I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Henderson-Massey Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 20 August 2019

4.00pm

Council Chamber
Henderson Civic Centre
6 Henderson Valley Road
Henderson

 

Henderson-Massey Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Shane Henderson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Peter Chan, JP

 

Members

Paula Bold-Wilson

 

 

Brenda Brady, JP

 

 

Warren Flaunty, QSM

 

 

Will Flavell

 

 

Matt Grey

 

 

Vanessa Neeson, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Busola Martins

Local Board Democracy Advisor (West)

 

15 August 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 892 4455

Email: busola.martins@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Glenn Boyd

Relationship Manager (West Local Boards)

 

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                        5

2          Apologies                                                                                      5

3          Declaration of Interest                                               5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                              5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                         5

6          Acknowledgements                                                   5

7          Petitions                                                                      5

8          Deputations                                                                5

9          Public Forum                                                                                 5

10        Extraordinary Business                                            5

11        Henderson-Massey Local Grants Round One 2019/2020 grant allocations                                      7

12        Te Pae o Kura/Kelston Community Centre Comprehensive Renewal                                      227

13        Riverpark Reserve: playground upgrade - additional budget allocation                                 235

14        Henderson-Massey Connections Plan                239

15        Play Network Gap Analysis                                  243

16        Approval for a New Road Name at 6, 8 & 9 Hulme Place, Henderson                                                   249

17        Road Name Approval: Two New Private Roads created by way of Subdivision at 10-32 Titoki Street, Te Atatu                                                      257

18        Auckland Transport Update Report for the Henderson-Massey Local Board – August 2019                                                                                 265

19        Allocation of Henderson-Massey Local Board  Community Safety Fund                                       277

20        Discretionary grant to West Auckland Historical Society to assist with preparing Henderson 175th anniversary                                                             283

21        Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes                                 285

22        ATEED six-monthly report to the Henderson-Massey Local Board                                              295

23        Formal Approval of feedback on the Productivity Commission                                                           303

24        Governance Forward Work Programme             307

25        Confirmation of Workshop Records                   311

26        Auckland Council's year end and quaterly performance report: Henderson Massey Local board for quarter four 2018/2019                         313

27        Henderson-Massey Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019                                                                321

28        Ward Councilors' Update                                      325  

29        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

30        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                              327

26        Auckland Council's year end and quaterly performance report: Henderson Massey Local board for quarter four 2018/2019

b.      Henderson-Massey operating performance summary Q4                                                  327

27        Henderson-Massey Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

a.      Draft 2018/2019 Henderson-Massey Local Board Annual Report                                   327  

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

The following are declared interests of elected members of the Henderson-Massey Local Board.

 

BOARD MEMBER

ORGANISATION

POSITION

Updated

Shane Henderson (Chairman)

Waitakere Licensing Trust

Waitakere Badminton

Colwill School

Elected Member

Patron

Trustee

21 August 2018

4 Dec 2018

Peter Chan, JP

(Deputy Chairman)

Cantonese Opera Society of NZ
Asian Leaders Forum
NZ-Hong Kong Business Association
NZ-China Business Association
Auckland Chinese Environment Protection Association (ACEPA)

Whau Coastal Walkway Trust

Member
Member
Member
Member
Advisor 

 

Trustee

21 Feb 2017

5 June 2018

Brenda Brady, JP

Safer West Community Trust

Trustee

17 April 2018

Matt Grey

West Auckland Youth Development Trust

Billy Graham Youth Foundation

Director and Board Member

Affiliate

17 July 2018

 

16 October 2018

Paula Bold-Wilson

Community Waitakere

Unitec Institute of Technology

Board member

Employee

17 April 2018

Vanessa Neeson, JP

Village Green Quilters

Ranui Advisory Group

Member

Chairperson

17 April 2018

Warren Flaunty, QSM

NorSGA Properties
The Trusts Community Foundation Ltd

Life North West Pharmacy

Waitemata District Health Board
Waitakere Licensing Trust
Massey Birdwood Settlers Ass.
Taupaki Residents & Ratepayers Association

Henderson Rotary

Director
Director
Director

Elected Member
Elected Member
Member
Member

Member

17 April 2018

5 June 2018

18 Sep 2018

 

 

 

Will Flavell

Te Atatū Tennis Club

Asia New Zealand Leadership Network

Rutherford College

Waitākere Literacy Board

Board Member

Member

Employee

Board Member

15 Nov 2016

 


 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 16 July 2019, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Henderson-Massey Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Henderson-Massey Local Grants Round One 2019/2020 grant allocations

File No.: CP2019/11866

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Henderson-Massey Local Grants Round One 2019/2020 including multiboard applications.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received for Henderson-Massey Local Grants Round One 2019/2020 (Attachment B) including multiboard applications (Attachment C).

3.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board adopted the Henderson-Massey Local Board Grants Programme 2019/2020 on 16 April 2019. The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $123,870 for the 2019/2020 financial year.

5.       Twenty-one applications were received for Henderson-Massey Local Grants, Round One 2019/2020, requesting a total of $86,957.68 and 24 multiboard applications were received, requesting a total of $97,703.01.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Henderson-Massey Local Grants Round One 2019/2020 listed in the following table:   

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

LG2005-108

Corban Estate Arts Centre

Arts and culture

Towards “Kakano Youth Arts Collective – end of year exhibition” from 13 December 2019 to 16 December 2019.

$4,945.65

LG2005-129

Interacting trading as Interacting Theatre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards facilitator costs for the weekly drama, hip hop and film classes from October 2019 to April 2020.

$4,940.00

LG2005-132

Ryan Turner Limited

Arts and culture

Towards market research and the social media campaign for the film “Absent Minded” to be delivered at a public viewing and the 2020 Auckland Pride Festival.

$4,500.00

LG2005-101

Massey Playcentre

Community

Towards the purchase of kitchen appliances including a fridge, freezer, dishwasher and microwave at Massey Playcentre from 01/09/2019 to 31/12/2019.

$2,754.03

LG2005-104

Anjuman-e-Saifee (New Zealand) Charitable Trust.

Community

Towards costs for the "community kitchen garden" including timber, soil, irrigation system, seeds, plants and garden tools.

$2,600.00

LG2005-105

Armani Alofa

Community

Towards the purchase of six industry gaming computer monitors for the "Arena Grounds - Game Haven" event on 10 September 2019.

$1,000.00

LG2005-110

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the “WISE Collective” programme at Massey Community Hub including venue hire, volunteer costs, resources, and phone bills from September 2019 to June 2020.

$4,820.00

LG2005-113

YMCA North Incorporated

Community

Towards the "Raise Up Massey" programme including crew uniforms, a youth development camp, graduation, crew recruitment and training costs between 02/09/2019 to 03/05/2020.

$5,000.00

LG2005-115

Auckland Environmental Protection Association Incorporated

Community

Towards a private residential hire for the Auckland Environmental Protection Association activities from 1 August 2019 to 31 July 2020.

$5,000.00

LG2005-118

RecruitMum

Ranui Action Project Incorporated

Community

Towards website development fees for “RecruitMum”

$3,200.00

LG2005-120

Waitakere Hindi Language and Cultural School

Community

Towards venue hire, stage set-up and costume costs for the "Charity Show 2019."

$2,756.00

LG2005-122

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of new laptops for two youth workers at Youthline based in Grey Lynn.

$2,485.00

LG2005-124

Henderson Baptist Church (HBC) Community Trust

Community

Towards carpark lighting, alarm installation and a defibrillator at “HBC Trust”.

$5,000.00

LG2005-126

New Zealand Nepalese Association

Community

Towards facilitation and logistics costs for the New Zealand Nepalese Association in September 2019.

$2,370.00

LG2005-127

West Auckland Youth Development Trust

Community

Towards the "West Auckland Boxing Academy" including the purchase of a portable speaker and uniforms.

$5,000.00

LG2005-131

Kids Safe with Dogs Charitable Trust

Community

Towards instructor wages, administration and printing costs to deliver the "Kids Safe with Dogs" programme in local schools.

$4,887.00

LG2005-133

Nixcrew Trust Incorporated

Community

Towards "Peace One Day" in September 2019 including cleaning costs, food, and a gift for the presenters.

$1,500.00

LG2005-134

New Zealand Centre for Gifted Education Limited

Community

Towards subsidies for students attending the Auckland West MindPlus programme for the period September 2019 to April 2020.

$5,000.00

LG2005-106

Louise Broughton

Historic Heritage

Towards exterior painting work of “Category B” historic heritage building.

$9,200.00

LG2005-119

Rutherford Primary School

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase and installation of bike and scooter racks at Rutherford Primary School.

$5,000.00

LG2005-125

Athletics New Zealand Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards printing and signage for the Waitakere Athletics Festival at the Douglas Track and Field, Trusts Arena on 21 March 2019.

$5,000.00

Total

 

 

 

$86,957.68

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Henderson-Massey Multiboard Round One 2019/2020, listed in Table Two below:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

MB1920-123

Connect the Dots

Arts and culture

Towards the "Make Moments" art workshops including the assistant tutor fee, printing of the postcards and art material costs for workshops delivered in the local board area.

$2,887.58

MB1920-153

The Operating Theatre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards 2,000 free show tickets and free transport to children from low decile schools in the local board area to attend the theatre production "Greedy Cat" by Joy Cowley.

$3,103.55

MB1920-179

Te Pou Theatre - Ruia Taitea Creative Limited

Arts and culture

Towards the "Kōanga Festival 2019" including event management, marketing, Kaumatua and Whanau Day costs.

$2,000.00

MB1920-106

Womens Centre Waitakere

Community

Towards operational costs at the Womens Centre Waitakere from October 2019 to September 2020.

$8,500.00

MB1920-107

BTC Boxing Community Health and Wellbeing

Community

Retrospective costs towards a refurbished boxing facility and equipment in Mangere.

$1,000.00

MB1920-119

CNSST Foundation, formerly known as Chinese New Settlers Services Trust

Community

Towards the teacher facilitation fees and the purchase of two tablets.

$4,864.80

MB1920-126

Age Concern Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards the provision of an accredited visitor service and field social support services across west and central Auckland.

$10,000.00

MB1920-127

Rutherford College Community Education

Community

Towards the distribution costs of 2020 West Auckland Adult and Continuing Education booklets to over 55,000 households.

$2,500.00

MB1920-131

Violence Free Communities Incorporated

Community

Towards event costs for the "Toddler Day Out" on 22 February 2020.

$5,000.00

MB1920-133

Auckland Kids Achievement Trust

Community

Towards wages for the Kiwi Can leaders in schools from 1 October 2019 to 30 September 2020.

$5,000.00

MB1920-136

Deaf Action New Zealand

Community

Towards venue hire, New Zealand Sign Language interpreter fees, and purchase of technical equipment to deliver live-stream forums from October 2019 to September 2020.

$1,427.17

MB1920-139

Epilepsy Association of New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards the educator salary, fuel costs and marketing for support services for people living with epilepsy.

$2,500.00

MB1920-141

Royal New Zealand Foundation of The Blind Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase of digital talking books for the Blind Foundation library.

$2,200.00

MB1920-152

Mika Haka Foundation Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of running the "YES Creative Hub" from 10 October 2019 to 10 October 2020, specifically the costs of rent, public liability insurance, utilities, safety officer's salary and administration.

$4,897.00

MB1920-156

Dance Therapy NZ

Community

Towards venue hire, marketing, facilitation, equipment, coordination and administration costs for the "Dance 4 Us West" programme from February to June 2020.

$1,000.00

MB1920-161

The Parkinson's New Zealand Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the salary of six Auckland Parkinson's community educators for the period of 1 October 2019 to 1 October 2020.

$2,000.00

MB1920-162

Children's Autism Foundation

Community

Towards the workshop facilitators charge, travel and mileage costs, project co-ordination and administrative fees.

$1,500.00

MB1920-168

Thrive Teen Parent Support Trust

Community

Towards a young parents' group activities including venue hire, food, transport, communications, volunteers and a speaker contribution from September 2019 to June 2020.

$5,000.00

MB1920-176

Garden to Table

Community

Towards the programme coordinator salary and travel costs to deliver a food education programme to schools in West Auckland.

$5,000.00

MB1920-103

The ReCreators Limited

Environment

Towards the costs for upcycling workshops and to provide educational services in the local board area.

$5,000.00

MB1920-170

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards the purchase of native plants from Te Whangai Trust and Gulf Trees and courier fees for delivering classroom bins, administration and office expenses for recycling for schools and preschools in the local board area.

$8,465.41

MB1920-110

The Korean Society of Auckland Incorporated

Events

Towards the annual event costs for the Korean Day event on 14 March 2020.

$600.00

MB1920-151

New Zealand Nepal Society Incorporated

Events

Towards the 'Nepal Festival 2020' including audio visual hire, insurance, waste management, marketing, travel and operational costs.

$8,007.50

MB1920-159

United North Piha Lifeguard Service Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the costs of structural engineering, detailed design plans, project management and consent fees for the Lifeguard Facility Replacement Project.

$5,250.00

Total

 

 

 

$97,703.01

 

 

Do not delete this line

Horopaki

Context https://acintranet.aklc.govt.nz/EN/workingatcouncil/techandtools/infocouncil/Pages/Context.aspx

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board adopted the Henderson-Massey Local Board Community Grants Programme 2019/2020 on 16 April 2019 and will operate two quick response, two multiboard and two local grant rounds for this financial year.

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

11. Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage. Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department, will provide input and advice.

14.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Henderson-Massey Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

16.     The board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

17.     A summary of each application received through Henderson-Massey Local Grants, Round One 2019/2020 and multi-board applications is provided in Attachment B and Attachment C.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

19.     Twenty-three applicants applying to local grant round one, has indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

21.     The Henderson-Massey local board has set a total community grants budget of $181,660.69 for the 2019/2020 financial year.

22.     In round one of the Henderson-Massey Local Grants 2019/2020, 21 applications were received requesting a total of $86,957.68 and 24 multiboard applications requesting a total of $97,703.01.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Following the Henderson-Massey Local Board allocating funding for round one of the local grants and multiboard, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Henderson-Massey Local Board Grants Programme 2019/2020

17

b

Henderson-Massey Local Grants Round One 2019/2020 applications

19

c

Henderson-Massey Multiboard Grants Round One 2019/2020 applications

107

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Erin Shin - Community Grants Coordinator

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Shane King - Head of Service Support

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Te Pae o Kura/Kelston Community Centre Comprehensive Renewal

File No.: CP2019/13323

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Kelston Community Centre Needs Assessment and Options Analysis Report and to approve a preferred option for the comprehensive renewal of Te Pae o Kura/Kelston Community Centre.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Te Pae o Kura was identified and approved for comprehensive renewal in the 2018/2019 Community Facilities work programme. To assist in determining needs and priorities for the project an operational review and a building survey were required.

3.       The Kelston Community Centre Needs Assessment and Options Analysis Report concludes that at present the centre is well used as a venue for hire but is not fully meeting ‘community’ needs. The facility is fit for purpose by hirers but needs internal refurbishment.

4.       Building investigation and survey work has identified various weather tightness defects and elements of the building that are considered to be at or nearing the end of their serviceable life.

5.       Four options have been identified, with initial cost estimates, for potential building work in light of both the needs assessment and building condition assessment, as follows:

·    Option 1 – Exterior remediation and interior refurbishment works - $5,800,000

·    Option 2 – Demolition and rebuild of the building - $10,750,000

·    Option 3 – Exterior remediation and interior reconfiguration/refurbishment - $6,040,000

·    Option 4 – Do nothing – undertake repair works as required - $200,000 plus annually.

6.       At a workshop held in June 2019 the local board indicated their support for Option 3.

7.       There is currently insufficient budget allocated to the project to deliver Option 3. Additional Asset Based Services Capital – Renewals and Locally Driven Initiative budget would need to be allocated to deliver the project.

8.       Concept design work is required to help determine priorities, timelines and budget requirements for specific work elements.  This information will enable staff to provide further advice to the local board on budget allocation and the impact of the boards overall community facilities work programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receives the ‘Kelston Community Centre Needs Assessment and Options Analysis Report’ dated April 2019 as attachment to the agenda report.

b)      approves Option 3 – comprehensive building renewal with interior upgrade including exterior remediation works, interior refurbishment works and repurposing of the interior common area to accommodate a space to substitute the basement area for the future comprehensive renewal of Te Pae o Kura/Kelston Community Centre.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board identified the undertaking of an operational review of the Kelston Community Centre as a priority in its 2018/2019 financial year work programme.  Any operational review needed to be informed by a community needs assessment.  With funding support from the local board this assessment was completed by Mobius Research and its findings workshopped with the local board in March 2019.

Operational Review

10.     The Mobius Report (Attachment A) provides information about the following:

·    current users and uses

·    current user perceptions of and experiences with the facility

·    how the community is changing

·    how this facility fits into the network of facilities in the area.

11.     Key conclusions from the needs assessment are:

·    At present Te Pae o Kura is well used as a venue for hire serving the West Auckland community but has potential to offer more value to the local community through a change to its operating focus.

·    The facility is considered to be fit for purpose by its hirers and users but needs internal refurbishment.

·    There is an opportunity for the community centre to become a key community facility with Council coordinated and community-led activities, rather than simply as a venue for hire.

·    The community centre has not been positioned or promoted as a facility for the local community.

12.     The Mobius Kelston Community Centre Needs Assessment and Options Analysis Report April 2019 will inform any changes to the existing operational model of the centre that will be considered once the future building remediation option is confirmed.  Any proposed changes to the operational model will be workshopped with the board before implementation.

Building Investigation and Survey

13.     As part of the investigation stage for the Te Pae o Kura comprehensive renewal, a weather tightness and remediation review report has been completed for the exterior of the building. A building survey was completed, with limited invasive and destructive testing undertaken, to provide an assessment as to the extent of damage and any likely future damage. A visual survey was also undertaken of the roofs to determine the current condition and recommend remedial and maintenance work required.

14.     The building was constructed over 44 years ago (as per the property file). The building is no longer compliant with current standards and codes. Based on site investigation the following areas and defects have been deemed likely to result in significant leaking in the short to medium term:

·    poor detailed roof/wall junctions.

·    lack of adequate drainage including poorly detailed and installed internal and external gutters.

·    deteriorating condition of the fibre cement (asbestos) roofs (medium term).

·    poorly detailed and installed joinery units.

·    deteriorated timber weatherboard cladding in isolated locations (medium term).

·    corrosion and deterioration of the metal flashing at the concrete blockwork and timber weatherboard junctions.

·    widespread evidence of moisture ingress via the timber weatherboard cladding, internal and external gutters and joinery units.

·    timber framing decayed in the locations along with deteriorated flooring and deteriorated building paper.

·    the fibre cement (asbestos) roofs were also observed to be in a deteriorated condition which poses a health and safety risk, if adequate controls are not implemented.

15.     Additional to the building investigation and survey it has been determined that the interior of the building requires considerable refurbishment to comply with current building standards and to modernise it, improve energy efficiency and to meet customer expectations.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Scope of exterior remedial works required

16.     As a result of the various weather tightness defects identified, and the fact that visibly decayed timber framing was observed, along with elements considered to be at or nearing the end of their useful serviceable life, it is recommended that extensive remedial works be carried out on Te Pae o Kura.  This work consists of:

·    full replacement of the joinery units

·    full re-clad of the timber weatherboard cladding, including replacement of all decay damaged timber framing

·    replacement of the metal and fibre cement (asbestos) roofs and associated drainage, underlay and flashings etc. from the limited destructive and invasive testing, it is recommended that an allowance of 50 per cent for timber replacement to the walls and internal gutters to the roof areas

·    Due to the presence of asbestos at the building, a Demolition and Refurbishment Survey will be completed to identify the presence of asbestos in areas affected by the remedial works. All asbestos related works are required to be carried out in accordance with the Health and Safety at Work (Asbestos) Regulations 2016. Other consequential works are also required to ensure compliance with the building code. These works include the installation of new concrete nibs to where re-cladding works are being undertaken (at ground floor), modifications to the roof structures and drainage and internal works such as replacement of wall and ceiling linings.

17.     The interior of the building requires considerable refurbishment to modernise it.  This work includes:

·    investigation to install an additional roof on the main floor area, renewal of the main kitchen, upgrade of plumbing and drainage

·    replacing doors, windows, blinds and curtains and renewal of carpets and wall coverings

·    upgrade of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning system

·    upgrade of entrance lighting.

18.     The estimated cost of necessary exterior remediation work is $3,400,000, while the estimated cost for internal refurbishment works is $2,800,000.

19.     The exterior and interior investigation and estimates were prepared by two different consultants. These estimates have been thoroughly reviewed and staff have undertaken an options analysis to justify the proposed work which bought down the overall cost from a combined total of $6,200,000 to $5,800,000.

20.     The current approved allocation of funding for the comprehensive renewal of Te Pae o Kura is $1,811,500 over four financial years and is shown in some detail in paragraph 30 below.

21.     An options analysis was undertaken which considered the full extent of the required work both exterior and interior works.  This is shown in the table below:

Options

 

Scope

High Level Estimated Cost (based on 2019 market rates)

Breakdown of high level estimated cost

(based on 2019 market rates)

Option 1 – comprehensive building renewal

Exterior remediation works and interior refurbishment works.

$5,800,000

 

Exterior remediation $3,400,000

Interior refurbishment $2,400,000

Option 2 – remove and replace building

The cost to remove the asbestos, demolish the building and rebuild. The estimate is a broad order of costs to construct a building of comparable size and specification.

 

$10,750,000

Demolition

$980,000

Rebuild

$9,770,000

Option 3 – comprehensive building renewal with interior upgrade

Exterior remediation works, interior refurbishment works and repurposing of the interior common area to accommodate a space to substitute basement area.

 

$6,040,000

Exterior remediation $3,4000,000

Interior refurbishment $2,400,000

Common area conversion $240,000

Option 4 – do nothing

Do nothing – do not undertake work to remediate the external building issues and refurbish the building interior.  Undertake mitigation works annually.

 $200,000+

 annually

 

The annual cost will escalate over the years as the building further deteriorates.

 

22.     As outlined above Option 1 and Option 3 will both involve replacement of roofs, exterior cladding and flashings, joinery, and the refurbishment of the interior of the building. Option 3 also includes the design and construction of a new room in the existing main floor area.

23.     Option 1 is recommended by staff as the suitable option for the continued and required level of service and the most cost effective.

24.     Option 1 or Option 3 will ensure that the facility is available to service the community needs for another 25 years.

25.     Option 2, to demolish the existing building and replace it with a new building is not recommended due to the significant cost associated with the option.

26.     Option 4, to do nothing is also not a recommended option. This option will create ongoing issues and costs, both of which will escalate as the building ages, and would be likely to lead to a fall in use and a loss of revenue.

Opportunities to update the facility

27.     This project provides opportunity to upgrade areas of the building and this will be explored during the concept design phase of the project. Any works which upgrades the building by extending its current footprint will require the allocation of locally driven initiative capex funding and will be thoroughly discussed with the local board.

Temporary mitigation works

28.     While future budget is being secured to progress these works, temporary mitigation works are proposed to minimise further water ingress and subsequent damage. This temporary work will begin in August 2019 and expected to cost approximately $90,000.  Asset Based Services (ABS) Renewals Opex will be sought for this work. The building can remain open whilst this work in undertaken.

29.     These temporary mitigation repairs do not address the construction defects to this building due to no short-term solutions being viable and therefore there is a risk that these defects will continue to allow water ingress.

30.     It is recommended that the building be inspected on an annual basis, until permanent works are undertaken to ensure the building remains safe for continued use. Further temporary mitigation works may be deemed necessary if identified during annual inspections. There is also a likelihood that reactive maintenance will be required in the event that leaks manifest.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     Community Places and Community Facilities have worked together to consider options for the future of Te Pae o Kura, ensuring the right outcome for the facility and its users. This approach aims to improve the quality of advice for the local board through collaboration and understanding across departments.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     Should the local board choose to progress with Option 1 or Option 3, the facility will be closed for 12 to 18 months during the construction period for the remediation works.  Facility users will be provided with options for alternative space, suitable for their needs. 

33.     If Option 2 is chosen, to demolish and rebuild the facility the construction period is likely to be 12 to 24 months. 

34.     Option 4, to do nothing, would eventually lead to the closure of the facility and is therefore not the recommended option.

35.     Staff attended workshops with the Henderson-Massey Local Board on 12 March 2019 and 25 June 2019 to discuss findings of the Mobius Needs Assessment and Options Analysis Report and the weather tightness and remediation review report.

36.     The local board indicated on 25 June 2019 that their preferred option is Option 3 – exterior remediation works, interior refurbishment works and repurposing of the interior common area to accommodate a space to substitute the basement area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     There is a higher than City average Māori population in the Te Pae o Kura catchment area indicating that there is potential for increased Māori involvement and use of the centre.  The renaming of the centre presents an opportunity to renew and strengthen its local identity and focus. There is an opportunity to make the centre more responsive to local Māori needs.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     Asset Based Services Capital - Renewals funding for the comprehensive renewal of this community facility has been included in the Henderson-Massey Local Board Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew Work Programme 2019-2022 as follows:

 

Financial year

Work description

Budget allocation

2018/2019

·    Investigate and scope required work.

$37,500

2019/2020

·    Investigate and scope required work.

·    Detailed design and consenting.

·    Undertake remedial work.

$250,000

2020/2021

·    Detailed design and consenting.

·    Plan and undertake physical work

$1,234,000

2021/2022

·    Plan and undertake physical work

$290,000

Total

$1,811,500

 

31.     Following the completion of the concept design phase staff will provide the local board with a revised community facilities work programme for their consideration and approval.  This will outline priorities, timelines and the overall effect of the required work on the local board’s future programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     The weather tightness and remediation review report undertaken to date was non-invasive and therefore its author has made some assumptions to provide high level cost estimates. There is a risk that unforeseen damage and issues are present in the building that cannot be detected through this type of review however a contingency sum has been allowed as a part of the high-level cost estimate.

33.     Refurbishment of the facility will be disruptive to users and alternative facilities will need to be found to accommodate the needs of these users.

34.     Budget requirements for delivery of Options 1, 2 and 3 are significant and would require the allocation of the local boards Asset Based Services Capital - Renewals budget and Locally Driven Initiative budget (for Options 2 and 3). Allocation of budget to this project in the short term would be likely to require the deferral of currently approved projects, which may in turn have implications on the performance of those assets. Staff will provide an assessment of any potential implications of reallocation of budgets from currently approved projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Temporary mitigation work will be undertaken to ensure the building remains open and available for community use.

36.     Staff will begin work on concept designs for the boards preferred option.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Kelston Community Centre Needs Assessment and Optons Analysis Report  (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Helen Biffin - Work Programme Lead

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Riverpark Reserve: playground upgrade - additional budget allocation

File No.: CP2019/14327

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Henderson-Massey Local Board for additional Locally Driven Initiative Capex funding to be allocated to the Riverpark Reserve playground upgrade project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Riverpark Reserve playground is currently being upgraded at the request of the Henderson-Massey Local Board.

3.       Funding for the project consists of Locally Driven Initiative Capex funding and Asset Based Services Renewal funding.

4.       The true and final cost of the project is $240,067.  The current budget allocation for the project is $214,000.  Additional cost has been incurred with the requirement to undertake modifications to ensure compliance with the New Zealand Safety Standards and to ensure the safety of playground users.  This work added to the original cost estimate for the project.  This leaves shortfall of $26,067.

5.       Budget allocation approval of $26,067 of Locally Driven Initiative Capex funding is being sought.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      approve the allocation of an additional $26,067 of Locally Driven Initiative Capex funding to enable the completion of the playground upgrade at Riverpark Reserve.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board requested an upgrade of the existing small playground at Riverpark Reserve. During the scoping of the project the estimated costs were provided and associated funding was approved by the local board.

7.       The existing playground consists of a swing set and a small slide module.  The concept design for the upgraded playground includes: an upgraded swing set with basket swing, a natural play trail through the playground with steeping logs, balance beams and climbing stilts, park furniture, a flying fox, connecting footpaths, subsoil drainage, fall surfacing and edging.  The concept design was approved by the board on 11 December 2018.

8.       To date an allocation of $164,000 Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) Capex and $50,000 ABS Renewals funding has been approved during the 2017/2018 and 2018/2019 financial years to a total of $214,000.  A breakdown of the allocation is shown in table 1 below.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The Playground Safety Assessor review determined that cushionfall depths were insufficient and therefore further excavation and concreting was required to meet New Zealand Safety Standards. This is essential work to ensure compliance and the safety of playground users.  Additionally due to the tight project completion timeline, track mats were hired to decrease site damage in the wet weather. These requirements added to the original cost estimate for the project.

10.     Table 1 below shows the budgeting history and shortfall for the project:

Table 1: Funding allocation

Resolution number

Year resolved

Funding type

Project Delivery items

Budget allocated

HM/2017/156

FY2017/2018

LDI Capex

Consultation and design

$10,000

HM/2017/156

FY2017/2018

LDI Capex

Installation of fitness equipment in FY2019/2020

$4,000

HM/2018/112

FY2018/2019

LDI Capex

Physical work

$100,000

HM/2018/112

FY2018/2019

ABS Renewals

Physical work

$50,000

HM/2018/211

FY2018/2019

LDI Capex

Paths and drainage improvements

$50,000

 

 

 

Total currently allocated

$214,000

 

 

LDI Capex

Shortfall for modifications to meet safety standards

$26,067

 

 

 

Total project cost

$240,067

 

Options Analysis

11.     As outlined above the budget shortfall is required for essential safety and compliance work to be undertaken as a part of the playground upgrade.  If the budget shortfall is approved by the project will be completed and the playground will be compliant and able to be opened.  Should the additional $26,067 not be approved, the playground will not receive the compliance certificate and the playground will not be able to be opened

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     The project to upgrade the Riverpark Reserve playground is supported by the Park Services team within Community Services.

 Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     The playground upgrade is a community driven initiative and is well supported by residents in the area around Riverpark Reserve and its completion will be celebrated.

14.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board support the upgrade of the playground and at a workshop held on 16 July 2019 were made aware of the requirement for the allocation of additional LDI Capex funding to complete the project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     The project to upgrade the Riverpark Reserve playground will benefit the local community including its Māori residents.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     Henderson-Massey Local Board currently have unallocated LDI Capex budget that can be allocated towards the shortfall in this project.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     As outlined above, the budget shortfall is required for essential safety and compliance work to be undertaken during the playground upgrade.  Should the additional $26,067 not be approved, the playground will not receive the required compliance certificate to open it to the public.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     Following approval of the additional required LDI Capex budget, the playground upgrade project will be completed and the playground opened for public use.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Helen Biffin - Work Programme Lead

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Henderson-Massey Connections Plan

File No.: CP2019/14049

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek Henderson-Massey Local Board adoption of the Henderson-Massey Connections Plan (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Henderson-Massey Connections Plan (Connections Plan) was undertaken to identify opportunities to improve walking and cycling in the Henderson-Massey local board area.   The intent of the Connections Plan is to create pedestrian and cycle connections between communities and destinations, encouraging safe travel and a reduction in vehicle use for local trips.

3.       The Connections Plan outlines a high-level vision for the development of connections through parks and on-road within the Henderson-Massey Local Board area, and neighbouring local board areas, to assist the local board in decision-making.

4.       The overall consultation included workshops with local board members, Mana Whenua, internal and external stakeholders, targeted engagement with specific interest groups, public drop-in sessions and wider online public engagement.

5.       The final Henderson-Massey Connections Plan for adoption is attached (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      adopt the Henderson-Massey Connections Plan (August, 2019) to assist the local board in decision-making to improve pedestrian and cycle connections throughout the local board area.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Henderson-Massey Connections Plan (August, 2019) is a strategic document which shows connectivity within the Henderson-Massey Local Board area and connectivity into neighbouring local board areas.

7.       The Connections Plan was developed through the following process:

a)   Background research including GIS mapping and researching neighbouring greenways plans

b)   Targeted consultation, meeting with mana whenua, workshops with key stakeholders and working group meetings

c)   Public engagement through two drop-in sessions at community events and online ‘Have Your Say’ surveys

d)   Henderson-Massey Local Board adoption of the Connections Plan

 

8.       Phases a) to c) have been completed and the project team are now seeking local board adoption of the Henderson-Massey Connections Plan (Attachment A).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       Seven focus areas have been defined, centred around destinations and key connections.  Each focus area has key routes and connections which will improve the network.  The focus areas can be viewed in Part Four – Focus Areas (Page 24-41). The seven focus areas a

·    Massey Westgate

·    West Harbour Royal Heights

·    Te Atatū Peninsula

·    Bridwood, Ranui, Sturges, Western Heights and Sunnyvale (west)

·    Lincoln

·    Te Atatū South, Glendene and Sunnyvale (east)

·    Henderson

10.     At the time of development of the Connections Plan the Henderson town centre was being investigated by Auckland Transport and Panuku Development, to improve walking and cycling connections.  The focus area of Henderson has been used as a placeholder and can be updated once the ongoing investigation works are completed. 

11.     The key routes and connections for each focus area have not been prioritised.  Prioritisation of connections located within parks and reserves will be undertaken and this is one of the projects in the Parks Sports and Recreation 2019/2020 work programme adopted by the local board at the June 2019 meeting (HM/2019/83). 

12.     Connections within the road corridor sit with Auckland Transport.  The local board can discuss the prioritisation or further investigation of these connections with Auckland Transport.

13.     As connections and associated projects are progressed through investigation and design, further opportunities will arise to undertake community consultation and shape community aspirations within the design phases.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Throughout the development and finalisation of the draft Connections Plan, engagement with internal partners, including Auckland Transport, was undertaken to assist with drafting the plan. Council group impacts and views have been included in the final plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     The Connections Plan aligns to the Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan 2017 Outcome 5: It is easy to get around without a car.  The key objective of this outcome is for safe footpaths and cycleways that enable people to reach key destinations in a timely manner.

16.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board approved the development of a connections plan at their 19 June 2018 meeting (HM/2018/86). Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) funding was allocated to develop this plan as part of the 2018/2019 Parks Sport and Recreation (PSR) Work Programme.

17.     During the course of the project, Henderson-Massey Local Board members have been consulted on the project methodology, key milestones and engagement approach.  Local Board members Shane Henderson (Chair) and Vanessa Neeson were members of the project working group created to review the development of the plan as it progressed. 

18.     The draft Connections Plan was discussed on 25 June 2019 at a Henderson-Massey Local Board workshop. Members supported the document’s vision for improving connections in their local board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     This project was discussed at the Parks Sport and Recreation North-West Mana Whenua Forum on 6 March 2019.  Ngā Maunga Whakahii O Kaipara and Te Kawerau ā Maki identified their interest in the development of the Plan.

20.     A further workshop was held with Ngā Maunga Whakahii O Kaipara who provided direction on using Te Aranga design principles as a framework to capture Mana Whenua values and aspirations for this project. This has been captured within the document under Section 5.3 Te Aranga Design Principles (page 45).

21.     Iwi have reviewed the draft Connections Plan and support further engagement as projects develop and specific sites can be further investigated.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The key routes and connections outlined within the plan identify a range of connections at a strategic level.  These routes and connections can be delivered in any order, as and when funding and other opportunities arise through local board, Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, community support and developer initiatives.

23.     To initiate projects based on activities in the Community Parks and Places work programme, further LDI investment may be required. If recommended outcomes are agreed, staff will work with the local board to identify possible opportunities for funding as part of the proposed Community Facilities work programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigationshttps://acintranet.aklc.govt.nz/EN/workingatcouncil/techandtools/infocouncil/Pages/Risks.aspx

24.     There is an inherent risk in investing in investigation and design to initiate a project when there is no capital funding identified to deliver the physical work components.

25.     The investigation and design phase of the project delivery may identify issues that require the feasibility of routes to be reassessed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     The Connections Plan identifies desired outcomes for existing and new connections. Detail on the activities that will deliver on the agreed outcomes will require investigation, design and community engagement.

27.     The adopted Connections Plan will be used to prioritise connections as part of the PSR 2019/2020 Work Programme adopted at the June 2019 local board business meeting (HM/2019/83).  Candidate projects can then be included in the Community Facilities future work programmes to be delivered through investigation and design.

28.     As each identified connection is progressed, further engagement will be undertaken with the local board, mana whenua, relevant key stakeholders, community groups and the local community.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Henderson-Massey Connections Plan (August, 2019) (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tracey Hodder - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Play Network Gap Analysis

File No.: CP2019/14045

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Henderson-Massey Play Network Gap Analysis, June 2019, (Attachment A) for adoption.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Henderson-Massey Play Network Gap Analysis, June 2019, was undertaken to identify opportunities to improve the network of play experiences in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area.  The assessment identifies key opportunities through the analysis of current parks play network provision.

3.       The purpose of the Play Network Gap Analysis is to:

a)   Analyse and assess the current play network provision within the local board area to identify areas where projected population increase will place a demand on the parks network.

b)   Identify and evaluate opportunities and gaps in the network and identify areas with the most opportunity for development.

c)   Highlight opportunities for improving the diversity of experiences across the network.

d)   Provide a tool for discussion and feedback on how the Henderson-Massey Local Board invests in play by providing strategic planning context to the provision of play across the parks network.

4.       The Play Network Gap Analysis identifies key opportunities to improve the levels of service, responding to key outcomes in the 2017 Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan and Auckland Council’s strategic documents.  

5.       The Play Network Gap Analysis will guide parks specific improvement to the provision of play experiences in the Henderson-Massey area.  Feedback from the Henderson-Massey Local Board has been incorporated into the report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      adopt the Henderson-Massey Play Network Gap Analysis June 2019 (Attachment A) to assist the local board in decision-making to improve their network of play experiences.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Play is what children and young people do when they follow their ideas and interests, in their own way and for their own reasons. It is how they explore and make sense of the world and learn to take responsibility for their own decisions. Play takes many varied forms and happens in a wide variety of settings. Play can be boisterous and noisy, quiet and contemplative, creative, imaginative, physically challenging, thoughtful, enjoyed alone or in the company of others, and may seem to have no purpose at all to the outside onlooker.

7.       Places people play range from individual backyards, neighbourhood streets, local parks to formal play spaces, beaches, regional parks and town centres. A play network consists of a group of interconnected places, where play is encouraged both formally and informally, throughout a neighbourhood, community and the wider city.

8.       The Play Network Gap Analysis (Attachment A) was executed in six stages to establish gaps in play provision and priorities at individual play space and network level:

a)      Preparation of Key Network Prioritisation Principles, definitions (including identifying radial catchment distances) and data capture to inform overall network assessment and recommendations.

b)      Individual play space site visits to collect raw data and record information on data capture spreadsheets.

c)      Raw data collation and map preparation, to articulate existing play provision, gaps in provision and relationships between individual play spaces.

d)      Preparation of population analysis maps addressing current and projected population trends and changes in population density.

e)      Analysis of play provision relationships at a network level, evaluating data to rationalise geographic provision and communicate options for network extension or consolidation as applicable.

f)       Preparation of concise commentary at a network level, moderating play space recommendations where necessary to accurately reflect network requirements and priorities.

9.       This document is aligned strategically to the following Auckland Council guiding documents;

·    The Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan 2017

·    Tākaro - Investing in Play (draft)

·    The Auckland Plan

·    Parks and Open Spaces Acquisition Policy 2013

·    Auckland Council Open Space Provision Policy 2016

·    Open Space Strategic Asset Management Plan 2015-2025

·    Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan 2013

·    Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan 2014-2024

·    Auckland Design Manual

10.     The purpose of the Key Network Opportunities Table (page 20) is to identify high, medium and low development priorities to improve the play network.  This information is a starting point for discussions with the local board and community to guide potential park improvements, to create an even distribution of play provision across the network.  Further feasibility studies and investigation would be required as each opportunity is progressed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Play network assessment

a)   Generally, play spaces are evenly distributed across the Henderson-Massey Local Board area.  Play spaces range from small neighbourhood play spaces, with limited experience and age provision through to suburb play spaces and destination play spaces like those at Tui Glen Reserve and Royal Reserve.

b)   Geographic gaps have been identified in Te Atatu Peninsula, southwest Rānui, Westgate and Red Hills areas.  Westgate and Red Hills are within growth areas and either have play spaces currently in development or require acquisition of land prior to development.  Some instances of over supply have also been identified.

c)   Play spaces typically provide climbing/crawling, swinging and sliding play experiences as a baseline minimum.  Specialised play experiences such as water, sand, sound and nature play are lacking within the play network.

d)   Nearly all play spaces cater to the early childhood and junior age groups (under eight years old).  The exception to this is Te Rangi Hiroa Reserve which was designed to provide challenging play experiences for older children and teenagers.  Most gaps in age group provision are associated with seniors (9-12 years) and youth (13+ years).

Opportunities to improve the play network

a)   There is great opportunity to enrich the play experience for all ages, abilities, and cultures across the Henderson-Massey Local Board area.

b)   Current provision of play types is repetitive, standardised and could be further enhanced.  Specialised play experiences could be expanded across the network with an emphasis on play facilities to offer more experiences for the senior and youth age group.

c)   Creative use of renewals budgets is key to revitalising play spaces in the communities that will not experience major population growth. Revitalisation can be achieved by adding more variation and challenge to equipment types, additional planting, nature play elements (logs, rocks, or other local materials). ‘Play along the way’ can be encouraged through playful paint marking on footpaths, and small interventions such as stepping stones, balance logs, or a sculpture piece.

d)   Universal/accessible design principles need to be at the forefront of renewals, to ensure all members of the community have access to a formal play space and have some choice in the kind of play experience they would like to enjoy, either on their own or in the company of friends and family.

e)   A number of new play spaces have been identified to fill geographic gaps at a neighbourhood level.  Optimisation of certain sites has been proposed and would require further investigation to determine if decommissioning, relocation or development in a complementary manner would best improve the play network.

Specific opportunity areas are detailed in Attachment A (pages 18–22)

11.     Staff are recommending that the local board resolves to adopt the Henderson-Massey Play Network Gap Analysis, to inform future playground development and renewals, and help guide the decision-making process.

12.     When opportunities identified within the assessment are initiated, the engagement process will be tailored to facilitate community feedback as appropriate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     This assessment will assist Community Facilities to plan future work programmes and to improve play spaces through the programmed renewals process.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     This project aligns to outcomes in the Henderson-Massey Board Plan; Outcome 4: Community facilities are vibrant and welcoming places at the heart of our communities; Extend the variety of play and exercise experiences for a range of ages and abilities. 

15.     The PSR 18/19 Work Programme was approved by the Henderson-Massey Local Board on 19 June 2018 (HM/2018/86). A strategic assessment of play provision in Henderson-Massey was included in the programme.

16.     Workshops were held with the local board on 12 March 2019 (80% draft) and 28 May 2019, where the Parks and Places Specialist presented the draft Play Network Gap Analysis (Attachment A). The local board expressed a strong desire to improve their play network especially in areas of high deprivation.  Based on feedback received at these workshops, staff prepared the attached amended draft.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     The PSR 18/19 Work Programme was presented to the Parks Sport and Recreation North-Western Mana Whenua Hui in July 2018. 

18.     The work undertaken in the Parks and Places Team Work programme has been designed to enable meaningful engagement with iwi by outlining the potential opportunities and the how it will deliver on the outcomes identified in the Local Board Plan.

19.     Projects that are initiated from this assessment will be presented again to the North-Western Mana Whenua Hui. Iwi will have the opportunity to express interest in the projects and indicate how they would like to be involved in the project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     Locally Delivered Initiatives (LDI) investment may be required to initiate projects identified within the assessment. Staff will work with Community Facilities to identify possible opportunities for funding as part of the future work programmes.  Future work programmes will be discussed with the local board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     The is an inherent risk in investing in investigation and design to initiate a project when there is no capital funding identified to deliver the physical work components.

22.     The investigation and design phase of project delivery may identify issues that require the feasibility of the project to be reassessed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

23.     The Play Network Gap Analysis assessment is designed to agree on desired play outcomes at a network level. Detail on the activities that will deliver on the identified opportunities will require detailed investigation and community engagement.

24.     The Community Services 2019/2020 Work Programme adopted in June 2019 (HM/2019/83) includes the development of a service assessment for an all accessible play space and a programme to guide the delivery of play experiences within the local board area.  Both work programme items will be discussed further with the local board as the projects progress.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Henderson-Massey Play Network Gap Analysis, June 2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tracey Hodder - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Approval for a New Road Name at 6, 8 & 9 Hulme Place, Henderson 

File No.: CP2019/14220

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Henderson-Massey Local Board to name a new private road, being a commonly owned access lot, created by way of a subdivision development at 6, 8 & 9 Hulme Place, Henderson (Stage 1).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has Road Naming Guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, Shah Homes Ltd, agent EMACS Group Ltd has proposed the following names for consideration by the Local Board:

·    Nashwa Place (Applicant Preferred)

·    Ruruku Place (Alternative 1)

·    Hangi Place (Alternative 2)

4.       Any of the three proposed road name options would be acceptable for the local board to approve for use in this location, having been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met and the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region. Mana Whenua were also consulted. Therefore it is up to the local board to decide upon the thematic suitability of the names within the local context.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)   approve the name Nashwa Place for the new private road created by way of subdivision at 6, 8 & 9 Hulme Place, Henderson in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent reference BUN30578717, SUB60039915).

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Resource consent BUN30578717 & SUB60039915 (SUB-2016-1561) was issued 15 September 2017 for the construction of 15 new dwellings and one commonly owned access lot (COAL) for Stage 1 of the development, under the Housing Accords and Special Housing Area Act 2013 (HASHAA).

6.       The remaining Stage (2) will be completed at a later stage, including the extension of the COAL and the construction of additional residential dwellings.

7.       In accordance with the National Addressing Standards for road naming (the AS/NZS 4819-2011 standard), the COAL requires a road name because it serves more than 5 lots.

8.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B respectively.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

10.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

-   a historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

-   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

-   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

11.     Theme: The applicant has proposed some names from Maori culture, as well as a name that represents happiness (from their own culture).

12.     The Applicant’s proposed names and meanings are set out in the table below:

Proposed Names & Preferences

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Nashwa Place

(applicant preferred)

Arabic word meaning:  Elation, feeling of great happiness/ ecstasy

The applicant wants the new dwellings in this development to provide happiness to the new residents, and for people to live in happiness there - therefore they have chosen a name that means great happiness to encourage a sense of positivity in the local environment.

Ruruku Place

(alternative 1)

Maori word with several meanings; Commitment, to coordinate, or to draw together, bind or lash together.

This word can be seen to represent the drawing together of the development and of the new residents, as well as the applicant’s commitment to the completion and success of the development. The applicant commented that “This name is proposed to contribute to the visibility of Auckland’s extensive and rich Maori history.”

Hangi Place

(alternative 2)

Maori word meaning: Earth oven - to cook food with steam and heat from heated stones.

The applicant again commented, “This name is proposed to contribute to the visibility of Auckland’s extensive and rich Maori history.”

 

13.     Assessment: The names proposed by the Applicant have been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met and the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region, therefore it is up to the local board to decide upon the thematic suitability of the names within the local context.

14.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has also confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

15.     Road type: ‘Place’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the road, as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

16.     Iwi Consultation: All relevant local iwi were written to by the applicant (via email) and invited to comment. Only Ngati Whatua responded to defer their interest to the remaining Mana Whenua groups, who in return did not respond. No other iwi provided responses or comments. It is therefore implied that no iwi were opposed to the use of any of the proposed names in this location for this small private road.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The review sought from the Henderson-Massey Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity. Two Maori road name options have been proposed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan for 6, 8, 9 Hulme Place Henderson

253

b

Location plan for 6 - 9 Hulme Place Henderson

255

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Road Name Approval: Two New Private Roads created by way of Subdivision at 10-32 Titoki Street, Te Atatu

File No.: CP2019/14486

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Henderson-Massey Local Board to name two new private roads, being commonly owned access lots (COALs), created by way of a subdivision development at 10-32 Titoki Street, Te Atatu, by Fletcher Residential Ltd.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has Road Naming Guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       The Applicant, Fletcher Residential Ltd, has proposed the following names for consideration by the Local Board:

Private Road 1 (Commonly Owned Access / COAL):

·   Semadeni Lane - preferred name

·   Illingsworth Lane - alternative name

·   Payter Lane - alternative name

Private Road 2 (Commonly Owned Access / COAL):

·   Orukuwai Lane - preferred name

·   Shell Lane - alternative name

·   Elsie Thomas Lane - alternative name

4.       Any of the six proposed road name options would be acceptable for the Local Board to approve for use in this location, having been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met and the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region.

5.       Mana Whenua were also consulted, supporting the Te Reo Maori name option, and stating that they were not opposed to the other non-Te Reo option. Therefore it is up to the local board to decide upon the thematic suitability of the names within the local context.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      approve the following names for the two new private roads (commonly owned access lots) created by way of subdivision at 10-32 Titoki Street, Te Atatu, by Fletcher Residential Ltd, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent reference BUN60331500):

·   Private Road 1 (COAL): Semadeni Lane

Private Road 2 (COAL): Orukuwai Lane

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent BUN60331500 was issued on the 20th of March 2019 for the construction of 37 residential units including 14 Kiwi Build units and two private roads, being commonly owned access lots (COALs) across a three-stage development.

7.       In accordance with the National Addressing Standards for road naming (the AS/NZS 4819-2011 standard), and as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines, the COALs each require road names because they serve more than 5 address sites.

8.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider / developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

10.   Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

-   a historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

-   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

-   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

 

11.     Assessment: The names proposed by the Applicant have been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met and the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region, therefore it is up to the local board to decide upon the thematic suitability of the names within the local context.

12.     Theme: The applicant has proposed names with a local theme, being early settlers of the Te Atatu Peninsular, as well as some names from the local history of mana whenua Te Kawerau-a-Maki. Use of the applicants preferred name for COAL 1; ‘Semadeni Lane’ is supported by decedents of that family, who were contacted by the applicant (details below). Te Kawerau-a-Maki supported use of the proposed name ‘Orukuwai Lane’. They were also not opposed to use of the name ‘Semadeni Lane’. The use of one Te Reo and one European name is a good balance between local mana whenua and early settler history.

13.     The Applicant’s proposed names and meanings are set out in the table below:

Proposed Names

& Preferences

Meaning (as described by applicant)

 

Source of Information

Semadeni Lane

 Private Road 1

(Preferred Name)

The Semadeni’s were amongst the first European families to arrive in early Te Atatu c1870 (the Baily’s being the first, and then the Moore’s, Roby’s, Semadeni’s, Thomas’s, and McCormack’s). The Semadeni’s were from Switzerland and have lived on Te Atatū peninsula since 1910. They have a presence in the area with the restored historic Semadeni House in Longbush Rd, built in the 1890’s and now overlooking the Harbourview-Orangihina reserve.

Permission from family members / descendants:

On Friday 28/06/2019 Filmer Casper Semadeni was contacted by Fletcher Residential Limited. Filmer is a descendant of the Semadeni’s who were amongst the first families to arrive in Te Atatu. We discussed his stance on the potential for one of one the new roads in the Titoki Street development being named Semadeni Lane. His response was very positive. Additional information around the Semadeni family history (told by Filmer Casper Semadeni) can be found in the Auckland Council Libraries through the link below:

https://kura.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz/digital/?p=r&c=p20062coll9&search=Semadeni&field=all&mode=all&conn=&id=1658&rec=1

Te Atatu Business Association Article: History of Te Atatu Peninsula:

https://www.teatatupeninsula.co.nz/neighbourhood/history

 

Auckland Libraries Article: History of Te Atatu Peninsula:

http://heritageetal.blogspot.com/2018/08/the-semadeni-family-of-te-atatu.html

Illingsworth Lane

Private Road 1

(Alternative 1)

The Illingsworth’s were also amongst the first families to arrive in early Te Atatu c1870. The first shop to be established in Te Atatu was one owned by a Mr Illingsworth, who also later added post office facilities and a petrol pump to the store.

Early Te Atatu c1870 -1920 by Paul Wymer; from Local Article: A History of Te Atatu North

https://markboyd.co.nz/a-short-history-of-te-atatu-peninsula/

Payter Lane

Private Road 1

(Alternative 2)

 

Mr Payter was akin to mayor in early Te Atatu c1870 – 1920, and also one of the richest men around at the time. When electricity was introduced to the area, those wanting it had to pay for the poles as well. Mr Payter was able to erect two street lights, one at ‘the top of the road’ (the main road at the time) and another at where the roundabout in Te Atatu North is now.

Early Te Atatu c1870 -1920 by Paul Wymer; from Local Article: A History of Te Atatu North https://markboyd.co.nz/a-short-history-of-te-atatu-peninsula/

 

Orukuwai Lane

Private Road 2

(Preferred Name)

The original Maori name for the Te Atatu area was Orukuwai, meaning the place of Rukuwai (an ancestor of Te Kawerau-a-Maki). The remains of a large Māori settlement were found in many places on the suburb. European settlement began between 1853-1873 when Thomas Henderson acquired land from the Ngati Whatua and eventually the Crown in 1855.  The area was known as Henderson Point until around 1907-09 when it was renamed Te Atatu ("break of the day" or “dawn”).

 

Te Atatu Business Association Article: History of Te Atatu Peninsula

https://www.teatatupeninsula.co.nz/neighbourhood/history

Also sources listed at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Te_Atatu

Shell Lane

Private Road 2

(Alternative 1)

Some of the first roads in Te Atatu were paved with white shell obtained from the shell banks on the fringe of the mangroves at the north end of the Peninsula. This was done by way of a gantry across the mud flats at the north end of Te Atatu Road.

Later some of the roads were paved with bricks. Records show that three brick works were established before 1900 on the Peninsula. Some of the houses built at this time were also built of brick and an example of this is the restored historic Semadeni House still standing on Longbush Rd (see above descriptions).

 

Auckland Libraries Article: History of Te Atatu Peninsula:

http://heritageetal.blogspot.com/2018/08/the-semadeni-family-of-te-atatu.html

Elsie Thomas Lane

Private Road 2

(Alternative 2)

In early Te Atatu the journey from Henderson to Te Atatu Road presented a 5-mile ride over dirt road covered in shells by a horse and dray. So from town, the quickest way to Te Atatu was 1 hour by launch. This launch was named ‘Elsie’, after Elsie Thomas, the young daughter of the Thomas Family (one of the first families to move in to Te Atatu) who drowned of the boat whilst traveling to Auckland. The launch arrived Saturdays, Tuesdays and Fridays, and food supplies such as bread and meat could be brought in this way. Later on cars and roads were improved.

 

Local Article: A History of Te Atatu North https://markboyd.co.nz/a-short-history-of-te-atatu-peninsula/

 

 

14.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) have confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

15.     Road type: ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new private roads (COALs), suiting the form and layout of the roads, as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

16.     Iwi Consultation: Mana whenua Te Kawerau-a-Maki were contacted and responded in support of the name ‘Orukuwai Lane’, this being their original name for the Te Atatu area and meaning ‘the place of Rukuwai’, an ancestor of Te Kawerau-a-Maki. They were also not opposed to use of the name ‘Semadeni Lane’, commenting: “We understand that Te Atatu is a diverse community and residents need to see their history in the space”. Whilst all relevant mana whenua were contacted regarding the proposed names, no other comments were received regarding the other proposed names. The use of one Te Reo and one European name is a good balance between mana whenua and early settler history.

17.     Permission from family members / descendants: as noted in the above table, the applicant was able to obtain permission and support for use of the name ‘Semadeni Lane’ from a living relative of the family. No other descendants were able to be traced for the remaining historical names.

18.     Full details for sources of local information:

·   Local Article: A History of Te Atatu North, written by various residents of the area and summarised by realtor Mark Boyd. Found at: https://markboyd.co.nz/a-short-history-of-te-atatu-peninsula/

·   Te Atatu Peninsula Business Association Article: History of Te Atatu Peninsula, published on the website of Te Atatu Peninsula Business Association and written by local residents Jim and Josephine Gill whose strong family connection to the Peninsula are very apparent, in three local street names; Gill Avenue is named after Jim’s father Jack who subdivided the land. He fought in Gallipoli, was wounded and returned from the war, eventually becoming the first councillor for Te Atatu on the Waitakere City Council, during the 1960’s. Mayburn Road was named after Jim’s mother May, whose maiden name was Burn and Kelvin Crescent was named after Jim’s brother Kelvin who was known to everyone as Jack and lived on the Peninsula all his life. He died at 89 and Josephine says he was a wonderful character who “built half of Henderson”, through his construction company Bonner Gill. Found at: https://www.teatatupeninsula.co.nz/neighbourhood/history

·    Auckland Libraries Article: The Semadeni Family of Te Atatū Peninsula, published on the Auckland Libraries website – along with additional supporting information from ‘Heritage et AL’ blogspot webpage; unique collections and resources of Auckland Libraries research centres and heritage collections. Found at: http://heritageetal.blogspot.com/

·    Additional sources listed at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Te_Atatu.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The review sought from the Henderson-Massey Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

22.     Te Kawerau-a-Maki supported use of the proposed name ‘Orukuwai Lane’. The use of one Te Reo and one European name is a good balance between local mana whenua and early settler history.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Road Layout & Location - 10-32 Titoki Street, Te Atatu

263

      Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Emerald James - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport Update Report for the Henderson-Massey Local Board – August 2019

File No.: CP2019/13952

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to respond to requests on transport-related matters, provide an update on the current status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF), provide a summary of consultation material sent to the board and, provide transport related information on matters of specific application and interest to the Henderson-Massey Local Board and its community.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In particular, this report:

·    Provides updates on the Local Board Transport Fund projects in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area.

·    Notes consultation information sent to the board for feedback.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Update to the Henderson-Massey Local Board – August 2019 report.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       This report updates the board on Auckland Transport (AT) projects and operations in the local board area, it updates the board on their advocacy and consultations, and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

4.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·    be safe

·    not impede network efficiency

·    be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

6.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board’s funding allocation under the LBTCF was $4,623,969 for the current political term. In addition, there is a sum of $1,253,083 which has been approved by Council and is available from 1 July 2018. 

Henderson Massey Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$5,877,052

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$5,021,103

Remaining Budget left

$855,949

 

Henderson North Zone proposed Residential Speed Management project update – 24 June 2019

7.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board resolved at its December meeting, approving the allocation of up to $1.1 million to the Henderson North Zone proposed Residential Speed Management project. Auckland Transport has awarded the contract to a consultant to carry out the investigation component of this project. 

8.       Consultation closed on the 25 June.  AT will be looking through submissions and was aiming to send out responses by mid-July.  AT has booked a workshop in late August to go through the outcome of the consultation, scheme design and rough order of cost with the Local Board.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

9.       The impact of information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group. Any engagement with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Anastasis Coffee Shop on McLeod Parking Issues

10.     Auckland Transport’s Parking Design team visited the location and spoke to the coffee shop owner. Auckland Transport (AT) are aware that there were a few parking issues opposite the café on McLeod road due to works being done of removing trees. As this work is now completed, there are no longer any issues.

11.     During the site visit, the Parking Designer noted that there was a P60 sign missing, and the road markings were faded. These issues have since been reported to the sign and road marking coordinator to remedy.

12.     AT believe that the current parking restrictions in this area are sufficient for customers visiting the café and the owner of the coffee shop also confirmed that there are no issues with parking in this area and they are happy with the current parking restrictions.

Walking and Cycling on Don Buck Road – Lack of connections to Ranui and Swanson

13.     These kinds of improvements fall within Auckland Transport (AT) Walking and Cycling Programme, which currently includes investment of around $339 million over the next ten years (funding for the Urban Cycleways Programme and Local Board initiatives is additional to the Walking and Cycling Programme).   

 

14.     The allocation of funding within the Walking and Cycling Programme was based on the 2017 Auckland Cycling Programme Business Case. The Business Case identified priority areas for investment based on potential to maximise long-term cycling uptake and safety. The assessment identified 22 focus areas for investment within an assumed total budget of around $600 million.

15.     The 22 focus areas were divided into two groups. The first ‘early start’ group includes network development in the City Centre and Fringe, Central Isthmus and Sandringham, along with selected suburban hubs such as Henderson and Mangere. Investment in these areas is expected to improve accessibility to major employment and education centres, fill network gaps and build on other initiatives. These areas are implementable in the first part of the programme and have few dependencies with other major planned transport infrastructure projects or land use changes.

16.     The remaining focus areas are for later implementation due to interactions with other major transport projects or having slightly lower potential to contribute to investment objectives. An overview of the investment programme can be found at https://at.govt.nz/media/1974167/auckland-cycling-10-year-plan-july-2017.pdf.

17.     Within the currently available Walking and Cycling Programme funding, AT expect to be able to complete the early start areas, along with Manukau, by 2028. Meanwhile the later start areas, will be progressed after this date. Consequently, although Auckland Transport is supportive of cycling improvements outside of these priority areas, funding for any works is not expected to be available until after 2028. Given the ten year wait this may be an area where the Local Board Transport Capital Fund could be employed.

Royal Road School Safety Issues During Drop Off And Pick Up Times

18.     Auckland Transport attended a site meeting with the Royal Road principal and the Local Board in June.  Auckland Transport is investigating the feasibility of low-cost safety improvements in the vicinity of Royal Road Primary and surrounding street.

19.     Once investigations are completed we will report findings back to the local board and the Royal Road Primary School.

Local Board Issues Being Investigated

20.     The Local board have requested the following issues be investigated.  These are still under investigation:

·    Waimanu Bay Reserve, Te Atatu Peninsula speeding and antisocial behaviour Issues

·    13-15 Lincoln Road Footpath repairs – Safety Issue

·    Bruce Mc Laren Road Safety Issues outside Bruce McLaren Intermediate School

·    Central Park Drive Development Issues

·    Sungrove Rise Speeding Issues

 

Consultation documents on proposed improvements

21.     Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Henderson-Massey Local Board for its feedback and are summarised below for information purposes only.

22.     After consultation, Auckland Transport considers the feedback received and determines whether to proceed further with the proposal as consulted on or proceed with an amended proposal if changes are considered necessary.

·    Trading Place - Paved footpath renewal with concrete

·    Proposal for a new footpath on Metcalfe Road in Ranui

·    Te Atatu  Road- Pedestrian Improvements

Local Board Quarterly Summary Report – April to June 2019

Road Safety

23.     Residential Speed Management projects in Te Atatu South have begun construction which will be completed in July and August, respectively. These projects provide a slower speed environment in local residential areas and support safe travel to schools.

School Community Transport – TravelWise Programme - Period April to June 2019

24.     The School Community Transport – TravelWise Programme is attached to this report.

Walking, Cycling and Safety Events – Period April to June 2019

Project Name

Project Description and Avtivitiy

Project Start date

Project Finish Date

Project Phase/Status

Road Safety Campaigns, Education  and Events

· Delivered an alcohol CBT in partnership with the NZ Police

· Delivered a child restraints checking clinic in partnership with Plunket

· Delivered a non-signalised intersection regional campaign

· Delivered a non-signalised intersection checkpoint with NZ Police

· Delivered 2 young driver learner licence workshop

· Delivered a young driver restricted licence workshop

· Deliver a Ākonga (Learner Licence) Workshop with Waipareira Trust
Deliver a free child restraint checking clinic with Top Kidz

· Apr-19

Jun-19

Completed

Road Safety Campaigns, Education  and Events

·  Deliver 3 learner license courses

·  Deliver 3 child restraint checkpoints with NZ Police

·  Deliver a young driver’s enforcement

·  Deliver 2 motorcycle/moped workshops

·  Deliver a regional red-light running campaign

                                          

Jul-19

Sep-19

On-going

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for the transport projects undertaken in the local board area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Auckland Transport provides the Henderson-Massey Local Board with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in the local

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Quarter 4 Schools - Henderson Massey Local Board Quarterly report

271

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Owena Schuster - Elected Members Relationship Manager (Western Boards)

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon - Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Allocation of Henderson-Massey Local Board  Community Safety Fund

File No.: CP2019/13959

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of the report is for the Board to consider how to allocate its share of the Community Safety Fund to road safety projects in its area and to decide on a prioritised list of projects to fully utilise the Henderson-Massey Local Board area’s allocation of the fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Board has put forward potential projects, these have been assessed, scoped and an estimated cost developed. The scoped and costed list of projects have been workshopped with the Board and a prioritised list developed. This list is being tabled at this meeting to enable the Board to make a decision on the prioritised list.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      Henderson-Massey Local Board agree the following projects to utilise the Community Safety Fund allocated to the Henderson/Massey Local Board area, in the following priority order:

i)    Universal Drive/Rathgar Road – Signalisation

ii)   Universal Drive / Rathgar Road – Raised Intersection

b)      Henderson-Massey Local Board in principal support the allocation of funds from its Local Board Transport Capital Fund to top up the Community Safety Fund, should this be required to allow both the above projects to be completed.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       The 2018 Regional Land Transport Plan allocated $20 million for Financial Year 2019/2020 and Financial Year 2020/2021 for local initiatives in road safety. ($5 million in Financial Year 2019/2020  and $15 million in Financial Year 2020/2021).  In order to promote safety at the local community level, the fund is apportioned to each local board area based on a formula that focuses on the numbers of Deaths and Serious Injuries (DSI) in that area.

4.       The objective is to accelerate local community initiated safety projects, around identified high-risk locations and local schools. Local Boards were invited to submit proposals for projects addressing safety issues their communities have identified and also worked with Auckland Transport’s Community Transport Team to identify projects using the new toolbox developed for the Safe School Streets pilot. 

5.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board share of the Community Safety Fund is $1,059,210 over the two years.

6.       Criteria for the fund includes physical measures raised by the local community to prevent, control or mitigate identified local road and street safety hazards which expose people using any form of road and street transport to demonstratable hazards which may result in death or serious harm. Individual project cost is to be no greater than $1 million.  Projects must consist of best practice components, conform to AT standards and comply with New Zealand law.

7.       The fund does not cover the following:

·    Projects that are funded by existing AT road safety or other capital works programmes including, but not limited to setting speed limits, seal extensions, maintenance, renewals and planned footpath upgrades (but can be used to augment these projects).

·    Projects not within the street, including parks, rail corridor, beaches and property not owned or controlled by AT.

·    Projects that have unacceptable effects on network efficiency or introduce unacceptable secondary hazards or effects. 

·    Projects with an unacceptably high maintenance cost.

·    Projects that clash with other planned public projects.

·    Complex projects that may take greater than 2 years to deliver including but not limited to projects requiring significant engineered structures, complex resource consents and complex traffic modelling. 

·    Projects containing unconventional or unproven components including new trials or pilot projects.

·    Projects or components of projects that have no demonstratable safety benefit unless they are integral with a safety project.

8.       That two projects has now been costed by AT. If this costing is more than the budget allocated to the particular local board under this funding, then it has the option of using any of it’s available Local Board Transport Capital Fund to top up the project budget.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board has put forward the Rathgar Road, Universal Drive intersection as it’s Community Safety Fund (CSF) project. Because of the size and complexity of this project it has been broken into two separate components, which could, if necessary, be delivered separately. The current estimate for the entire project (both components) exceeds the Board’s allocation under the CSF. However, there would be clear economies of scale achieved by delivering both aspects of the project at the same time and these savings alone, may allow the complete project to be delivered. If not, then the second component of the project could be topped up using the local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

10.     Using the LBTCF as a topping up mechanism will allow the Henderson-Massey Local Board to maximise the utilisation of the CSF by ensuring the below the red line project can be delivered. If this mechanism is not employed and the first project comes in under budget, then any unspent money will be lost to the Board.

11.     To this end AT is asking that the Board prioritise both aspects of the project to go forward for design. This will allow the project to be tendered both as one complete package but also as two distinct parts. Tendering it this way should result in the best possible price for the complete package but will also ensure we have separate prices for the component parts, should we need to build them separately.

12.     The two components of the project are detailed below.


 

Community Safety Project Proposals – Henderson-Massey Local Board July 2019

Project Name

Description

Status

Comment

Budget

ID

 

Universal Drive/Rathgar Road – Signalisation

Over the last 5 years (2014 – 2018), there has been 14 reported crashes (1 serious, 4 minor and 9 non injury) at this intersection.

 

The main crash type at this intersection is ‘crossing / turning’, in particular with vehicles turning right out of Rathgar Road and colliding with vehicles travelling on Universal Drive.

 

Further, there are no formal crossing facilities provided at this intersection

 

Pass

 

 

Complex - Investigation & detail design

Proposal to install traffic signal at this intersection to provide control over turning movements at this intersection to reduce the number of ‘crossing / turning’ type crashes. This proposal will also provide a safe crossing facility for pedestrians

$1M

CSFH1.1

XXXXXXXXXX

Red line projectXXXXX

XXXXX

Red line projectXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

XXXXX

XXXXXX

Universal Drive / Rathgar Road – Raised Intersection

Over the last 5 years (2014 – 2018), there has been 14 reported crashes (1 serious, 4 minor and 9 non injury) at this intersection.

 

The main crash type at this intersection is ‘crossing / turning’, in particular with vehicles turning right out of Rathgar Road and colliding with vehicles travelling on Universal Drive.

 

Further, there are no formal crossing facilities provided at this intersection.

 

A separate document has been submitted for the signalisation of this intersection. Signalisation of the intersection reduces the number of potential crossing / turning type conflicts at this intersection, however it does not manage the speed and energy of vehicle should a driver make a mistake (i.e. red light running).

 

In line with the safe system philosophy and with AT’s commitment to vision zero, further mitigation measures should be considered to reduce the speed / energy at this intersection such that if I crash was to occur, it does not result in any people being killed or seriously injured.

Pass

 

 

Complex - Investigation & detail design

This is a safe systems approach. However, as it is in the same location as the signalisation project it pushes the budget over the one million dollar threshold. Therefore, this part of the project is only a Pass, with regard to the community safety fund, if additional funding is provided. (Such as from the LBTCF)

$400K

CSFP 1.2

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is/are confined to AT and do/does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     The projects allocated funding in this report will improve the road safety environment in the communities within the Henderson-Massey Local Board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     The Henderson-Massey Local Board area’s allocation of the Community Safety Fund is fully utilised, provided provision is made to utilise the LBTCF as a top-up mechanism.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     Design and construction of approved list of projects.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Owena Schuster, Elected Member Relationship Manager – Henderson-Massey, Whau and Upper Harbour Local Boards

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Discretionary grant to West Auckland Historical Society to assist with preparing Henderson 175th anniversary

File No.: CP2019/14964

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant $4,000 from the Community Response fund to the West Auckland Historical Society to assist with preparation of the Henderson 175th Anniversary celebrations, to be held during October 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The West Auckland Historical Society are facilitating development of a programme of activities in October 2019 to acknowledge the 175th anniversary of the incorporation of Henderson as a town. Various community groups, West City Mall, Corban Estate Arts Centre and Auckland Libraries are involved in the activities.

3.       The local board has previously allocated $10,000:

·   $5,000 on 15 May 2018 to develop activities during the Auckland Heritage Festival and collaborate with other local groups interested in participating in the festival.

·   $5,000 on 20 November 2018 to develop activities during the Henderson Anniversary in 2019.

4.       At the local board workshop on 6 August, the West Auckland Historical Society provided a progress update and listed the groups involved, a draft programme of events and a budget estimate.

5.       Based on the budget estimate, a further of $6,760 is projected to be required.

6.       The West Auckland Historical Society requested Henderson-Massey Local Board provide further assistance towards meeting the budget requirement.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      grant $4,000 from the Community Response fund allocation to the West Auckland Historical Society to assist with preparation of the Henderson 175th Anniversary celebrations.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Wendy Kjestrup - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes

File No.: CP2019/15173

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, and to endorse the subsequently updated draft Auckland Film Protocol.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is currently reviewing the Auckland Film Protocol.  The Auckland Film Protocol sets out:

·        the commitment of the council group to supporting filming in Auckland;

·        expectations and rules that filmmakers must abide by when filming in Auckland; and

·        provides guidance for filmmakers on the process for approval to film in Auckland.

3.       The purpose of the review was to ensure that the Auckland Film Protocol is up-to-date and identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities that should be addressed.  Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Auckland Film Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol. 

4.       A revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in June 2019 for consideration and was approved for public consultation (resolution number ENV/2019/73). 

5.       The following is a summary of the key changes made to the Auckland Film Protocol before public consultation was undertaken:

·        Native species: new content added stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: new content added providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: new content added stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: new content added stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: new content added to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was updated to reflect current policy, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council.  Some structural and editorial amendments were also made to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

6.       Public consultation was undertaken over a three week period between 21 June and 12 July 2019.

7.       A total of 74 submissions were received during the public consultation period.  The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board residents provided a total of one submission on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, representing 1% percent of all submissions.  Staff are proposing some changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address submitter concerns; the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film protocol are shown in track changes in Attachment B.

8.       This report provides a summary of public feedback and of proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address feedback.  The following is a high‑level summary of the key changes proposed to the Auckland Film Protocol in response to public consultation:

·        Natural environment: include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Native species: include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Kauri dieback: amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

·        Impact on access to public open space: include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

·        Compliance and enforcement: include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with the Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

9.       Submission themes and proposed changes are summarised in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive a summary of consultation feedback, received 21 June and 12 July 2019, on the draft Auckland Film Protocol

b)      endorse the updated draft Auckland Film Protocol (Attachment B) and provide any feedback on the recommended changes.

c)       note that local board feedback will be included in a report to the Environment and Community Committee in August 2019, seeking approval for the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The first version of the Auckland Film Protocol (the Protocol) was adopted by the Regional Development and Operations Committee (resolution number RDO/2013/27) on 14 March 2013.  A review of fees for filming in the Auckland Region was undertaken in 2014 and a new set of region‑wide charges was recommended; providing a simplified and harmonised range of charges.  The Governing Body adopted a region‑wide schedule of film fees and revised Auckland Film Protocol on 28 May 2015 (resolution number GB/2015/36).

11.     Since the Protocol was adopted in 2015 there have been a number of changes to legislation and to Auckland Council’s policy and planning framework. The purpose of the review of the Protocol was to:

·        ensure that the Protocol is up-to-date; and

·        identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities to be addressed in the Protocol.

12.     Content of the Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.

13.     Workshops were held in September and October 2018 to engage with local boards that experience a high volume of filming.

14.     Engagement to inform the preparation of the revised draft Protocol was also undertaken with:

·        mana whenua: mana whenua interests are represented by 19 iwi (tribal) authorities in Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland.  The 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review of the Protocol.

·        staff of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to inform the review.

·        screen sector: the screen sector was invited to participate in a survey in April 2019 to inform the review.  The survey asked a series of general questions about the Protocol and experiences of filming in public open space in Auckland. 

·        public: the People’s Panel in September 2018; a total of 4,762 responses were received.  The survey asked a series of questions on views on and experiences of filming in Auckland. 

A high-level summary of feedback (including local board feedback) is provided in Attachment C.

15.     The review recommended that a range of changes be made to the Auckland Film Protocol, the following is a summary of the key changes proposed to the Environment and Community Committee:

·        Native species: include new content stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: include new content providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include new content stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: include new content stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: include new content to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Filming on Tūpuna Maunga: update content to reflect that applications to film on Tūpuna Maunga are assessed by the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority.

·        Updates to content: update content to reflect current policy (e.g. smokefree policy), plans (Auckland Unitary Plan) and bylaws of Auckland Council.

·        Structural and editorial: amend some parts of the document to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

16.     The revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was approved by the Envrionment and Community Committee for public consultation in June 2019 (resolution number ENV/2019/73).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     Consultation on the revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol took place from 21 June to 12 July 2019.  A total of 74 submissions were received; this represents a substantial increase on the 21 submission which were received in response to the 2015 review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  Of the submissions received, 72 were submitted using the online form and 2 non‑form hardcopy submissions were received. 

18.     Submitters were asked to identify if they worked in the screen sector or not, with:

·        29 submissions (39%) received from individuals or organisations that identified themselves as working in the screen sector

·        45 submissions (61%) received from individuals or organisations that do not work in the screen sector.

The questions included in the online form varied depending on whether the submitter identified themselves as working in the screen industry or not.

19.     A breakdown of all submissions received by local board area is shown in Table 1 below.  The small number of responses from individual local board areas means that a analysis of views by local board area was not possible for all local board areas.

 

Table 1: Breakdown of submissions made by local board area.

Local Board Area

Number of respondents

Percentage of respondents

Waitākere Ranges

17

23.0%

Albert-Eden

9

12.2%

Waitematā

8

10.8%

Rodney

6

8.1%

Upper Harbour

5

6.8%

Ōrākei

5

6.8%

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

4

5.4%

Devonport-Takapuna

4

5.4%

Henderson-Massey

3

4.1%

Kaipātiki

3

4.1%

Howick

2

2.7%

Whau

2

2.7%

Māngere-Ōtahuhu

1

1.4%

Puketapapa

1

1.4%

Hibiscus and Bays

1

1.4%

Papakura

1

1.4%

Franklin

0

0%

Great Barrier

0

0%

Ōtara‑Papatoetoe

0

0%

Manurewa

0

0%

Waiheke

0

0%

Don't Know

1

1.4%

Outside Auckland

1

1.4%

Total

74

 

 

20.     A series of closed questions were asked of non‑screen sector individuals and organisations; a summary of the responses to these questions is shown in Table 2 below.  Table 2 shows that:

·        most respondents are supportive of Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach and that;

·        most respondents think that the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on residents and businesses, on public open space and historic and cultural heritage.

Table 2: Feedback on the Auckland Film Protocols management of the impacts of filming

Question

Response

Percentage of regional submissions

(number of respondents is shown in brackets)

Do you support Auckland Council's film‑friendly approach?

Yes

75% (33)

Partially

20% (9)

No

5% (2)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on residents and businesses?

Yes

56% (18)

Partially

19% (6)

No

25% (8)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on our public open space and environment?

Yes

53% (23)

Partially

33% (14)

No

14% (6)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on our historic and cultural heritage?

Yes

62% (26)

Partially

29% (12)

No

10% (4)

 

21.     The main reasons given by those who supported Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach are shown in Table 3.

Table 3: Summary of key reasons for supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Economic

·     generates employment and economic growth;

·     benefits communities and local businesses;

·     benefits a broad range of trades and industries;

·     attracts investment and businesses to Auckland.

Cultural and creative

·     has cultural benefits allowing and supporting the telling of stories visually;

·     supports the creative economy and enables people to find a future in the creative industries;

·     It’s fun and exciting to see Auckland on the screen.

Promotion and tourism

·     promotes and showcases Auckland to the world;

·     creates a positive image of Auckland.

 

22.     Table 4 showns the key reasons that respondents gave for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Table 4: Summary of key reasons given for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Access

·     the impacts on resident, including parking restrictions, road closures and ability to use public open space while filming is taking place need to be considered and managed;

·     need to ensure that film‑makers are respectful of other users of public open space.

Notification

·     there needs to be sufficient notification to ensure that residents and businesses are aware of open space being used for filming and are not inconvenienced.

Balance

·     need to consider and manage the impact that filming has on the environment and impacted residents;

·     need to balance the cumulative impacts of filming.

Equity

·     need to ensure that fees for commercial use of public places are fair.

 

23.     The key reasons given for not supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach were:

·        the cost to ratepayers of enabling filming;

·        that there is not enough protection for individuals, businesses and residents affected by filming being carried out on private property.

24.     A series of open‑ended questions were also included to elicit further information about responses to these questions and about a range of other topics.  Staff have worked through submissions to determine any changes to be recommended for the final revised Auckland Film Protocol.  Attachment A identifies key themes and submission points along with proposed staff responses.  

A summary of the most common submission themes and the proposed staff responses are shown in table 5.

Table 5: Summary of key submission themes and proposed staff responses.

Key themes

Summary of proposed responses

Use of drones for filming

Include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

Impact on natural environment

Include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Kauri dieback

Amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

Impact on native species

Include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Impact on access to public open space

Include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

Compliance and enforcement

Include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

Health and safety

Amend to enable production companies to arrange alternative timeframes for the submission of a site specific health and safety plan by agreement with Screen Auckland.

Notification

Screen Auckland to consider operational approaches to achieving wider public notification.

Impact on business

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  The protocol is intended to provide a framework that enables decisions to be made on a case‑by‑case basis.

Equity

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  Fees for commercial use of public open space are set under the Auckland Council Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 and amended through the long term plan and annual plan.

 

25.     This report seeks formal feedback from the board at its August 2019 business meeting on the recommended changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol in response to consultation feedback.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.  This included engagement with Auckland Transport, Panuku Development Auckland, and with Auckland Council community facilities, region‑wide planning, social policy and bylaws, visitor experience and heritage

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Role of local boards in film permitting

27.     Landowner approval is required to film on any public open space in the Auckland region.  Local boards are responsible for landowner approvals for local parks and reserves.  Engagement with local boards that experience a high volume of applications for film permits was undertaken in September and October 2018 to inform the review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  A summary of the key engagement themes is included in Attachment C and was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

28.     A key theme from local board engagement was that the film permit timeframes mean that landowner approval timeframes are very tight, particularly when considering complex or contentious applications.  It was also noted that the current timeframes do not allow sufficient time to consider applications at full board meetings or to consult key stakeholders.  Given this, the following options on film permit timeframes were presented to the Environment and Community Committee at a workshop in May 2019 and at the June 2019 meeting.

Option one: Status Quo

Option two: amend the permit timeframes

·        Option 2(a) the permit time frame is amended to be “up to five working days”.

·        Option 2(b) the permit time frame is increased to 5‑7 working days.

29.     Following direction from the Environment and Community Committee, that increasing timeframes could act as a disincentive making Auckland internationally uncompetitive, the status quo option was retained in the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) has an ongoing relationship with several mana whenua and mataawaka groups, across its whole portfolio of activity.  To inform the review of the Protocol the 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review.  In relation to film permit applications Māori views and input may be obtained in several ways where there is a potential impact on particular land or sites. This is usually coordinated either by the film facilitator, or through the relevant parks manager.

31.     Specific processes are in place for the tūpuna maunga, with all commercial filming on the maunga requiring the approval of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority).  Screen Auckland facilitates all requests for approval to film on the tūpuna maunga.  Approval to film will be subject to conditions and restrictions set by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.  Meetings were held with staff of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to inform the review and ensure that proposed amendments are consistent with the policy of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The proposed amendments to the Protocol do not impact on existing levels of service and will not impact on operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     There are no significant risks arising from the local board giving feedback on the proposed changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol at this time.

34.     If adoption of the revised Auckland Film Protocol is delayed this would impact on council’s ability to implement the proposed changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Public feedback and proposed amendments to the Auckland Film Protocol will be presented to the Environment and Community Committee for approval.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key submission themes and responses (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Draft 2019 Auckland Film Protocol (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Summary of preconsultation engagement (Under Separate Cover)

 

      Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Marie Jenkins, Screen Facilitation Manager, ATEED

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza, Acting General Manager, Local Bboard Services Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

ATEED six-monthly report to the Henderson-Massey Local Board

File No.: CP2019/15052

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides the Henderson-Massey Local Board with highlights of ATEED’s activities in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area as well as ATEED’s regional activities for the six months 1 January to 30 June 2019.

2.       This report should be read in conjunction with ATEED’s Quarter 3 report to Auckland Council (available at www.aucklandnz.com) and the forthcoming Quarter 4 report to the Auckland Council CCO Finance and Performance Committee (available 17 September). Although these reports focus primarily on the breadth of ATEED’s work at a regional level, much of the work highlighted has significant local impact.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report provides the Henderson-Massey Local Board with relevant information on the following ATEED activities: 

·     Locally driven initiatives: Henderson-Massey Pop-Up Business School, Support for the Kitchen Project, Young Enterprise Scheme, Green tech feasibility

·     Supporting local business growth

·     Filming activity

·     Youth employment pathways

·     Youth connections

·     Offshore talent attraction

·     Local and regional destination management and marketing

·     Delivered, funded and facilitated events

 

4.       Further detail on these activities is listed under Analysis and advice.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive ATEED’s update to the Henderson-Massey Local Board – August 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       ATEED has two areas of focus:

Economic Development – including business support, business attraction and investment, local economic development, trade and industry development, skills employment and talent and innovation and entrepreneurship.

Destination - supporting sustainable growth of the visitor economy with a focus on destination marketing and management, major events, business events (meetings and conventions) and international student attraction and retention.

 

6.       These two portfolios also share a common platform relating to the promotion of the city globally to ensure that Auckland competes effectively with other mid-tier high quality of life cities.

7.       ATEED works with local boards, Council and CCOs to support decision-making on local economic growth and facilitates or co-ordinates the delivery of local economic development activity. ATEED ensures that the regional activities that ATEED leads or delivers are fully leveraged to support local economic growth and employment.

8.       In addition, ATEED’s dedicated Local Economic Development (LED) team works with local boards who allocate locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget to economic development activities. The LED team delivers a range of services[1] such as the development of proposals, including feasibility studies that enable local boards to directly fund or otherwise advocate for the implementation of local initiatives.

9.       ATEED delivers its services at the local level through business hubs based in the north, west and south of the region, as well as its central office at 167B Victoria Street West.

10.     Additional information about ATEED’s role and activities can be found at www.aucklandnz.com/ateed

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     As at 30 June[2], 3303 businesses had been through an ATEED intervention or programme. Of these, 122 businesses were in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area – 36 businesses went through Destination-related programmes and 86 businesses went through Economic Development-related programmes.

Economic Development

Locally Driven Initiatives:

12.     Henderson-Massey Pop-Up Business School: The Pop-Up Business School ran from 29 April to 10 May, in partnership with the Whau and Puketāpapa Local Boards and the Ministry of Social Development. Sixty-three people attended the course, of which a quarter were from the Henderson-Massey Local Board area. Forty per cent of attendees were unemployed or on a benefit and 70 per cent were women. Feedback from participants was very positive. A survey of participants in May 2020 is planned to see what impact the course has had on those that attended. A full report is available.

13.     Support for the Kitchen Project: The grant was paid during Q3 and the Kitchen Project recruited its third cohort.

14.     Young Enterprise Scheme: The Auckland Chamber of Commerce has delivered the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) since January 2018. ATEED maintains a strategic role. The Chamber invoiced for funds during Q3 and payment was subsequently made. During the period, there were 58 schools participating in the Auckland YES programme, representing 1376 students completing the programme. Henderson High School, Massey High School and Waitākere College are the three schools from the Henderson-Massey Local Board area participating in the YES programme.

15.     Green tech feasibility: A feasibility study was presented to the Local Board in February, detailing plans to develop a site in Henderson as a green sector hub. Further development of the concept stopped after market testing suggested insufficient demand from businesses. ATEED is supporting community partners to develop an alternative potential use for the site identified.

 

Supporting Local Business Growth

16.     This area is serviced by the Business and Enterprise team in the West hub, based in the Henderson Service Centre. The team comprises of two Business and Innovation Advisors and administration support. The role of this team is to support the growth of Auckland’s key internationally competitive sectors and to support to provide quality jobs.

17.     A key programme in achieving this is central government’s Regional Business Partnership Network (RBPN). This is delivered by ATEED’s nine Business and Innovation Advisors (BIA), whose role is to connect local businesses to resources, experts and services in innovation, R&D, business growth and management. 

18.     ATEED’s BIAs engage 1:1 with businesses through a discovery meeting to understand their challenges, gather key data, and provide connections / recommendations via an action plan.

19.     Where businesses qualify (meet the programme criteria and/or align to ATEED’s purpose as defined in the SOI) the advisors facilitate government support to qualifying businesses, in the form of:

·   Callaghan Innovation R&D grants (including Getting Started, project and student grants (https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/grants)

·   Callaghan Innovation subsidised innovation programmes

(https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/innovation-skills)

·   RBPN business capability vouchers (NZTE), where the business owner may be issued co-funding up to $5,000 per annum for business training via registered service providers. Voucher co-funding is prioritised to businesses accessing this service for the first time, in order to encourage more businesses to engage with experts to assist their management and growth.

·   NZTE services such as Export Essentials (https://workshop.exportessentials.nz/register/)

·   Referrals to NZ Business Mentors via The Chamber of Commerce.

 

20.     During the reporting period, ATEED Business and Innovation Advisors met with 18 businesses in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area, three for innovation advice and services and 15 for business growth and capability advice and services (six were returning clients). From these engagements:

·   Twelve RBPN vouchers were issued to assist with business capability training

·   Five connections were made to Callaghan Innovation services and programmes

·   Five referrals were made to Business Mentors New Zealand

·   Sixteen connections were made to ATEED staff and programmes

·   Nearly sixty connections were made to other businesses or programmes.

 

Other support for new businesses

21.     During the period, ATEED also ran workshops and events aimed at establishing or growing a new business and building capability. Ten people from the Henderson-Massey Local Board area attended an event below:

·   Starting off Right workshop - 3

·   Business clinic – 5

·   Innovation clinic - 2.

 

Filming activity within the Henderson-Massey Local Board area

22.     ATEED’s Screen Auckland team provides film facilitation services as part of ATEED’s support for the screen and digital sector of Auckland’s economy. Screen Auckland facilitates, processes and issues film permits for filming activity in public open space. This activity supports local businesses and employment, as well as providing a revenue stream to local boards for the use of local parks.

23.     Between 1 January and 30 June 2019, 305 film permits were issued in the Auckland region across 379 locations and 404 days of filming. Of these, 32 permits were issued in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area. The Henderson-Massey Local Board area’s share of film permit revenue was $3,965.22 for the period (total for all boards combined was $51,191.30).

24.     On average, 37 crew work on each shoot day. This does not reflect filming that also takes place in studios, private property or low impact activity that wouldn’t have required a permit. During the period, 81 permits were issued for TV commercials (TVC), making up 27 per cent of permits issued. A quarter of the TVC permits were destined for an international market.

25.     Some of the key film productions that were issued permits to film in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area were:

·   Ahikāroa Season 2 (web series)

·   Brokenwood Mysteries S6 (TV series)

·   Power Rangers

·   Shortland Street

·   Westside S5 (TV series)

 

26.     Auckland is becoming a popular destination for international television networks to pilot an episode of a new TV series to allow them to gauge if a series will be successful. Permits were issued for locations across the Auckland region earlier this year for two new US pilots. One of these productions made a donation to the Surf Life Saving Club in the Bethells Beach community.

Youth employment pathways

27.     The Go with Tourism campaign was successfully launched on 5 April, attracting 170 employers and more than 700 youth by year-end. The campaign is designed to shift perceptions many young people have about careers in tourism and address the skills gap in the industry.  

28.     ATEED delivered the Future Ready Summit on 26 June at the Vodafone Events Centre in Manukau. Approximately 250 employers, 40 young people and 20 speakers (eight under the age of 24). The Youth Employer Pledge partners were the primary audience. The Future Ready Auckland: Driving economic development through technology and transformation insights paper was also released, attracting strong media attention - including a lead story on Radio NZ Nine to Noon.  The research insights aims to better understand Auckland’s future skill needs, including future growth sectors. ATEED is currently working with pledge partners to harness the network, with a focus on south and west Auckland now that Youth Connections has transferred to The Southern Initiative.

Local Jobs and Skills Hubs

29.     ATEED is the regional partner for the network of Auckland Jobs and Skills Hubs. These multi-agency hubs support employers at developments where there is a high and sustained demand for local labour and skills development. The Auckland network includes Ara (Auckland Airport development), City Centre and Tāmaki hubs. As at 30 June, 377 people had been placed into employment via the ATEED-facilitated CBD hub, 1,914 training outcomes were delivered, and 11 apprenticeships were facilitated. About 36 per cent of those employed are Māori, against a target of 40 per cent. ATEED has developed a school engagement pilot programme with interested employers and schools aimed at engaging students with career opportunities in the construction and infrastructure sector. ATEED also provided funding to a Progressive Employment Programme for at-risk youth, supporting cadet training and developing youth-ready capability within businesses working on the City Rail Link. The City Centre hub is a training partner for this programme.

Offshore talent attraction

30.     The Auckland. We’re Hiring campaign ran from January to March 2019. The campaign is designed to attract high-skilled offshore construction and technology talent to Auckland. The campaign resulted in 2295 job applications.

 

Destination

Local destination management and marketing activity

31.     ATEED’s Destination Innovation team has been working with businesses in the three western boards, including Henderson-Massey, to continue to develop a tourism cluster. The goal is to establish well-timed product identification, mentoring and sustainable business practices that will ensure the area benefits from the local tourism activities.

Regional destination management and marketing activity

32.     The Elemental AKL winter festival website went live on 29 April. The festival ran from 1-31 July and is developed to promote sustainable tourism growth by encouraging visitation more evenly throughout the year, and dispersing visitors across the region. The programme included more than 60 free and ticketed events across the themes of light, food, entertainment, and culture. Elemental Feast went live on 4 June, with 120 restaurants participating in plating up unique festival dishes using ingredients sourced from the Auckland region and inspired by the elements. Farm to Table Gourmet Weekend, Winter Lights at Paradice Ice Skating, the Matariki Glow Show, Sounds at the Grounds and Fire in the Western Sky were held in the western part of the city.

33.     The Short Break campaign, aimed at leisure travellers on Australia’s eastern seaboard, ran during Q3 and Q4. There were three bursts of the campaign, focused on themes of nature, food and wine, and ultimate things to do in Auckland featuring different parts of the region. As part of the campaign, ATEED hosted news.com.au and lifestyle.com.au in Auckland, showcasing the city’s unique offering that is promoted in the campaign. News.com.au has a reach of six million and will produce a dedicated feature on Auckland as well as share one article on Facebook with their 1.1m followers. Lifestyle.com.au has a reach of 1.2m unique viewers and will produce two dedicated online features.

Delivered, funded and facilitated events

34.     During the period, ATEED delivered the 2019 Auckland Lantern Festival at the Auckland Domain. Customer satisfaction was 89 per cent, an increase of nine per cent compared to the previous year. Some key findings from the customer survey found that respondents were very positive about what the event meant for the city, with 96 per cent of respondents agreeing that Auckland Council should continue to support events like the Lantern Festival and 94 per cent saying that the event brought people from different ethnic and cultural groups together (compared to 95 per cent and 91 per cent respectively in the previous year). The Auckland Lantern Festival’s sustainability objectives through the Cultural Festivals Strategy resulted in 62 per cent of waste being diverted from landfill. This has nearly doubled in two years, with the diversion being 34 per cent in 2017.

35.     Given the need to prioritise police resourcing following the events in Christchurch on 15 March, the 2019 Pasifika festival, which was due to run on 23 and 24 March, was cancelled. Although the festival would have been an opportunity to bring Auckland’s communities together at a time of national mourning, given the unprecedented nature of what happened and after discussions with the New Zealand Police, it was agreed that Police must prioritise resourcing to ensure the safety of communities across the city.

36.     During the period, residents of the Henderson-Massey Local Board area were also able to enjoy events funded or facilitated by ATEED across the Auckland region, including the ASB Classic, Splore Music and Arts Festival, Sculpture on the Gulf, the New Zealand Comedy Festival, the Auckland Writers Festival, the Auckland Art Fair, Warhorse, and Auckland Wine Week.

37.     A full schedule of major events is available on ATEED’s website, aucklandnz.com

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     ATEED assesses and manages our initiatives on a case-by-case basis and engages with the Council group where required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     Local Board views are not sought for the purposes of this report. Local Board views were sought for some of the initiatives described in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds to any impact that our initiatives may have on Māori on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigationshttps://acintranet.aklc.govt.nz/EN/workingatcouncil/techandtools/infocouncil/Pages/Risks.aspx

42.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with our initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     ATEED will provide the next six-monthly report to the Local Board in February 2020 and will cover the period 1 July to 31 December 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Samantha-Jane Miranda, Operational Strategy Advisor (ATEED)

Authorisers

Quanita Khan, Manager Operational Strategy and Planning (ATEED)Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Formal Approval of feedback on the Productivity Commission

File No.: CP2019/14258

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to formally approve the feedback provided for inclusion in the Auckland Council submission on the Productivity Commission's draft report on local government funding and financing.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the 16 July Henderson-Massey Local Board business meeting, feedback on the Productivity Commission's draft report on local government funding and financing was delegated to the chair.

3.       The attached feedback was provided for inclusion in the Auckland Council submission on the Productivity Commission's draft report on local government funding and financing.

4.       The Auckland Council submission will be considered at the 20 August Finance and Performance Committee meeting.

5.       Formal approval at a business meeting, although retrospective, provides an opportunity to make Henderson-Massey Local Board’s feedback available on the public record.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      retrospectively approve the feedback provided for inclusion in the Auckland Council submission on the Productivity Commission's draft report on local government funding and financing.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Henderson-Massey Local Board feedback on the Productivity Commission's draft report on local government funding and financing

305

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Wendy Kjestrup - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

25/07/19

Henderson-Massey Local Board submission on the Productivity Commission's draft report on local government funding and financing

 

Henderson-Massey Local Board agree that the current funding and financing framework is broadly sound, with the following comments on specific aspects:

The best way to use the current funding tools and improving equity

With regard to the benefit principle as the primary basis for deciding who should pay for local government services, ability to pay should be given greater consideration.

There should be greater weight on ability to pay given much of Council’s core services are essential for wellbeing.  The benefit principle is a useful tool to assess business impacts on council service, with a disproportionate demand and benefit meaning greater requirements to pay over residential ratepayers.  One must also consider that higher socio-economic communities tend to have closer access to employment and private sector wellbeing provision, whereas communities further from the centre tend to have greater need coupled with less ability to pay. 

Henderson-Massey Local Board oppose changing rating powers to give more prominence to the benefit principle. More weight should be given on ability to pay.  For the city, emphasising the benefit principle could see council services significantly diverge based on arbitrary local board boundaries, creating and entrenching already problematic levels of inequality based on both socio-economic status and underlying geography.

Henderson-Massey Local Board agree that central government should contribute funding where local services also benefit national interests and note that transport improvement is a key element when considering national benefit.

The statement “user charges or targeted rates should be used wherever it is possible and efficient to do so” implies that a blanket system of targeted rates should be considered as a fair mechanism.  This would be inappropriate for Auckland, as our residents do not live by local board boundaries.  There is also the issue of sub-regional facilities, where one set of ratepayers could end up subsidising others.  In principle, there should be a reasonable level of council service that is what any Auckland resident should expect.

Henderson-Massey Local Board support introducing a national rates postponement scheme, as long as it ensures rates relief to those who need it.

 

New funding tools are needed to address key pressures

Value capture

It is unclear on how value capture would work in practice.  If a property’s value rises and is thus liable for more rates, is this not already compensating for the value uplift without the need for an extra charge?

Tax on vacant land

Henderson-Massey Local Board support a tax on vacant land, and support Auckland keeping a component of its generated GST to fund development.  It is perverse that Auckland investments in growth and subsequent economic development results in a cost for servicing that growth without a clear fiscal benefit to compensate the Council and if applicable, existing communities affected.

 


 

Adapting to climate change is a significant challenge

Henderson-Massey Local Board agree that the Government should extend the role of the New Zealand Transport Agency in co-funding local roads to include assistance to councils facing significant threats to the viability of local roads and bridges from climate change.

Henderson-Massey Local Board support the recommendation that the Government create a climate-resilience agency and associated fund to help at-risk councils redesign, and possibly relocate and rebuild wastewater, stormwater and flood-protection infrastructure threatened by the impacts of climate change.

 

Funding support for tourism hotspots

Henderson-Massey Local Board support the recommendation that the Government should legislate to enable councils in tourist centres to implement an accommodation levy.

Agree that for small councils that cannot reasonably use either accommodation levies or user pays, the Government should provide funding from the international visitor levy.

Henderson-Massey Local Board considers that Rodney, Waitakere Ranges and Waitemata Local Board areas should be recognised as having high tourist interest.

 

Need to reset the relationship with central government

Henderson-Massey Local Board agree that another cause of funding pressures on local government is the continued accumulation of tasks and responsibilities passed from central government, without adequate funding means.

Henderson-Massey Local Board considers that in the past local government has been called upon to meet deficiencies in central government funding in key areas such as the environment, for example action on kauri dieback.

 

A new regulatory regime for the three waters

Henderson-Massey Local Board support the recommendation.

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Programme

File No.: CP2019/15179

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Henderson-Massey Local Board with its updated governance forward work programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Henderson-Massey Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar is part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work programme calendar for August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work programme calendar - August 2019

309

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Busola Martins - Local Board Democracy Advisor (West)  

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Confirmation of Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2019/15237

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present records of workshops for by the Henderson-Massey Local Board for the following dates:

·    2 July 2019

·    16 July 2019

·    23 July 2019

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Briefings provided at the workshop held are as follows:

2 July 2019:

·    Board Administration

·    Westgate General Update

·    Westgate General Update

·    Panuku Update: Proposed 'way finding' signage for Bike Henderson

·    Snow in the park

·    2019 local and area plan monitoring progress update

·    Elected Member Survey

 

16 July 2019:

·    Board Administration

·    Community Facilities Update

·    Panuku Auckland

·    Pilot activation planning tool for Henderson-Massey Local Board area

·    Auckland Transport Report

·    Upcoming Board Meeting Reports

23 July 2019:

·    Board Administration

·    Ranui Action Project

·    Ranui 135

·    Massey Matters

·    WEST

·    Community Waitakere

·    MPHS

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the workshop records for:

i)       2 July 2019

ii)       16 July 2019 and

iii)      23 July 2019

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop records for 2 July, 16 July and 23 July 2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Busola Martins - Local Board Democracy Advisor (West)  

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Council's year end and quaterly performance report: Henderson Massey Local board for quarter four 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14197

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Henderson-Massey Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter four, 1 April – 30 June 2019, and the overall performance for the financial year, against the agreed 2018/2019 local board work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Henderson-Massey Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2018/2019 financial year.

3.       Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

4.       147 activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Ten activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred and 16 projects/activities have not progressed as expected during 2018/2019.

5.       Key highlights for quarter four and the 2018/2019 work programme include:

·    The recruitment for the west local boards Māori Broker role (Kaiwhakaawe) has begun.

·    Te Manawa multipurpose facility in Westgate was officially opened in April 2019.  

·    All physical works were completed for Royal Reserve Park and playground development.

·    The local board committed $1.1 million of its Auckland Transport discretionary funding to establish the Henderson North Home and School Zone.

6.       For quarter four and the end of the 2018/2019 year, projects ‘On hold’ are shown as RED as they are unresolved by the end of the year. Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·    The renewal of park signage to include Te Reo naming is currently on hold as council awaits direction on how to proceed with the dual naming process. Naming protocol discussions are underway.

·    Implementation of the concept plan to upgrade and improve Te Rangi Hiroa Nursery/Birdwood winery is on hold until consultation has been carried out with the tenants at the adjacent property. In the meantime, the Landscape Architect procurement process is underway.

·    At the end of quarter four, several council lease renewals and leases to new groups have been deferred for reasons such as lease review and expression of interest processes. These will be progressed in quarter one, 2019/2020.

7.       The 2018/2019 financial performance report is attached but is excluded from the public. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter and year ending 30 June 2019.

b)      Note the financial performance report in Attachment B will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2018/2019 are released to the NZX.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board has an approved 2018/2019 work programme for the following operating departments:

·    Community Services (Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; Parks, Sport and Recreation; and Service Strategy and Integration) approved on 18 June 2019.

·    Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew and Community Leases, approved on 18 June 2019.

·    Infrastructure and Environmental Services approved on 18 June 2019.

·    Local Economic Development approved on 18 June 2019.

·    Youth Connection activities approved on 18 June 2019 (moved from the Arts, Community and Events to The Southern Initiative/West Worx work programme in quarter two).

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

Overall performance against the Henderson-Massey Local Board 2018/2019 work programme

10.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected (completed by the end of July 2019) or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

11.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

12.     The table below shows the overall performance of work programme activities (RAG status and activity status by work programme).

Table 1: End of year Local Board Work Programmes Status

RAG Status

Activity Status

ACE

PSR

Libraries

SS&I

CF

Leases

I&ES

P&P

ATEED

TSI

Green

Completed

39

8

6

1

23

6

14

1

5

-

In progress

1

2

-

1

38

-

1

-

-

1

Amber

In progress

2

4

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

Red

In progress

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

On Hold

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

Not delivered

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Grey

Deferred

1

-

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

-

Cancelled

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Key activity achievements for quarter four and the 2018/2019 work programme

13.     The key achievements quarter four and in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2018/2019 include:

·    The Waitākere ki tua action plan has been socialised with both local Māori involved in its development and the wider Māori community and with council department staff, where the approach to incorporating the recommendations in the document was discussed. The recruitment for the Māori responsiveness broker role (Kaiwhakaawe) is underway in conjunction with Hoani Waititi Marae. This role will take forward and expand on the actions in the plan for the three west local boards.

·    The multi-purpose facility, Te Manawa, was officially opened to the public in Westgate. This facility is the first of its kind in Auckland as both a community hub and library. Services and resources include a library, customer service centre, rooms for hire, commercial kitchen, creative spaces, work and study areas, and a Citizens Advice Bureau. Te Manawa also offers community-focused programmes and activities.

·    The local board funded $3.6 million to upgrade Royal Reserve park in Massey as a new destination playground and includes new footpaths, fitness equipment and additional parking. This project was fully completed in early 2019. 

·    The local board has committed $1.1 million of its Auckland Transport discretionary funding to establish west Auckland’s first ‘Home and School Zone’ in Henderson North. This means traffic calming measures such as traffic islands, crossings and cycling paths to make it safer to walk and cycle to school in that area.

Overview of work programme performance by department

Arts, Community and Events work programme

14.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 40 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and two activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Māori naming of community centres and venues for hire

Amber

In progress

This project is progressing but not yet completed.

Te Pae o Kura (Kelston) Community Centre operational model review

Amber

In progress

Once redevelopment option for this centre is confirmed, the operational model can be developed.

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

15.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are 10 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), four activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), one activity significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Implementation plan for Auckland’s Urban Forrest (Ngahere) Strategy

Amber

In progress

Following completion of the Knowing Phase (collection of data), the draft report is being prepared for the local board.

Deliver park restoration SH16/20

Amber

In progress

Staff continue to work with NZTA to arrange any residual final payments in 2019/2020.

Waitemata Rugby Club partnership investigations

Amber

In progress

Needs assessment has been completed and this will be reported back to the local board in quarter one, 2019/2020.

Dive Auckland feasibility studies

Amber

In progress

Further work to be done once capital works at Westwave Aquatic Centre have been carried out.

Māori naming of reserves phase two

Red

In progress

The naming process is taking longer than expected with interest and welcome input coming from four mana whenua groups.

 

Libraries and Information work programme

16.     In the Libraries and Information work programme, there are six activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey).

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

17.     In the Service Strategy and Integration work programme, there are two activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey).

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

18.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 61 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), five activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), four activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

 

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Renew coastal structures 2018/2019

Amber

In progress

Resource consent has been approved and the project has been transferred to the Strategic Projects Unit and is waiting on gateway approval before commencing.

Renew park furniture 2018/2019

Amber

In progress

Contract has been awarded, physical works to start in July 2019.

Te Pae o Kura (Kelston) Community Centre comprehensive renewal

Amber

In progress

Further discussions will happen with the local board to finalize the preferred renewal option and allocate funding to any budget shortfalls.

Westwave Aquatic Centre – comprehensive renewal

Amber

In progress

Concept design for priority areas to be developed in quarter one 2019/2020.

Install minor assets from NZTA funding

Amber

In progress

Initial tenders came in too high, new tenders received and works programmed for July 2019.

Renew community facilities signage

Red

On hold

Waiting on direction on how to proceed with the dual language signage.

Renewal of park signage across multiple sites

Red

On hold

Waiting on direction on how to proceed with the dual language signage.

Te Rangi Hiroa Nursery/Birdwood winery – implement master plan

Red

On hold

On hold until consultation with adjoining properties is complete.

The Concourse Strand – renew carpark

Red

On hold

Project is pending the completion of the Watercare Project based at the carpark.

 

Community Leases work programme

19.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are six activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and eight activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey).

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

20.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are 15 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey).

Local Economic Development work programme

21.     In the Local Economic Development work programme, there are five activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey).

Deferred activities

22.     As part of the local board funding policy, activities funded through the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operating fund that were not delivered in 2018/2019 will be deferred into 2019/2020 work programmes.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     This report informs the Henderson-Massey Local Board of the performance for quarter ending 30 June 2019 and the performance for the 2018/2019 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Te Kawerau ā Maki are progressing the Māori naming of parks projects as part of the wider Te Kete Rukuruku project which aims to ensure the parks and other public spaces of Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland better reflect the region’s rich Māori heritage. Councils community facilities team are progressing the renewal of signs for these places to include dual naming and/or new gifted Māori names.

26.     Waitākere ki tua, an action plan for west Auckland Māori, was approved by the local board and the recruitment of the Māori Broker role, a key action out of this plan, is underway.

27.     The Opanuku Link project in Henderson uses Te Aranga design principles (founded on intrinsic Māori cultural values) to enhance Opanuku reserve in Henderson. The design incorporates natural play opportunities developed on the theme of papa tākaro whanau (family play) and the bridge (Te Mana o Tane) is in the form of a fallen kauri, designed by Johnson Witehira and inspired by the tale of Rata and the tree.

28.     The local board are supporting Waitākere Outrigger Canoe (Waka Ama) Club at Bridge Ave in Te Atatū South with the development of two design options, both which align with Te Whau Pathway proposed route. These options will now be explored further, and more detailed costings investigated by staff.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     This report is provided to enable the Henderson-Massey Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2018/2019 work programmes and to report this to the public. This report is for information only and therefore there are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

30.     Auckland Council currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September. Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is excluded from the public.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

32.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Henderson Massey work programme update Q4 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Henderson-Massey operating performance summary Q4 (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tracey  Wisnewski - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Henderson-Massey Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/15164

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2018/2019 Annual Report for the Henderson-Massey Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 26 September 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2018/2019 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      adopt the 2018/2019 Henderson-Massey Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A.

b)      note that any proposed changes will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019.

c)       note that the draft 2018/2019 Henderson-Massey Local Board Annual Report (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report) will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2018/2019 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities, and the overall Financial Impact Statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

6.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the NZX Debt Market (quoted bonds) maintained by NZX Limited. As a result, the council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules (listing rules) and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA). Under these obligations, local boards may not release annual financial results in any form, including publishing their agenda/minutes containing their results, until council group results are released to the NZX on 27 September 2019.  Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi relates to the local board area.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area, summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved.

Funding information

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English, and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2018/2019 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2019

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 26 September 2019

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 27 September 2018

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2018/2019 Henderson-Massey Local Board Annual Report (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

David Gurney - Manager Corporate Performance & Reporting

Authorisers

Kevin Ramsay - General Manager Corporate Finance and Property

Victoria Villaraza - Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Ward Councilors' Update

File No.: CP2019/15335

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Waitākere Ward Councillor to have an opportunity to update the Henderson-Massey Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      thank Waitākere Ward Councilors for their update.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Busola Martins - Local Board Democracy Advisor (West)  

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

     

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

26        Auckland Council's year end and quaterly performance report: Henderson Massey Local board for quarter four 2018/2019 - Attachment b - Henderson-Massey operating performance summary Q4

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

The report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2018/2019 are released to the NZX..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

27        Henderson-Massey Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019 - Attachment a - Draft 2018/2019 Henderson-Massey Local Board Annual Report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that could give an individual access to this information prior to public release, gaining an improper advantage over others..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

   



[1] This activity is subject to local boards prioritising local economic development, and subsequently allocating funding to local economic development through their local board agreements.

[2] FY 2018/19 result for ATEED’s SOI KPI2