I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Kaipātiki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 21 August 2019

4.00pm

Kaipātiki Local Board Office
90 Bentley Avenue
Glenfield

 

Kaipātiki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

John Gillon

 

Deputy Chairperson

Danielle Grant

 

Members

Paula Gillon

 

 

Ann Hartley, JP

 

 

Kay McIntyre, QSM

 

 

Anne-Elise Smithson

 

 

Adrian Tyler

 

 

Lindsay Waugh

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacinda Short

Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

 

14 August 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 484 6236

Email: jacinda.short@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                        PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Adopting the Birkenhead War Memorial Park Masterplan                                       7

12        Chelsea Estate Heritage Park track realignment and bridge renewal                   17

13        Smiths Bush Reserve – bridge repair
                                                                                                                                      
31

14        Fernglen Reserve Service Assessment                                                                    35

15        Naturalisation of Local Parks Service Assessment                                                41

16        New community lease to Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated at Mayfield Reserve, R 1 Mayfield Road, Glenfield                                                                      61

17        Auckland Transport Monthly Update                                                                        69

18        Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust Work Programme
2019/2020                                                                                                                     
87

19        Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust Quarterly Report                                       105

20        Kaipātiki Community Places Quarterly Reports                                                    125

21        Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development Kaipātiki Local Board six-monthly update                                                                                                                         151

22        Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes    157

23        Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report                                                         181

24        Members' Reports                                                                                                     183

25        Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board Members' Update   191

26        Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - July 2019                                       193

27        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                     199

28        Future Kaipātiki aquatic and recreation provision                                                205

29        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Kaipātiki Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019                                                                                        219

30        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019                                                                    275  

31        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

32        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               279

28        Future Kaipātiki aquatic and recreation provision

a.      21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Birkenhead Pool and Leisure Centre                                                                                                  279

b.      21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Glenfield Pool and Leisue Centre                                                                                                    279

c.      21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - ActivZone   279

d.      21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Beach Haven Sports Centre                                                                                                                279

29        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Kaipātiki Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

b.      21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki financial performance, quarter four 2018/19                                                                 280

30        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

a.      21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Draft 2018/2019 Kaipātiki Local Board Annual Report                                                                            280  

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.  

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest: 

i)       A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member; and

ii)      A non-financial conflict of interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest. 

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request.   

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Relationship Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 17 July 2019, as  true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.


 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Kaipātiki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Adopting the Birkenhead War Memorial Park Masterplan

File No.: CP2019/12913

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Birkenhead War Memorial Park Masterplan, dated August 2019 (refer Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Birkenhead War Memorial Park Masterplan (the masterplan) has been finalised following public consultation. The masterplan sets the vision for the park for the next 30 years.  It is the first step towards regenerating the park and proposes the following key changes:

·     replace aging facilities with new fit for purpose facilities;

·     create more accessible open space by reducing the number of facilities and relocating car parking;

·     increase opportunities for play, including nature play and māra hūpara (Māori play); and

·     create a cohesive park with good connections, wayfinding and interpretative signage.

3.      The masterplan was developed working closely with mana whenua and park user groups.

4.       Public consultation on the draft masterplan confirmed that the community supported nine of the 10 proposed projects. Staff therefore made the following changes to the masterplan based on feedback:

·     improved wording around responding to Māori cultural values and opportunities in developing the park;

·     improved descriptions and detail of proposed projects;

·     added information about the implementation of proposed projects;

·     removed reference to relocating the War Memorial Shrine to Recreation Drive; and 

·     added a new nature play area near the existing playground.

5.       The overall spatial layout plan for the park did not change as a result of feedback.

6.       The implementation of the plan will be staged (as outlined in Attachment E) and funding for implementation stages will come from different sources, including ‘One Local Initiative’ (OLI) funding.

7.       OLI funding for the priority projects in the masterplan - the multi-use sport facility and upgrades to Osborne Pool (including aquatic play space) - will be considered as part of a detailed business case.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      adopt the Birkenhead War Memorial Park Masterplan, dated August 2019 (refer Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      request staff to develop the detailed business case for the multi-use sport facility and upgrades to Osborne Pool (including aquatic play space) as the highest priority.

c)      note that the masterplan will be implemented progressively through the annual work programmes, as shown in Attachment E to the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Birkenhead War Memorial Park occupies 32 hectares, approximately half of which is significant native bush (including kauri), and the remainder focused on sport and recreation. At present 17 community and sports groups are based at the park (‘the park user groups’).

9.       In September 2017, the local board approved the development of a ‘regeneration’ masterplan for the park (resolution number KT/2017/128 as provided in Attachment C).

10.     The local board made the implementation of a masterplan for the park its ‘One Local Initiative’ (OLI). The OLI programme was established as part of the 10-year Long-term Plan 2018-2028 to enable each local board to prioritise one project to receive funding.

11.     The ‘regeneration’ option for the masterplan was chosen for three reasons:

·     to revitalise the park;

·     to continue to provide for existing activities and services as far as is practical; and

·     to enable new activities to be developed on the park in the future.

12.     Staff worked with mana whenua and park user groups to develop the draft masterplan. In February 2019, the local board approved the draft masterplan for public consultation (resolution KT/2019/7 as provided in Attachment D). Public consultation was open from 15 March to 14 April 2019.

13.     This report presents a summary of consultation outcomes and the masterplan for adoption by the local board.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The masterplan in a nutshell

14.     The masterplan consolidates existing facilities, and clusters similar activities together to improve use of buildings and create more easily accessible open space. It provides for the following key changes:

From…

To…

Ageing facilities

New, fit-for-purpose facilities

Multiple facilities taking up a lot of space

Fewer facilities providing more space for other activities on the park

Cars dominating the park

Parking moved to the edges, enabling people to use more of the park

Limited play options

Increased opportunities for children to play and have fun

Building space only available for current park users

Building space with flexibility, able to cater to new user groups in the future

A disjointed site that feels like two parks divided by an unused stormwater gully

A cohesive park with good connections and activity throughout the site

No visible information about history or ecology on the park

Plentiful wayfinding and interpretative signage

 

15.     The main projects proposed in the masterplan are:

·     A multi-use sport facility: new public leisure facilities and dedicated space for park user groups based on the Mahara Avenue side of the park.

·     Upgraded aquatic facilities: new water play / splash pad facilities, cosmetic upgrades to enhance the existing pools, and remedial works as required to extend the life of the existing assets.

·     Relocated War Memorial Shrine: a new home for the Shrine when the existing leisure centre is eventually removed.

·     Relocated car parking: existing car parks moved from the current central locations to locations at the edge of the site, creating space for flexible public plazas.

·     Recreation Drive redevelopment: in the long term (25+ years) community buildings to be clustered at the edge of this side of the park or replaced with shared facilities.

·     Pedestrian and cycle track: a path to link the two sides of the park, following the route of the existing service road (which will remain for service vehicle use only).

·     Māra hūpara: new Māori nature play elements in the stormwater gully to activate the centre of the park, increase play opportunities, and emphasise Māori values and history. Funding for a māra hūpara concept design has been allocated by council’s Māori Outcomes Steering Group.

·     Environmental protection: track design and maintenance combining public accessibility with kauri protection, and ongoing ecological restoration work.

·     BMX track removal: removal of these unauthorised structures to support kauri protection.

·     History, heritage, and signage: wayfinding and interpretative signage to assist with site navigation, provide information about features like environmental protection and māra hūpara, and raise awareness of the park’s history as a war memorial.

16.     The indicative timeline for implementation provided in Attachment E shows that some projects are dependent on the completion of other work.  For example, car parking on the Mahara Ave side of the park cannot be relocated until the multi-use sport facility is built and the existing leisure centre removed.

Consultation summary and local diversity

17.     188 submissions were received on the draft plan.

18.     A very high level of support (above 80 per cent) was received for five of the 10 proposed projects.  A further three projects received high support (60-80 per cent).  One project was not well supported (<50 per cent) as discussed in paragraph 26 below. Attachment B gives a detailed overview of consultation responses.

19.     While staff consider the number and quality of submissions to be good, the feedback did not reflect the demographic make-up of the local board area, despite efforts to provide a range of ways for people to have their say.

20.     Compared to those who live in the Kaipātiki Local Board area, submission data indicates that:

·     more Māori responded (11 per cent compared to 8 per cent living in the area);

·     fewer Asian residents responded (2 per cent compared to 25 per cent living in the area); and

·     fewer under 25-year olds responded (8 per cent compared to 34 per cent living in the area).

21.     Paragraph 50 below references how the risk of fewer youth and Asian resident feedback can be mitigated.

How staff have responded to community feedback

22.     All projects in the masterplan, apart from the new shared facilities at Recreation Drive, received high to very high levels of support.

23.     Attachment B provides detailed information on consultation themes.

24.     In response to feedback, staff have included more detailed information on the projects, a summary of the consultation response, and further information about timeline and next steps for implementation.

25.     The following table identifies key submission points and how staff have responded to them.

Public feedback

Masterplan amendments

Provide interim club rooms for use while the multi-use sport facility is built

·    The need for this interim space is acknowledged

Include a 400 metre athletics track

·    Text and imagery to illustrate why a 400 metre track will not fit

·    Other 400 metre tracks on the North Shore are identified

Keep the War Memorial Shrine in its current location to enable existing ANZAC Day commemorations to continue

·    Plans to relocate the shrine to Recreation Drive have been put on hold

·    The need to relocate the Shrine after the existing leisure centre is removed is noted

Increase access to free play on the park

·    New nature play area created near the existing playground

Include information about māra hūpara, to help users to understand how to engage with it

·    Interpretative signage to be included as part of the māra hūpara installation

 

26.     The Recreation Drive redevelopment received the lowest level of support. A number of responses were received from people associated with All Saints Birkenhead Scout Group. The group’s objections were largely based on their perception that a shared facility for the Scouts and Birkenhead Playcentre would go ahead in the near future and be designed without their input.  Staff reassured these submitters that any proposed shared facility would be designed with the Scout group’s full involvement. Staff also clarified that this proposal is not anticipated to be completed within 25 years. The masterplan reflects these points.

27.     The proposed relocation of the War Memorial Shrine was not supported by the Birkenhead RSA – the user group that many submitters regard as a key stakeholder.   Staff met with the Birkenhead RSA committee and learned that they were concerned that the Recreation Drive side of the park does not have enough space to allow as many people to attend the ANZAC Day commemorations as the Mahara Ave side of the park. Other logistical difficulties, such as the route of the ANZAC Day parade and difficulty with car parking, were mentioned. 

A new multi-use facility at Mahara Avenue – highest priority for the council and the community

28.     The very high public support for a new multi-use facility at Mahara Avenue and the response from park user groups indicates that this is a high priority project (87 per cent of respondents supporting the proposal). As discussed in paragraph 40 below, the local board considers this project should have the highest priority.

29.     Implementing this proposal will be a complex and involve several phases:

·     finalising the business case to secure funding; including working with user groups to determine specific requirements and the operating and business model for the facility;

·     detailed design, in consultation with mana whenua and relevant park user groups;

·     obtaining resource consent;

·     tendering of work;

·     transferring relevant park user groups to temporary club facilities on the park;

·     removing existing structures; and

·     building the new facility.

Osborne Pool is in better condition than anticipated

30.     The condition of Osborne Pool was assessed in April 2019. This assessment found that the facility is in sound condition and, with appropriate maintenance, can be expected to function for another 30 years.

31.     The draft masterplan showed improvements to the entire pool area, but the masterplan now only includes upgrades to the existing pool, including the provision of an aquatic play space.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     Several council teams and departments have provided support in writing the masterplan, enabling multiple perspectives to be reflected. Project team members were drawn from:

·     Parks, Sports and Recreation;

·     Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·     Community Facilities;

·     Service Strategy and Integration;

·     Biodiversity; and

·     Heritage.

33.     Implementation of the masterplan will involve several council departments. Projects within the first 10 years of the masterplan have been discussed with the relevant teams responsible for implementation, to ensure that the necessary work enters the relevant work programmes. This is subject to the local board allocating funding for relevant projects (refer Attachment E).

34.     Auckland Transport staff support the development of the walking and cycling track through the park, and the local board has allocated Local Board Transport Capital Funding (LBTCF) for this project.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Anticipated impacts of the masterplan for the park and local area

35.     The masterplan will create lasting benefits for residents of the local board area and park users. Key positive impacts include:

People

·   improved health and wellbeing through increased opportunities to be physically active and play

·   positive impact on social connectedness and belonging through provision of public plazas and increased open space, flexible multi-use sport facility, information about heritage and history of the area

·   improved site safety from relocating car parking to the park’s edges and passive surveillance and activation of the stormwater gully.

Culture

·    improve visible presence of Māori values in the park.

Environment

·    improved biodiversity and mauri through environmental protection.

 

36.     Some park user groups will not find their specific needs met within the masterplan. The affected groups are:

·    Birkenhead Rifle Club: this group has not been present on the park for three years, and the new multi-use sport facility is unlikely to contain enough space to provide dedicated indoor shooting areas.

·    users of informal BMX jumps: local riders have used these jumps for several years, but the jumps will be removed as part of wider environmental bush protection measures.

37.     The masterplan is used to promote a regional approach to use of facilities. It highlights where user groups might find more suitable facilities, either elsewhere in the Kaipātiki Local Board area, or in the city. This approach has also enabled staff to respond to specific requests for facilities that cannot be accommodated at the park. An example of this is deep-water facilities, which are provided at Glenfield Pool.

Local board and political working group feedback

38.     The local board’s political working group for the masterplan project reviewed submission feedback with council staff. The working group asked staff to re-engage with the Birkenhead RSA and the All Saints Birkenhead Scout Groups, as these two groups had expressed concerns. Staff response has been discussed above.

39.     At a workshop on 10 July 2019, the local board suggested that the multi-use sport facility should be the highest priority project, as it replaces aging assets in the park such as the leisure centre, provide more flexible spaces for local users and provides a home for some of the clubs displaced by the demolition of the grandstand. Staff have amended the masterplan to reflect this, both in the project descriptions and in a project summary table.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     Staff have worked with mana whenua throughout the masterplan drafting process. Details of this engagement was included in a report to the local board on 20 February 2019 and the masterplan itself.

41.     Further mana whenua suggestions for various sections have been incorporated into the final version of the plan, together with Te Aranga Principles. Suggestions include ways in which council will work with mana whenua during implementation, and specific actions such as reflecting Māori cultural narratives, art and design in park development; and acknowledging mana whenua through signage and heritage features.

42.     The focus on environmental protection of native bush is of particular importance to mana whenua. Staff have emphasised this by prioritising kauri protection above recreational activities, such as track use and BMX jump use in the bush. One track has been closed permanently to protect kauri.

43.     Including māra hūpara on the park is an important element of the masterplan, and will be implemented in partnership with mana whenua and council’s Healthy Waters team. This new feature will create opportunities for ongoing engagement and positive outcomes for Māori by putting tikanga Māori at the centre of the park, figuratively and literally. It will provide local schools and groups (including the Birkenhead Playcentre and the All Saints Birkenhead Scout Group) with an engaging way to teach students about Māori values, which will help to raise the profile of Māori language and culture in children from a young age and the community at large.

44.     More generally, the masterplan emphasizes the importance of sport and physical activity on the park. This has a positive impact on wellbeing for all participants, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     Implementation of the masterplan will be staged. Funding for implementation will come from different sources.

46.     One of the funding sources is Auckland Council’s OLI funding. OLI funding for the implementation of the masterplan will be released following the completion of a successful business case. The business case will include the highest priority projects, which have been identified as the development of the multi-use sport facility at Mahara Avenue, and the upgrades to Osborne Pool including aquatic play space.

47.     Other potential funding sources are the local boards’ locally driven initiative funding and local board transport capital funding, as well as partnerships with community groups.

48.     Opportunities for sponsorship should also be investigated.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     This table updates information about risk and mitigation that was included in the report presented to the local board on 20 February 2019:

Pre-consultation risks and mitigation

Masterplan update

The impact of geotechnical assessments

Geotechnical assessments of the pool area and the site for the proposed multi-use sport facility were not available before the consultation. The draft masterplan incorporated available previous geotechnical advice.

A preliminary geotechnical review of the pool and multi-use sport facility has been completed and advice incorporated into the masterplan. 

Further geotechnical advice will need to be obtained in the detailed planning and design phase of individual projects

Community expectations for masterplan delivery and funding

Available funding is insufficient to fully implement the masterplan. The draft masterplan attempted to convey this and set out a likely implementation schedule that also showed the scale of investment required for each project.

The masterplan is clearer about the funding requirements for projects.  It shows a staged implementation approach including priorities. The masterplan also notes that alternative funding sources are likely to be needed. This could include partnering with user groups and pursuing external funding.

Resourcing of masterplan implementation

Ongoing resourcing is required as projects are implemented, and this will involve several teams and departments within the council.

An internal implementation plan is being prepared in consultation with relevant teams to ensure that projects can be added to their work programmes.

Public feedback was not reflective of the whole community

N/A – this risk was not discussed in the February report.

Staff have consulted with ActivAsian, Harbour Sport’s programme to encourage Asian community health and wellbeing.  They advised that swimming and walking appeal to this community. Staff are therefore confident that the masterplan improves these opportunities.

Future consultation on individual projects should try to reach the wider community of Kaipātiki to better reflect their voices.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

50.     If the local board approves the masterplan, the next step is to develop a business case to implement priority projects in the masterplan, the development of the multi-use sport facility and upgrades to Osborne Pool, including aquatic play space. This business case will be presented to the Finance and Performance Committee to release the OLI funding earmarked for masterplan implementation.

51.     The local board will need to consider allocating funding towards selected projects to ensure that these enter the relevant work programmes.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Birkenhead War Memorial Park Masterplan (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Summary of public consultation on draft masterplan (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Board resolution KT/2017/128 – 20 September 2017 (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Board resolution KT/2019/7 – 20 February 2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Indicative timeline for implementation of masterplan (Under Separate Cover)

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacquelyn Collins - Service and Asset Planner

Nicki Malone - Service and Asset Planner

Authorisers

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Chelsea Estate Heritage Park track realignment and bridge renewal

File No.: CP2019/14058

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for the concept design for the realignment of the walkway and bridge at Chelsea Estate Heritage Park.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council’s Community Facilities department is currently undertaking a renewal of the Chelsea Estate Heritage Park walkway network as part of the local board’s 2019/2020 work programme.

3.       The walkway is a key link to New Zealand Sugar refinery, a popular destination for park users.

4.       A slip occurred along the walkway in 2017 and the bridge has come to the end of its useful life, which will require works in the near future.

5.       Temporary repairs were completed along the path where the slip occurred to allow the walkway to reopen in February 2019, and the public to use the link to New Zealand Sugar refinery.

6.       Several options for the walkway renewal were considered. A realigned walkway to bypass the slip site is the preferred option as it will provide a better user experience with gentler gradients and avoid the unstable ground around the existing slip site.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the walkway and bridge realignment to proceed to detailed design, consents and construction, as shown in Concept Plan, in Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Council’s Community Facilities department is currently undertaking a renewal of the Chelsea Estate Heritage Park, Birkenhead walkway network as part of the local board’s 2019/2020 work programme.

8.       The Chelsea Estate Heritage Park consists of the land surrounding the NZ Sugar refinery that was sold to Auckland Council in 2008 for public use as a recreation reserve.

9.       A 160-metre-long section of this walking path follows a fairly direct route between the sweeping bend below No 60 Colonial Road and the road near the Pond 3 dam. This path was originally formed across the steep slope above Pond 4 by benching into the underlying rock, and side casting the cut material to form the outside of the path bench. The path has a longitudinal gradient of up to 21 per cent, and ranges in width from 1.8 metres at the upper end, down to 1.2 metres where it traverses the steeper slopes near the Pond 3 dam. The path is asphalt surfaced. A 1.8-metre-wide timber pedestrian bridge supported on hardwood piles provides access across the upper reaches of Pond 4.

10.     In 2017, ground movement resulted in a section of the filled outer edge of the path slipping away so that the available walking width was reduced to less than 1 metre. Cracking and subsidence elsewhere along this path indicates that significant ground movement is occurring, and further slipping is likely.

11.     The path was closed until February 2019, when temporary works were undertaken to allow the key link to be reopened. The temporary works included reducing the path width to approximately 750mm, installing a temporary barrier and resurfacing the walkway with asphalt.

12.     Chelsea Estate Heritage Park is an important recreation area for nearby residents and for visitors coming from elsewhere in Auckland. The demand for good walking access into the Park has increased in recent times as a result of the opening of a café at the NZ Sugar refinery. A long-term re-instatement of a safe and sustainable pedestrian access from above No 60 Colonial road to the shore and refinery area is essential for the ongoing public use and enjoyment of this reserve.

13.     The project and budget ($800,000 in total) for this project was approved in the Community Facilities Work Programme, June 2019, resolution number KT/2019/119.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Frame Group Limited were engaged to undertake an options analysis of the track renewal. A copy of their report is provided as Attachment B to this agenda report. Several options have been considered to address the slip and they have been analysed in the table below. These included:

·     Do nothing

·     Repair the slip and retain current alignment

·     Re-route walkway along Colonial Road

·     Realign the walkway to bypass the slip site.

 

Option

Description

Estimated costs

Advice

Option 1: Do nothing

The walkway link would be prematernity closed. This doesn’t resolve the requirement to provide a connection through the reserve and to the popular NZ Sugar refinery site. This option would have health and safety issues as public would be forced to walk along Colonial Road, where there is no footpath and the road is heavily used with large trucks servicing the refinery.

$60,000

Including design, consents and physical works

Not a viable option

Option 2: Repair the slip and retain current alignment

The existing walkway is steep with grades up to 21 per cent (the preferred maximum grade for walkways is 17 per cent). The area is unstable and will require a retaining wall to stabilise the land and allow for the path to be widened to 1.8 metre to meet standards.

$380,000

Including design, consents and physical works

Not a viable option

Option 3: Re-route walkway along Colonial Road

This option would require an additional 430 metre of walkway to be created, with retaining walls in sections to create the 1.8-metre-wide path. The gradient would be reduced to 17 per cent, however the whole of the path length would be in close proximity to the road and as a result would be a less enjoyable walking experience in comparison to the current path which passes through the forested area away from the road. The path would not provide better connections to the existing track network.

$850,000

Including design, consents and physical works

Viable option but not the preferred option

Option 4: Realign the walkway to bypass the slip site.

This option consists of forming a new 1.8-metre-wide path alignment which deviates from the current path below the carpark on Colonial Road and skirts the grass area once occupied by a house, and then sidling down the gentle slopes above Pond 3. A bend in the walkway would take the path back across steeper slopes that would be retained on the outer edge with low timber retaining walls before reaching a boardwalk constructed on the steepest part of the vegetated slope where large tree roots are present. A new 25-metre-long sloping bridge would cross Pond 3 to a point near the end of the Pond 3 dam. This option would provide an asphalt path route that is separated from Colonial Road, at a gradient that is well below 17 per cent, and offer some forest walking and lake view experiences.

$650,000

Including design, consents and physical works

Most viable and preferred option

 

Realign the walkway to bypass the slip site plan (preferred option):

15.     Staff recommend Option 4: Realign the walkway to bypass the slip as it provides the best user experience, improved grades and is cost efficient. The concept plan for this option is provided as Attachment A of the agenda report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Watercare has recently contacted Auckland Council to confirm they intend to renew the pipeline servicing the area. Their proposed alignment works with the new proposed path and bridge, therefore liaison will continue to incorporate the pipeline within the new bridge design, if possible. This will mean the existing bridge and pipeline can be removed and the site will be tidier. Watercare is still in the early stages of planning though.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local residents and visitors will benefit from the realigned walkway as it will provide an improved service level with better gradients and improved condition. 

18.     Consultation has been undertaken with the local volunteer group, Chelsea Heritage Estate Regional Park Authority and NZ Sugar. Both groups support the proposed alignment.

19.     Chelsea Heritage Estate Regional Park Authority has a preference for the bridge design to have a heritage design element and feel to suit the park. This can be incorporated in our design, where budget allows. 

20.     Local board views and preferences have been sought through development of this project and as part of the proposed recommendations in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     Engagement with mana whenua will be undertaken in the next phase of the project and will be required for Resource Consent.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     $800,000 budget for this project was approved in the Community Facilities work programme, June 2019, over several financial years.

23.     Option 4: Realign the walkway to bypass the slip is estimated to cost $650,000, including design, surveying, geotechnical assessments, ecological assessment, arboriculture assessment, consultation, consents, physical works and project contingency. Any cost savings from the project can be reallocated within the renewals programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     Should the local board not support the realignment option, this will subsequently delay and extend the timeframes to deliver the project as the project will need to rescoped and consulted before it can proceed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Once approved by the local board, the project will be progressed through the detailed design, consultation and procurement phases to enable construction to commence in 2020.

26.     Chelsea Heritage Estate Regional Park Authority, New Zealand Sugar, neighbouring residents and owners will also be informed of the local board’s decision, and the proposed time frame for construction.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Attachment A_Chelsea Heritage Reserve Plan

23

b

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Attachment B_CEHP Colonial Rd Track Renewal Options Report

25


     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Julie Crabb – Principal Project Manager – Park Facilities

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Smiths Bush Reserve – bridge repair

File No.: CP2019/13954

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Kaipātiki Local Board to repair the Smith Bush Reserve bridge linking Kitewao Street Esplanade Reserve to Smiths Bush Reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The bridge is currently closed to public due to public safety concerns.

3.       The bridge was damaged due to the force of water and debris during an extreme weather event that caused the foundation piles to be sheared off and the adjoining boardwalk to be damaged in the process.

4.       Staff have considered options to:

·      Option One: Do nothing

·      Option Two: Construct new foundations, re-use the existing bridge, repair the boardwalk and box stairs on either side of the bridge, add signage and a link from Kitewao Street to the boardwalk

·      Option Three: Raise the entire bridge and board walk above the flood level

·      Option Four: Remove the bridge and walkway and rebuild elsewhere.

5.       Staff recommend Option two. It should be noted, however, that there is still a small risk that the bridge could potentially be damaged during an extreme weather event. This risk is however small as the foundation piles and bearer sizes will be increased to cater for additional loading from stormwater and associated debris.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve Option Two: Construct new foundations, re-use the existing bridge, repair the boardwalk and box stairs on either side of the bridge, add signage and a link from Kitewao Street to the boardwalk.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The bridge is not high priority in the current Greenways Plan, however it provides a link from Kitewao Street and Kitewao Street Esplanade Reserve to Smiths Bush Reserve.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       Staff have considered options to:

·      Do nothing

·      Construct new foundations, re-use the existing bridge, repair the boardwalk and box stairs on either side of the bridge, add signage and a link from Kitewao Street to the boardwalk.

·      Raise the entire bridge and board walk above the flood level.

·      Remove the bridge and walkway and rebuild elsewhere.

8.       A needs assessment was not completed for the bridge, however it is considered to be required as it provides the only link from Kitewao Street Esplanade Reserve to Smiths Bush Reserve.

9.       Staff also considered the Seapath link to the Awataha Greenway and its potential bearing on the position or suitability of the current bridge, but this is most likely some years away.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

10.     Project Delivery have consulted with Healthy Waters regarding their planned project at the Akoranga Stormwater treatment pond. It was agreed that the projects are independent of each other but that construction times will have to be coordinated.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

11.     The repair options for the bridge were discussed with the local board at a workshop on 12 June 2019, and the local board requested a report recommending options for approval.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

12.     No culturally significant factors have been identified in the project identified in this report.

13.     Therefore, it is proposed that no further consultation with the Parks and Recreation North West Mana Whenua Engagement Forum is required.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

14.     The financial implications per option are as follows:

·      Option Two: Construct new foundations, re-use the existing bridge, repair the boardwalk and box stairs on either side of the bridge, add signage and a link from Kitewao Street to the boardwalk: $120,000 - $150,000. This is a high-level estimate as no detail design has been done.

·      Option Three: Raise the entire bridge and board walk above the flood level: $400,000.

·      Option Four: Remove the bridge and walkway and rebuild elsewhere: difficult to determine an estimate for this option but will likely be more expensive than option three.

15.     The “do nothing” option will not incur any immediate cost but will require some sort of funding for either demolition or repair at a later stage.

16.     The Kaipātiki Local Board Community Facilities Work Programme 2019 – 2022 approved a total budget of $359,815.  Final costings have identified with option two an indicative budget of $120,000 - $150,000 and therefore future funds can be reallocated to other projects within the future Kaipatiki renewals programme.

17.     Auckland Council Insurance and Claims confirmed that they will pay out a figure for a portion of the repair. Final pay out figure can only be calculated once the repair cost is known and will be updated accordingly to the local board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

18.     The risk if we do nothing is that the bridge and the boardwalk will further deteriorate and could possibly be completely washed away in the next significant weather event. There is also a reputational risk if we do nothing.

19.     There is still a risk that the bridge and foundations can be damaged in future significant weather events however the risk is small as we are increasing the foundation pile sizes to withstand more lateral forces.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     If the local board supports option two we will commence with detail design and planning to repair the bridge.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Nicolaas Viljoen – Senior Programme Manager

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Fernglen Reserve Service Assessment

File No.: CP2019/14014

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the service assessment for Fernglen Native Plant Garden Reserve (refer Attachment A of the agenda report).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A draft development plan for Fernglen Native Plant Garden Reserve (FNPGR) was completed by Richard Reid and Associates in 2015, which outlined in detail asset development opportunities for the reserve (refer Attachment B).

3.       As part of the approved Parks, Sports and Recreation work programme 2018/2019, a service assessment was undertaken to review the draft development plan and ensure that the identified service outcomes are fit for purpose.

4.       These service outcomes will guide future works at the reserve, by informing provision and enabling a holistic framework to ensure the reserve is developed to meet future local community needs.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      adopt the service assessment for Fernglen Native Plant Garden Reserve (refer Attachment A of the agenda report) as a framework for detailed investigation into future development options for the reserve, as funding becomes available.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The service assessment document is strategically aligned to the following Auckland Council policy and guiding documents:

·    Reserve Management Plan for Fernglen Native Plant Gardens 1992;

·    Kaipatiki Local Board Plan 2017;

·    Kaipātiki Network Connections Plan, 2016 Update;

·    Auckland Plan;

·    Auckland Unitary Plan;

·    Open Space Provision Policy 2016; and

·    Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan 2013.

6.       The purpose of completing the assessment was to identify the parks service outcomes, capture the views of Fernglen Reserve Management Committee and inform local board decision making. This service assessment will guide future park improvements to enhance the open space at FNPGR.

7.       The draft development plan completed in 2015 established themes and recommendations for FNPGR. This development plan provided the basis for the Project Working Group (PWG), which assessed its relevance and carried forward projects where it was deemed appropriate. Projects that were not appropriate or had not identified outcomes were removed from the service assessment. The draft development plan has not been adopted by the Kaipātiki Local Board.

8.       Planning for the development of FNPGR was previously supported and funded by Kaipātiki Local Board. The removal of the historic Fisher residence from the site was contemplated in the draft development plan and has been completed.

9.       The reserve has an active management committee which was established with a series of goals outlined in the Reserve Management Plan for Fernglen Native Plant Gardens 1992 (refer Attachment C). These goals ranged from maintaining Fernglen as a public garden, fostering horticulture by organising visitor services, raising funds for the development of the gardens and promoting membership of the committee. Two members of the committee were invited to be part of the PWG.

10.     A review and refresh of the Richard Reid draft development plan was approved by the Kaipātiki Local Board through the approved Parks, Sports and Recreation work programme 2018/2019. The review and refresh of the draft plan was completed through a service assessment which sought to identify parks service outcomes to inform future decision making. This reflects a change from asset-based solutions to a focus on parks outcomes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The assessment methodology was developed through a review of strategic council documents and other relevant material. A Project Working Group (PWG) was formed to socialise all groups with an interest in the reserve. The PWG representatives were members of the Fernglen Reserve Management Committee, Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson, Auckland Council staff and a WSP Opus consultant.

12.     The PWG held two workshops to gauge interests and opinions of the group. The initial session canvased all possible strategic goals and possible outcomes for the site. These determined the importance of the key physical works previously proposed at FNPGR. From this initial session all the potential service outcomes and strategic goals were confirmed to guide the key works packages within the service assessment.

13.     The second workshop reviewed the draft service assessment after it had been presented to the Kaipātiki Local Board. Further input was provided on the extent and scope of the key works packages and feedback was provided on the prioritisation of projects. Based on the feedback the service assessment was updated to its final version.

14.     The service assessment identified eight park service outcomes. These service outcomes will guide future works at FNPGR. These outcomes reflect services that are currently provided as well as potential future outcomes that can be realised at the reserve. The service outcomes are:

·    Horticulture and Botany (focusing on horticulture education, community events, volunteer engagement and botanical research)

·    Ecology and Sustainability (with a focus on kauri dieback management, pest control, conservation and habitat restoration)

·    Education (focusing on kauri dieback training, school visits, Eco fest, volunteer training and guided tours)

·    Connections and Access (specific outcomes being a resolved arrival experience, diverse pathway network and connections, legible entry and exit points and accessibility and safe access for all)

·    Experience (focusing on visual quality and cohesion, protection from elements, immersive experience and the native backdrop)

·    Recreation (with a focus on walking trails, nature play trails, public toilet provision and key walkway connections)

·    Placemaking (particular interest in the following outcomes being community identity, site activation and horticultural destination)

·    History, Culture, Arts (focusing on community events, art installations, temporary activation and historic narratives and storytelling).

The service outcomes will establish a holistic framework to ensure that any future key works packages meet community needs. This aligns with Auckland Council’s Investment Delivery Framework, where an opportunity, problem or gap is initially identified. The outcome is the key driver for investment under this framework. Outcomes should meet both the needs of the community and open spaces.

15.     Park service outcomes received a priority weighting percentage which was aligned to the importance of the outcome. This was confirmed by the PWG to ensure a robust, transparent and fair process for identifying future projects and how they can meet the service outcomes. Each key works package is not ranked. However, the priority weighting percentage of each individual project is aligned to the service outcomes and strategic goals of the reserve.

16.     Key works packages were developed from the project longlist which was included in the draft development plan. These were reviewed by the PWG and assessed against the service outcomes. The projects were grouped into key work packages to promote efficiency in design, consenting, funding and delivery of works, with similar function or within similar areas of the reserve.

17.     The potential services and activations outlined in the assessment will provide a platform for detailed investigation of each key works package, in conjunction with the Fernglen Reserve Management Committee and consultation with the local community.

18.     All the key works packages will require approval by the Kaipātiki Local Board as the decision makers over the reserve. It is important to also recognise the Fernglen Reserve Management Committee as key stakeholders within the reserve, and any physical works should be reviewed and approved through the consultation process. The key works packages will be implemented at the discretion of the local board to coincide with funding.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     Community Facilities Investigation and Design staff have reviewed and support the indicative costings included in each key works package. The costings provide a starting point to inform future budget allocation.

20.     Community Facilities Leasing staff are currently assisting the Fernglen Reserve Management Committee through their application for a new lease.

21.     Auckland Transport has reviewed the service assessment and confirmed that key works package A (which includes a bus loading zone, pedestrian footpaths and upgrading the entrance) can be delivered. Currently the proposed improvements are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme and will need to be funded through the Kaipātiki Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The service assessment aligns to the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan, in particular Outcome Two: Our natural environment is protected for future generations to enjoy.

23.     The draft service assessment was workshopped with the local board on the Wednesday 8 May 2019. Feedback from the workshop has been incorporated into the final version of document.

24.     The Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson provided feedback and views as a member of the Project Working Group (PWG). These have been reflected in the assessment.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     The Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme was presented to the North-West area Mana Whenua Hui on 4 July 2018. Iwi expressed an interest in being involved in parks projects at this time and will remain a key stakeholder throughout the process.

26.     The work undertaken in the Parks and Places Team Work Programme have been designed to enable meaningful engagement with iwi by outlining the potential projects and how they will deliver on the outcomes identified in the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan. The intention is to provide enough information for iwi to efficiently provide input into the direction of the project before the design process begins.

27.     Works packages have been identified for Investigation and Design staff and will be presented again to the North-western area Hui. Iwi will have the opportunity to express interest in the projects and indicate how they would like to be involved in the project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     Currently there is $86,000 renewals allocation in the 2019/2020 Community Facilities work programme to progress key works package D (refer Attachment A, p.18). The scope of the work will include the physical works to renew the water feature and rock garden.

29.     Each key works package identified in the service assessment (refer Attachment A, p.18) will require funding to progress. It is recommended that key works packages are delivered in a manner that realises the service outcomes which have been agreed with the PWG and local board. These key works packages will inform projects within future Community Facilities work programmes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     A lack of Locally Driven Initiatives or renewals funding in the future may lead to the service outcomes not being realised. To mitigate this risk, it is recommended that staff and the local board consider key works packages as part of the future Community Facilities work programme planning phase prior to each new financial year.

31.     The investigation and design phase of project delivery may identify issues that require the feasibility of a project to be reassessed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Key works package D will be progressed in financial year 2019/2020 as part of Community Facilities work programme.

33.     Other works packages will progress to detailed investigation, as funding becomes available. It is recommended that the service assessment is reviewed by staff and the local board during the planning phase of future Community Facilities work programmes.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Fernglen Native Plant Garden Reserve Service Assessment (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Fernglen Native Plant Gardens Reserve Service Assessment Appendices (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Fernlgen Reserve Management Plan 1992 (Under Separate Cover)

 

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

George McMahon - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Naturalisation of Local Parks Service Assessment

File No.: CP2019/14292

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the service assessment for Naturalisation of Parks (refer Attachment A to the agenda report).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As part of the approved Parks, Sports and Recreation work programme 2018/2019, a service assessment was undertaken to identify a trial site for naturalisation within a local park, by creating a natural meadow, edible garden, pollinator pathway and food forest. This aligned with previous feedback from the Kaipātiki Local Board to trial this initiative prior to developing a strategy.

3.       Monarch Park is recommended as a potential trial site for Community Facilities to investigate further. The site was the preferred option of staff. The site is north facing with an area that is separated by a concrete path and would provide a buffer area to the existing bush.

4.       The Monarch Park Placemaking Group is supportive of the trial site at Monarch Park.

5.       The service assessment will guide the trial by establishing key parks outcomes. These range from creating an ecological experience, connecting people with nature, providing nesting and food gathering area for pollinating insects and developing a sustainable maintenance practice within a local park (refer Attachment A, p 6).  

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      adopt the service assessment for Naturalisation of Parks (refer Attachment A to the agenda report) as a framework for detailed investigation and development of a trial site.

b)      note that Monarch Park is the preferred option for a trial as highlighted on the attached map (refer Attachment B to the agenda report).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Kaipātiki Local Board approved a service assessment to identify a trial site within local parks as part of the Parks, Sports and Recreation work programme 2018/2019. The trial was to include a natural meadow, edible garden, pollinator pathway and food forest.

7.       The service assessment document is strategically aligned to the following Auckland Council policy and guiding documents:

·    Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017

·    Kaipātiki Network Connections Plan, 2016 Update

·    Auckland Plan

·    Open Space Provision Policy 2016

·    Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan 2013

·    Auckland’s Urban Ngahere Strategy 2019.

8.       The purpose of the service assessment is to explore naturalisation of parks opportunities and to assist in identifying potential trial sites within local parks in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

9.       Staff have used advice from similar trials throughout the region to determine what the key principles and desired outcomes for the service assessment are.

10.     These principles and outcomes have been developed and incorporated in the service assessment. The service assessment has also sought to review the maintenance contracts to align with the current maintenance delivery by Auckland Council contractors.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The assessment methodology was based on interviews with staff who had previous experience in managing similar trials. A review of each of these trials throughout the region has allowed for results to be included into the service assessment. These have provided a basis for the outcomes and principles that will be utilised during the trial. 

12.     Site visits were completed by Community Facilities and Community Services staff. This included four site visits to Monarch Park, Manuka Reserve, Lauderdale Reserve and Eskdale Reserve.

13.     From the assessment of each site it was determined that Monarch Park is the preferred option for a trial due to the north facing aspect, native bush and proximity to a well-used playspace. Further investigation may be required to determine if the soil is appropriate for fruit trees.

14.     The service assessment identified key matters for consideration to ensure that the trial is successful. These shall inform Community Facilities on how best to establish the trial, from controlling plant and animal pests to signage and irrigation.

15.     The trial length will be based on the progress towards delivering an area that has established fruit trees and a meadow aspect. A minimum period of 12 months should be allowed for, with reporting to the Kaipātiki Local Board at key milestones. Milestones will be determined in conjunction with the local board.

16.     The development of a future strategy will be informed by the results of the trial. Staff will be able to measure what management and maintenance techniques produced the desired outcomes. Community benefit should be measured through site surveys on park experience.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     Community Facilities staff have been consulted with on the service assessment. This has included advice on site selection, maintenance contracts, weed management policy and management principles.

18.     Auckland Council’s Botanic Gardens Curator has been consulted and has provided advice on the service assessment. This included results and recommendations from the meadow trials that have been run at the Botanic Gardens.

19.     Auckland Council’s Senior Ecologist has provided input into the site selection as well as the management principles that will be used in the trial. The butterfly meadow trial at Tuff Crater has informed the recommendations of this service assessment.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     Staff have workshopped with the Kaipātiki Local Board on 12 September 2018, 13 February 2019 and 12 June 2019. These workshops have confirmed the scope of the project and feedback has been received on the service assessment (refer Attachment A).

21.     The Monarch Park Place Making Group have reviewed the service assessment and have confirmed they support Monarch Park as a trial site for naturalisation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     The Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme was presented to the North-West area Mana Whenua Hui on 4 July 2018. Iwi expressed an interest in being involved in parks projects at this time and will remain a key stakeholder throughout the process.

23.     The work undertaken in the Parks and Places Team Work Programme has been designed to enable meaningful engagement with iwi by outlining the potential project and how it will deliver on the outcomes identified in the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan. The intention is to provide enough information for iwi to efficiently provide input into the direction of the project before the design process begins.

24.     Mana whenua have not expressed an interest in the project at this time. Staff will assist with any request for engagement during the project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The $5,000 Locally Driven Initiatives Operational Expenditure has not been required for this project. This has been previously reported to the local board and staff for reallocation.

26.     Currently there is $30,000 Locally Driven Initiatives Capital Expenditure allocated in the Community Facilities work programme. This is split equally over financial years 2019/2020 and 2020/2021.

27.     A project is scheduled to develop a food forest network within the Community Facilities work programme for 2018/2019. (Sharepoint project ID: 1832 Kaipātiki). This project is to plant fruit trees within the Kaipātiki Local Board area on sites which are yet to be determined. There is $10,000 Locally Driven Initiatives Capital Expenditure allocated to this project. It is recommended that the project is delivered in line with the naturalisation of parks trial.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     Public perception of the trial may lead to negative response. The meadow trial may be perceived as messy and unkempt due to the appearance of long grass in an area where the grass has been traditionally mown. Signage will be installed with Auckland Council contact details to inform the public of the purpose of the trial.

29.     Animal and pest plants may increase in the area if not adequately managed. To mitigate against this, it is recommended that Pest Free Kaipātiki be consulted to ensure that a pest strategy is developed and included as part of the trial.

30.     The trial may be unsuccessful due to the weather conditions. If fruit trees do not establish themselves over the winter months this may lead to the tree loss. An irrigation regime over the summer months will manage this risk.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Community Facilities will investigate Monarch Park and develop a detailed concept for the local board to consider and approval prior to planting. 

32.     The project to develop a food forest network in Kaipatiki, approved as part of the Community Facilities work programme 2018/2019, will be incorporated into the delivery of the naturalisation of parks trial.

33.     Staff will engage with Monarch Park Place Making Group and other key stakeholders such as Pest Free Kaipātiki and the Kaipātiki Project to ensure strong community support and alignment with pest free strategies.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Naturalisation of Parks Service Assessment

45

b

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Proposed Site Location

59

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

George McMahon - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

 

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

New community lease to Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated at Mayfield Reserve, R 1 Mayfield Road, Glenfield

File No.: CP2019/13634

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated at Mayfield Reserve, R 1 Mayfield Road, Glenfield.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated holds an operative community lease for a site at Mayfield Reserve, R 1 Mayfield Road, Glenfield. The lease expired on 30 June 2017 and remains operative on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is formalised.

3.       Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated has applied for a new community lease. The building and improvements on the site are owned by the club.

4.       After assessing the club’s application, staff are satisfied that it meets the requirements for a new lease under Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

5.       Staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated for a term of 10 (ten) years commencing 1 September 2019, with one right of renewal for a further 10 (ten) years.

6.       The recommendations within this report align with the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes: “Our community facilities and infrastructure are high quality and well managed”, and “Services are well managed and meet community needs”.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      grant a new community lease to Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated at Mayfield Reserve, Mayfield Road, Glenfield, comprising approximately 425m2 for Part Allotment 466 Parish Takapuna shown outlined in red and marked A on Attachment A to the agenda report on the following terms and conditions:

i)     term - 10 (ten) years commencing 1 September 2019 with one 10 (ten) year right of renewal;

ii)     rent -$1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded; and

iii)    all other terms and conditions to be in accordance with Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

b)      approve Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated’s Community Outcomes Plan (refer Attachment B to the agenda report) which will be appended to the lease.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       This report considers the new community lease to Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated at Mayfield Reserve, R 1 Mayfield Road, Glenfield.

8.       The Kaipātiki Local Board is the allocated decision-making authority relating to local, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Land, building and lease

9.       Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated holds an operative lease for the footprint of its building at Mayfield Reserve, Glenfield. The land is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as classified local purpose (community buildings) reserve. The land status supports the proposed activity. The land is legally described as Pt Allotment 466 Parish of Takapuna with an area of 5883m2 in Certificate of Title NA5B/706 (Part-Cancelled).

10.     In accordance with the Reserves Act 1977, a lease on land classified as a local purpose reserve can be granted, without public notification but with mana whenua engagement, if the activity is aligned to the purpose of the classification. The building on the reserve is for community use, and therefore complies with the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977. 

11.     The proposed new community lease was presented at the North/West Mana Whenua Forum on 5 June 2019. No objections were raised at the forum.

12.     The building is owned by Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated.

13.     The club has spent a significant amount of money on their building over the last few years to ensure it remains fit for purpose in the coming years. A site visit in May 2019 found the club rooms to be very well maintained and tidy.

14.     The club replaced the floor of the main hall within the last month and have plans to replace the roof as part of ongoing maintenance.

15.     The club-owned facilities comprise a large hall, a large carpeted room that can be opened up to form part of the hall or closed off for separate use, another medium sized room at the back of the hall and a large well-maintained kitchen that opens out to both the main hall and the large carpeted room. The building has been added to over a number of years with the current footprint having been in place since the early 2000s.

16.     The proposed ground lease is approximately 425m2 (more or less) and is more accurately represented by the area delineated in red and marked A on Attachment A to the agenda report.

Glenfield Senior Citizens

17.     The club has been in existence since 1926. It currently has a membership of 81 members. The group advertise locally and rely on referrals for new members.

18.     The club’s purpose is to provide social and recreational activities for older people. The club also organises outings for older people.

19.     The club rooms are well utilized with other community groups using the facility. Currently the club offers seven activity session per week along with six other community groups who hire the hall on a weekly basis.  These include a dance group, yoga and a genealogy group. The facilities are also hired out on a casual basis and in the last year there was approximately one casual hire a month.

20.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 set out the criteria for community occupancy agreements.

21.     Under the guidelines, the club has an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of its occupancy term, a right which it is exercising. It is recommended that a new lease be granted to the club for a term of 10 (ten) years with one right of renewal for a further term of 10 (ten) years, in accordance with the guidelines.

22.     Local boards have discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. The guidelines suggest that where a term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms contained in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

23.     Staff have determined that Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated meet the requirements under the guidelines to qualify for new community lease as evidenced below:

i)     it is a registered incorporated society;

ii)     it has complied with the terms of the operative lease;

iii)    it has a history of delivering quality services to the local community;

iv)   Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated has provided a copy of its financial accounts, which indicate that its funds are sufficient to meets its liabilities and that it possesses adequate financial reserves; and

v)    the club is managed appropriately as evidenced by its longevity and programmes offered.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Staff obtained feedback from council’s Service Strategy and Integration team regarding the proposed lease and no concerns were raised.

25.     The proposed lease has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of other council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     The new lease to Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated is contemplated in the Kaipātiki Community Lease Work Programme 2019/2020, approved by resolution number KT/2019/119.

27.     A memo to the local board recommending a new lease was circulated to the local board on the 4 June 2019. No concerns were raised.

28.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated decision-making authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.

30.     Support for Maori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Maori Responsiveness Framework. An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Maori community development projects.

31.     Iwi engagement has been undertaken and involved:

i)     a presentation at the North-West Mana Whenua Forum held at Orewa Service Centre on 5 June 2019; and

ii)     formal, written engagement which commenced on 28 June 2019 and concluded on 26 July 2019. Detailed information on the land and Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated was provided to mana whenua, inviting iwi representatives to hui and/or for a kaitiaki site visit to comment on any spiritual, cultural or environmental impact with respect to the proposal.

32.     No objections were raised and there were no requests for hui or kaitiaki site visits received from any of the iwi groups who responded.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     There are no cost implications to the local board approving a new lease to Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     Should the Kaipātiki Local Board resolve not to grant a renewal of the community lease to Glenfield Senior Citizens Club Incorporated, this decision will materially affect the group’s ability to undertake its core activities and diminish the anticipated community outcomes.

35.     Additionally, there is a risk of the property passing to council under the Property Law Act 2007 and council could be liable for an asset that has no budget and is not contemplated in the Long-Term Plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     Subject to the grant of a new community lease, council staff will work with the group to finalise the new lease document.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Attachment A Site Plan Glenfield Senior Citizens

65

b

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Attachment B Glenfield  Senior Citizens Community Outcomes Plan

67

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Phillipa Carroll - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport Monthly Update

File No.: CP2019/02160

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Auckland Transport Monthly Update Kaipātiki Local Board August 2019 report is attached.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Auckland Transport Monthly Update Kaipātiki Local Board August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Auckland Transport Monthly Update August 2019

71

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda  Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust Work Programme
2019/2020

File No.: CP2019/13652

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust (KCFT) work programme for the 2019/2020 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust (KCFT) is a community organisation that delivers community-led development programmes, which support the local board with delivery of community engagement and activation activities.

3.       The KCFT work programme for 2019/2020 aligns with Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes by delivering a range of neighbourhood-based, community-wide programmes and activities including:

·    youth programmes;

·    community development activity;

·    youth employment support;

·    community networking; and

·    events and environmental activities.

4.       KCFT was allocated a total of $405,900 from the 2019/2020 local board work programme (resolution number KT/2019/118) for the following activities:

·    $249,000 - Line 95, Increase diverse participation: Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust (KCFT) – community development grant.

·    $25,000 – Line 96, Increase diverse participation (KT): Youth voice and youth-led initiatives.

·    $131,900 – Line 248, KCFT Delivered Events Kaipātiki.

5.       KCFT have developed their work programme and event programme for 2019/2020. Progress updates will be provided to the local board on a quarterly basis.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust work programme for the 2019/2020 financial year (refer to Attachment A and B of the agenda report).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       KCFT is a community organisation that supports the local board with delivery of community-led development programmes through community engagement and activation activities.

7.       In April 2015, the local board and KCFT signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) partnering agreement, which outlines how the two parties intend to work together to support Kaipātiki residents and communities to thrive.

8.       During the 2018/2019 financial year, the KCFT governance group and the Kaipātiki Local Board governance group engaged in co-designing a revised partnering agreement for implementation covering the next three to five-year community planning cycle.

9.       The 2019/2020 local board work programme includes the following budget allocations for KCFT:     

·    $249,000 - Line 95, Increase diverse participation: Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust (KCFT) – community development grant.

·    $25,000 – Line 96, Increase diverse participation (KT): Youth voice and youth-led initiatives.

·    $131,900 – Line 248, KCFT Delivered Events Kaipātiki.

10.     KCFT have developed their work programme for 2019/2020 (refer Attachment A of the agenda report) and event programme for 2019/2020 (refer Attachment B of the agenda report). The schedule of work achieved and completed by KCFT in accordance with Schedule 1 will be provided to the local board on a quarterly basis.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The objective of the funding is to support KCFT to deliver activity lines 95, 96 and 248 in the local board 2019/2020 work programme. This funding will support community-led projects in the local board area including community engagement, neighbourhood activation and events, community safety, community networking, strengthening neighbourhood connectedness, youth leadership and employment programming.

12.     Activity lines 95 and 96 in the local board 2019/2020 work programme focus on increasing diverse community participation, including youth voice and youth-led initiatives, enabling collaborative action, and delivering inspirational community initiatives and projects.

13.     Activity line 248 in the local board 2019/2020 work programme is to support KCFT to deliver an annual events programme, which enables a wide variety of community events and activations that support local board priorities and diverse community participation.

14.     In addition to funding from the local board, KCFT will be contributing a further $216,000 from alternate sources towards Kaipātiki community development and event initiatives.

15.     The schedule of programme outcomes detailed in the respective work programme lines was negotiated between the KCFT management and governance group, Local Board Services, and Arts, Community and Events (ACE) staff at the direction of the Kaipātiki Local Board as part of the process to develop the local board 2019/2020 work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Community Empowerment Unit (CEU) will provide and monitor the funding agreement for two work programme lines as follows:

·    95: Increase diverse participation: Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust (KCFT) - community development grant, and

·    96: Increase diverse participation (KT): Youth voice and youth-led initiatives.

17.     The Events team from ACE will provide and monitor the funding agreement for line 248: KCFT Delivered Events Kaipātiki.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The KCFT work programme aligns with the following local board plan priorities:

·    Outcome 1: Our people identify Kaipātiki as their kāinga (home)

·    Outcome 2: Our natural environment is protected for future generations to enjoy

·    Outcome 3: Our people are active and healthy

·    Outcome 4: Getting to and around Kaipātiki is easy

·    Outcome 5: Our urban centres are vibrant

·    Outcome 7: Services are well managed and meet community needs.

19.     The local board has participated in workshops and meetings with staff and KCFT representatives to identify projects and outcomes sought for the 2019/2020 financial year. 

20.     Local board and KCFT governance groups’ have engaged since November 2018 in a co-design process to review and update the existing joint partnering agreement. This review is scheduled for completion by the end of September 2019.

21.     The review and renewal of the partnering agreement will support the local board and KCFT to continue to maintain collaborative and mutually supporting processes to achieve local board plan and community outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     KCFT is highly engaged with local rangatahi in the areas of Māori youth employment, youth voice, and Māori student support.

23.     KCFT will retain a Kaiwhakahaere role to increase Māori and Pacific responsiveness and participation in aspects of consultation and engagement mainly through KCFT relationships with local schools and community networks.

24.     The Kaiwhakahaere role contributes to enabling and promoting Māori well-being through the Whiria Te Muka Tangata outcomes of;

·      effective communication and engagement of Māori

·      contributing to Māori well-being

·      building Māori capability and capacity

·      addressing the statutory obligations to Māori

25.     KCFT and its partners will respond to the aspirations of mana whenua, matāwaka, marae and all local Māori organisations through provision of community development capacity support and relationships with the local board

26.     KCFT will continue to support relationships and partnering activity with Uruamo Maranga Ake Marae members and their communities.

27.     The Kaiwhakahaere role is tasked to engage directly with Māori youth (rangatahi) and deliver opportunities for rangatahi to engage in culturally appropriate ways. KCFT is tasked with compiling this feedback and reporting key themes and outcomes to the local board.

28.     The purpose of this activity is to understand the aspirations of rangatahi, and improve KCFT responsiveness to their self-identified needs.

29.     Māori and Pacific youth engagement outcomes specified within the work programme are intended to provide opportunities for increased levels of control and influence for young people over what happens in their local areas and enable greater awareness of the needs and aspirations of young people in the communities across Kaipātiki.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     The 2019/2020 local board work programme includes the following budget allocations for KCFT:     

·    $249,000 - Line 95, Increase diverse participation: Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust (KCFT) – community development grant.

·    $25,000 – Line 96, Increase diverse participation (KT): Youth voice and youth-led initiatives.

·    $131,900 – Line 248, KCFT Delivered Events Kaipātiki.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     There are no identified risks currently associated with this activity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Staff will process a funding agreement with KCFT for work programme activities.

33.     Staff will monitor KCFT activity based on the attached schedule and provide regular local board updates.

34.     Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust will submit written reports on a quarterly basis and present at a Local Board workshop on a quarterly basis.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki Community Facility Trust Schedule 1 2019/2020

93

b

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust Event Schedule 2019/2020

103

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ayr Jones – Specialist Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust Quarterly Report

File No.: CP2019/14527

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to update members on the schedule of work achieved and completed by the Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust (KCFT), aligned to Schedule 1 of the Kaipātiki Local Board contract delivery partnership.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The attached report provides members with an oversight of Kaipātiki Local Board and Auckland Council’s shared community development partnership with the Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust (KCFT). The Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust leads and supports collaborative responses to improve community wellbeing in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust quarter four report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Schedule 1 - Accountability Reporting KCFT Quarterly Q4 report

107

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Kaipātiki Community Places Quarterly Reports

File No.: CP2019/14530

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide a quarterly update to members on the activities and achievements of the community places in Kaipātiki.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The attached reports provide members with an oversight of the activities and achievements of the community places in the Kaipātiki Local Board area. The reports contain updates on:

·        Glenfield Community Centre;

·        Kaipātiki Youth Development Trust;

·        Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project;

·        Bayview Community Centre; and

·        Highbury House.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Kaipātiki community places quarter four 2019 reports.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Glenfield Community Centre 4th Quarterly Summary April - June 2019

127

b

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki Youth Development Trust 4th Quarterly Summary April - June 2019

131

c

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project Incorporated 4th Quarterly Summary April - June 2019

135

d

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Bayview Community Centre 4th Quarterly Summary April - June 2019

141

e

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Highbury House 4th Quarterly Summary April - June 2019

143

 

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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21 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development Kaipātiki Local Board six-monthly update

File No.: CP2019/15005

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides the Kaipātiki Local Board with highlights of Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development’s (ATEED) activities in the Kaipātiki Local Board area as well as ATEED’s regional activities for the six months 1 January to 30 June 2019.

2.       This report should be read in conjunction with ATEED’s Quarter 3 report to Auckland Council (available at www.aucklandnz.com) and the forthcoming Quarter 4 report to the Auckland Council CCO Finance and Performance Committee (available 17 September). Although these reports focus primarily on the breadth of ATEED’s work at a regional level, much of the work highlighted has significant local impact. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report provides the Kaipātiki Local Board with relevant information on the following ATEED activities: 

·      Locally driven initiatives: Young Enterprise Scheme;

·      Supporting local business growth;

·      Filming activity;

·      Youth employment pathways;

·      Youth connections;

·      Offshore talent attraction;

·      Local and regional destination management and marketing; and

·      Delivered, funded and facilitated events.

4.       Further detail on these activities is listed under the ‘Analysis and advice’ section of this report.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development Limited’s update to the Kaipātiki Local Board for 1 January to 30 June 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       ATEED has two areas of focus:

·      Economic Development – including business support, business attraction and investment, local economic development, trade and industry development, skills employment and talent and innovation and entrepreneurship.

·      Destination - supporting sustainable growth of the visitor economy with a focus on destination marketing and management, major events, business events (meetings and conventions) and international student attraction and retention.

6.       These two portfolios also share a common platform relating to the promotion of the city globally to ensure that Auckland competes effectively with other mid-tier high quality of life cities.

7.       ATEED works with local boards, Auckland Council and its CCOs to support decision-making on local economic growth and facilitates or co-ordinates the delivery of local economic development activity. ATEED ensures that the regional activities that ATEED leads or delivers are fully leveraged to support local economic growth and employment.

8.       In addition, ATEED’s dedicated Local Economic Development (LED) team works with local boards who allocate locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget to economic development activities. The LED team delivers a range of services[1] such as the development of proposals, including feasibility studies that enable local boards to directly fund or otherwise advocate for the implementation of local initiatives.

9.       ATEED delivers its services at the local level through business hubs based in the north, west and south of the region, as well as its central office at 167B Victoria Street West.

10.     Additional information about ATEED’s role and activities can be found at www.aucklandnz.com/ateed

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Economic Development

11.     As at 30 June[2], 3303 businesses had been through an ATEED intervention or programme. Of these, 76 businesses were in the Kaipātiki Local Board area – 13 businesses went through Destination-related programmes and 63 businesses went through Economic Development-related programmes.

Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI):

12.     Young Enterprise Scheme (YES): The Auckland Chamber of Commerce has delivered the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) since January 2018. ATEED maintains a strategic role. The Chamber invoiced for funds during Q3 and payment was subsequently made. During the period, there were 58 schools participating in the Auckland YES programme, representing 1376 students completing the programme. Glenfield College and Northcote College are the two schools from the Kaipātiki Local Board area participating in the YES programme.

Supporting Local Business Growth

13.     This area is serviced by the Business and Enterprise team in the North hub, based in the B: Hive. The team comprises of two Business and Innovation Advisors and administration support. The role of this team is to support the growth of Auckland’s key internationally competitive sectors and to support to provide quality jobs.

14.     A key programme in achieving this is central government’s Regional Business Partnership Network (RBPN). This is delivered by ATEED’s nine Business and Innovation Advisors (BIA), whose role is to connect local businesses to resources, experts and services in innovation, R&D, business growth and management. 

15.     ATEED’s BIAs engage 1:1 with businesses through a discovery meeting to understand their challenges, gather key data, and provide connections / recommendations via an action plan.

16.     Where businesses qualify (i.e. meeting the programme criteria and/or aligning to ATEED’s purpose as defined in the Statement of Intent), the advisors facilitate government support to qualifying businesses in the form of:

·    Callaghan Innovation R&D grants (including Getting Started, project and student grants (https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/grants);

·    Callaghan Innovation subsidised innovation programmes (https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/innovation-skills);

·    RBPN business capability vouchers (NZTE), where the business owner may be issued co-funding up to $5,000 per annum for business training via registered service providers. Voucher co-funding is prioritised to businesses accessing this service for the first time, in order to encourage more businesses to engage with experts to assist their management and growth;

·    NZTE services such as Export Essentials (https://workshop.exportessentials.nz/register/); or

·    Referrals to NZ Business Mentors via The Chamber of Commerce.

17.     During the reporting period, ATEED Business and Innovation Advisors met with 30 businesses in the Kaipātiki Local Board area, seven for innovation advice and services and 25 for business growth and capability advice and services (seven were returning clients). From these engagements:

·    fifteen RBPN vouchers were issued to assist with business capability training;

·    twelve connections were made to Callaghan Innovation services and programmes;

·    eleven referrals were made to Business Mentors New Zealand;

·    seventeen connections were made to ATEED staff and programmes; and

·    nearly 130 connections were made to other businesses or programmes.

Other support for new businesses

18.     During the period, ATEED also ran workshops and events aimed at establishing or growing a new business and building capability. Fourteen people from the Kaipātiki Local Board area attended an event below:

·    Starting off Right workshop – 5; and

·    Business clinic – 9.

Filming activity within the Kaipātiki Local Board area

19.     ATEED’s Screen Auckland team provides film facilitation services as part of ATEED’s support for the screen and digital sector of Auckland’s economy. Screen Auckland facilitates, processes and issues film permits for filming activity in public open space. This activity supports local businesses and employment, as well as providing a revenue stream to local boards for the use of local parks.

20.     Between 1 January and 30 June 2019, 305 film permits were issued in the Auckland region across 379 locations and 404 days of filming. Of these, 10 permits were issued in the Kaipātiki Local Board area. Scenes in feature film, Only Cloud Knows were filmed in the Kaipātiki Local Board area. The Kaipātiki Local Board area’s share of film permit revenue was $2,179.72 for the period (total for all boards combined was $51,191.30).

21.     On average, 37 crew work on each shoot day. This does not reflect filming that also takes place in studios, private property or low impact activity that would not have required a permit. During the period, 81 permits were issued for TV commercials (TVC), making up 27 per cent of permits issued. A quarter of the TVC permits were destined for an international market.

 

22.     Auckland is becoming a popular destination for international television networks to pilot an episode of a new TV series to allow them to gauge if a series will be successful. Permits were issued for locations across the Auckland region earlier this year for two new US pilots.

Youth employment pathways

23.     The Go with Tourism campaign was successfully launched on 5 April, attracting 170 employers and more than 700 youth by year-end. The campaign is designed to shift perceptions many young people have about careers in tourism and address the skills gap in the industry.  

24.     ATEED delivered the Future Ready Summit on 26 June at the Vodafone Events Centre in Manukau. Approximately 250 employers, 40 young people and 20 speakers (eight under the age of 24). The Youth Employer Pledge partners were the primary audience. The Future Ready Auckland: Driving economic development through technology and transformation insights paper was also released, attracting strong media attention - including a lead story on Radio NZ Nine to Noon The research insights aims to better understand Auckland’s future skill needs, including future growth sectors. ATEED is currently working with pledge partners to harness the network, with a focus on south and west Auckland now that Youth Connections has transferred to The Southern Initiative.

Local Jobs and Skills Hubs

25.     ATEED is the regional partner for the network of Auckland Jobs and Skills Hubs. These multi-agency hubs support employers at developments where there is a high and sustained demand for local labour and skills development. The Auckland network includes Ara (Auckland Airport development), City Centre and Tāmaki hubs. As at 30 June, 377 people had been placed into employment via the ATEED-facilitated CBD hub, 1,914 training outcomes were delivered, and 11 apprenticeships were facilitated. About 36 per cent of those employed are Māori, against a target of 40 per cent. ATEED has developed a school engagement pilot programme with interested employers and schools aimed at engaging students with career opportunities in the construction and infrastructure sector. ATEED also provided funding to a Progressive Employment Programme for at-risk youth, supporting cadet training and developing youth-ready capability within businesses working on the City Rail Link. The City Centre hub is a training partner for this programme.

Offshore talent attraction

26.     The Auckland We’re Hiring campaign ran from January to March 2019. The campaign is designed to attract high-skilled offshore construction and technology talent to Auckland. The campaign resulted in 2295 job applications.

Destination

Regional destination management and marketing activity

27.     The Elemental AKL winter festival website went live on 29 April. The festival ran from 1-31 July and is developed to promote sustainable tourism growth by encouraging visitation more evenly throughout the year, and dispersing visitors across the region. The programme included more than 60 free and ticketed events across the themes of light, food, entertainment, and culture. Elemental Feast went live on 4 June, with 120 restaurants participating in plating up unique festival dishes using ingredients sourced from the Auckland region and inspired by the elements. Nine events were held in the northern part of the city.

28.     The Short Break campaign, aimed at leisure travellers on Australia’s eastern seaboard, ran during Q3 and Q4. There were three bursts of the campaign, focused on themes of nature, food and wine, and ultimate things to do in Auckland featuring different parts of the region. As part of the campaign, ATEED hosted news.com.au and lifestyle.com.au in Auckland, showcasing the city’s unique offering that is promoted in the campaign. News.com.au has a reach of six million and will produce a dedicated feature on Auckland as well as share one article on Facebook with their 1.1m followers. Lifestyle.com.au has a reach of 1.2m unique viewers and will produce two dedicated online features.

 

Delivered, funding and facilitated events

29.     During the period, ATEED delivered the 2019 Auckland Lantern Festival at the Auckland Domain. Customer satisfaction was 89 per cent, an increase of nine per cent compared to the previous year. Some key findings from the customer survey found that respondents were very positive about what the event meant for the city, with 96 per cent of respondents agreeing that Auckland Council should continue to support events like the Lantern Festival and 94 per cent saying that the event brought people from different ethnic and cultural groups together (compared to 95 per cent and 91 per cent respectively in the previous year). The Auckland Lantern Festival’s sustainability objectives through the Cultural Festivals Strategy resulted in 62 per cent of waste being diverted from landfill. This has nearly doubled in two years, with the diversion being 34 per cent in 2017.

30.     31. Given the need to prioritise police resourcing following the events in Christchurch on 15 March, the 2019 Pasifika festival, which was due to run on 23 and 24 March, was cancelled. Although the festival would have been an opportunity to bring Auckland’s communities together at a time of national mourning, given the unprecedented nature of what happened and after discussions with the New Zealand Police, it was agreed that Police must prioritise resourcing to ensure the safety of communities across the city.

31.     32. During the period, residents of the Kaipātiki Local Board area were also able to enjoy events funded or facilitated by ATEED across the Auckland region, including the ASB Classic, Splore Music and Arts Festival, Sculpture on the Gulf, the New Zealand Comedy Festival, the Auckland Writers Festival, the Auckland Art Fair, Warhorse, and Auckland Wine Week.

32.     A full schedule of major events is available on ATEED’s website, aucklandnz.com

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     ATEED assesses and manages our initiatives on a case-by-case basis and engages with the Council group where required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     Local Board views are not sought for the purposes of this report. Local Board views were sought for some of the initiatives described in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds to any impact that our initiatives may have on Māori on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with our initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     ATEED will provide the next six-monthly report to the Local Board in February 2020 and will cover the period 1 July to 31 December 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Samantha-Jane Miranda – Operational Strategy Advisor, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development

Authorisers

Quanita Khan – Manager Operational Strategy and Planning, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes

File No.: CP2019/14983

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, and to provide feedback on the recommended changes to the document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is currently reviewing the Auckland Film Protocol. The Auckland Film Protocol sets out:

·        the commitment of the council group to supporting filming in Auckland;

·        expectations and rules that filmmakers must abide by when filming in Auckland; and

·        provides guidance for filmmakers on the process for approval to film in Auckland.

3.       The purpose of the review was to ensure that the Auckland Film Protocol is up-to-date and to identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities that should be addressed. Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Auckland Film Protocol should be updated. Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications from across the council group was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the protocol. 

4.       A revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in June 2019 for consideration and was approved for public consultation (resolution number ENV/2019/73).

5.       The following is a summary of the key changes made to the Auckland Film Protocol before public consultation was undertaken:

·        Native species: new content added stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species.

·        Kauri dieback: new content added providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: new content added stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: new content added stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: new content added to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site-specific health and safety plan.

·        Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was updated to reflect current policy, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council. Some structural and editorial amendments were also made to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

6.       Public consultation was undertaken over a three-week period between 21 June and 12 July 2019.

7.       A total of 74 submissions were received during the public consultation period. Kaipātiki Local Board residents provided a total of three submissions on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, representing 4.1 per cent of all submissions. Insufficient submissions were received to allow a comparison with regional views or to present a summary of key submission points for the Kaipātiki Local Board area. Staff are proposing some changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address submitter concerns; the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol are shown in tracked changes in Attachment B.

8.       This report provides a summary of public feedback and of proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address feedback. The following is a high‑level summary of the key changes proposed to the Auckland Film Protocol in response to public consultation:

·        Natural environment: include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Native species: include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Kauri dieback: amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

·        Impact on access to public open space: include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

·        Compliance and enforcement: include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with the Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

9.       Submission themes and proposed changes are summarised in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

b)      provide feedback on the recommended changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

c)      note that local board feedback will be included in a report to the Environment and Community Committee in September 2019, seeking approval for the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The first version of the Auckland Film Protocol was adopted by the Regional Development and Operations Committee (resolution number RDO/2013/27) on 14 March 2013. A review of fees for filming in the Auckland region was undertaken in 2014, and a new set of region‑wide charges was recommended providing a simplified and harmonised range of charges. The Governing Body adopted a region‑wide schedule of film fees and revised the Auckland Film Protocol on 28 May 2015 (resolution number GB/2015/36).

11.     Since the protocol was adopted in 2015, there have been a number of changes to legislation and to Auckland Council’s policy and planning framework. The purpose of the review of the protocol was to:

·        ensure that the protocol is up-to-date; and

·        identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities to be addressed in the protocol.

12.     Content of the protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the protocol should be updated. Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications from across the council group was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the protocol.

13.     Workshops were held in September and October 2018 to engage with local boards that experience a high volume of filming.

14.     Engagement to inform the preparation of the revised draft protocol was also undertaken with:

·        Mana whenua: mana whenua interests are represented by 19 iwi (tribal) authorities in Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland. The 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review of the protocol.

·        Staff of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to inform the review.

·        Screen sector: the screen sector was invited to participate in a survey in April 2019 to inform the review. The survey asked a series of general questions about the protocol and experiences of filming in public open space in Auckland. 

·        Public: the People’s Panel in September 2018; a total of 4762 responses were received. The survey asked a series of questions on views on and experiences of filming in Auckland. 

15.     A high-level summary of feedback (including local board feedback) is provided in Attachment C.

16.     The review recommended that a range of changes be made to the Auckland Film Protocol, and the following is a summary of the key changes proposed to the Environment and Community Committee:

·        Native species: include new content stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species.

·        Kauri dieback: include new content providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include new content stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: include new content stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: include new content to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site-specific health and safety plan.

·        Filming on Tūpuna Maunga: update content to reflect that applications to film on Tūpuna Maunga are assessed by the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority.

·        Updates to content: update content to reflect current policy (e.g. smokefree policy), plans (Auckland Unitary Plan) and bylaws of Auckland Council.

·        Structural and editorial: amend some parts of the document to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

17.     The revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was approved by the Environment and Community Committee for public consultation in June 2019 (resolution number ENV/2019/73).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Consultation on the revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol took place from 21 June to 12 July 2019. A total of 74 submissions were received; this represents a substantial increase on the 21 submissions received in response to the 2015 review of the Auckland Film Protocol. Of the submissions received, 72 were submitted using the online form and two non‑form hard copy submissions were received. 

19.     Submitters were asked to identify if they worked in the screen sector or not, with:

·        29 submissions (39 per cent) received from individuals or organisations that identified themselves as working in the screen sector; and

·        45 submissions (61 per cent) received from individuals or organisations that do not work in the screen sector.

20.     The questions included in the online form varied depending on whether the submitter identified themselves as working in the screen industry or not.

21.     A breakdown of all submissions received by local board area is shown in Table 1 below. The small number of responses from individual local board areas means that an analysis of views by local board area was not possible for all local board areas.

          Table 1: Breakdown of submissions made by local board area.

Local Board area

Number of respondents

Percentage of respondents

Waitākere Ranges

17

23.0%

Albert-Eden

9

12.2%

Waitematā

8

10.8%

Rodney

6

8.1%

Upper Harbour

5

6.8%

Ōrākei

5

6.8%

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

4

5.4%

Devonport-Takapuna

4

5.4%

Henderson-Massey

3

4.1%

Kaipātiki

3

4.1%

Howick

2

2.7%

Whau

2

2.7%

Māngere-Ōtahuhu

1

1.4%

Puketapapa

1

1.4%

Hibiscus and Bays

1

1.4%

Papakura

1

1.4%

Franklin

0

0%

Great Barrier

0

0%

Ōtara‑Papatoetoe

0

0%

Manurewa

0

0%

Waiheke

0

0%

Don't Know

1

1.4%

Outside Auckland

1

1.4%

Total

74

 

22.     A series of closed questions were asked of non‑screen sector individuals and organisations; a summary of the responses to these questions is shown in Table 2 below, which shows that:

·        most respondents are supportive of Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach; and

·        most respondents think that the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on residents and businesses, on public open space and historic and cultural heritage.

          Table 2: Feedback on the Auckland Film Protocols management of the impacts of filming

Question

Response

Percentage of regional submissions

(number of respondents in brackets)

Do you support Auckland Council's film‑friendly approach?

Yes

75% (33)

Partially

20% (9)

No

5% (2)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on residents and businesses?

Yes

56% (18)

Partially

19% (6)

No

25% (8)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on our public open space and environment?

Yes

53% (23)

Partially

33% (14)

No

14% (6)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on our historic and cultural heritage?

Yes

62% (26)

Partially

29% (12)

No

10% (4)

23.     The main reasons given by those who supported Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach are shown in Table 3 below.

          Table 3: Summary of key reasons for supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Economic

·    generates employment and economic growth

·    benefits communities and local businesses

·    benefits a broad range of trades and industries

·    attracts investment and businesses to Auckland

Cultural and creative

·    has cultural benefits allowing and supporting the telling of stories visually

·    supports the creative economy and enables people to find a future in the creative industries

·    it’s fun and exciting to see Auckland on the screen

Promotion and tourism

·    promotes and showcases Auckland to the world

·    creates a positive image of Auckland

24.     Table 4 shows the key reasons that respondents gave for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

          Table 4: Summary of key reasons given for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Access

·    the impacts on residents, including parking restrictions, road closures and ability to use public open space while filming is taking place, need to be considered and managed

·    need to ensure that film‑makers are respectful of other users of public open space

Notification

·    there needs to be sufficient notification to ensure that residents and businesses are aware of open space being used for filming and are not being inconvenienced

Balance

·    need to consider and manage the impact that filming has on the environment and impacted residents

·    need to balance the cumulative impacts of filming

Equity

·    need to ensure that fees for commercial use of public places are fair

25.     The key reasons given for not supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach were:

·        the cost to ratepayers of enabling filming; and

·        there is not enough protection for individuals, businesses and residents affected by filming being carried out on private property.

26.     A series of open‑ended questions were also included to elicit further information about responses to these questions and about a range of other topics. Staff have worked through submissions to determine any changes to be recommended for the final revised Auckland Film Protocol. Attachment A identifies key themes and submission points along with proposed staff responses.  

27.     A summary of the most common submission themes and the proposed staff responses are shown in Table 5 below:

Table 5: Summary of key submission themes and proposed staff responses.

Key themes

Summary of proposed responses

Use of drones for filming

Include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

Impact on natural environment

Include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Kauri dieback

Amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

Impact on native species

Include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Impact on access to public open space

Include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

Compliance and enforcement

Include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

Health and safety

Amend to enable production companies to arrange alternative time-frames for the submission of a site-specific health and safety plan by agreement with Screen Auckland.

Notification

Screen Auckland to consider operational approaches to achieving wider public notification.

Impact on business

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol. The protocol is intended to provide a framework that enables decisions to be made on a case‑by‑case basis.

Equity

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol. Fees for commercial use of public open space are set under the Auckland Council Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 and amended through the long-term plan and annual plan.

28.     This report seeks formal feedback from the local board at its August 2019 business meeting on the recommended changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol in response to consultation feedback.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications from across the council group was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the protocol. This included engagement with Auckland Transport, Panuku Development Auckland, and with Auckland Council Community Facilities, Region‑wide Planning, Social Policy and Bylaws, Visitor Experience and Heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Role of local boards in film permitting

30.     Landowner approval is required to film on any public open space in the Auckland region.  Local boards are responsible for landowner approvals for local parks and reserves.  Engagement with local boards that experience a high volume of applications for film permits was undertaken in September and October 2018 to inform the review of the Auckland Film Protocol. A summary of the key engagement themes is included in Attachment C and was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

31.     A key theme from local board engagement was that the film permit time-frames mean that landowner approval time-frames are very tight, particularly when considering complex or contentious applications. It was also noted that the current time-frames do not allow sufficient time to consider applications at full board meetings or to consult key stakeholders.  Given this, the following options on film permit time-frames were presented to the Environment and Community Committee at a workshop in May 2019 and at the June 2019 meeting.

·        Option one: status quo

·        Option two: amend the permit time-frames

·        Option 2(a): the permit time-frame is amended to be ‘up to five working days’

·        Option 2(b): the permit time-frame is increased to 5‑7 working days.

32.     Following direction from the committee, that increasing time-frames could act as a disincentive and make Auckland internationally uncompetitive, the status quo option was retained in the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) has an ongoing relationship with several mana whenua and mataawaka groups across its whole portfolio of activity. To inform the review of the protocol, the 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review. In relation to film permit applications, Māori views and input may be obtained in several ways where there is a potential impact on particular land or sites. This is usually coordinated either by the film facilitator or through the relevant parks manager.

34.     Specific processes are in place for the tūpuna maunga, with all commercial filming on the maunga requiring the approval of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority). Screen Auckland facilitates all requests for approval to film on the tūpuna maunga. Approval to film will be subject to conditions and restrictions set by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority. Meetings were held with staff of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to inform the review and ensure that proposed amendments are consistent with the policy of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     The proposed amendments to the protocol do not impact on existing levels of service and will not impact on operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     There are no significant risks arising from the local board giving feedback on the proposed changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol at this time.

37.     If adoption of the revised Auckland Film Protocol is delayed, this would impact on council’s ability to implement the proposed changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     Public feedback and proposed amendments to the Auckland Film Protocol will be presented to the Environment and Community Committee for approval.


 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Key submission themes and responses

167

b

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Draft 2019 Auckland Film Protocol (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Summary of preconsultation engagement

177

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Marie Jenkins – Screen Facilitation Manager, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza – Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2019/02091

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson to update members on recent activities, projects and issues since the last meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the chairperson’s report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Members' Reports

File No.: CP2019/02154

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for members to update the Kaipātiki Local Board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the written report from Member Anne- Elise Smithson.

b)      note any verbal reports of members.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Member Report Anne-Elise Smithson

185

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board Members' Update

File No.: CP2019/02084

 

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board members to update the board on Governing Body or Independent Maori Statutory Board issues, or issues relating to the Kaipātiki Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board members’ verbal updates.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - July 2019

File No.: CP2019/14511

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to record the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 3 July and Wednesday 10 July.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 3 July 2019, the Kaipātiki Local Board had briefings on:

·    Auckland Transport

-     Community Safety Fund Projects

·    3 Bartley Street

3.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 10 July 2019, the Kaipātiki Local Board had briefings on:

·    Service Strategy and Integration

-     Birkenhead War Memorial Park Masterplan

·    Public Excluded

-     Kaipātiki pools, leisure and recreation provision

·    Birkdale Facilities

-     136 Birkdale

-     Birkdale Kauri Kids

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the record for the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 3 July and Wednesday 10 July. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Wednesday 3 July Workshop Record

195

b

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Wednesday 10 July 2019 Workshop Record

197

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2019/02665

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the board for 2019 and an overview of workshops scheduled for the month ahead.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local board’s governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities;

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when; and

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The September 2019 governance forward work calendar for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment A to the agenda report.

5.       The August - September 2019 workshop forward work plan for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment B to the agenda report. Scheduled items may change at short notice depending on the urgency of matters presented to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Kaipātiki Local Board September 2019 governance forward work calendar and August - September 2019 workshop forward work plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Governance Forward Work Calendar September 2019

201

b

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Workshop Forward Work Plan August - September 2019

203

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Future Kaipātiki aquatic and recreation provision

File No.: CP2019/14834

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for:

i)     the recommended direction for future aquatic, leisure and recreation provision in Kaipātiki Local Board area; and

ii)     the next steps for the four sites in scope to inform future decision-making.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A priority action from the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2015) involves investigating the future need for pools and leisure facilities in Kaipātiki.

3.       To maintain current service levels Birkenhead Pool and Leisure Centre, Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre, ActivZone and Beach Haven Sports Centre require significant capital investment and increasing maintenance costs due to ageing of assets, so decisions need to be made on how best to invest to provide value for customers and the community.

4.       At a workshop on 12 September 2018, the local board supported investigation of four options for future pool, leisure and recreation provision.

5.       The investigation provides the opportunity to consider what investment is needed over the next 30 years for levels of provision to meet service requirements.

6.       In assessing options staff have prioritised strategic alignment, service outcomes for future communities and long-term value for money through prudent stewardship. Interdependencies have also been considered. Assessment summaries including costings are in the confidential attachments, this also contains financial information relating to the development potential of the council-owned sites within the scope of the investigation.

7.       Staff propose different courses of action for each site, based on the options analysis.

Table one: Proposed investigative course of action for each site

Site

Proposed course of action for investigation

Birkenhead Pool and Leisure Centre

Upgrade Osborne Pool (including aquatic play space). Replace current leisure centre with a new shared multi-use sport facility.

Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre

Prioritise an initial seismic assessment (ISA). The ISA will:

a)   inform a short-term renewals plan for the facility to support ongoing service delivery in the medium term (5 – 10 years)

b)   provide additional information for the development of an indicative business case for a new aquatic and recreation facility in Glenfield.

ActivZone

Discontinue specialist roller skating services and develop capacity for indoor sports as part of a new aquatic and recreation facility.

Beach Haven Sports Centre

Complete essential renewals while a master planning exercise is carried out that considers the facility as part of the long-term intentions for Shepherds Park and alternatives for provision of squash and tennis services.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note a new multi-use sport facility and upgrades to Osborne Pool (including aquatic play space) as the highest implementation priorities for the Birkenhead War Memorial Park master plan to be progressed through the development of a detailed business case.

b)      endorse the progression of an initial seismic assessment (ISA) for Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre and ActivZone facilities to inform short-term renewals planning and provide information for the development of an indicative business case for a new aquatic and recreation facility in Glenfield.

c)      support the development of a master plan for Shepherds Park commencing in 2020/2021 which would require $50,000 of Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) opex funding.

Horopaki

Context

8.       A priority action from the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2015) is to investigate provision of pool and leisure services in Kaipātiki. The action specifically relates to:

·      Birkenhead Pool and Leisure Centre;

·      Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre;

·      ActivZone; and

·      Beach Haven Sports Centre.

9.       As components of the facilities reach the end of their useful life, the investigation provides an opportunity to review service and facility provision to understand what decisions and potential investment is needed over the next 30 years.

10.     The investigation:

·      provides direction on the future of the facilities and service provision to ensure value for investment;

·      determines if there are gaps in current or future services or facility provision across the Kaipātiki area;

·      provides clarity about the future need for pools, leisure and recreation services and facilities in Kaipātiki in relation to the provision across the north shore network that services Kaipātiki, Devonport-Takapuna and Upper Harbour local boards;

·      considers future growth and community demand for new or substantially changed services/facilities; and

·      offers recommendations that ensure services and facilities meet the changing needs of transforming communities.

11.     The investigation commenced in May 2018 and a current state analysis and preliminary options were identified in September 2018.

12.     In a workshop on 12 September 2018, the local board requested investigation of four options:

·      status quo, which consists of component-by-component renewals;

·      specialist facilities;

·      multi-use existing location; and

·      multi-use existing location (including optimisation).

13.     Staff assessed the options to determine current and future demand based on projected community growth and demographics, and to understand if there is a need for new or changed services and facilities.

14.     The analysis of these options was informed by technical, strategic and subject matter expert inputs. Staff also worked across the council family to understand other programmes of work, interdependencies and local board priorities.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Council pool and leisure facilities in the Kaipātiki Local Board area will require significant capital investment over the term of the current Long-term Plan (LTP) to maintain current service levels.

16.     Status quo renewals will not sufficiently address all identified issues, as the work required is more than the available budget for facility renewals set through the LTP. The assets are ageing so they also require more maintenance.

17.     Some issues are the result of assets being near the end of their useful life, while others are related to low demand for the service offered.

Key findings of the current state analysis

18.     The current state analysis completed in September 2018 identified the following key findings:

Table two: Kaipātiki pools and leisure services current state analysis key findings

Key finding

Summary

Investment

₋     pool and leisure facilities in Kaipātiki require considerable capital investment to maintain current service levels, and business-as-usual renewals will not sufficiently address all the identified issues

₋     the condition of assets is impacting on customer satisfaction in some cases

₋     ongoing investment in existing services may not provide value for money as some only serve niche audiences and others are not fit for purpose

Demographics and growth

₋     over the next thirty years the population increase in Kaipātiki is predicted to be low (11.2 per cent) relative to other parts of the Auckland region.

₋     the cultural makeup of the area will change with residents identifying as European declining by 17 per cent and residents identifying as Asian (predominately Chinese and Indian) increasing by 20 per cent

₋     the elderly population will also increase over this time

₋     Māori and Pacific populations (currently 8.4 and 5.8 per cent respectively) will be static

₋     it is important to ensure facilities meet the changing service needs of changing communities

Provision

₋     existing facilities are in suitable locations to serve the Kaipātiki community and there is sufficient pool provision for the local board area for the next 30 years

₋     there is a shortfall in indoor court provision in the area as per the levels specified in the National Facilities Strategy for Indoor Sports developed by Sport NZ

₋     there are a wide range of facilities and services (both council and non-council) that contribute to meeting community needs and fulfil similar roles to council’s network of community facilities

Utilisation and performance

₋     utilisation at Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre is high and Glenfield is one of the highest financial performers across the Active Recreation network

₋     utilisation is low at Birkenhead Pool and Leisure Centre and the condition of the facilities is impacting on customers’ service satisfaction

₋     the financial performance of Birkenhead has been declining for the past three years and the network is subsidising each visit (this has doubled over last two years)

₋     ActivZone and Beach Haven Sports Centre provide very specialised services and have low levels of utilisation by the community. Operations of both facilities are being subsidised by the network

₋     there is a cap on utilisation capacity for ActivZone because of building compliance restrictions owing to the number of toilet amenities and the need for fire safety improvements

₋     Beach Haven Sports Centre has 150 members although it is unclear how often the members use the building as it is managed by a third party and reporting on utilisation has not been required from the group 

₋     swimming and group exercise classes (including Pilates and yoga) all rate within the top 10 activities for residents who live within Kaipātiki. These services are provided by Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre and partly by Birkenhead Pool and Leisure Centre

₋     local community participation is less than three percent in total across tennis, squash, table tennis, rollerblading and roller-skating. Beach Haven Sports Centre provides tennis and squash and there are squash courts at Glenfield. ActivZone provides for roller skating and table tennis

 

Interdependencies

19.     Several activities have been recognised as interdependencies with this project:

Table three: Interdependent projects and implications

Activity

Implications

Birkdale Kauri Kids facility and services

Options for the future of the building are being investigated as a separate project in parallel with this work. With limited funding available to renew facilities decisions will need to be made regarding service priorities

Birkenhead War Memorial Park (BWMP) master plan and local board OLI

Some of the facilities under investigation are part of the scope of the BWMP master plan. Options development has taken direction from the draft master plan, which is due to be adopted in August 2019

Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan and the Open Space Network Plan

The Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan and the Open Space Network Plan are both in development. Recommendations from this project will be reflected in these plans where relevant

 

Glenfield Town Centre Plan

The development of the plan began in July 2019 and will be completed within 12 to 15 months. A key focus of the plan will be gaining insights through community consultation into the role of recreation and library services as part of the future of the town centre

Glenfield Library and Service Centre building renewals

The building requires significant renewals. One of the options has involved exploring the potential for a new multi-use facility for Glenfield that may include the library and service centre. The level of investment in renewals for the current building is dependant on the decision whether or not to move the functions from their current location

 

Options for future provision

20.     At a workshop on 12 September 2018 the local board supported investigation of four options as outlined in table four below.


 

Table four: Kaipātiki pool, leisure and recreation provision options as applied across facilities

Option

Birkenhead

Glenfield

ActivZone

Beach Haven Sports Centre

1. Status quo (component-based renewals)

Renew

Renew

Renew

Renew

2. Specialist facilities

Redevelop

Redevelop

Restore or redevelop

Restore or redevelop

3. Multi-use existing location

Redevelop / multi-use sport and pool facility

Redevelop new aquatic and recreation Glenfield & ActivZone sites

 

N/A

4. Multi-use existing location, including optimisation

N/A

Redevelop new aquatic and recreation at one or both of Glenfield & ActivZone sites.

Consider library and service centre inclusion in new facility.

Investigate optimisation potential.

 

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21.     The following specialist input was obtained to help inform the options presented:

·        detailed asset and financial information;

·        aquatics and active recreation expert advice;

·        thirty-year renewals estimates;

·        new build costings;

·        condition assessment summaries (to inform renewals information);

·        optimisation expertise; and

·        geotechnical appraisals.

22.     Sport New Zealand insights, demographic and growth information has also informed the analysis.

23.     The Auckland Plan 2050, the Community Facilities Network Plan 2015, the National Facilities Strategy for Indoor Sports, the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan and the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017 were used to consider strategic alignment.

24.     In assessing options staff have prioritised network contribution, strategic alignment, likely facility improvement, service outcomes for future communities and long-term value for investment.

25.     Optimisation was considered in relation to one or both of Glenfield and ActivZone sites. Service property optimisation is a policy tool that aims to deliver improved community outcomes with no impact on rates. The aim is to release value of underperforming assets to provide funding for reinvestment in improved service delivery. It offers a potential alternative funding source for service improvement projects, but it is market dependent.

26.     Based on the assessment, staff propose the following course of action for each facility:


 

Table five: Birkenhead Pool and Leisure Centre recommendations (Attachment A)

Course of action proposed Birkenhead Pool and Leisure Centre

Recommendation: Upgrade Osborne Pool (including aquatic play space). Replace current leisure centre with a new multi-use sport facility (Option 3 in Attachment A).

Rationale: The Birkenhead pool and leisure facilities are within the Birkenhead War Memorial Park so recommendations are intended to align with the master plan.

Structural assessment and maintenance of the Birkenhead outdoor pool was completed in May 2019. The assessment has found the pool to be sound and not requiring replacement. It is recommended the pool area be fully upgraded to ensure 30-year lifetime. The addition of an aquatic play space will enhance the offering by providing a children’s area that improves the overall service offer for families. The current high ropes area will be demolished to accommodate the aquatic play space as detailed in the Birkenhead War Memorial Park master plan.

It is recommended the leisure centre component of the Birkenhead facility offering is replaced with a new multi-use sport facility that would provide an optimal service for communities. Multi-use facilities provide flexible recreational options for changing communities and they are able to support a range of activities, so they can be used by more people in the community.

Connection to options investigated: Three options were investigated for Birkenhead pool and leisure:

·    Option one: Renewal of all facilities

·    Option two: Renewal of pool. New multi-use sport facility.

·    Option three: Upgrade of pool and addition of aquatic play space. New multi-use sport facility.

 

 

Option one

Option two

Option three

Network contribution

Strategic alignment

X

Facility improvement

X

Service outcomes

X

Neutral

Value for investment 

X

 

Table six: Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre recommendations (Attachment B)

Course of action proposed Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre

Recommendation: Prioritise an initial seismic assessment (ISA). The ISA will:

a)       inform a short-term renewals plan for the facility to support ongoing service delivery in the medium term (5 – 10 years)

b)       provide additional information for the development of an indicative business case for a new aquatic and recreation facility in Glenfield (further explore options three and five, in the table below).

Rationale: The assessment of options for Glenfield pool and leisure is complex. Investigation indicates that costings for a new aquatic and recreation facility are comparable to full renewals over thirty years. Optimisation offers the opportunity to offset new build costs, but is market dependent and in the current market when optimisation is factored in new build costs are only slightly reduced.

A new multi-use (aquatic and recreational) facility will provide the best service outcomes for future communities. To continue business-as-usual renewals on existing assets has high long-term cost with little impact on service offering improvements.

Staff propose essential renewals are completed while an indicative business case is developed for a new facility. The recommendation is to give priority to progressing the ISA as this will give clarity about a programme for renewals investment required to maintain current service levels for the short to medium term. At the same time the ISA will inform the indicative business case, which will ascertain the strategic and economic case for investment.

Connection to options investigated: Five options were investigated for Glenfield pool and leisure:

·    Option one: renewals

·    Option two: full restoration

·    Option three: new multi-use aquatic & recreation centre same site

·    Option four: new multi-use aquatic, recreation, library and service centre

·    Option five: new multi-use aquatic & recreation centre alternative site

Optimisation was considered in relation to 3, 4, and 5.

The cost of a new build is comparable to renewals costs over thirty years but provides better service outcomes that will be future-proofed and flexible and therefore responsive to changing communities and changing service needs.

At this high-level stage of investigation, it is apparent that in the current market proposed optimisation options are not enough to fully fund the cost of developing a new multi-use facility, with significant indicative funding shortfalls for a new build. There are other scenarios that could be investigated as part of developing a business case that may work to offset cost. Partnership opportunities could also be more fully explored.

 

 

 

Option one

Option two

Option three

Option four

Option five

Network contribution

Strategic alignment

X

X

Facility improvement

X

Neutral

Service outcomes

Neutral

Value for investment 

X

Neutral

 

Table seven: ActivZone recommendations (Attachment C)

Course of action proposed ActivZone

Recommendation: Discontinue specialist roller skating services and develop capacity for multi-use indoor sports and recreation as part of a new aquatic and recreation facility.

Rationale: The future of ActivZone and Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre services should be considered as part of the same place-based programme. The recommendation is that these two sites are brought together to consider a single solution for Glenfield.

ActivZone service is currently highly subsidised (below one per cent of Aucklanders participate in this sport) and primarily used by people outside the local board area. Current service investment does not represent value for money. Further investigation is required regarding roller sport provision and network requirements against indoor sport and recreation priorities. Investment in the development of capacity to accommodate a wide range of indoor sports is recommended.

Connection to options investigated: Two options were investigated for ActivZone:

·    Option one: renewals

·    Option two: full restoration

Whether renewed or restored the service provides a highly specialised offering that will continue to be highly subsidised and will not adapt in response to a changing community.

The options for a new multi-use facility at the existing location were rolled into the assessment of Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre as the two current facilities are on adjoining properties.

 

 

Option one

Option two

Network contribution

?

?

Strategic alignment

X

X

Facility improvement

X

Service outcomes

X

X

Value for investment 

X

X

 

Table eight: Beach Haven Sports Centre recommendations (Attachment D)

Course of action proposed Beach Haven Sports Centre

Recommendation: Complete essential renewals while a master planning exercise is carried out that considers the facility as part of the long-term intentions for Shepherds Park and alternatives for provision of services.

Rationale: Less than four per cent of the community participate in the sports offered by the facility, and operations are currently being subsidised by the network. Instead staff propose essential renewals are undertaken while a master plan is completed to assist with prioritisation. This exercise will involve considering whether there is a need for a full renewal of the facility as part of long-term intentions for the park, and alternatives for provision of squash and tennis services.

Connection to options investigated: Three options were investigated for Beach Haven Sports Centre:

·    Option one: renewals

·    Option two: full restoration

·    Option three: demolition and rebuild

High cost to council to service a niche audience. Whether renewed or restored the service provides a highly specialised offering that will not adapt in response to a changing community.

 

 

Option one

Option two

Option three

Network contribution

?

?

?

Strategic alignment

X

X

X

Facility improvement

X

Service outcomes

X

Neutral

Neutral

Value for investment 

X

X

X

 

Auckland Council’s three-stage process for new investment

27.     Cases for new investment in community services and facilities follow Auckland Council’s three stage process, based on the better business case model developed by the Treasury. The process applies to the recommendations for new facilities at Birkenhead and Glenfield and the stage each is at is outlined in table nine below: 

Table nine: New investment case process stage for Birkenhead and Glenfield

Process stage

Description

Birkenhead

Glenfield

Needs assessment

Analysis of growth, demographics, network provision and gaps

Completed through the development of the Birkenhead War Memorial Park master plan

Completed through the current state analysis and options investigation phases of this project

Indicative business case

Considers the merits of proposed investment, strategic alignment and economic case that looks at costs and benefits to help ensure a robust case for change

Completed through the development of the Birkenhead War Memorial Park master plan

The next stage for the proposal to bring together Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre and ActivZone sites to consider a new single multi-use aquatic and recreation offering for Glenfield

Detailed business case

Builds on the previous stages and identifies preferred options(s) that will deliver community benefit and value for money

To be undertaken following adoption of the Birkenhead War Memorial Park master plan, due to happen through another item on the same agenda

To be determined by the indicative business case

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     A dedicated project team was set up to oversee the options investigation phase of this project. The team included representation from Service Strategy & Integration, Community Facilities, Commercial & Finance, Panuku Development Auckland, Parks Sports & Recreation, Libraries & Information and Local Board Services.

29.     Essential renewals work will be prioritised and planned through the Community Facilities renewals work programme process to ensure levels of service are maintained while planning for the future takes place.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The population increase in Kaipātiki over the next thirty years is expected to be low relative to the rest of the region, but the change in demographic makeup of the population is expected to be significant.

31.     According to Sport New Zealand data, the European population will decline by 17 per cent, while the most significant ethnicity shift is Asian (predominately Chinese and Indian) where the population will increase by 20 per cent, becoming nearly forty per cent of the total local board area population. The older adult population will also increase over this time.

32.     Both ethnicity and age influence people’s sport and recreation choices.

33.     Rates of participation for Kaipātiki by demographic group (according to Sport New Zealand data) for the activities collectively offered by the facilities in the scope of this investigation are summarised in table ten below:

Table ten: Rates of participation in activities offered by the sites in scope

Activity

Kaipātiki European

Kaipātiki Pacific

Kaipātiki Asian

Kaipātiki Māori

Kaipātiki average

Auckland average

Population participation (per cent)

Swimming

17.6

14.4

15.0

23.2

17.1

16.5

Individual workout

24.4

14.9

19.5

22.8

22.2

22.7

Group exercise

13.4

14.0

6.4

9.7

11.4

12.1

Pilates/yoga

8.8

3.1

7.0

4.0

8.0

8.6

Tennis

3.2

2.7

3.0

0.4

3.0

2.8

Squash

0.7

0.0

0.8

0.7

0.7

0.7

Rollerblading

0.1

0.0

0.1

0.7

0.2

0.2

Table tennis

2.3

0.9

2.7

0.6

2.2

1.6

Roller skating

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Inactive

17.6

17.7

24.9

20.9

20.8

20.2

 

34.     Sport New Zealand data shows weekly sport and recreation participation by Māori in Auckland is 73.7 per cent. This is lower than European (83 per cent) and Pacific (74 per cent), but higher than Asian (67.1 per cent).

35.     Specialised facilities are limited in their capacity to cater for more than one activity and can be low value for investment if they are inaccessible to the wider community and inefficient to operate.

36.     In general, multi-use facilities have the flexibility and functionality to support a wider range of sport, physical activity and community preferences, and offer the potential for higher utilisation and therefore better value for investment.

37.     Nine local community groups based at or with an interest in the Birkenhead War Memorial Park provided input for the park’s master plan as have mana whenua. Implementation of the master plan includes a multi-use sport facility and enhanced aquatic offering (and are detailed in sections 3.2 and 3.3 of the plan).

38.     Mana whenua, mataawaka and the local community will be invited to engage in the process and provide input for the proposed Shepherds Park master plan throughout the development.

39.     Mana whenua and the local community will be engaged with and provide input for details of the service provision and outcomes required through the design phases of the new facility projects at Birkenhead War Memorial Park and, if determined through the business case process for a new aquatic and recreational facility, Glenfield.

40.     In a workshop on 12 September 2018, the local board requested further investigation of four options.

41.     In a workshop on 10 July 2019, options investigation findings and proposed courses of action for each site were presented to the local board. The proposals for each site were endorsed by the local board at the workshop.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     Sport participation contributes directly to the following ‘Māori Identity and Wellbeing’ outcome in the Auckland Plan 2050:

·          Direction one: Advance Māori wellbeing

·       Focus area one: Meet the needs and support the aspirations of tamariki and their whanau

 

43.     Sport and leisure contributes to outcomes under three directions in the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau (2017). The plan, published by the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB), provides a framework to Auckland Council for implementing desired cultural, economic, environmental and social outcomes for Māori:

·          Direction – Whanaungatanga: social outcome, Māori communities are connected and safe; action, wellbeing of tamariki through provision of facilities and services such as libraries, community centres, swimming pools

·          Direction – Manaakitanga: social outcome, Māori enjoy a high quality of life

·       Direction – Wairuatanga: social outcome, Māori social institutions and networks thrive

 

44.     IMSB’s plan provides the following key performance indicator for sport and recreation: ‘per cent of Māori who can access at least three public council facilities, such as a library, pool or sports facility.’ This will be confirmed through the business case process.

45.     The Community Facilities Network Plan (2015) emphasises council’s responsibility to deliver outcomes for Māori. The network plan details six actions that will ensure council meets this commitment including active engagement with Māori to factor needs and expectations into decision-making for the planning and operations of facilities and incorporating concerns about wahi tapu.

46.     New facilities also offer the potential to deliver on Auckland Plan Direction four: ‘Showcase Auckland’s Māori identity and vibrant Māori culture through design and te reo Māori.

47.     Mana whenua were involved in the development of the Birkenhead War Memorial Park master plan. Input was provided by Ngaati Whanaunga, Te Kawerau a Maki, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngātiwai, Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua, Ngati Te Ata and Ngati Maru.

48.     Mana whenua will be invited to engage in the process and provide input for the proposed Shepherds Park master plan.

49.     Mana whenua will be engaged with and provide input for details of the service provision and outcomes required for communities through the design phases of the new facility projects that are progressed following a detailed business case for investment.

50.     Sport New Zealand data shows the Māori population is 8.4 per cent Māori in Kaipātiki, forecast to increase to 8.9 per cent by 2038. This compares to the Auckland average Māori population of 11 per cent, forecast to increase to 11.6 per cent.

51.     As demonstrated in table ten, rates of participation by Kaipātiki Māori (compared to the both Auckland and Kaipātiki averages) are higher for swimming. Participation is lower for group exercise, pilates/yoga, tennis and table tennis.

52.     The Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) states that development of new facilities will involve investigating Māori demographic participation and usage trends, identifying opportunities to increase the attendance and use of facilities by Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

53.     Financial assumptions have been made to provide consistent options comparison to inform recommendations, as outlined in the attachments.

54.     The funding sources vary for each recommended option and each facility and are outlined in table eleven below.

Table eleven: Potential funding sources for recommended options by facility

Facility

Costs to implement next steps

Potential long-term funding source

Birkenhead Pool and Leisure Centre

The business case development will be funded through operational budgets.

 

One Local Initiative (OLI) funding for a new multi-use sport facility and upgrades to Osborne Pool (including aquatic play space), if pool and leisure facilities are prioritised within the Birkenhead War Memorial Park master plan implementation.

The OLI programme was established as part of the 10-year Long-term Plan 2018-2028 to enable each local board to prioritise one project to receive funding.

Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre

The ISA will be funded through operational budgets.

 

Facility renewals will be funded through LTP capex renewals budgets, depending on renewals priorities.

New aquatic and recreation facility build subject to LTP consideration of detailed business case. 

The indicative business case development will be funded through operational budgets.

ActivZone

The ISA will be funded through operational budgets.

 

As per Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre – develop capacity for indoor sports as part of a new aquatic and recreation build. 

Beach Haven Sports Centre

Local board LDI opex ($50,000) is required in 2020/2021 to fund the Shepherds Park master plan.

 

Facility renewals through LTP capex renewals budgets, depending on renewals priorities.

Priorities identified in the Shepherds Park master plan will set the direction for implementation requirements.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     There are four main risk areas associated with the report recommendations where new investment and changed services are proposed; Birkenhead and Glenfield sites.

Type of risk

Mitigation

If community aquatic and recreation facilities, in Kaipātiki, do not receive additional investment for renewals, then existing assets will continue to deteriorate and reduce service levels.

Staff involved with existing services and facilities will work through the local board to agree a renewals programme based around service and asset priorities.

If optimisation does not offer enough capital to fully fund the cost of developing a new multi-use facility, then costs to council will increase.

Optimisation scenarios will be fully tested and will include market awareness. Partnership opportunities will also be fully explored.

If there is perceived loss of existing services or the expectation of additional services, then community members may react negatively.

This risk will be managed through clear and regular communication with staff involved with existing services and through the local board.

If population growth rates exceed projections, then demand for additional or larger facilities may result.

This risk will be managed by designing adaptable and flexible spaces aimed at serving a changing population.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.     From September 2019 a detailed business case for Birkenhead new multi-use sport facility, upgrades to Osborne Pool (including aquatic play space) will be prepared by staff for consideration as part of the One Local Initiative (OLI) programme.

57.     Initial Seismic Assessments (ISAs) for Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre and ActivZone facilities will be complete by February 2020. The ISAs will determine the timing of the indicative business case that will be required for consideration as part of the Long-term Plan process for a new multi-use aquatic and recreational facility in Glenfield.

58.     If approved and funded through LDI opex, a master plan for Shepherds Park will be included in the local board 2020/2021 work programme for delivery in 2021. Priorities identified in the Shepherds Park master plan will set the direction for implementation actions.

59.     Prioritise renewal of the Beach Haven Sports Centre through the 2020/2021 Community Facilities renewals work programme process to ensure levels of service are maintained while long term intentions for the facility are considered through the Shepherds Park master planning process.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Birkenhead Pool and Leisure Centre (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

b

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Glenfield Pool and Leisue Centre (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

c

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - ActivZone (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

d

21 August 2019 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Beach Haven Sports Centre (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tracey Williams - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Kaipātiki Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14607

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Kaipātiki Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter four, 1 April – 30 June 2019, and the overall performance for the financial year, against the agreed 2018/2019 local board work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Kaipātiki Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2018/2019 financial year.

3.       Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

4.       134 activities (74 per cent) within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. 10 activities (6 per cent) were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred. 37 activities (20 per cent) have not progressed as expected during 2018/2019.

5.       Operating departments have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery (refer Attachment A). Key highlights for quarter four include:

·    the Northern community houses and centres delivered the first community-led community places regional hui in June 2019;

·    allocation of $103,031 to the Kaipātiki Public Arts Trust to deliver a public artwork within Oruamo Domain, Glenfield;

·    approval of the green building framework concept for the rebuild of the community facility at 17 Lauderdale Road, Birkdale;

·    completion of construction of the new toilet at Monarch Park;

·    development of the nature play space at Normanton Reserve;

·    installation of the retaining wall at Downing Street Reserve;

·    completion of construction of the youth playspace at Marlborough Park; and

·    the small building sites ambassador completed site visits with reporting going through to the targeted initiatives team for follow up.

6.       Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme include:

·    kauri die back preventative measures have been undertaken including the temporary/partial closure of a number of reserves;

·    movies in parks, Christmas parades, summer/winter fun activities and other free community-led events were delivered;

·    track renewals and upgrades at various parks were completed, including Lauderdale Reserve, Eskdale Reserve (Stage 1), Verran / Castleton Reid/ Ridgewood Reserve, Dudding Ave Reserve;

·    deconstruction of the Birkenhead War Memorial Park Grandstand was successfully undertaken and the draft master plan for the park was approved for public consultation;

·    playground renewals and upgrades were completed at various reserves, including Tamahere Reserve, Normanton Reserve and Marlborough Park;

·    full coverage shade sails have been installed over playgrounds at Little Shoal Bay Reserve, Inwards Reserve and Shepherds Park; and

·    visits to 162 sites in Wairau were undertaken as part of the Industry Pollution Prevention Programme.

7.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·    Birkenhead War Memorial Reserve renewal works are on hold due to the impending masterplan;

·    Kauri Park track and signage renewal works are on hold due to the discovery of kauri die back;

·    the installation of dog agility equipment is on hold until the scope and outcomes sought can be confirmed;

·    the development of a food forest network is not ready for delivery until the scope and outcomes sought can be confirmed; and

·    the comprehensive renewal of the Beach Haven Sports Centre is on hold pending the findings from the strategic assessment of the service requirements and needs assessments of pools and leisure facilities in the Kaipātiki local board area.

8.       The 2018/2019 financial performance report is attached but under confidential cover. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX, which are expected to be made public 30 September 2019.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Kaipātiki Local Board performance report for the financial quarter and year ending 30 June 2019.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2018/2019 are released to the NZX which are expected to be made public 30 September 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Kaipātiki Local Board has an approved 2018/2019 work programme for the following operating departments:

·          Arts, Community and Events – approved on 20 June 2018 (resolution number KT/2018/114)

·          Parks, Sport and Recreation – approved on 20 June 2018 (resolution number KT/2018/114)

·          Libraries and Information – approved on 20 June 2018 (resolution number KT/2018/114)

·          Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration – approved on 20 June 2018 (resolution number KT/2018/114)

·          Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew – approved on 18 July 2018 (resolution number KT/2018/142)

·          Community Leases – approved on 18 July 2018 (resolution number KT/2018/142)

·          Infrastructure and Environmental Services – approved on 20 June 2018 (resolution number KT/2018/113)

·          Local Economic Development – approved on 20 June 2018 (resolution number KT/2018/115)

·          Plans and Places – project carried forward from 2017/2018 (resolution number KT/2017/110).

10.     Work programmes are produced annually, to meet the Kaipātiki Local Board outcomes identified in the three-year Kaipātiki Local Board Plan. The local board plan outcomes are:

·          Our people identify Kaipātiki as their kāinga (home) / He kāinga a Kaipatiki ki tō tātou iwi o reira

·          Our natural environment is protected for future generations to enjoy / Kei te tiakina tō tātou taiao hei painga mō ngā uri whakaheke

·          Our people are active and healthy / He ngangahau he ora tonu ō tātou iwi

·          Getting to and around Kaipātiki is easy / He māmā te haere atu me te haereere noa i Kaipātiki

·          Our urban centres are vibrant / He wāhi hihiri te pokapū tāone

·          Our community facilities and infrastructure is high quality and well managed / He rangatira, he tōtika te arataki i ō tātou urunga hapori me ōna kaupapa whakahaere

·          Services are well managed and meet community needs / He tōtika te arataki i ngā ratonga kia eke ai ngā hiahia o te hapori

11.     Graph 1 below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph:

Graph 1: Kaipātiki work programme activities by outcome

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     Operating departments have provided the last quarter delivery update against their work programme (refer Attachment A).

Key highlights for quarter four

13.     The key achievements to report from the quarter four period include:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Quarter 4 update

Bayview Community Centre

Birkdale Community House & Beach Haven Community House

Glenfield Community Centre, Highbury House

Marlborough Park Youth Hall

Green

Completed

The regional hui was held on 7 June 2019 with over 30 participants attending. This hui was the first to be community-led and was delivered by partners in the northern region. The main objective was to bring together community places teams to share information, ask questions and learn from each other.

Placemaking pilot

Amber

In Progress

Placemaking contractor Catalyse has developed a placemaking strategy, identifying key actions and placemaking activations to be carried out over the next six months. Community activations are being promoted and positive feedback is being received about the community-led approach. Some participants have expressed an interest in utilising this approach within their own organisations. Project plans and timelines have been completed for Birkdale Community House, Bayview Community Centre and Glenfield Community Centre. Bayview and Glenfield Community Centres have been identified as locations that residents from target areas Windy Ridge and Glenfield are more likely to participate. Totara Vale residents provided local knowledge and assistance to Kaipātiki Community Facilites Trust. The Housing New Zealand (HNZ) community development team are participating in the project. HNZ promoted two placemaking workshops to HNZ tenants to gain insight into what matters to local people.

Legacy ARST contestable funding – Kaipatiki allocation

Green

In Progress

In April 2019 the local board approved $103,031 to the Kaipātiki Public Arts Trust to deliver a public artwork within Oruamo Domain, Glenfield, including defined outcomes and objectives (resolution number KT/2019/54). Local board member Adrian Tyler was appointed as the local board representative on the selection panel. The panel commenced on 17 June 2019.

17 Lauderdale Road, Birkdale - renew/rebuild facility

Green

In Progress

Current status: Concept design approved at business meeting in June 2019. Design team meetings to be arranged over the month of July. A value management process was required to identify the primary purpose, benefits and key features of the rebuild. This took some time and has delayed the time frames for delivery, however has set a firm direction and scope for the project and will enable a smoother delivery through the next phases of the project.

Next steps: Professional services engagement for developed design stage and preparation of resource consent application.

Kaipatiki - install shade sails

Green

In Progress

Current status: The shade sails have been installed at Little Shoal Bay Reserve and Inwards Reserve. Shade trees and Shepherds Park playground shade sails are being installed in June/July.

Monarch Park - develop toilet

Green

Completed

Project completed June 2019.

Normanton Reserve - improve play space

Green

Completed

Current status: Project completed after significant delays with handover to Parks Operations 28 June 2019.

Downing Street Reserve - install retaining wall

Green

Completed

Project completed June 2019.

Marlborough Park - renew youth playspace

Green

Completed

Project completed June 2019.

New Project - Small Building Sites Ambassador

Green

Completed

Site visits have been completed and a snapshot report will be provided to the local board in July 2019, outlining the results of the programme. The targeted initiatives team have been advised and will follow through the areas with compliance. The targeted initiatives team will provide detail around the follow through site visits and any enforcement action that is taken in this area, and this will be provided to the local board.

Children and Youth engagement - Kaipātiki

Green

Completed

A diverse school holiday programme was offered across the Kaipātiki libraries encouraging varying literacies and community interaction. On May the 4th 100 people attended a joint Star Wars evening. Libraries and Information have hosted a Rosmini College student to fufill his Learning Assessment. Stand-up poetry events at Northcote had many youthful poet performers. Libraries and Information are regularly visiting Onepoto Primary and Northcote Intermediate with the mobile library Waka to School programme and we are seeing children doing and enjoying more reading after school in the library at Northcote.

Overall performance against the Kaipātiki Local Board 2018/2019 work programme

14.     Graph 2 below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected (completed by the end of July 2019) or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey):

Graph 2: Kaipātiki Work Programme by RAG status

15.     Graph 3 below identifies the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each department’s work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes:

Graph 3: Kaipātiki work programme activity by activity status and department

16.     Table 1 below shows the overall performance of work programme activities (RAG status and activity status by work programme):

Table 1: End of year Kaipātiki work programme activities status

RAG Status

Activity Status

ACE

PSR

Libraries

SS&I

CF

Leases

I&ES

P&P

ATEED

Green

Completed

22

3

7

-

35

16

5

1

1

In progress

1

1

-

2

39

1

-

-

-

Amber

In progress

5

3

-

1

23

1

-

-

-

Red

In progress

-

-

-

-

3

1

-

-

-

On Hold

-

-

-

-

5

1

-

-

-

Grey

Deferred

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

Cancelled

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

 

Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme

17.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2018/2019 include:

·    ongoing volunteer activities in Kaipātiki local parks have been undertaken, including rubbish clean-ups, weed control, planting and ongoing animal pest control;

·    kauri die back preventative measures have been undertaken including the temporary/partial closure of a number of reserves;

·    the Sunnynook-Totara Vale Plan was approved for publication;

·    movies in parks, Christmas parades, summer/winter fun activities and other free community-led events were delivered;

·    placemaking pilot scope was confirmed and the lean placemaking strategy was completed, identifying key actions and placemaking activations to be carried out over the next six months;

·    track renewals and upgrades at various parks were completed, including Lauderdale Reserve, Eskdale Reserve (Stage 1), Verran / Castleton Reid/ Ridgewood Reserve, Dudding Ave Reserve;

·    deconstruction of the Birkenhead War Memorial Park Grandstand was successfully undertaken and the draft master plan for the park was approved for public consultation;

·    the Hilders Park play boat was moved safely onto Larking’s Landing where repairing and repurposing into a play space was initiated;

·    playground renewals and upgrades were completed at various reserves, including Tamahere Reserve, Normanton Reserve and Marlborough Park;

·    full coverage shade sails have been installed over playgrounds at Little Shoal Bay Reserve, Inwards Reserve and Shepherds Park;

·    visits to 162 sites in Wairau were undertaken as part of the Industry Pollution Prevention Programme;

·    allocation of $103,031 to the Kaipātiki Public Arts Trust was made to deliver a public artwork within Oruamo Domain, Glenfield; and

·    approval of the green building framework concept was made for the rebuild of the community facility at 17 Lauderdale Road, Birkdale.

Overview of work programme performance by department

Arts, Community and Events work programme

18.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 22 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be completed by end of July 2019 (green), 5 activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and 1 activity that have been cancelled in quarter four (grey). Activities that are delayed are discussed below:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

RAG Explanation

Christmas Events - Kaipatiki

Amber

In Progress

Staff are working with the Birkenhead Rotary Club for the full 2018 accountability to be submitted correctly. 2019 funding to be withheld until staff are satisfied that the accountability requirements have been fulfilled.

Placemaking pilot

Amber

In Progress

Although the Placemaking pilot is currently progressing well, it will now continue until November 2019 due to delays in starting.

Manaakitanga

Amber

In Progress

The project changed direction from the initial concept. Due to the change in direction, the budget was agreed by the local board to be carried forward to 2019/2020. The workshops weren’t held in Q4 as identified in Q3. To get better traction in supporting Māori aspirations the manaakitanga work programme line will support and contribute to work that assists the transferal of traditional Māori knowledge through a variety of mediums e.g. film, event, digital and face to face interviews. This work is confirmed to begin in Q1 2019/2020.

MOU and Partnership Agreements

Amber

In Progress

A facilitated co-design process has been undertaken with the governance board of Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust (KCFT) and the Kaipātiki Local Board. Scheduling of joint meetings has impacted on the delivery timeline. The project continues to progress with the report back on agreed outcomes scheduled for the end Q1 2019.

Youth programmes funding review

Amber

In Progress

Initial findings of the youth funding review of ACE programmes were reported to the board at the 26 June 2019 workshop and further refinements to the review following the workshop will be completed for Q1 2019/2020.

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

19.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are 3 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), 3 activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are delayed are discussed below:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

RAG Explanation

KT: Naturalisation of Parks Service Assessment

Amber

In Progress

During the workshop with Kaipātiki Local Board on 12 June 2019, further feedback was received which necessitated changes to the document.

KT: Specific implementation plan for Auckland's Urban Forest (Ngahere) Strategy

Amber

In Progress

The draft Ngahere local assessment report is being prepared for review by the local board at a workshop in August. Based on local board feedback a final report will be prepared for approval at the September 2019 business meeting.

KT: Māori Naming of Reserves and Facilities Phase Two

Amber

In Progress

Part of a multiyear activity/project that was expected to continue into next year which has not progressed as expected for 18/19. The first tranche of names is expected to be delivered late 2019.


Libraries and Information work programme

20.     In the Libraries and Information work programme, all 7 activities were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green).

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

21.     In the Service Strategy and Integration work programme, there are 2 multiyear activities that progressed as expected for 2018/2019 and will continue in 2019/2020 (green), and 1 activity that is in progress but is delayed (amber). The activity that is delayed is discussed below:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

RAG Explanation

Investigate and provide direction on future of Glenfield Pool, Birkenhead Pool, Beachhaven sports centre and Active Zone

Amber

In Progress

The outcome of the highly complex options investigation is different than expected. Rather than one option being recommended encompassing all four sites in the scope of the investigation, analysis has led to a different course of action being proposed for each site. The final assessment and recommendations for each site will be presented to the local board for decision on 21 August 2019.

 

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

22.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 35 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), 23 activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), 8 activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and 1 activity that has been cancelled in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed or on hold are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

RAG Explanation

Kauri Park track and signage renewals

Red

In Progress

Activity/project will not be completed by the end of Q1 next year.

Current status: Stage 1 scope is being considered in consultation with Biosecurity.

Kaipatiki - install dog agility equipment

Red

In Progress

Until such time when the scope is confirmed and approved, the project cannot progress further. Due to this, the project will not be delivered by the end of this financial year but will carry over into the next financial year.

Current status: The project is currently on hold due to further strategic assessments being requested by the local board. A report with further details on options for locations of both installation of dog agility equipment or dog parks is being prepared by Community Services with input from Community Facilities.

Kaipatiki - develop Food Forest network

Red

In Progress

Not ready for delivery – Community Services to confirm Strategic Assessment to inform deliverables.

Current status: Awaiting a strategic assessment from Community Services to determine the outcomes required. Project may be linked to "Naturalisation in Parks" project where the scope is still being confirmed.

Beach Haven Sports Centre - comprehensive renewal

Red

On Hold

Current status: Service Strategy and Integration team is undertaking strategic assessment of the service requirements and needs assessments within the local board area including community places, active recreation centers and kauri kids. Awaiting the outcome of this assessment before progressing comprehensive renewal of this facility. This will delay the project progress and decision has been made to place on hold until outcome has been received.

Birkenhead War Memorial Park - renew tracks

Red

On Hold

Project has been placed on hold. Awaiting completion of Birkenhead War Memorial Park Development Plan.

18 Denby Lane, Northcote Point - reroof building and renew electrical board

Red

On Hold

Project on hold pending Kaipatiki Local Board business meeting resolution.

Current status: A report recommending demolition will go to the Kaipatiki Local Board business meeting in August 2019.

Birkenhead War Memorial Park - renew skate park, including park to pool access - stage 2

Red

On Hold

On hold awaiting outcome of Park Master Plan to be completed.

Current status: Draft detailed design is nearly complete but on hold until the Park Master Plan refresh is completed and whether the top car park may change.

Birkenhead War Memorial Park - renew car parks

Red

On Hold

The masterplan needs to be completed prior to renewing the carpark.

Kaipatiki - install new signage

Amber

In Progress

Current status: The lack of detail in the project scope, provided as part of the FY2018/2019 work programme led to a misunderstanding and the project was delayed in the initial stage. These issues have now been resolved and the project is progressing as expected.

Onepoto Domain - renew pathway (H&S)

Amber

In Progress

This option has been reviewed with iwi and internal stakeholders. Delayed due to determination of scope of work and scale of funding.

Shepherds Park - Install coastal track connection to Tui Park