Red Beach Parks allowing sports teams to access fields for practice for longer hours across winter.

·        Silverdale War Memorial Park and Stanmore Bay sand fields have been renewed with new turf growing in over autumn.

·        The Water Sensitive Urban Design programme has been highly successful with all early childhood centres participating fully and providing presentations back to board members to celebrate their success and show how the programme has changed their understanding of water.

·        The Business Waste Reduction Programme approached 72 businesses offering free waste assessments.  Of the assessments completed it was identified that up to 94.2 tonnes of waste could be diverted from landfill, 62 tonnes of this being organic waste that could be composted.  Of the changes implemented across the businesses, 6.3 tonnes of waste has been diverted from landfill.

7.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·        Crows Nest Walkway is still to be completed however a temporary solution that will allow the track to remain in place and open for the near future is being implemented this year, with works expected to be completed in December 2019.

·        The East Coast Bays Community Centre redesign and renewal has been delayed due to seismic design requirements.  Once the detailed design including seismic design has been completed the project will get back on track.

·        The Rock Isle Beach Reserve toilet block rebuild has been delayed after finding an unrecorded midden on site.  Geotechnical investigations have been completed and staff now need to obtain approval from Heritage New Zealand for test pit sites.

8.       The 2018/2019 financial performance report is attached but is excluded from the public. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter and year ending 30 June 2019.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2018/2019 are released to the NZX which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has an approved 2018/2019 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Community Services (Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; Parks, Sport and Recreation; and Service Strategy and Integration) approved on 20/6/2019, resolution HB/2018/99

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew and Community Leases, approved on 20/06/2019, resolution HB/2018/122

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services, approved on 20/06/2019, resolution HB/2018/96

·        Local Economic Development, approved on 20/06/2019, resolution HB/2018/100

10.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

 

 

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

Key highlights for quarter four

11.     The key achievements to report from the quarter four period include:

·        All local grant funds have been fully allocated to community groups after one of the most successful grant rounds in the quarter.  In Quarter four, the local board allocated $150,000 from the Facilities grant round, $174,562 to Local and Multi-Board grants round, and $22,038 to the Quick Response grant round.

·        Both the Stanmore Bay and East Coast Bays Leisure centres have had growth operationally, and seen an increase in visitor attendance as well as their satisfaction.  Improvements to programmes have been met well by the community. The Stanmore Bay Leisure Centre was a finalist in the NZ Fitness Awards Facility of the Year and staff won the coveted People’s Choice Group Fitness Instructor of the Year award.

·    Orewa Beach Kohu to Marine View has had its Environment Court hearing and deliberations are underway.  The Environment Court should release the decision in August 2019, at which point officers will recommend a way forward.  The Southern Seawall work is progressing with a complex strategic assessment underway.  All findings and options will be presented to the local board in August 2019.

Overall performance against the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board 2018/2019 work programme

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected (completed by the end of July 2019) or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

 

 

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

13.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

14.     The graph below shows the status and the stage of the activities in each department’s work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Table 1: End of year Local Board Work Programmes Status

 

Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme

15.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2018/2019 include:

·        The Mairangi Bay Development Plan implementation has commenced with a coastal processes report being developed that will set out the impacts that the current esplanade and beach reserves are experiencing and how best to develop this area.

·          Three projects have progressed this year with Māori concerning matters of significance and mutual interest, that will lead to some significant results for the Hibiscus and Bays community.  More information is presented in Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori below.

·          The local board has continued to advocate successfully for equitable funding across the Auckland region for community organisations with the Hibiscus Coast Youth Centre receiving its second year of regional funding.

·          We have worked closely with Auckland Council around managing Kauri dieback.  While this has affected access and development of some parks and reserves in the area, this has also provided opportunities to engage with local residents around the significance of our reserves and the protection of kauri.

Overview of work programme performance by department

Arts, Community and Events work programme

16.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 18 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), three activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) nor any activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey) activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Capacity Building – East Coast Bays

 

Amber

In progress

 

East Coast Bays Community Project has experienced challenges with their governance structure in the last six months. The organisation did not receive the second instalment of their funding as they requested support to build their internal organisational capacity. The proposed carry-forward will be utilised in 2019/2020 to seed-fund organisations to implement local placemaking activities. 

Responding to community needs: Hibiscus Coast and East Coast Bays

 

Amber

In progress

 

Staff identified that the projects in East Coast Bays were not sufficiently developed as the groups could not clearly identify resourcing requirements. Staff will work with community to identify needs related projects in Q1 2019/2020, and directly fund organisations with the proposed carry-forward  to deliver on projects developed through the needs analysis project that directly benefit the community.

Future Whangaparaoa received $17,500 to progress projects identified in Q3.

Community inclusion and diversity

 

Amber

In progress

 

Phase 3 of the project has been delayed due to contracting delays between AUT and council. Delivery of the project will commence in Q1 2019/2020.
The proposed carry-forward budget will support the delivery of the project.

In Q4

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

17.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are: 11 activities that were completed by the end of the year, or will be by end of July 2019 (green); 3 activities that are in progress, but are delayed (amber); 2 activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red); and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Greenways Plan Service Assessment (Priority Route Identification Phase 2)

Red

 

On hold

The project is currently on hold until existing greenway priorities are progressed.

Orewa Reserve Service Provision and Community Outcome Assessment

 

Red

 

In progress

 

This is a complex project and requires the gathering and analysis of a large range of reserve use data.  Data analysis is now underway and is progressing.

The next steps are for the information that has been gathered to be analysed. A business report will be prepared in Q2 2019/2020 to enable the local board to decide on the key outcomes that will be sought when considering long term management options for Orewa Reserve.

HB: Specific implementation plan for Auckland's Urban Forest (Ngahere) Strategy

 

Amber

In progress

 

The draft Ngahere local assessment report has been completed for review by the local board at a workshop in July.

Local board feedback will be incorporated into the final report for approval at a Q1 business meeting. This completes the Knowing phase. The local board has allocated funding for the Growing phase in 2019/2020

Freyberg Park: Feasibility Assessment for Shared Clubrooms

 

Amber

In progress

 

The East Coast Bays Rugby League Club have engaged a consultant to carry out their options analysis. An update on work completed to date will be provided to the local board in Q1 of the 2019/2020 year. A final report will be presented by the East Coast Bays Rugby League Club at a community deputation once complete.

HB: Māori Naming of Reserves and Facilities Phase 2

 

Amber

In progress

 

Part of a multiyear activity/project that was expected to continue into next year which has not progressed as expected for 2018/2019. The first tranche of names is expected to be delivered late 2019.

We can now confirm that as part of sorting through the overlapping naming interest, seven mana whenua have currently indicated naming interest and are now working through the naming process to ensure one name is gifted back to the local board per site.

 

Libraries and Information work programme

18.     In the Libraries and Information work programme, there are: 7 activities that were completed by the end of the year, or will be by end of July 2019 (green); and no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber); or activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red); or activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey).

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

19.     In the Service Strategy and Integration work programme, there is: one activity completed by the end of the year, or will be by end of July 2019 (green); one activity that is in progress but is delayed (amber); no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red); nor any activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Hibiscus and Bays Open Space Management Plan (formerly HB reserves: Review Reserve Management Plans in 17/18 WP)

Amber

In Progress

Delivery of draft plan to local board has been delayed by legal review of the document taking longer than expected.

Legal Services review continued in preparation for three workshops with the political reference group during July and in August 2019.

 

 

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

20.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are: 52 activities that were completed by the end of the year, or will be by end of July 2019 (green); 11 activities that are in progress, but are delayed (amber); four activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red); and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below. 

 

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Browns Bay - renew skate park and drainage

Amber

In progress

 

Construction is likely to be delayed due to tendering and safety in design issues that will need to be worked through.

Current status: Detailed design has been workshopped with the local board, a report is now in the July business meeting for approval.
Next steps: Once approved, the tender process will start.

 

 

 

 

 

Crows Nest Walk, 16 Brighton Terrace, Murrays Bay - remediate major slip

 

Amber

In progress

 

Initially under scoped and under budgeted back in 2018. Scoping options report has been completed and option to proceed is now being confirmed.

Current status: The walkway is expected to be reopened by the end of December 2019. The works include installing a new aggregate path, with a barrier and a new staircase. Regular monitoring will be undertaken to ensure the walkway remains safe to use.
Next steps: Complete design and tender physical works.

 

East Coast Bays Community Centre building - renew and redesign facility

 

Amber

In progress

 

Current status: The seismic team have now approved their external seismic consultants and will be engaging an engineer to complete this detailed work in the coming months.

Next steps: Awaiting seismic detailed design documentation.

 

Hibiscus and Bays - investigate options for sports lighting and sports field upgrades

 

Red

On Hold

This project will be on-hold until adequate funding is available.

Current status: The concept design has been completed.
This project was to only deliver concept design to give council direction with funding requirements.
At this stage there is no future funding secured and it is not seen as a priority for further work.

 

Hibiscus and Bays - renew park buildings 2018/2019+

 

Amber

In progress

 

Schedule delay due to refinement of scope.

Current status: Weiti- Wade River Road, Torbay shops, Red Beach and Little Manly public toilets require renewal and therefore will be included in the list of sites to be renewed as part of this project. Silverdale War Memorial public toilets will be renewed as part of whole park renewal project. Browns Bay (marine centre), Mairangi Bay Park, Moana Reserve, Mairangi Bay Surf Club, Metro Park East public toilets; Tindalls, Victor Eaves public toilets are currently fit for purpose and do not require capital renewal works.
Next steps: Attend Silverdale Street and Agency Lane to identify if renewals are required. Identify scope of works required to bring the toilets back to standard at Weiti- Wade River Road, Torbay shops, Red Beach and Little Manly. Discuss scope of works and associated costs with the local board in future months.

 

Hibiscus and Bays - renew park play spaces 2017/2018+

 

Amber

In progress

 

Due to poor drainage over the four playground sites, the drainage is now being investigated prior to any playground upgrades.

Current status: The designs for the play spaces are complete. These results were workshopped with the local board in June 2018. The renewal of the Orewa basketball court surface was on hold due to the uncertainty how the reserve will be managed over the long term; however the local board have asked for interim costs, this is scheduled for a workshop in July. Design for the remediation of the play space area drainage has been received and reviewed.
Next steps: Consenting and tendering.

 

Moana Reserve, Orewa - renew fountain

 

Amber

In progress

 

The local boards preference is to have the artwork/water feature installed by Christmas, as the area is heavily used after this time by public events and the general public.

Next steps: To discuss the consultation outcome with the local board in July, then start the structural and safety design phase and consenting process.

 

Rock Isle Beach Reserve - rebuild toilet block

 

Amber

In progress

 

A large previously undocumented midden was found onsite. As a consequence, a full archeological assessment has been requested for this site.

Next steps: Lodge proposed test sites with Heritage New Zealand.

 

Sherwood Reserve - renew footbridges

 

Amber

In progress

 

Project has been delayed as lighting was not originally scoped and this was later added to the project.

 

This project is now being delivered by Healthy Waters who will continue to lead this project, with project delivery support from Community Facilities as required.

Western Reserve - renew seawall consent

 

Amber

In progress

 

Delays due to difficulties retrieving the original consent application from 2015.

Current status: Working with Northern Consents team to identify what further information is required to progress the original consent application.
Next steps: Progress the consent application.

(OLI) Orewa Beach - Kohu- Marine View - renew northern seawall

 

Red

On Hold

Awaiting hearing outcome.

Current status: North Beach - The hearings have now concluded which commenced May 2019.The judge is expected to take approximately two-three months to reach a decision.
Next steps: North Beach - The Environment Court hearing will determine whether consent is granted or not, thereby determining the future of this project.

 

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays - actions from signage audit

 

Amber

In progress

 

Finalisation of visuals has taken longer than expected and weather conditions may delay the delivery of the signs.

Current status: Draft signs have been designed and are currently being discussed with the Communications and Brand team for input. In addition officers on the project are working closely with the Safe Swim initiative to develop panels for additional information to be attached to the digital signs, which will help promote water and boat safety information at key beaches.
Next steps: Continue to review opportunities to improve and enhance signage and submit reviewed signage visuals to the local board for feedback.

 

 

 

Metro Park - develop netball and hockey grounds - concept plan phase 1

 

Red

On Hold

No next steps for this project and will be on-hold until further notice.

Current status: The design services are complete and the concept design has been presented to the local board. The feedback from the local board was, for this project to continue Netball need to find funding to contribute and lead the development works. Council have conducted the necessary design work and no further work will be required until netball are in a position to progress the project. Council Sport and Recreation team are working closely with netball to facilitate further conversations about partnering.

 

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays - renew walkways, paths and Emlyn Place retaining wall 2017-18

 

Amber

In progress

 

Schedule delays due to requirement for kauri dieback mitigation input at Emlyn Reserve.

Current status: Joydon Place- compete missing sections of application to Heritage New Zealand and submit. The Ecological assessment for Emlyn and Fitzwilliam Reserves has been completed. The ecologist’s recommendation for Emlyn Reserve is to reroute the walking track 14m away from the small stream, which will require structural design and resource consent. The end loop section within Emlyn Reserve also runs through a number of Kauri stands, this section will need to be considered for closure as part of Kauri dieback mitigation.
Next steps: complete business case for all three sites. Once Heritage New Zealand has approved the Joydon Place works this walkway can progress to the physical works stages. Seek advice from Kauri dieback specialist team on treatment of Emlyn Place route through Kauri stands. Following advice engage consultant to undertake detailed design and resource consent application.

 

Wade Landing Reserve - develop access way

 

Red

On Hold

The project is not required at this point in time and has been placed on hold. If the adjacent private property is developed in the future this project will be reactivated.

The adjacent property owner is no longer marketing the property for sale. The design of the upgraded right-of-way through the reserve is therefore not required at this point in time.

 

Community Leases work programme

21.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are: 12 activities that were completed by the end of the year, or will be by end of July 2019 (green); no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber); no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red); and two activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.


 

 

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Long Bay Beach Reserve, 1045 Beach Road, Torbay: Lease renewal for the Sir Peter Blake Marine Education and Recreation Board Incorporated.

 

Grey

Deferred

 

Staff are addressing underlying land classification issues.
Council staff are in the process of revoking the Reserves Act 1977 status of the affected land parcel and will present a report to the local board during quarter two to endorse the proposed revocation.

Legal Services are still finalising their advice regarding revocation. This matter remains on hold pending their feedback.

 

Mairangi Bay Beach Reserve, Sidmouth Street, Mairangi Bay: Proposed new lease to Mairangi Bay Surf Life Saving Club Incorporated for additional land.

 

Grey

Cancelled

 

The Mairangi Bay Surf Life Saving Club Incorporated is still in the design and feasibility stage of their planned development. This item can be progressed once the design plans have been finalised. Staff will activate this on the three-year work programme.

 

 

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

22.          In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are: five activities that were completed by the end of the year, or will be by end of July 2019 (green); no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber); or activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red); and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below. 

Local Economic Development work programme

23.         In the Local Economic Development work programme, there are: three activities that were completed by the end of the year, or will be by end of July 2019 (green); no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber); no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red); nor any activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Work with Silverdale Business Association to facilitate employment in Silverdale

 

Red

Not delivered

There has not been any further engagement from the Silverdale Business Association with staff. The Business Improvement District team will pick up any activity in regard to further SME advice to Business Associations.

 

 

Deferred activities

24.     As part of the local board funding policy, activities funded through the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operating fund that were not delivered in 2018/2019 will be deferred into 2019/2020 work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     This report informs the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board of the performance for quarter ending 30 June 2019 and the performance for the 2018/2019 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Many community facilities and programmes supported by the local board have provided services to promote Māori culture including hosting Te Reo classes and running Matariki celebrations, and engaging Māori youth in leadership activities.

28.     Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori was very successful across the last year with the Ōrewa North Kapa Haka group performing in the Ōrewa library, Matariki story time sessions in all libraries, and Te Reo song time in the Whangaparāoa Library becoming very popular.

29.     Progress on the Māori Naming of Reserves has been slow with seven mana whenua have indicated a naming interest in local reserves and the project team is currently working through the first tranche of reserve names to agree to the agreed name that will be gifted to the reserve.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     This report is provided to enable the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2018/2019 work programmes and to report this to the public. This report is for information only and therefore there are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

31.     Auckland Council currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZX. As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September 2019. Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is excluded from the public.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

33.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work Programmes Quarter four

161

b

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Quarterly Performance Report June 2019 - Financial Appendix performance financial summary (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Danielle Hancock – Senior Local Board Advisor, Hibiscus and Bays

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Ward Councillors Update

File No.: CP2019/00126

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillors, Councillor Wayne Walker and Councillor John Watson, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Councillors Walker and Watson for their update.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2019/00132

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the local board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar: a schedule of items that will come before the local board at business meetings and workshops over the next 12 months.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings.  It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

197

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Record of Workshop Meetings

File No.: CP2019/00139

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board held workshop meetings on 4, 11 and 25 July 2019. 2018 and 1and 8 August 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      endorse the record of the workshop meetings held on 4, 11 and 25 July 2019 and 1 and 8 August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Record Workshop Meeting 4 July 2019

201

b

Record Workshop Meeting 11 July 2019

203

c

Record Workshop Meeting 25 July 2019

205

d

Record Workshop Meeting 1 August 2019

207

e

Record Workshop Meeting 8 August 2019

209

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vivienne Sullivan - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


 

    

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

19        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019 - Attachment a - Draft 2018/2019 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Annual Report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2019 that require final Audit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

20        Auckland Council's Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019 - Attachment b - Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Quarterly Performance Report June 2019 - Financial Appendix performance financial summary

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2019 that require final Ausit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange. .

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.3      Attachment a    Powerpoint Presentation                                Page 217


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 

 



[1] This activity is subject to local boards prioritising local economic development, and subsequently allocating funding to local economic development through their local board agreements.