I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 21 August 2019

5.00pm

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Office
Shop 17B
93 Bader Drive
Māngere

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

 

Deputy Chairperson

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

Members

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

 

 

Carrol Elliott, JP

 

 

Makalita Kolo

 

 

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese, QSM, JP

 

 

Christine O'Brien

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Janette McKain

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

13 August 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 262 5283

Email: janette.mckain@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Aktive - Auckland Sport and Recreation                                     5

8.2     Deputation - Māngere East Rugby League Football Club and Sports Incorporated                                                                                                          5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Public Forum - Pasifika Aotearoa Women in Sport                                         6

9.2     Public Forum - Kasey King, CEO of Counties Manukau Rugby League       6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Governing Body Member Update                                                                                9

12        Local Board Leads and Appointments Report                                                         11

13        Chairpersons Report and Announcements                                                              13

14        Auckland Transport August Update Report                                                             19

15        Allocation of Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board  Community Safety Fund               25

16        David Lange Destination Playground Development                                                31

17        ATEED six-monthly report to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board                        45

18        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Achievements Report for 2016 - 2019 triennial  53

19        Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes     87

20        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019                                                                    171

21        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019                                                                  175

22        Local board resolution responses and information report                                  219

23        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      233

24        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes                                                  237  

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

26        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               245

20        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

a.      Draft 2018/2019 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Annual Report                245

21        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

b.      Financial Performance Report                                                                        245  

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of its ordinary meeting, held on Wednesday, 17 July 2019,  as  true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

·           Opening of the Mangere Town Centre Library, after the long awaited refurbishment a wonderful community event with local artists, local children performing for the re-opening by the Board, Auckland Council and many guests were part of the service conducted by Whakatau Mana whenua, local board, local pastor and speeches.  A great occasion for the community.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Aktive - Auckland Sport and Recreation

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Steve Kidd, Brett Young and representatives from Manukau Rovers, Ōtāhuhu clubs and NZ Rugby for their presentation and attendance.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Māngere East Rugby League Football Club and Sports Incorporated

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Tasha Tasmania, General Manager from the Mangere East Rugby League Football Club and Sports Incorporated would like to update the board on the following:

·     Report on our building renovation to date including outcomes 

·     Proposal on construction work still to be done and barriers ahead

·     Integrating a medical clinic into the clubrooms and timeline.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Tasha Tasmania, General Manager from the Mangere East Rugby League Football Club and Sports Incorporated for her presentation and attendance.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Pasifika Aotearoa Women in Sport

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Moana Leilua, Chair of Pasifika Aotearoa Women in Sport would like to update the local board on their work, including funding previously received.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Moana Leilua for her presentation and attendance.

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Kasey King, CEO of Counties Manukau Rugby League

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Kasey King, CEO of Counties Manukau Rugby League would like to update the board on the work that they have been doing in Norana Park.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Kasey King for his presentation and attendance.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Governing Body Member Update

File No.: CP2019/01957

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 Minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from Cr Alf Filipaina and Cr Efeso Collins.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Local Board Leads and Appointments Report

File No.: CP2019/11847

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item allows the local board members an opportunity to present verbal and written updates on their lead rolls, such as relevant actions, appointments and meetings.

Organisation

Lead

Alternate

Community Impact Forum for Kohuora Corrections Facility

Makalita Kolo

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Mangere Bridge BID

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Mangere Town Centre BID

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Makalita Kolo

Mangere East Village BID

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Otahuhu Business Association

Christine O’Brien

Makalita Kolo

South Harbour Business Association BID

Carrol Elliott         

Makalita Kolo

Auckland Airport Community Trust for

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

 

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Carrol Elliott

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Youth Connections South Local Governance Group (3 members)

Christine O’Brien, Makalita Kolo,

Lemauga Lydia Sosene 

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich (appointed 15 March 2017)

Maori input into local board decision-making political steering group (1 lead, 1 alternate)

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Te Pukaki Tapu O Poutukeka Historic Reserve & Associated Lands Co-Management Committee

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Ambury Park Centre

Christine O’Brien

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Mangere Mountain Education Trust

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Local Government New Zealand Zone One Committee

Carrol Elliott (appointed 21 March 2018)

 

Local Board Leads

Infrastructure and Environmental Services lead

 

Carrol Elliott

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Arts, Community and Events lead

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua/

Christine O’Brien

Parks, Sport and Recreation lead and Community Facilities

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua/

Tafafuna’i Tasi Lauese

Libraries and Information Services lead

Christine O’Brien

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua/

Makalita Kolo

 

Local planning and heritage lead – includes responding to resource consent applications on behalf of board

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua (Planning)

Carrol Elliott

(Heritage)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Transport lead

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Carrol Elliott/

Makalita Kolo

Economic development lead

Christine O’Brien

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

The Southern Initiative Joint Steering Group

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua (appointed 17 May 2017)

Liquor Licence Hearings – Delegation to represent

Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich

(appointed 17 May 2017)

 

Manukau Harbour Forum

Carrol Elliott (appointed 19 April 2017)

Togiatolu Water Togiamua (appointed 19 April 2017)

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal and written reports from local board members.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Chairpersons Report and Announcements

File No.: CP2019/01971

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the Chairperson an opportunity to update the local board on any announcements and for the local board to receive the Chairperson’s written report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal update and written report of the local board Chair.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairs August Report

15

b

Herald Article

17

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport August Update Report

File No.: CP2019/14962

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Provide an update to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on transport related matters in their area, including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund. (LBTCF)

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Although this report does not require a decision, there is a decision report on the agenda this month. This report contains information about the following:

·        The wider ‘context’ involving a summary of the strategic projects or issues impacting  the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area

·        An update on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

·        Progress on local board advocacy initiatives

·        No items were forwarded to the local board for consultation this month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      accept the Auckland Transport update report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. Auckland Transport reports on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

4.       Auckland Transport continues to deliver a number of strategic projects in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu as discussed below.

Road Safety and Speed Management

5.       Road safety is an issue across New Zealand and is an increasing problem in Auckland, including in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, and over the last five years has worsened. This is why Auckland Council and Auckland Transport are taking action to address the problem and since 2018 have committed to improving road safety and working together to deliver a new road safety strategy.

6.       A ‘Vision Zero’ approach, in the Government Policy Statement made safety a priority for central government and Auckland Transport (AT) is also committed to supporting this approach. AT is delivering a considerable safety work programme, including reducing speed limits in dangerous areas.

7.       In December 2018, the Auckland Transport Board gave approval to publicly consult on a proposed Speed Limits Bylaw. Auckland Transport consulted on the proposed bylaw using the special consultative procedure and invited feedback to be provided between 28 February 2019 and 31 March 2019.

8.       Public engagement and interest in the topic of speed limits in Auckland has been high. This is evident in the 11,719 submissions received in response to our consultation. The submissions included 51 submissions from stakeholders and 10 submissions from local boards including the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board.

9.       Due to the high public interest, the volume of submissions and the detail in some of the submissions, more time is now required to fully analyse and consider the feedback received against the proposed speed limit changes in the proposed bylaw.

10.     Auckland Transport’s Board is still considering the information gathered during the consultation and further developments are not expected before September 2019.

 

Airport to Botany Rapid Transport Network (RTN)

11.     Strategically, Auckland Council and Auckland Transport are working to create a Rapid Transport Network linking the Airport and Botany. The strategic plan is that the Central Rail Link, AMETI-Eastern Busway, Airport to Botany and electrification to Pukekohe all finish at roughly the same time creating a ‘skeleton’ of the Rapid Transit Networks able to move people efficiently north/south and east/west.

12.     From Māngere-Ōtāhuhu’s perspective, key projects are the City Centre to Airport Link and the Airport to Botany Rapid Transport Network. 

13.     Next month Puhinui Station will close so work can start on its redevelopment as a central east/west hub and transfer point.  This is large project and is key to the Airport to Botany Rapid Transport Network.

14.     The Airport to Botany project team’s aim is to discuss the project with the Auckland Transport Board this month, providing them with information from the consultation and design process to consider, so they can confirm the project direction (i.e. confirming preferred routes). Within Māngere-Ōtāhuhu more advice and decisions are required. When this work is finished, the project team will return to the affected local boards and provide more information, including preferred routes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Responding to Resolutions

15.     At the July Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board meeting, the members passed a resolution. Auckland Transport’s response to this resolution is recorded below. The resolution in italic font and the answer in normal font. A number of the resolutions may require an update in the future.

Resolution Number MO/2019/112

That the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board request Auckland Transport officers to follow-up urgently the maintenance of the road surface on Bader Drive – specifically the stretch between the Māngere Town Centre and the BP petrol station, that is, between the two roundabouts.

 

16.     Road Corridor Delivery contractors have filled the potholes and Auckland Transport can confirm that Bader Drive is scheduled for rehabilitation this financial year.

                                                                     

 

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

17.     The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·    Be safe

·    Not impede network efficiency

·    Be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks may be considered if they support a transport outcome).

18.     The fund allows local boards to build transport focused local improvements in their areas. Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s total funding in this term is approximately $1.4 million (including new money allocated during the recent Council budget process and shown in the ‘Financial Summary’). The following table provides an overall summary of the current LBTCF position, including the increased LBTCF approved by Council and applying from 1 March 2018.

Table 1: Local Board Transport Capital Fund Summary

19.     Below in Table 2 is a summary of all projects status.

 

Table 2: Local Board Transport Capital Fund Projects

General Overview

Projects

Current Status 

Status

Upgrading the footpaths in and around the Mangere East Town Centre.

 

Upgrading footpaths and pedestrian facilities in Mangere East. 

Bader Drive Roundabout

 

Building a two-lane roundabout at the intersection of Bader Drive and Idlewild Road

Widening Bader Drive in front of the Cosmopolitan Club

 

Completed

Ashgrove Reserve Cycle Route

 

A walking and cycling path through the Ashgrove Reserve.

Bus shelter improvement project

 

Local board members are putting together the list of stops.

Boggust Park

 

Improve the parking and pathways in or around Boggust Park.

Detailed Project Progress Report

Upgrading the footpaths in and around the Mangere East Town Centre

In May 2019 the local board committed $338,000 to this project and authorised Auckland Transport to construct.

Auckland Transport has received the board’s authorisation and is completing project planning.  Final planning has started however; some discussion is required with Council Parks to formalise aspects of the project.

Bader Drive Roundabout

This project slowed down a little. The tender price provided by contractors was higher than expected. Auckland Transport reviewed the tender because it was more than $100,000 higher than estimated. After reviewing the situation, Auckland Transport has decided to cover the additional cost rather than asking the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to provide additional funding.

The final details of the contract are being finalised and contractor mobilisation on site is expected in August or September 2019.

Widening Bader Drive in front of the Cosmopolitan Club

Completed.

Ashgrove Reserve Cycle Route

The local board authorised construction in June 2019 at an approximate cost of $800,000.

The team are completing planning and will start this project in the summer building season. In winter, the ground in the reserve is soft and easily damaged by heavy trucks and diggers so it is better to build in summer. When confirmed dates are available, they will be reported to the local board.

Bus shelter improvement project

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has provided a list of the bus stops and shelters that they want investigated for maintenance or upgrade. 

Auckland Transport officers are working through this list organising the two groups and auctioning the board’s request.

Boggust Park

In June 2019, the local board transferred $126,625 from the LBTCF to Auckland Council.

 

Local board advocacy

20.     This section provides a regular report about how Auckland Transport is supporting the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu’s advocacy initiatives. The board’s advocacy initiatives are recorded in its Local Board Plan. In this month’s report, the board’s advocacy initiatives from the 2016-2019 electoral term have been recorded in the table below.

Table 3: Advocacy Initiative Status

1.      

1.      

1.      

A well-connected area, part of a great, affordable public transport network that makes it easy for all to move around.

Deliver projects with the governing body and Auckland Transport including:

Improving street connections between the Ōtāhuhu bus/train station and town centre

Upgrading the street environment around Māngere East shopping area and community facilities

Completing the Māngere town centre bus station upgrade

Support walking and cycling connections around popular parks like Walter Massey and Māngere Town Centre.

Auckland Transport has a range of projects underway  supporting this initiative including:

·    Auckland Transport is working with Council to help develop a plan for Mangere East and is delivering a LBTCF project in this area

·    A pathway through Ashgrove Reserve is confirmed and is funded from the LBTCF it will improve off-road walking and cycling opportunities in Mangere.

Attractive, accessible and safe cycle ways and walkways.

Champion and support the Ōtāhuhu Portage route project to open the area for recreation, walking and cycling.

An advocacy issue that Auckland Transport can help support but cannot lead.

Implement Norana path walkway and fund priority Local Paths projects.

An advocacy issue that Auckland Transport can help support but cannot lead.

Continue supporting Te Ara Mua-Future Streets and identify options to increase use of cycle ways and walkways.

·    Auckland Transport’s Community Safety Team is still working in the area supporting local people like Mr ‘T’ to deliver events and programmes that promote walking and cycling in this area.

·    Auckland Transport is delivering a pathway through Ashgrove Reserve linking people with Future Streets area

Partner with Te Wānanga o Aotearoa to use digital technology to popularise and increase use of new paths.

A local board project

Safe, attractive and well-maintained streets for all.

Develop and deliver improvements to Bader Drive, e.g. a roundabout at the Idelwild Road intersection and road widening near Māngere town centre

Auckland Transport has delivered the project to widen Bader Road and is about to start the Bader Drive roundabout. 

 

 

Future Streets activation activities

21.     Future Streets is a key local board advocacy issue and Auckland Transport is supporting this project by promoting use of the area for walking and cycling.  The most important upcoming project is an event planned in September 2019 to celebrate World Car Free day.

 

Community Safety Fund

22.     The Community Safety Fund involves $ 20 million distributed across all local board for local road safety projects. The fund is split between local board areas based on the number of death and serious injury crashes in that area. Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s budget is $1,108,085.

23.     Auckland Transport has workshopped with Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and a decision report with detailed information is on this agenda.

Mangere Bridge Safer Community

24.     Auckland Transport is delivering a new road safety initiative that concentrates road safety funding in certain areas. Māngere-Bridge is an area in which money has been committed to this initiative and in recent years two rounds of community consultation and a large technical study has been conducted. Full details are available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/road-safety/safer-communities-programme/mangere-bridge/

25.     Auckland Transport has made a third report to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and has confirmed the project is funded and plans to start in 2020.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Any impacts with other Council groups within this report were discussed earlier in the report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     Local board impacts and views recorded in the body of the report if relevant to a project or issue.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     In this reporting period no project required iwi engagement

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     This report does not have a financial impact.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     The proposed decision to receive the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all of its projects

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board next month

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ben Stallworthy – Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Team Manager

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Allocation of Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board  Community Safety Fund

File No.: CP2019/14982

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board’s direction on allocation of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Community Safety Fund of $1,108,085 which is available to fund road safety projects in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport officers have worked with the local board and provided advice about possible projects. The local board expressed interest in a number of potential projects, these have been assessed, scoped and an estimated cost developed. The scoped and costed list of projects have been workshopped with the local board and a prioritised list developed.

3.       This list is being tabled at this meeting to enable the local board to make a decision on the prioritised list.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      Request delivery of the following Community Safety Fund projects:

i.   $260,421 contributing to signalisation of the Princes Street and Great South Road intersection.

ii.  $750,000 contributing to improved off-road cycle facilities in the Ōtahuhu Town Centre.

iii.  $50,000 to make the intersection of Fort Richard Lane and Great South Road safer.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       The 2018 Regional Land Transport Plan allocated $20 million for Financial Year 2019/2020 and Financial Year 2020/2021 for local initiatives in road safety - the Community Safety Fund. $5 million is allocated Financial Year 2019/2020 and $15 million is allocated in Financial Year 2020/2021. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

5.       On 1 May 2019 Auckland Transport officers workshopped with Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and provided advice regarding possible projects.  The local board asked that Auckland Transport investigate the following projects

·    Building a pedestrian crossing near 69 Vine Street

·    More Crossings in the Māngere Bridge area

·    Ōtāhuhu and Great South Road safety

·    Safety around rest homes

·    Upgrading the intersection of Walmsley and Donnell Roads.

6.       Auckland Transport’s engineers visited every site and assessed the projects, including meeting with other Auckland Transport teams to check their work programmes. When this was finished, Auckland Transport workshopped the projects and costings with the local board on 7 August 2019.

7.       The assessment and advice are summarised in Table One (below). The work in and around Ōtāhuhu has been split into three smaller projects.

Table One: Summary of CSF Project Investigations

 

Project Name

Description

Auckland Transport Advice

Budget

Safety improvements near rest homes

Investigate improving safety around four rest homes:

 

·    Bridge Court

·    Court Town

·    Lambie Court

·    Topping Court

This is a summary of the engineers assessment of each:

•     Bridge Court    - 7 Coronation Road - Low risk, no reported crashes.

•     Court Town Court       - 23 Court Town Close - Low risk, one crash in the last five years (non-injury involving pedestrian) low traffic volumes

•     Lambie Court  - 11 Yates Road - One crash in last five years in this part of the road and an existing raised zebra outside the rest home here.

•     Topping Court - 13a Ashley Avenue - Low-medium risk, no reported crashes in this part of the road, bus stops just outside rest home.

After reviewing the rest homes the engineers felt that a need for safety improvements could not be demonstrated.

 

The project cannot be delivered using the CSF.

 

N/A

Vine Street Crossing

Building a new crossing at approximately 69 Vine St.

This project is being funded from within Auckland Transport so could not be delivered using the CSF.

 

N/A

Walmsley Road/ Donnell

Re-modelling the intersection to make it safer .

This project is being funded from within Auckland Transport so could not be delivered using the CSF.

 

 

N/A

Crossings in Māngere Bridge

Building new pedestrian crossings in different locations in Māngere Bridge

This is a summary of the engineers assessment of each.

 

•     Māngere Bridge School (Taylors Road) – Existing Kea Crossing -Good practice is to convert into raised zebra. Safer Communities is upgrading Domain Kea and Taylor Rd Zebra.

•     Māngere Domain (Taylors and Domain) - Low speed environment.  Good visibility.  Existing judder bars.  Low risk of collision. 

•     Swanson Park/ Library access/ Church Street –Safer Communities has lots of work planned in this area and there are existing crossing points

•     House Ave near Waterlea School – Safer Communities is raising the existing zebra crossing outside the school.

 

After reviewing the crossings the engineers felt that either the need for safety improvements could not be demonstrated or there were plans in place to deliver the crossings anyway.

 

The project cannot be delivered using the CSF.

 

N/A

Ōtāhuhu Safety Improvements

Improving safety in Ōtāhuhu particularly near the intersection of Great South Road and Princes Street

 

During the review process this project was split into smaller projects to provide more flexibility.

Upgrading the roundabout at the intersection of Princes and Great South Road:

 

The suggested approach is that the CSF contributes $260,421 to a safety improvements shortfall in the wider town centre upgrade project. This will get this project ‘over the line’ more quickly and release money from the town centre upgrade for other parts of Ōtāhuhu.

 

Cycle safety at the intersection of Princes Street and Great South Road:

 

It is proposed that the Community Safety Fund pay for 50% of the improved cycle facilities including off –road routes.

 

The cycle facility is one of the key deliverables for the upgrade project and the suggested approach is that the CSF contributes $750,000 that will get this project ‘over the line’ more quickly and release money for upgrades in other parts of Ōtāhuhu.

 

Fort Richard Road / Great South Road intersection:

 

A dangerous intersection in Ōtāhuhu. It has restricted visibility for vehicles turning out of Fort Richard Road. There were 13 crashes in the last five years for vehicles turning right out of Fort Richard Rd. 18 total crashes at the intersection. Intersection has high personal risk rating.

The suggested approach is that the CSF is used to deliver $50,000 to safety improvements at this intersection.

 

 

$ 260,4211

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$ 750,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$ 50,000

 

8.       Auckland Transport’s advice is that use of the CSF in the Ōtāhuhu area contributes to the town centre upgrade by releasing money from safety projects for use elsewhere.  The Ōtāhuhu project is currently underfunded and the use of the CSF in this way addresses safety problems, releasing existing budget to be used for place-making activities.  In short, this use of the CSF maximises utility helping the local board to achieve two long standing objectives:

·    Improving safety at the intersection of Princes Street and Great South Road and Ōtāhuhu Town Centre generally

·    Completing the Ōtāhuhu Town Centre upgrade.

9.       Further, the recent decision by Auckland Transport to confirm funding for the Māngere Bridge Safer Community project and the local board’s commitment of Local Board Transport Capital Fund for projects that support the Māngere Future Streets project means that the each of the local board area’s large town centres has road safety work delivery scheduled in the near future. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

10.     The impact of decisions in this report are confined to AT and do not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

11.     The CSF has been workshopped twice with the local board.  The local board members indicated that the projects allocated funding in this report will likely improve the road safety environment in the community that they are delivered. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

12.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

13.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area’s allocation of the Community Safety Fund will be fully utilised if the recommendations are adopted.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

14.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

15.     Design and construction of an approved list of projects. When a timeline for delivery is confirmed it will be reported to the board.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ben Stallworthy – Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Team Manager

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

David Lange Destination Playground Development

File No.: CP2019/13901

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To allocate $350,000 Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) capex funding to support the development of a destination playground development at David Lange Park and approve the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU - Attachment A) between Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and Variety – the Children’s Charity.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Variety - the Children’s Charity, has expressed a desire to partner with Auckland Council to provide a destination playground to mark their 30th anniversary.

3.       David Lange Park is a sports park that provides a range of formal and informal sport and recreation provision and forms part of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board parks network.

4.       David Lange Park playground is identified as a high development priority in the local board adopted Play Network Analysis (2018). 

5.       At a June 2019 workshop the local board met with Variety representatives and provided in-principle support of the project and feedback on the draft MoU which seeks to formalise the commitment between the Local Board, Council and Variety. The intent of the partnership is to provide increased play provision at David Lange Park playground.

6.       In FY19 the local board provided $35,000 LDI opex for Community Facilities to commence preparation of a destination playground concept plan (MO/2019/92).

7.       The MoU has been amended to reflect local board feedback from the July workshop requesting two local board members are nominated to sit on the project steering group (Attachment A, Section 3).

8.       The board provided support in principle for including Variety in the playground name subject to consultation with mana whenua and the David Lange Trust (the Trust).

9.       It is recommended that the local board allocates $350,000 LDI capex and approves the attached MoU which outlines the principles and objectives for the parties’ to work collaboratively and approves that General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation be authorised to make any minor changes to the MoU.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      Allocates $350,000 Locally Driven Initiative capex to the development of a destination playground at David Lange Park.

b)      Approves the MoU (Attachment A) between the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and Variety – the Children’s Charity and nominates two local board representatives to sit on the project steering group.

 

 

c)      Approves that General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation be authorised on behalf of the council to make any minor changes or edits to the MoU.

d)      Supports staff opening discussions with mana whenua and the David Lange Trust to progress dual playground naming for the destination playground at David Lange Park.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     At the June business meeting the board adopted the Play Network Analysis (MO/2019/92) which identified David Lange Park playground as the highest play development priority and also reallocated $35,000 LDI opex to fund concept plan preparation for this project. 

11.     The concept plan will guide holistic redevelopment of the playground, skate park, basketball court, toilets and pathways to provide an accessible facility for a wide range of users.

12.     Variety – the Children’s Charity expressed a desire to partner with Auckland Council to develop a destination playground to celebrate their 30th anniversary. David Lange Park was identified as the preferred location.

13.     Variety works with disadvantaged children in low socio economic neighbourhoods. The development of a destination playground at David Lange Park meets Variety’s and the local board’s aspirations to provide access to challenging and exciting playgrounds in poorly serviced areas.

14.     At a June workshop the local board met with Variety representatives to discuss project aspirations and funding envelopes. The board provided support for the project and feedback on the draft MoU.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     It is estimated that destination playground development at David Lange Park will cost $1.2M, with budget drawn from the following sources: 

·        play item renewals - $400,000 (#2955 Renew & Upgrade Parks Assets - approved in three-year local board renewals programme)

·        Local Board LDI capex - $50,000 (#2968 - play provision assessment – approved in three year work programme)

·        Local Board LDI opex - $35,000 (allocated in June to commence concept plan preparation)

·        Local Board LDI capex - $350,000 (recommended contribution to support playground development - to be confirmed)

·        Variety funding – $400k (to be confirmed).

16.     Additional funding will be required to implement skate park renewal, pathway connections and accessible toilet provision. Indicative funding of $500,000 for the skate park renewal has been informally discussed with Community Facilities but does not form part of the approved three-year renewals programme.

17.     At the June workshop Variety representatives indicated their interest in developing a dual name for the destination playground. This could potentially combine a name provided by mana whenua and a name that reflects Variety’s financial support for the project. The names will be formally approved by the local board via report.

18.     Variety has provided funding for other playground development projects in Auckland including the Long Bay Reserve playground which was named the ‘Long Bay Reserve -Variety Playground’.

19.     The local board support the dual name for the playground subject to consultation with mana whenua and the David Lange Trust. Consultation to determine the Trust’s position on dual-naming will take place prior to staff opening discussions with mana whenua. It is recommended that no further action is taken on the dual-naming project if the Trust or mana whenua do not support the proposal. 

20.     The draft MoU between Variety – the Children’s Charity and Auckland Council outlines the founding principles and objectives for the parties’ commitment to work collaboratively to create a destination playground at David Lange Park that will include:

·        a wide range of play experiences

·        an accessible playground for children with physical and mental needs

·        collaborative play equipment for children to engage and play together

·        picnicking and gathering spaces 

·        planting large specimen trees for shade

·        cultural design themes that resonate with people in Māngere

·        integrating design elements acknowledging the significant financial contribution to the project by Variety and their financial donors/sponsors.

21.     Section 3 of the draft MoU requires formation of a project steering group to oversee project development. At the July workshop the board requested that two Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board members are nominated to sit on the steering group.

22.     It is recommended that the local board approves that General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation be authorised on behalf of the council to make any minor changes or edits to the MoU.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Community Services has collaborated with Community Facilities to provide oversight of project funding sources including renewals and approved LDI capex.

24.     Community Facilities will manage concept plan preparation funded by the $35,000 LDI opex and project manage the delivery of the destination playground at David Lange Park.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     The local board has provided in-principle support for the project at workshops in October 2018, June 2019 and July 2019. The board provided $35,000 LDI opex to commence preparation of a concept plan for the playground.

26.     The board also provided support for playground dual-naming in consultation with mana whenua and the David Lange Trust.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     David Lange Park is identified in the local board adopted Play Network Analysis as an area of low play provision. Destination playground development will benefit Māori and the wider community by providing access to a challenging, exciting playground that provides play experiences for all ages and abilities.

28.     Mana whenua will be engaged to support concept plan preparation and provide a cultural narrative in the playground design and delivery.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The Community Facilities adopted three year work programme provides $35,000 LDI opex, $50,000 LDI capex and $400,000 capex (play item renewals) for destination playground development at David Lange Park.

30.     A further $350,000 capex is required to meet the $800,000 capex investment to secure Variety’s contribution of $400,000.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     If the additional $350,000 LDI capex funding is not approved the partnership with Variety will not progress and the project will be re-scoped to meet the funding allocated by the local board.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Community Facilities will prepare a holistic concept plan based on mana whenua and stakeholder engagement feedback. Local board and steering group workshops will be held to capture feedback on concept plan designs. The concept plan will be adopted via a report in quarter four, FY20.

33.     Detailed designs for the playground will be produced and resource consents applied for in FY21. Destination playground development will take place in FY22.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memorandum of Understanding (MoU)

35

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Steve Owens - Parks and Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

ATEED six-monthly report to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

File No.: CP2019/14984

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with highlights of ATEED’s activities in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area as well as ATEED’s regional activities for the six months 1 January to 30 June 2019.

2.       This report should be read in conjunction with ATEED’s Quarter 3 report to Auckland Council (available at www.aucklandnz.com) and the forthcoming Quarter 4 report to the Auckland Council CCO Finance and Performance Committee (available 17 September). Although these reports focus primarily on the breadth of ATEED’s work at a regional level, much of the work highlighted has significant local impact.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report provides the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with relevant information on the following ATEED activities: 

·   Locally driven initiatives: 24-hour south visitor promotion, Mangere local economic development forum and workshops, Young Enterprise Scheme, interim review of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Economic Development action plan, Pop-Up Business School South

·   Supporting local business growth

·   Filming activity

·   Youth employment pathways

·   Youth connections

·   Offshore talent attraction

·   Local and regional destination management and marketing

·   Delivered, funded and facilitated events.

 

4.       Further detail on these activities is listed under Analysis and advice.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive ATEED’s update to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board – August 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       ATEED has two areas of focus:

Economic Development – including business support, business attraction and investment, local economic development, trade and industry development, skills employment and talent and innovation and entrepreneurship.

 

Destination - supporting sustainable growth of the visitor economy with a focus on destination marketing and management, major events, business events (meetings and conventions) and international student attraction and retention.

 

6.       These two portfolios also share a common platform relating to the promotion of the city globally to ensure that Auckland competes effectively with other mid-tier high quality of life cities.

7.       ATEED works with local boards, Council and CCOs to support decision-making on local economic growth and facilitates or co-ordinates the delivery of local economic development activity. ATEED ensures that the regional activities that ATEED leads or delivers are fully leveraged to support local economic growth and employment.

8.       In addition, ATEED’s dedicated Local Economic Development (LED) team works with local boards who allocate locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget to economic development activities. The LED team delivers a range of services[1] such as the development of proposals, including feasibility studies that enable local boards to directly fund or otherwise advocate for the implementation of local initiatives.

9.       ATEED delivers its services at the local level through business hubs based in the north, west and south of the region, as well as its central office at 167B Victoria Street West.

10.     Additional information about ATEED’s role and activities can be found at www.aucklandnz.com/ateed

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     As at 30 June[2], 3303 businesses had been through an ATEED intervention or programme. Of these, 94 businesses were in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area – 46 businesses went through Destination-related programmes and 48 businesses went through Economic Development-related programmes.

 

Economic Development

Locally Driven Initiatives:

12.     24-hour south visitor promotion: The 24-hour south visitor south campaign closed in March. For the third year in a row, the content of the 24-hour south campaign received high engagement in the form of likes, comments and post shares, showing the creative was again strong. The programme was completed in Q4.

 

13.     Mangere local economic development forum and workshops: Twenty-two people attended the February meeting at Mangere Arts Centre. Attendees expressed a high level of interest in attending future meetings. Two more Mangere-Otahuhu Business Series were held on 22 May and 20 June at the Mangere Arts Centre. The two events featured two presentations on how to market your business, followed by a round table talk by attendees. The next meeting was scheduled for 1 August 2019.

 

14.     Young Enterprise Scheme: The Auckland Chamber of Commerce has delivered the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) since January 2018. ATEED maintains a strategic role. The Chamber invoiced for funds during Q3 and payment was subsequently made. During the period, there were 58 schools participating in the Auckland YES programme, representing 1376 students completing the programme. Al-Madinah School, Kings College, Māngere College and Southern Cross Campus are the four schools from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area participating in the YES programme.

 

15.     Interim review of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local economic development action plan: The final draft has been submitted to the local board for feedback in January 2019. Local board's feedback was received at the workshop on 22nd May.

 

16.     Pop-Up Business School South: The activity was completed in Q2.

 

Supporting Local Business Growth

17.     This area is serviced by the Business and Enterprise team in the South hub, based in Te Haa o Manukau. The team comprises of two Business and Innovation Advisors and administration support. The role of this team is to support the growth of Auckland’s key internationally competitive sectors and to support to provide quality jobs.

 

18.     A key programme in achieving this is central government’s Regional Business Partnership Network (RBPN). This is delivered by ATEED’s nine Business and Innovation Advisors (BIA), whose role is to connect local businesses to resources, experts and services in innovation, R&D, business growth and management. 

 

19.     ATEED’s BIAs engage 1:1 with businesses through a discovery meeting to understand their challenges, gather key data, and provide connections / recommendations via an action plan.

 

20.     Where businesses qualify (meet the programme criteria and/or align to ATEED’s purpose as defined in the SOI) the advisors facilitate government support to qualifying businesses, in the form of:

·   Callaghan Innovation R&D grants (including Getting Started, project and student grants (https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/grants)

·   Callaghan Innovation subsidised innovation programmes

(https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/innovation-skills)

·   RBPN business capability vouchers (NZTE), where the business owner may be issued co-funding up to $5,000 per annum for business training via registered service providers. Voucher co-funding is prioritised to businesses accessing this service for the first time, in order to encourage more businesses to engage with experts to assist their management and growth.

·   NZTE services such as Export Essentials  https://workshop.exportessentials.nz/register/)

·   Referrals to NZ Business Mentors via The Chamber of Commerce.

 

21.     During the reporting period, ATEED Business and Innovation Advisors met with seven businesses in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area, two for innovation advice and services and five for business growth and capability advice and services (two were returning clients). From these engagements:

·   Two RBPN vouchers were issued to assist with business capability training

·   Two connections were made to Callaghan Innovation services and programmes

·   Two connections were made to ATEED staff and programmes

·   Seventeen connections were made to other businesses or programmes.

 

Other support for new businesses

22.     During the period, ATEED also ran workshops and events aimed at establishing or growing a new business and building capability. Two people from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area attended a business clinic.

 

 

Filming activity within the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area

23.     ATEED’s Screen Auckland team provides film facilitation services as part of ATEED’s support for the screen and digital sector of Auckland’s economy. Screen Auckland facilitates, processes and issues film permits for filming activity in public open space. This activity supports local businesses and employment, as well as providing a revenue stream to local boards for the use of local parks.

 

24.     Between 1 January and 30 June 2019, 305 film permits were issued in the Auckland region across 379 locations and 404 days of filming. Of these, 18 permits were issued in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area. The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area’s share of film permit revenue was $1,669.56 for the period (total for all boards combined was $51,191.30).

 

25.     On average, 37 crew work on each shoot day. This does not reflect filming that also takes place in studios, private property or low impact activity that wouldn’t have required a permit. During the period, 81 permits were issued for TV commercials (TVC), making up 27 per cent of permits issued. A quarter of the TVC permits were destined for an international market.

 

26.     Some of the key film productions that were issued permits to film in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area were:

·    Jonah, The Untold Story (TV feature)

·    Power Rangers

 

27.     Auckland is becoming a popular destination for international television networks to pilot an episode of a new TV series to allow them to gauge if a series will be successful. Permits were issued for locations across the Auckland region earlier this year for two new US pilots.

 

Youth employment pathways

28.     The Go with Tourism campaign was successfully launched on 5 April, attracting 170 employers and more than 700 youth by year-end. The campaign is designed to shift perceptions many young people have about careers in tourism and address the skills gap in the industry.  

 

29.     ATEED delivered the Future Ready Summit on 26 June at the Vodafone Events Centre in Manukau. Approximately 250 employers, 40 young people and 20 speakers (eight under the age of 24). The Youth Employer Pledge partners were the primary audience. The Future Ready Auckland: Driving economic development through technology and transformation insights paper was also released, attracting strong media attention - including a lead story on Radio NZ Nine to Noon.  The research insights aims to better understand Auckland’s future skill needs, including future growth sectors. ATEED is currently working with pledge partners to harness the network, with a focus on south and west Auckland now that Youth Connections has transferred to The Southern Initiative.

 

Local Jobs and Skills Hubs

30.     ATEED is the regional partner for the network of Auckland Jobs and Skills Hubs. These multi-agency hubs support employers at developments where there is a high and sustained demand for local labour and skills development. The Auckland network includes Ara (Auckland Airport development), City Centre and Tāmaki hubs. As at 30 June, 377 people had been placed into employment via the ATEED-facilitated CBD hub, 1,914 training outcomes were delivered, and 11 apprenticeships were facilitated. About 36 per cent of those employed are Māori, against a target of 40 per cent. ATEED has developed a school engagement pilot programme with interested employers and schools aimed at engaging students with career opportunities in the construction and infrastructure sector. ATEED also provided funding to a Progressive Employment Programme for at-risk youth, supporting cadet training and developing youth-ready capability within businesses working on the City Rail Link. The City Centre hub is a training partner for this programme.

 

Offshore talent attraction

31.     The Auckland. We’re Hiring campaign ran from January to March 2019. The campaign is designed to attract high-skilled offshore construction and technology talent to Auckland. The campaign resulted in 2295 job applications.

 

Destination

Local destination management and marketing activity

32.     ATEED is in the process of re-forming the Māngere tourism cluster. The goal is to create a closer network for tourism providers in the area in order to more effectively identify and develop opportunities.

 

Regional destination management and marketing activity

33.     The Elemental AKL winter festival website went live on 29 April. The festival ran from 1-31 July and is developed to promote sustainable tourism growth by encouraging visitation more evenly throughout the year, and dispersing visitors across the region. The programme included more than 60 free and ticketed events across the themes of light, food, entertainment, and culture. Elemental Feast went live on 4 June, with 120 restaurants participating in plating up unique festival dishes using ingredients sourced from the Auckland region and inspired by the elements. A number of events were held in the Local Board area, including the Nuku Live event that ATEED provided funding towards. Nuku Live is a wahine empowerment wananga, focused on empowering indigenous women through storytelling and workshops that express the creativity of indigenous women in Tāmaki Makaurau.

 

34.     The Short Break campaign, aimed at leisure travellers on Australia’s eastern seaboard, ran during Q3 and Q4. There were three bursts of the campaign, focused on themes of nature, food and wine, and ultimate things to do in Auckland featuring different parts of the region. As part of the campaign, ATEED hosted news.com.au and lifestyle.com.au in Auckland, showcasing the city’s unique offering that is promoted in the campaign. News.com.au has a reach of six million and will produce a dedicated feature on Auckland as well as share one article on Facebook with their 1.1m followers. Lifestyle.com.au has a reach of 1.2m unique viewers and will produce two dedicated online features.

 

Delivered, funded and facilitated events

35.     During the period, ATEED delivered the 2019 Auckland Lantern Festival at the Auckland Domain. Customer satisfaction was 89 per cent, an increase of nine per cent compared to the previous year. Some key findings from the customer survey found that respondents were very positive about what the event meant for the city, with 96 per cent of respondents agreeing that Auckland Council should continue to support events like the Lantern Festival and 94 per cent saying that the event brought people from different ethnic and cultural groups together (compared to 95 per cent and 91 per cent respectively in the previous year). The Auckland Lantern Festival’s sustainability objectives through the Cultural Festivals Strategy resulted in 62 per cent of waste being diverted from landfill. This has nearly doubled in two years, with the diversion being 34 per cent in 2017.

 

36.     Given the need to prioritise police resourcing following the events in Christchurch on 15 March, the 2019 Pasifika festival, which was due to run on 23 and 24 March, was cancelled. Although the festival would have been an opportunity to bring Auckland’s communities together at a time of national mourning, given the unprecedented nature of what happened and after discussions with the New Zealand Police, it was agreed that Police must prioritise resourcing to ensure the safety of communities across the city.

 

37.     During the period, residents of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area were also able to enjoy events funded or facilitated by ATEED across the Auckland region, including the ASB Classic, Splore Music and Arts Festival, Sculpture on the Gulf, the New Zealand Comedy Festival, the Auckland Writers Festival, the Auckland Art Fair, Warhorse, and Auckland Wine Week.

 

38.     A full schedule of major events is available on ATEED’s website, aucklandnz.com

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     ATEED assesses and manages our initiatives on a case-by-case basis and engages with the Council group where required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     Local Board views are not sought for the purposes of this report. Local Board views were sought for some of the initiatives described in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds to any impact that our initiatives may have on Māori on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with our initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     ATEED will provide the next six-monthly report to the Local Board in February 2020 and will cover the period 1 July to 31 December 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Samantha-Jane Miranda, Operational Strategy Advisor (ATEED)

Authorisers

Quanita Khan, Manager Operational Strategy and Planning (ATEED)

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Achievements Report for 2016 - 2019 triennial

File No.: CP2019/12471

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the achievements of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and Local Board Plan (2017) over the 2016-2019 electoral term.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Attachment A notes the achievements of the local board over the current electoral term through assessment of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan (2017) progress.

3.       The report highlights projects, activities and events the local board has delivered, supported or significantly influenced.

4.       The achievements report will also be made available online.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receives the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Achievements Report for this electoral term - Attachment A of this report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Achievements Report - Mangere Otahuhu

55

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Riya Seth - Democracy Advisor - Whau

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes

File No.: CP2019/14448

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, and to provide feedback on the recommended changes to the document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is currently reviewing the Auckland Film Protocol.  The Auckland Film Protocol sets out:

·        the commitment of the council group to supporting filming in Auckland;

·        expectations and rules that filmmakers must abide by when filming in Auckland; and

·        provides guidance for filmmakers on the process for approval to film in Auckland.

3.       The purpose of the review was to ensure that the Auckland Film Protocol is up-to-date and identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities that should be addressed.  Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Auckland Film Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol. 

4.       A revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in June 2019 for consideration and was approved for public consultation (resolution number ENV/2019/73). 

5.       The following is a summary of the key changes made to the Auckland Film Protocol before public consultation was undertaken:

·        Native species: new content added stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: new content added providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: new content added stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: new content added stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: new content added to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was updated to reflect current policy, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council.  Some structural and editorial amendments were also made to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

6.       Public consultation was undertaken over a three week period between 21 June and 12 July 2019.

7.       A total of 74 submissions were received during the public consultation period. Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board residents provided a total of 1 submission on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, representing1.4% percent of all submissions.  Staff are proposing some changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address submitter concerns; the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film protocol are shown in track changes in Attachment B.

8.       This report provides a summary of public feedback and of proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address feedback.  The following is a high‑level summary of the key changes proposed to the Auckland Film Protocol in response to public consultation:

·        Natural environment: include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Native species: include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Kauri dieback: amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

·        Impact on access to public open space: include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

·        Compliance and enforcement: include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with the Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

9.       Submission themes and proposed changes are summarised in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

b)      provide feedback on the recommended changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

c)      note that local board feedback will be included in a report to the Environment and Community Committee in August 2019, seeking approval for the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The first version of the Auckland Film Protocol (the protocol) was adopted by the Regional Development and Operations Committee (resolution number RDO/2013/27) on 14 March 2013.  A review of fees for filming in the Auckland Region was undertaken in 2014 and a new set of region‑wide charges was recommended; providing a simplified and harmonised range of charges.  The Governing Body adopted a region‑wide schedule of film fees and revised Auckland Film Protocol on 28 May 2015 (resolution number GB/2015/36).

11.     Since the Protocol was adopted in 2015 there have been a number of changes to legislation and to Auckland Council’s policy and planning framework. The purpose of the review of the Protocol was to:

·        ensure that the Protocol is up-to-date; and

·        identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities to be addressed in the Protocol.

Content of the Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.

12.     Workshops were held in September and October 2018 to engage with local boards that experience a high volume of filming.

13.     Engagement to inform the preparation of the revised draft Protocol was also undertaken with:

·        mana whenua: mana whenua interests are represented by 19 iwi (tribal) authorities in Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland.  The 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review of the Protocol.

·        staff of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to inform the review.

·        screen sector: the screen sector was invited to participate in a survey in April 2019 to inform the review.  The survey asked a series of general questions about the Protocol and experiences of filming in public open space in Auckland. 

·        public: the People’s Panel in September 2018; a total of 4,762 responses were received.  The survey asked a series of questions on views on and experiences of filming in Auckland. 

A high-level summary of feedback (including local board feedback) is provided in Attachment C.

14.     The review recommended that a range of changes be made to the Auckland Film Protocol, the following is a summary of the key changes proposed to the Environment and Community Committee:

·        Native species: include new content stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: include new content providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include new content stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: include new content stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: include new content to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Filming on Tūpuna Maunga: update content to reflect that applications to film on Tūpuna Maunga are assessed by the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority.

·        Updates to content: update content to reflect current policy (e.g. smokefree policy), plans (Auckland Unitary Plan) and bylaws of Auckland Council.

·        Structural and editorial: amend some parts of the document to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

15.     The revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was approved by the Environment and Community Committee for public consultation in June 2019 (resolution number ENV/2019/73).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     Consultation on the revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol took place from 21 June to 12 July 2019.  A total of 74 submissions were received; this represents a substantial increase on the 21 submission which were received in response to the 2015 review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  Of the submissions received, 72 were submitted using the online form and 2 non‑form hardcopy submissions were received. 

17.     Submitters were asked to identify if they worked in the screen sector or not, with:

·        29 submissions (39%) received from individuals or organisations that identified themselves as working in the screen sector

·        45 submissions (61%) received from individuals or organisations that do not work in the screen sector.

The questions included in the online form varied depending on whether the submitter identified themselves as working in the screen industry or not.

18.     A breakdown of all submissions received by local board area is shown in Table 1 below.  The small number of responses from individual local board areas means that a analysis of views by local board area was not possible for all local board areas.

 

Table 1: Breakdown of submissions made by local board area.

Local Board Area

Number of respondents

Percentage of respondents

Waitākere Ranges

17

23.0%

Albert-Eden

9

12.2%

Waitematā

8

10.8%

Rodney

6

8.1%

Upper Harbour

5

6.8%

Ōrākei

5

6.8%

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

4

5.4%

Devonport-Takapuna

4

5.4%

Henderson-Massey

3

4.1%

Kaipātiki

3

4.1%

Howick

2

2.7%

Whau

2

2.7%

Māngere-Ōtahuhu

1

1.4%

Puketapapa

1

1.4%

Hibiscus and Bays

1

1.4%

Papakura

1

1.4%

Franklin

0

0%

Great Barrier

0

0%

Ōtara‑Papatoetoe

0

0%

Manurewa

0

0%

Waiheke

0

0%

Don't Know

1

1.4%

Outside Auckland

1

1.4%

Total

74

 

 

19.     A series of closed questions were asked of non‑screen sector individuals and organisations; a summary of the responses to these questions is shown in Table 2 below.  Table 2 shows that:

·        most respondents are supportive of Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach and that;

·        most respondents think that the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on residents and businesses, on public open space and historic and cultural heritage.

Table 2: Feedback on the Auckland Film Protocols management of the impacts of filming

Question

Response

Percentage of regional submissions

(number of respondents is shown in brackets)

Do you support Auckland Council's film‑friendly approach?

Yes

75% (33)

Partially

20% (9)

No

5% (2)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on residents and businesses?

Yes

56% (18)

Partially

19% (6)

No

25% (8)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on our public open space and environment?

Yes

53% (23)

Partially

33% (14)

No

14% (6)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on our historic and cultural heritage?

Yes

62% (26)

Partially

29% (12)

No

10% (4)

 

20.     The main reasons given by those who supported Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach are shown in Table 3.

Table 3: Summary of key reasons for supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Economic

·      generates employment and economic growth;

·      benefits communities and local businesses;

·      benefits a broad range of trades and industries;

·      attracts investment and businesses to Auckland.

Cultural and creative

·      has cultural benefits allowing and supporting the telling of stories visually;

·      supports the creative economy and enables people to find a future in the creative industries;

·      It’s fun and exciting to see Auckland on the screen.

Promotion and tourism

·      promotes and showcases Auckland to the world;

·      creates a positive image of Auckland.

 

21.     Table 4 showns the key reasons that respondents gave for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Table 4: Summary of key reasons given for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Access

·      the impacts on resident, including parking restrictions, road closures and ability to use public open space while filming is taking place need to be considered and managed;

·      need to ensure that film‑makers are respectful of other users of public open space.

Notification

·      there needs to be sufficient notification to ensure that residents and businesses are aware of open space being used for filming and are not inconvenienced.

Balance

·      need to consider and manage the impact that filming has on the environment and impacted residents;

·      need to balance the cumulative impacts of filming.

Equity

·      need to ensure that fees for commercial use of public places are fair.

 

22.     The key reasons given for not supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach were:

·        the cost to ratepayers of enabling filming;

·        that there is not enough protection for individuals, businesses and residents affected by filming being carried out on private property.

23.     A series of open‑ended questions were also included to elicit further information about responses to these questions and about a range of other topics.  Staff have worked through submissions to determine any changes to be recommended for the final revised Auckland Film Protocol.  Attachment A identifies key themes and submission points along with proposed staff responses.  

A summary of the most common submission themes and the proposed staff responses are shown in table 5.

Table 5: Summary of key submission themes and proposed staff responses.

Key themes

Summary of proposed responses

Use of drones for filming

Include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

Impact on natural environment

Include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Kauri dieback

Amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

Impact on native species

Include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Impact on access to public open space

Include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

Compliance and enforcement

Include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

Health and safety

Amend to enable production companies to arrange alternative timeframes for the submission of a site specific health and safety plan by agreement with Screen Auckland.

Notification

Screen Auckland to consider operational approaches to achieving wider public notification.

Impact on business

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  The protocol is intended to provide a framework that enables decisions to be made on a case‑by‑case basis.

Equity

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  Fees for commercial use of public open space are set under the Auckland Council Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 and amended through the long term plan and annual plan.

 

24.     This report seeks formal feedback from the board at its August 2019 business meeting on the recommended changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol in response to consultation feedback.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.  This included engagement with Auckland Transport, Panuku Development Auckland, and with Auckland Council community facilities, region‑wide planning, social policy and bylaws, visitor experience and heritage

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Role of local boards in film permitting

26.     Landowner approval is required to film on any public open space in the Auckland region.  Local boards are responsible for landowner approvals for local parks and reserves.  Engagement with local boards that experience a high volume of applications for film permits was undertaken in September and October 2018 to inform the review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  A summary of the key engagement themes is included in Attachment C and was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

27.     A key theme from local board engagement was that the film permit timeframes mean that landowner approval timeframes are very tight, particularly when considering complex or contentious applications.  It was also noted that the current timeframes do not allow sufficient time to consider applications at full board meetings or to consult key stakeholders.  Given this, the following options on film permit timeframes were presented to the Environment and Community Committee at a workshop in May 2019 and at the June 2019 meeting.

Option one: Status Quo

Option two: amend the permit timeframes

·        Option 2(a) the permit time frame is amended to be “up to five working days”.

·        Option 2(b) the permit time frame is increased to 5‑7 working days.

28.     Following direction from the Committee, that increasing timeframes could act as a disincentive making Auckland internationally uncompetitive, the status quo option was retained in the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     ATEED has an ongoing relationship with several mana whenua and mataawaka groups, across its whole portfolio of activity.  To inform the review of the Protocol the 19 Iwi Authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review.  In relation to film permit applications Māori views and input may be obtained in several ways where there is a potential impact on particular land or sites. This is usually coordinated either by the film facilitator, or through the relevant parks manager.

30.     Specific processes are in place for the tūpuna maunga, with all commercial filming on the maunga requiring the approval of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority).  Screen Auckland facilitates all requests for approval to film on the tūpuna maunga.  Approval to film will be subject to conditions and restrictions set by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.  Meetings were held with staff of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to inform the review and ensure that proposed amendments are consistent with the policy of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The proposed amendments to the Protocol do not impact on existing levels of service and will not impact on operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     There are no significant risks arising from the board giving feedback on the proposed changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol at this time.

33.     If adoption of the revised Auckland Film Protocol is delayed this would impact on council’s ability to implement the proposed changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Public feedback and proposed amendments to the Auckland Film Protocol will be presented to the Environment and Community Committee for approval.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key submission themes and responses

97

b

Draft 2019 Auckland Film Protocol

107

c

Summary of preconsultation engagement

167

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Marie Jenkins, Screen Facilitation Manager, ATEED

 

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza, Acting General Manager, Local Board Services Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14306

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2018/2019 Annual Report for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 26 September 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2018/2019 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      adopt the 2018/2019 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A.

b)      note that any proposed changes will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019.

c)      note that the draft 2018/2019 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Annual Report (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report) will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2018/2019 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities, and the overall Financial Impact Statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

 

 

6.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the NZX Debt Market (quoted bonds) maintained by NZX Limited. As a result, the council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules (listing rules) and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA). Under these obligations, local boards may not release annual financial results in any form, including publishing their agenda/minutes containing their results, until council group results are released to the NZX on 27 September 2019.  Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi relates to the local board area.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area, summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved.

Funding information

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English, and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2018/2019 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2019

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 26 September 2019

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 27 September 2018

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2018/2019 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Annual Report (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

David Gurney - Manager Corporate Performance & Reporting

Authorisers

Kevin Ramsay - General Manager Corporate Finance and Property

Victoria Villaraza – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14455

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter four, 1 April – 30 June 2019, and the overall performance for the financial year, against the agreed 2018/2019 local board work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2018/2019 financial year.

3.       Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes at the time of quarter one reporting.

4.       A total of 120 activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Eight activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred during 2018/2019.

5.       This report includes work programme numbers that correlate to the work programme schedule in attachment A. 

6.       Key highlights for quarter four include:

·    Mangere Mountain Education Centre: support for the centre to continue operating and delivering services to schools and communities. 

·    Out and About programme: support for an ‘activation container’ with fitness equipment located on Imrie Reserve as part of this programme.

·    Implementation plan for Auckland's Urban Forest (Ngahere) strategy: getting ready to use the data from the strategy results.  

·    Business waste minimisation education programme: Airport Oaks waste advisory programme where 71 businesses have been approached offering a waste assessment and advice.

·    Ngā Tapuwae Community Centre, Funding and Licence Year 2: a highlight was Te Kura O Nga Tapuwae utilising the centre for their kapa haka preparation for the regional competitions.

·    Ōtāhuhu Town Hall Community Centre: a highlight was the Family Fit Club programme growing to 307 participants.

·    Community Arts Broker Programme: successfully facilitating and supporting a range of community art programmes in the local board area.

·    Respond to Māori Aspirations – Māori Responsiveness: a focus to increase Maori voters in the next local elections.

·    Celebrating Te Ao Māori: Whakatipu i te reo Māori - successful and on-going.

·    Libraries Learning and Literacy programming and digital literacy implemented.

·   ATEED - Young Enterprise Scheme a successful programme completed in the previous quarter. 

7.       Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 annual work programme include:

·   See the local board achievements report – also on this agenda.

8.       Key activities not delivered/progressed as expected include:

·    Oruarangi Park - develop park facility: Subdivision development is subject to public protest and it is uncertain when the dispute will be resolved.

·    Old School Reserve - renew park road and car parks. This project has been put on hold until a timeframe for the implementation of the concept plan is provided.

·    Māngere Old School Hall - refurbish floors and walls. Contractor has commenced work on site. Next steps: Monitor project to completion.

·    Ōtāhuhu Community Centre (Town Hall) - renew community centre. On hold. Project on hold due to Panuku and Community Services considering future use of facility.

·    Walter Massey Park - develop new walkway and new outdoor fitness equipment. On hold. Pending concept plan completion.

·    (OLI) Walter Massey Park - develop Mangere East Precinct. The Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board is considering and revising OLI direction and detail.

·    Youth Connections. Some programmes are delivered others are yet to gain momentum.

9.       The 2018/2019 financial performance report is attached, confidential to local board members at this stage. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX (New Zealand Exchange) – on or about 30 September.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter and year ending 30 June 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board has approved its 2018/2019 work programmes on the 19 June 2019 for the following operating departments:

a.   Community Services (Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; Parks, Sport and Recreation; and Service Strategy and Integration)

b.   Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew and Community Leases

c.   Infrastructure and Environmental Services

d.   Local Economic Development, and

e.   Youth Connection activities moved from the Arts, Community and Events to The Southern Initiative work programme in quarter two.

11.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

Key highlights for quarter four

12.     The key achievements to report from the quarter four period include:

·    3199 - Piki Thompson Way – installation of a new flagpole. The 2019 ANZAC celebrations used the new flagpole, previous ANZAC events were celebrated using a temporary flagpole.

·    708 - Mangere-Otahuhu Full Facilities Contracts: This quarter, the lower and colder temperatures have slowed the grass growth across the local board area and the Rima region. There has been an increase in the use of sports fields with the winter sports, however a lower number of users on our neighbourhood parks has occurred during this colder period.

·    709 - Mangere-Otahuhu Arboriculture Contracts. The Arboriculture maintenance contracts include tree management and maintenance. A warm autumn saw continued tree growth late into the season. With the diminishing daylight hours, the seasonal requests to prune trees to improve sunlight into properties increased. Requests to prune trees to avoid or reduce leaf drop also increased. This may be associated with street sweeping. By the end of June, the Arboricultural team were well into replacement tree planting. The progress was very pleasing as early planting allows the best chance for tree establishment.

·    710 - Mangere-Otahuhu Ecological Restoration Contracts. The Ecological Restoration maintenance contracts include pest plant and animal pest management within ecologically significant parks and reserves. Key focus areas for the fourth and final quarter consisted of a mixture of activities. This included completion of the fourth pulse of the rat control programme across sites, high value and general pest plant control. After a busy wasp and rat season, request for service works have declined as expected during the colder months.

·    578 - Māori naming of reserves and facilities FY18/19 - Stage 2. Eight mana whenua have currently indicated naming interest and are now working through the naming process to ensure one name is gifted back to the board per site.

 

·    3200 - Boggust Park concept plan implementation. Resource consent approval has been granted. Some modifications to the design have been made to satisfy crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) and resource consent constraints. Staff have updated the local board at the June workshop then progress procurement and schedule delivery.

·    652 -Young Enterprise Scheme. The Auckland Chamber of Commerce, on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust, delivers the Young Enterprise Scheme. The funding from the local board will support the delivery of the Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days in February 2019. No further action was required as this activity was completed in the last quarter.

·    1065 - Capacity Building: Business Improvement Districts. Fund activities for five business associations operating Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area. Staff met with the five business associations to discuss plans for 2019/2020 and explore alignment of initiatives to the local board's outcomes. Staff will continue to work with Auckland Transport to finalise the transfer of CCTV assets, which was handed to Auckland Transport in June 2019.

·    918 - Restoring Mauri of the Oruarangi Creek and Tararata Creek. The remaining budget was used to purchase equipment (pumps) to use the rain tanks located at each site. This equipment will be installed with the budget that the board has approved for the 2019/2020 financial year.

 

·    127 - Event Partnership Fund - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu (Externally Delivered Events). All grants from the Event Partnership fund have now been paid to recipients. Most accountability reports have been received with three reports outstanding. These will be collated and provided to the local board in Q1 2019/2020.

Overall performance against the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board 2018/2019 work programme

13.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected (completed by the end of July 2019) or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

 

14.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which highlights the stage of the activity in each department the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

 

15.     The table below shows the overall performance of work programme activities (RAG status and activity status by work programme).

Table 1: End of year Local Board Work Programmes Status

 

RAG Status

Activity Status

ACE

PSR

Libraries

SS&I

CF

Leases

I&ES

ATEED

TSI

Green

Completed

27

8

8

-

14

7

8

5

-

In progress

-

1

-

1

29

-

2

-

-

Amber

In progress

1

2

-

-

5

5

2

-

1

Red

On Hold

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

In progress

-

-

-

-

4

2

-

-

-

Not delivered

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Grey

Deferred

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

Cancelled

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme

16.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2018/2019 include:

Note: further details of the achievements below are noted in attachment A, and/or, highlighted in other sections of this report.

·    3199 - Piki Thompson Way

·    708 - Mangere-Otahuhu Full Facilities Contracts

·    709 - Mangere-Otahuhu Arboriculture Contracts.

·    710 - Mangere-Otahuhu Ecological Restoration Contracts.

·    578 - Event Partnership Fund - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu (Externally Delivered Events).

·    578 - Māori naming of reserves and facilities FY18/19 - Stage 2.

·    3290 - Mangere East Family Service: resource recovery vehicle.

·    3200 - Boggust Park concept plan implementation.

·    532 - Ecological volunteer and environmental programme. 

·    2185 - Ōtāhuhu Portage project - Totoia.

·    2701 - Volunteer Awards programme and awards evening - over 400 people attended.

·    652 -Young Enterprise Scheme.

·    1065 - Capacity Building: Business Improvement Districts.

Overview of work programme performance by department

Arts, Community and Events work programme

17.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 27 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), one activity that is in progress but delayed (amber), nil activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and nil activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Nil activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

18.     Arts, Community and Events work programme: explanation why it is red/amber and any mitigation measures if known.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

1065 - Capacity Building: Business Improvement Districts

Amber

In progress

Staff met with the five business associations to discuss plans for 2019/2020 and explore alignment of initiatives to the local board's outcomes. Auckland Transport to finalise the transfer of CCTV assets, which was handed to Auckland Transport in June 2019.

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

19.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are nine activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and one activity that have been cancelled (grey): 390 Pukaki Crater Co-Management Committee. At the June business meeting the local board approved reallocation of $15,000 LDI Opex for Community Facilities to commence concept plan preparation for David Lange Playground in 2019/2020 (resolution number MO/2019/92). Nil activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

20.     Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme: explanation why it is red/amber and any mitigation measures if known.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

478 - Implementation plan for Auckland's Urban Forest (Ngahere) Strategy

Amber

In progress

The findings of the Ngahere-Knowing phase have been received. These provide detailed information about the current state of the tree canopy in the local board area. And help develop a planting programme for the area.

578 - Māori naming of reserves and facilities FY18/19 - Stage 2

Amber

In progress

Staff are working with mana whenua on new names and a workshop will be held by the end of 2019. As part of sorting through the overlapping naming interests, eight mana whenua have currently indicated naming interest and are now working through the naming process to ensure one name is gifted back to the board per site.

390 - Pukaki Crater Co-Management Committee

Grey

Cancelled

At the June business meeting the local board approved reallocation of $15,000 LDI Opex for Community Facilities to commence concept plan preparation for David Lange Playground in 2019/2020 (resolution number MO/2019/92).

Libraries and Information work programme

21.     In the Libraries and Information work programme, there are eight activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), nil activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), nil activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and nil activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Nil activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

22.     In the Service Strategy and Integration work programme has only one work programme item in this quarter four report as follows: 1398 Investigate and provide direction on future of Otahuhu Community Centre and (ex) Library space. More options will be presented to the local board in the next few months to identify next steps for this project. The project is in progress and RAG is green.  

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

23.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 43 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), five activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), four activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and one activity that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey): 2168 Māngere Old School Hall - refurbish floors and walls. Contractor has commenced work on site. Next steps: Monitor project to completion. Nil activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

24.     Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme: explanation why it is red/amber and any mitigation measures if known.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

2182 - Old School Reserve - renew park roading and car parks

Red

On hold

This project has been put on hold until a timeframe for the implementation of the concept plan is provided.

Next steps: Confirm when the concept plan will be implemented. If implementation exceeds 10 years, restart investigation and design.

2183 - Ōtāhuhu Community Centre (Town Hall) - renew community centre

Red

On hold

Project on hold due to Panuku and Community Services considering future use of facility.

2899 - Oruarangi Park - develop park facility

Red

On hold

Project remains on hold awaiting the outcome of the subdivision development which is subject to public protests and it is uncertain when or if the land will vest with us.

Next steps: Continue to work with Park Advisors in the planning phase.

2956 - Walter Massey Park - develop new walkway and new outdoor fitness equipment

Red

On hold

On hold pending concept plan completion.

Next steps: Awaiting outcome of concept plan.

2179    - Moyle Park - install sand carpet, irrigation and lights

Amber

In progress

Healthy Waters feedback on designs and what they are proposing could have implications on the timing of the project.

Next steps: Continue working with Healthy Waters on their proposals to ensure the best outcomes for the user groups of the park.

2181 - Norana Park - develop walkways and paths

Amber

In progress

A contract has been awarded for physical works.

Next steps: Agree a project timeline and timeframes for construction, set up site and commence physical works.

3198 - Sturges Park - implement actions from the concept plan

Amber

In progress

Detailed design phase. Resource consent was lodged 6 April.

Next steps: Once consent has been approved, progress to procurement. Delivery is not scheduled until late September, after rugby season.

3200 - Boggust Park - implement actions from the concept plan.

Amber

In progress

Waiting for resource consent approval.

3351 - Boggust Park - renew paths and furniture

Amber

In progress

This project is related to the overall park development. Resource consent approval has been granted. Some modifications to the design have been made to satisfy crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED), and resource consent constraints.

Next steps: Staff will update the local board at the June workshop then progress procurement and schedule delivery.

2168 - Māngere Old School Hall - refurbish floors and walls

Grey

Deferred

Contractor has commenced work on site.

Next steps: Monitor project to completion.

 

Community Leases work programme

25.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are seven activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), five activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), seven activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and one activity that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Nil activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

26.     Community Leases work programme: explanation why it is red/amber and any mitigation measures if known.

 

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

1330    - Centre Park, 141R Robertson Road, Mangere: Lease to Papatuanuku Kokiri Marae Incorporated

Red

In progress

The renewal of lease application has been assessed and a site visit has been completed. Staff have workshopped with the local board and the direction provided was to investigate options to align the renewal term with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

Staff will progress with this and workshop with the local board in quarter one of the 2019/2020 work programme year.

1333    - Waterlea Park, 28R House Avenue, Mangere Bridge: Lease to The Girl Guide Assn New Zealand  Incorporated - Mangere Bridge

Red

In progress

Staff have received the new lease application. Staff will complete a site visit and report back to the local board at a workshop during quarter one of the 2019/2020 work programme year.

1334 - Old School Reserve, 299R Kirkbride Road, Mangere: Lease to Nukutukulea Aoga Niue Incorporated

Red

In progress

The society has amalgamated into The Pasifika Early Learning Foundation and requested the lease to be assigned to the new entity. The society's application is to be reviewed and staff will present options to the board with regard to the occupancy.

This is expected to be progressed during quarter one and two of the 2019/2020 work programme year.

2512    - Moyle Park, 48R Bader Drive, Mangere: Lease to Manukau Rugby League Football & Sports Club Incorporated

Red

In progress

Staff have workshopped the proposed lease with the local board in June 2019. Iwi engagement of the intention to grant a new lease is expected to be progressed during quarter one of the 2019/2020 work programme year prior to a report being presented to the board.

2515    - House Park, 247R Kirkbride Road, Mangere: Lease to Māngere Combined Tennis Club Incorporated

Red

In progress

Staff are working with Active Recreation and the group to improve utilisation of the site.

A meeting with club representatives is scheduled for quarter one of the 2019/2020 work programme year to develop options to improve utilisation.

2529    - Bridge Court Housing for Elderly Grounds, 7 Coronation Road, Mangere Bridge: Vacancy at former Mangere Bridge Senior Citizens Club

Red

In progress

A workshop was planned for June 2019, however, at the request from Panuku Development Auckland, this has been deferred to quarter one of the 2019/2020 work programme year.

Panuku and leasing staff are re-evaluating the options for the use of the space and expect to workshop this with the local board during quarter one of the 2019/2020 work programme year.

2520 - Walter Massey Park, 394R Massey Road, Mangere East: Lease to Manukau City Association Football Club Incorporated

Red

On hold

Staff are still working with the group to address issues related to the outstanding building insurance charges.

Any new lease will be contingent on the outstanding debt being resolved.

1331    - Walter Massey Park, Mangere East Community Centre, 366 Massey Road, Mangere East: Lease to STRIVE Community Trust

Amber

In progress

 

Staff have received the renewal of lease application and will complete a site visit and report back to the local board via a workshop during quarter one of the 2019/2020 work programme year.

1332    - Mangere Recreation Centre Grounds 64 Mascot Avenue, Mangere: Lease to Te Oranga Kaumata Kuia Disability Support Services Trust

Amber

In progress

Staff have received the renewal of lease application. Staff will complete a site visit and report back to the local board at a workshop during quarter one of the 2019/2020 work programme year.

1335 - Mangere Domain, 11R Taylor Road, Mangere Bridge: Lease to Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust - Mangere Bridge

Amber

In progress

A report has been prepared and will be presented to the local board at its August 2019 business meeting.

2517    - Walter Massey Park, Mangere East Community Centre, 366 Massey Road: Mangere East After School Care, Community, Education, and Study Support Trust

Amber

In progress

The local board at its workshop in May 2019 has expressed their support to forego the expressions of interest process. Staff will present a report to the local board proposing a new community lease in quarter one of the 2019/2020 work programme year.

2518    - Walter Massey Park, Former Mangere East Library, 372 Massey Road, Mangere East: Lease to Māngere East Afterschool Care, Community Education and Study Support Trust

Amber

In progress

The local board at its workshop in May 2019 has expressed their support to forego the expressions of interest process. Staff will present a report to the local board proposing a new community lease in quarter one of the 2019/2020 work programme year.

 

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

27.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are eight activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 and two are in progress (green), two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), nil activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and nil activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Nil activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

28.     Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme: explanation why it is red/amber and any mitigation measures if known.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

907 - Manukau Harbour Forum - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

Amber

In progress

This work programme was not able to be delivered within this financial year due to the governance and management review not beginning until June 2019, and the symposium and community forum event being rescheduled from June to August 2019. Accrual of the 2018/2019 budget allocation for the symposium event will occur to cover costs.

1213 - Ōtāhuhu Town Centre Upgrade

Amber

In progress

Construction was scheduled to begin in March 2019 depending on the outcome of the tender process, however there has been a delay due to the tender period being extended further post the Christmas period.

 

Local Economic Development work programme

29.     In the Local Economic Development work programme, there are five activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), nil activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), nil activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and nil activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Nil activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Plans and Places work programme

30.     In the Plans and Places work programme, there are nil activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), nil activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), nil activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and nil activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Deferred activities

31.     As part of the local board funding policy, activities funded through the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operating fund that were not delivered in 2018/2019 will be deferred into 2019/2020 work programmes.

The following project is a deferral:

·         2168 Māngere Old School Hall $125,000 - refurbish floors and walls. Contractor has commenced work on site. Next steps: Monitor project to completion.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     This report informs the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board of the performance for quarter ending 30 June 2019 and the performance for the 2018/2019 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     The local board has continued to build its relationship with mana whenua and local marae over the years, like Te Ākitai Waiohua and Pukaki Marae. The local board signed a relationship agreement with Ngāti Tamaoho in 2017 and local board has representation on the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority and Southern mana whenua Iwi steering groups, highlighting the local board’s focus on these relationships. 

35.     The local board supports local Maori aspirations. Te Ao Maori has influence when the local board considers activities to improve Maori outcomes. The following are examples of how the board’s activities contribute to these outcomes.  

·    76 - Ngā Tapuwae Community Centre, Funding and Licence Year 2: Funding agreement to deliver activities to encourage more engagement with the community, is now complete. A highlight for Q4 was Te Kura O Nga Tapuwae utilising the centre for their kapa haka preparation for the regional competitions.

·    137 - Anzac Services. These services are a national day of remembrance in Australia and New Zealand that broadly commemorates all who served and died in all wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations and the contribution and suffering of all those who have served - including Maori.

·    532 - Ecological volunteer and environmental programme FY19: about 160 estimated volunteer hours and 2000 plants recorded for Q4, and about 1014 estimated hours for the year. Largest event was at Tararata stream. Key successes for the year includes two school plantings at Sturges park, supported mangrove seedling removal at Kiwi Esplanade by Friends of the Farm; also, plants for coastal area, Tararata stream team plantings, fencing and signage, community clean ups at Kiwi Esplanade.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            

·    600 - Iwi led, catchment wide pest control and ecological restoration. Contractors continued weed control, revegetation maintenance and site preparation for additional planting along the awa this quarter. A community planting day was held in late June 2019 to plant several thousand native riparian plants most of which were grown by Makaurau Marae nursery.

·    1131 - Libraries - Celebrating Te Ao Māori and Whakatipu i te reo Māori. Local libraries focused on celebrating Matariki by offering a Soup Day alternate Wednesdays and Thursdays at Māngere East, Māngere Town Centre and Ōtāhuhu libraries supported with funding from the Māngere Town Business Association. A Māungakiekie partnership has been established where Māori specialists rotate and work across local libraries to deliver Matariki-focussed story-times and programmes within Te Ao Māori context. Raranga and gardening will take place at Mangere Bridge in collaboration with community to celebrate Matariki.

·    1331 - Walter Massey Park, Mangere East Community Centre, 366 Massey Road, Mangere East: Lease to STRIVE Community Trust. Provide social services that support all local families.

·    1332 - Lease - Mangere Recreation Centre Grounds: Lease renewal process starting with Te Oranga Kaumata Kuia Disability Support Services Trust. This provider is described as a unique Kaupapa Maori organization within the South Auckland districts providing health and disability services to older people 54 years and over Provide a facility that supports senior citizens with disabilities.

·    2512 - Lease - Moyle Park: Lease to Manukau Rugby League Football & Sports. Local rugby league, rugby and sporting clubs have a long history with Mana whenua, who either played, coached, and or supported these sports codes. 

·    2174 - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu - renew park furniture and fixtures FY19+ including Otuataua Stonefields Reserve. Investigation and scoping phase are now completed. Next steps: Prepare pricing and business case.

·    2180 - Nga Tapuwae Community Building - renew structural components to be completed in mid to late 2020. Currently, stage one: Building renewals work are underwayand are two weeks into Stage 1. Programme is tracking well. Stage two: Due to commence first week of August 2019. Next steps: Review original internal refurbishment. Undertake a contract variation to include the work bought back into scope. Balance of 2019 budget to be brought forward to FY2020.

·    2699 - Otuataua Stonefields Reserve. Prepare of a concept plan to guide park development based on feedback from Iwi, local board and the community. This work is deferred to 2020.

·    2701 - Volunteer Awards. A successful evening that included Maori volunteers.

·    2875 - Respond to Māori Aspirations – Māori Responsiveness: To improve ways of working in partnership with the Mana Whenua, the strategic broker in collaboration with engagement advisor continued to contribute to the Improving Māori Input into Local Board Decision Making Project Delivery Team. A key focus in Q4 was to improve voter participation with key messages that speak to Mana Whenua. The strategic broker in collaboration with Engagement Advisor is working with local marae to deliver a candidate information evening and voter participation evening.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     This report is provided to enable the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2018/2019 work programmes and to report this to the public. This report is for information only and therefore there are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

37.     Auckland Council currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September. Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is excluded from the public.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

39.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Q4 Workshop programmes

189

b

Financial Performance Report (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Daniel Poe – Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Local board resolution responses and information report

File No.: CP2019/13086

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides a summary of resolution responses, feedback from the board and information reports for circulation to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board.

Feedback reports for the local board:

 

2.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board feedback on the Climate Change (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill is Attachment A to this report.

3.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing is Attachment B to this report.

Information report for the local board:

4.       At the Environment and Community Committee meeting on 11 June 2019 the Climate Emergency report was discussed (Attachment C to this report). The following resolutions were passed:

Resolution number ENV/2019/1

MOVED by Chairperson P Hulse, seconded by Member P Goff: 

That the Environment and Community Committee:

a)      note that Auckland Council has long acknowledged the importance of and urgent need to address climate change for the benefit of current and future generations

b)      note that Auckland Council already demonstrates leadership in the face of climate change, including incorporating climate change considerations into council’s work programmes and decisions; working with regional partners to ensure a collaborative response; advocating and engaging with central government; and leading by example in reducing our in-house emissions

c)      note that climate change does not satisfy the definition of an “emergency” under the Civil Defence and Emergency Management Act 2002, and that a declaration of a “climate emergency” has no other inherent statutory or legal implications; however, such a declaration may further highlight Auckland Council’s belief in the importance and urgency of addressing climate change

d)      note that further information on Auckland Council’s recent and planned climate change response is provided in the attachments to this report

e)  affirm the following statement:

“Auckland Council recognises the importance of and urgent need to address climate change for the benefit of current and future generations:

·   the science is irrefutable – climate change is already impacting ecosystems and communities around the world, with increasingly frequent and severe storms, floods and droughts; melting polar ice sheets; sea level rise and coastal inundation and erosion; and impacts on biodiversity including species loss and extinction.

·   the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) Special Report in October 2018 stated that we have twelve years to turn greenhouse gas emissions around to limit global warming to the Paris Agreement target of 1.5-degrees, or face an uncertain future. This requires ‘rapid and far-reaching transitions in energy, land, urban and infrastructure (including transport and buildings), and industrial systems’ (www.ipcc.ch/site/assets/uploads/sites/2/2018/07/sr15_headline_statements.pdf)

·   everyone has a role to play in delivering the change required.

As such, Auckland Council declares a climate emergency and commits to:

·   continue to robustly and visibly incorporate climate change considerations, in practical terms, into council work programmes and decisions

·   continue to provide strong local government leadership in the face of climate change, including working with local and central government partners to ensure a collaborative response

·   continue to advocate strongly for greater central government leadership and action on climate change

·   continue to increase the visibility of our climate change work

·   continue to lead by example in monitoring and reducing council’s greenhouse gas emissions

·   include climate change impact statements on all committee reports

·         requesting staff of council-controlled organisations to include climate change impact statements in their committee reports

CARRIED UNANIMOUSLY

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      endorse the local board’s feedback on the Climate Change (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill.

b)      endorse the local board’s feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing.

c)      note the 11 June 2019 Environment and Community Committee report and resolutions on a Climate Emergency.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Feedback on Climate Change (Zero Carbon) amendment bill

223

b

Feedback on Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing

225

c

Climate Emergency report

227

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2019/01949

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      notes the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Work Calendar August

235

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2019/01942

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are the notes from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board workshops held on 3, 10 and 24 July 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the workshop notes from the workshops held on 3, 10 and 24 July 2019.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

3 July workshop notes

239

b

10 July workshop notes

241

c

24 July Workshop Notes

243

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

    

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

21 August 2019

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

20        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019 - Attachment a - Draft 2018/2019 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Annual Report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2019 that require final Audit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

21        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019  - Attachment b - Financial Performance Report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

   



[1] This activity is subject to local boards prioritising local economic development, and subsequently allocating funding to local economic development through their local board agreements.

[2] FY 2018/19 result for ATEED’s SOI KPI2