I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 15 August 2019

3.00pm

St Chads Church and Community Centre
38 St Johns Road
Meadowbank

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Kit Parkinson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Carmel Claridge

 

Members

Troy Churton

 

 

Colin Davis, JP

 

 

Toni Millar, QSM, JP

 

 

Ros Rundle

 

 

David Wong, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Kim  Lawgun

Democracy Advisor

 

26 August 2019

 

Contact Telephone: 021 302 163

Email: kim.lawgun@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum - Janet Rowley - OPp ARt from chaos to form                         5

9.2     Public Forum - Keith Ratcliffe - College Rifles Rugby                                     6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update 1 January - 30 June 2019                                                                                                                        9

12        Proposal to classify part of 30 Tephra Boulevard, Stonefields as a local purpose (community buildings) reserve (Covering report)                                                   19

13        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019                                                                      21

14        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019                                                                               25

15        Auckland Transport August 2019 report to the Ōrākei Local Board                     61

16        Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes     73

17        Local Board feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing                                                                           95

18        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                135

19        Board Member Report - Carmel Claridge                                                                145

20        Board Member Report - Troy Churton                                                                    153

21        Board Member Report - Colin Davis                                                                        165

22        Board Member Report – Toni Millar                                                                         177

23        Board Member Report – Ros Rundle                                                                       179

24        Board Member Report – David Wong                                                                      185

25        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      197

26        Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Proceedings                                                          201

27        Resolutions Pending Action                                                                                     213  

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

29        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               217

13        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

a.      Draft 2018/2019 Ōrākei Local Board Annual Report                                    217

14        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

b.      Ōrākei Quarterly Performance Report June 2019 - Financial Appendix   217  

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the minutes of the Ōrākei Local Board meeting, held on Thursday, 18 July 2019, be confirmed as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōrākei Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Janet Rowley - OPp ARt from chaos to form

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Janet Rowley will be in attendance to present to the Local Board on OPp Art from form; a photographic art exhibition of art and crafts that involve an element of upcycling which will be projected at night on an exterior wall of Somervell Church as part of Auckland Artweek 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Janet Rowley.

 

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Keith Ratcliffe - College Rifles Rugby

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Keith Ratcliffe, General Manager of College Rifles Rugby will be present to address the Board regarding the ongoing maintenance of the two artificial turf fields at College Rifles Park.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Keith Ratcliffe.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Panuku Development Auckland Local Board six-monthly update 1 January - 30 June 2019

File No.: CP2019/12367

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland’s (Panuku) activities within the local board area and the region for the six months from 1 January to 30 June 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Panuku is charged with balancing financial and non-financial outcomes in order to create and manage sustainable and resilient places where people want to live, work, invest, learn and visit. The activities of Panuku cover four broad areas: 

·   redevelopment of urban locations, leveraging off council-owned land assets, mostly within existing suburbs;

·   review of, and where appropriate, redevelopment of council non-service property;

·   management of council property assets including commercial, residential, and marina infrastructure; and

·   other property related services, such as redevelopment incorporating a service delivery function, strategic property advice, acquisitions and disposals.

3.       Panuku currently manages 35 commercial and residential interests in the Ōrākei Local Board area.

4.       Panuku has a subdivision plan for 84-100 Morrin Road, following work with Auckland Transport (AT) and Park, Sport and Recreation (PSR).

5.       Two properties are currently under review as part of our rationalisation process.

6.       No properties were purchased, and two properties were sold in the Ōrākei Local Board area during the last six months.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the Panuku Development Auckland Local Board update for 1 January to 30 June 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland, from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

8.       The Auckland Plan is the roadmap to deliver on Auckland’s vision to be a world class city. Panuku will play a significant role in achieving the Homes and Places and Belonging and Participation outcomes.

9.       Panuku is leading urban redevelopment in Manukau, Onehunga, Wynyard Quarter, Waterfront, Northcote, Avondale, Takapuna, Henderson, Papatoetoe, Ormiston and Flat Bush, Panmure, Pukekohe, City Centre and redevelopment of the Haumaru Portfolio.

10.     Panuku manages around $3 billion of council’s non-service property portfolio, which is continuously reviewed to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio, or release land or property that can be better used by others.

11.     As part of the Annual Budget 2019 consultation the council consulted on the transfer of Waterfront assets owned by Panuku to council ownership. A decision was made in June 2019 to transfer the legal ownership of all Waterfront assets from Panuku to Auckland Council. The assets comprise wharves, parks, marinas, land and buildings along the Auckland Waterfront. Panuku will continue to manage these assets on behalf of Auckland Council.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Development

12.     Panuku is contributing commercial input into approximately 50 region-wide council-driven renewal and housing supply initiatives.

13.     Panuku works with partners and stakeholders over the course of a project. It also champions best-practice project delivery to achieve best value outcomes within defined cost, time and quality parameters.

14.     Below is a high-level update on development activities in the Ōrākei Local Board area:

15.     84-100 Morrin Road, St JohnsPanuku has a subdivision plan for 84-100 Morrin Road, following work with AT and PSR, and titles are being issued for the land parcels. AT needs to confirm its requirements for the land parcel (Section 4) t at which point, the parcel may revert to Panuku for disposal. Panuku has completed a feasibility study on the residential land parcel (Section 1) to establish the best way to progress the project in the areas where the geotechnical conditions will allow future residential development. Panuku has also commenced initial discussions with potential developers.

16.     78 Merton Road, St JohnsThis site is a 2.6 hectare reserve that has been rezoned to mixed use, part of which is currently leased by a BMX club. The site is being investigated for housing development. No acceptable alternative location for a BMX park has been identified which continues to delay development options for this property. Reserve revocation will not commence until resolution with BMX is reached

Properties managed in the Ōrākei Local Board Area

17.     Panuku currently manages 32 commercial and 3 residential interests within the local board area.

Business interests

18.     Panuku also manages the commercial return from business interests on the council’s behalf. This includes two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. 

19.     There are currently no managed business interests in the Ōrākei Local Board area.


 

Portfolio strategy

Optimisation

20.     The 2018-2028 Long-term Plan (LTP) reflects a desire of the council to materially reduce or slow down expenditure and unlock value from assets no longer required, or which are sub-optimal for service purposes. In response to this, ACPL developed a new method of dealing with service property called ‘optimisation’, prior to the establishment of Panuku. 

21.     Optimisation is a development approach targeting sub-optimal service assets. The process is a tri-party agreement between Community Facilities, Panuku and Local Boards. It is led by Panuku. It is designed to equal or enhance levels of service to the local community in a reconfigured form while delivering on strategic outcomes such as housing or urban regeneration with no impact on existing rate assumptions.

22.     Using optimisation as a redevelopment and funding tool, the Local Board can maximise efficiencies from service assets while maintaining levels of service through the release of some or all of that property for sale or development.

23.     Local boards are allocated decision making for the disposal of local service property and reinvestment of sale proceeds in accordance with the service property optimisation approach.

24.     Service optimisation properties in the Ōrākei Local Board area are listed below.

Property

Details

29-31 St Johns Road, Meadowbank

22 Tahapa Crescent, Meadowbank

4 Victoria Road, Remuera

The Ōrākei Local Board approved the redevelopment of the Meadowbank Community Centre and the sale of 22 Tahapa Crescent, Meadowbank and 4 Victoria Road, Remuera under the service property optimisation approach on 19 July 2018.

The implementation of the Ōrākei Service Property Optimisation programme is progressing well. 

The procurement process to select a development partner for the Meadowbank redevelopment is complete.  We are working with the preferred party to refine the proposal prior to the appointment of the preferred development partner. 

 

Portfolio review and rationalisation

Overview

25.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing review of the council’s property assets. This includes identifying properties from within the council’s portfolio that are no longer required for council service purposes and may be suitable for other public works and/or potential sale, and development if appropriate. Panuku has a particular focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the 2018-2028 LTP and the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

26.     Panuku works closely with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport staff to identify potential surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

27.     Target for July 2018 to June 2019:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$30 million disposal recommendations

$30.38 million achieved by 30 June 2019.

This figure includes properties recommended for sale as part of ‘Unlock’ Pukekohe.

 

28.     Target for July 2019 to June 2021 Target

Unit

Target

Portfolio Review

$45 million disposal recommendations over two years.

 

Process

29.     Once identified as potentially no longer required for council service purposes, a property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council departments and CCOs, the local board and Mana Whenua. This is followed by Panuku Board approval, engagement with the local ward councillor(s) and the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally a governing body decision.

Under review

30.     Properties currently under review in the Ōrākei Local Board area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the Governing Body.

Property

Details

9 Tagalad Road/6A Nihill Crescent, Mission Bay

The reserve was occupied by the former Mission Bay Bowls Club until June 2016.

Council’s Community Facilities department requested that Panuku investigate future service requirements or a potential disposal.

The board formally resolved, in response to a public presentation outside of the formal consultation process, that it does not support a disposal and requested that staff investigate a proposed multi-sports facility should the site be retained as a service property.

The rationalisation process commenced in April 2017. Panuku discussed the results of the internal consultation and a multi-sports facility investigation with the board in September 2018.

Public consultation regarding a proposed disposal is scheduled to occur in late 2019. Once the scope and extent of the consultation material is confirmed, Panuku will advise the Ōrākei Local Board and a subsequent council public notification process will inform the local community.

275 St Johns Road, St Johns

Residential property no longer required by AT for transport infrastructure purposes and subsequently transferred to council for rationalisation.

The rationalisation process commenced in September 2018. No alternate council service uses for the property were identified during the internal consultation.

The board endorsed a disposal at its April 2019 meeting.

The Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal at its June 2019 meeting.

Panuku is currently undertaking a due diligence process before taking the property to market.

 

Acquisitions and disposals

31.     Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. Panuku purchases property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other services. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

Acquisitions

32.     Panuku does not decide which properties to buy in a local board area. Instead, it is asked to negotiate the terms and conditions of a purchase on behalf of the council.

33.     Panuku purchased 12 properties for open space across Auckland in the 2018/2019 financial year at a cost of $38.8 million and bought two properties for storm water use at a value of $1.6 million.

34.     No properties were purchased in the Ōrākei Local Board area during the reporting period.

35.     All land acquisition committee resolutions contain a confidentiality clause due to the commercially sensitive nature of ongoing transactions, and thus cannot be reported on while in process.

Disposals

36.     In the financial year to the end of June 2019, the Panuku disposals team has entered into twenty-three sale and purchase agreements, with an estimated value of $44.4 million of unconditional net sales proceeds. 

37.     As part of the Northern Corridor Improvements, Auckland Council has agreed to transfer various parcels of land to NZTA to facilitate the works. The compensation amount totals $6.5 million, of which $1.554 million is advance compensation for required land at Rook Reserve with the final compensation amount still to be agreed.

38.     The Panuku 2019/2020 disposals target is $24 million for the year. The disposals target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis. 

39.     Two properties have been sold in the Ōrākei Local Board area during the reporting period. Donnelly Street (120 Abbotts Way), St Johns and 49 (Lot 2) Nihill Crescent, Mission Bay.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The recommendation has no impacts on the council group. The views of the council group are incorporated on a project by project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     The proposed decision of receiving this report has no impacts. Any local or sub-regional impacts related to local activities are considered on a project by project basis.

42.     Panuku requests that all feedback and/or queries relating to a property in the local board area be directed in the first instance to localboard@developmentauckland.co.nz.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no significant impacts on Māori.

44.     Panuku work collaboratively with mana whenua on a range projects including potential property disposals, development sites in the area and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum who have a broader mandate.

45.     Panuku will continue to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing.         

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     The next 6-monthly update is scheduled for February 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Subdivision Plan - 84-100 Morrin Road, St Johns

17

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anna Berthiaume - Engagement coordinator

Authorisers

Lisa Gooding - Senior Engagement Advisor

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Proposal to classify part of 30 Tephra Boulevard, Stonefields as a local purpose (community buildings) reserve (Covering report)

File No.: CP2019/14727

 

  

 

This is a late covering report for the above item. The comprehensive agenda report was not available when the agenda went to print and will be provided prior to the 15 August 2019 Ōrākei Local Board meeting.

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14282

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2018/2019 Annual Report for the Ōrākei Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 26 September 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2018/2019 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      adopt the 2018/2019 Ōrākei Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A.

b)      note that any proposed changes will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019.

c)      note that the draft 2018/2019 Ōrākei Local Board Annual Report (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report) will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2018/2019 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities, and the overall Financial Impact Statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

6.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the NZX Debt Market (quoted bonds) maintained by NZX Limited. As a result, the council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules (listing rules) and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA). Under these obligations, local boards may not release annual financial results in any form, including publishing their agenda/minutes containing their results, until council group results are released to the NZX on 27 September 2019.  Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi relates to the local board area.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area, summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved.

Funding information

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English, and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2018/2019 Annual Report for the local board are:

·   Audit NZ review during August and September 2019

·   report to the Governing Body for adoption on 26 September 2019

·   release to stock exchanges and publication online on 27 September 2018

·   physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2018/2019 Ōrākei Local Board Annual Report - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

David Gurney - Manager Corporate Performance & Reporting

Authorisers

Kevin Ramsay - General Manager Corporate Finance and Property

Victoria Villaraza - Acting General Manager Local Board Services’

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14239

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter four, 1 April – 30 June 2019, and the overall performance for the financial year, against the agreed 2018/2019 local board work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Ōrākei Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2018/2019 financial year.

3.       Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

4.       One-hundred and six activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered, including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Eight activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred for this quarter and 14 projects/activities have not progressed as expected during 2018/2019.

5.       Key highlights for quarter four include:

·   Work has been completed for Ōrākei – Built Heritage Improvements (2842) on the three searchlight emplacements along Tāmaki Drive.

·   The Ōrākei Basin – improve open space (2897) project upgraded tracks and steps with enhanced access from Lucerne Road and drainage improvements.

·   Streamside Assistance – Remuera Stream stage two (894) 1,200 plants were planted this quarter as well as pest management, weed control and rubbish clean-ups.

6.       Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme include:

·   During quarter four the Eastern Bays Songbird Initiative (603) reached the milestone of 1,000 participants.

·   The local board held its first Ōrākei Business Awards (1381) with an event in October 2018 to celebrate the nominees and winners.

·   Waiatarua Reserve – develop car park (2318) was completed in November 2018 and provides better access to the reserve for visitors.

7.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·   Colin Maiden Precinct transport analysis as part of the OR: Service provision for parks and recreation (1440) activity has taken longer than anticipated. Additional budget was required but no report was received to allocate the funding until the June business meeting. The project is currently being tendered and it is anticipated to have a supplier approved by August 2019. The analysis is also required for a number of other local board projects within the precinct.

·   A significant number of leases have not been progressed as expected. This includes the lease to the Scout Association of NZ – St Aidans Scout Group at Little Rangitoto Reserve, 6 Crown Lane Remuera (2610). Due to resourcing issues the lease has not been renewed. Staff have requested a site visit with the group and will progress the lease renewal over financial year 2019/2020.

·   St Heliers Library – comprehensive renewal (3120) works are on hold whilst further investigations are undertaken as part of a wider project to analyse community service provision in St Heliers. Due to the library’s seismic rating it has been prioritised for this analysis.

8.       The 2018/2019 financial performance report is attached but under confidential cover. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – expected to be made public from 30 September 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter and year ending 30 June 2019.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2018/2019 are released to the NZX which are expected to be made public 30 September 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Ōrākei Local Board has an approved 2018/2019 work programme for the following operating departments:

·   Community Services (Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; Parks, Sport and Recreation; and Service Strategy and Integration) approved on 21 June 2018.

·   Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew and Community Leases, approved on 19 July 2018.

·   Infrastructure and Environmental Services, approved on 21 June 2018.

·   Local Economic Development, approved on 21 June 2018.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

Key highlights for quarter four

10.     The key achievements to report from the quarter four period include:

·   Work has been completed on Ōrākei – Built Heritage Improvements (Searchlight Emplacements) (2842). The restoration of the searchlights along Tāmaki Drive helps to preserve their heritage, in particular emplacement three, which retained a lot of its original features. New artwork panels were installed on emplacement two to highlight what the emplacements were used for.

·   Ōrākei Basin – improve open space (2897) project upgraded and widened the eastern and southern tracks including drainage improvements which will keep the tracks dry and result in cleaner water. New planting has enhanced the walkway, and additional planting will soften the retaining wall by the carpark.  Access was also improved by the renewal of the steps by Lucerne Road and the path to Upland Road. A blessing and tree planting was led by kaumatua from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei in June 2019.

·   The local board continues to co-fund the Streamside Assistance – Remuera Stream stage two (894) project with the Waitematā Local Board. The project is led by From the Deck, an active community group which is connecting with neighbours and building resilience for the environment of the Newmarket and Remuera streams. This quarter has seen over 70 volunteers plant 1,200 plants with the local scouts group assisting with the barbeque. Extra weed control and a rubbish clean-up along the stream corridor was also able to be funded. Work continues on establishing bait and trap lines for rats and stoats.

Overall performance against the Ōrākei Local Board 2018/2019 work programme

11.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected (completed by the end of July 2019) or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 1: Work Programme by RAG status

12.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 2: work programme activity by activity status and department

13.     The table below shows the overall performance of work programme activities (RAG status and activity status by work programme).

Table 1: End of year Local Board Work Programmes Status

RAG Status

Activity Status

ACE

PSR

Libraries

SS&I

CF

Leases

I&ES

ATEED

Green

Completed

14

4

7

 

25

5

16

2

In progress

 

5

 

2

22

1

3

 

Amber

In progress

 

2

 

 

5

2

1

 

Red

In progress

 

1

 

 

 

3

 

 

On hold

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

Not delivered

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Grey

Merged

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deferred

 

 

 

 

2

2

 

 

Cancelled

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme

14.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2018/2019 include:

·    The local board has increased its funding, support and focus on ecological restoration in local parks and open spaces as well as supporting local community groups such as the Eastern Bays Songbird Initiative (603). During quarter four the group reached the milestone of 1,000 participants. The group has collaborated with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei for a trap handout event with others also held in St Heliers and Kohimarama.

·    The local board held its first Ōrākei Business Awards (1381) in quarter two. Almost 300 businesses were nominated for the awards by the public, with 53 finalists selected over six categories. The project highlighted the thriving local businesses as well as assisted building business networks across the Ōrākei Local Board area.

·    Waiatarua Reserve – develop car park (2318) was completed in November 2018. The upgrade included refurbishing carpark to provide better access for all users, along with additional footpaths, kerbs and dog washing facilities. A community BBQ and dog walk were held with support from the Mens’ Shed to highlight the new access ways and facilities.

Overview of work programme performance by department

Arts, Community and Events work programme

15.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, all 14 activities were completed by the end of the year or will be by the end of July 2019 (green).

16.     During quarter four, three Local Civic Events (166) were held within the board area. In April, the opening of Wairua Reserve playground was celebrated with local school students and the community. In June the board celebrated the opening of the Ōrākei Basin walkway with a blessing from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and a tree planting, as well as, a rededication of the memorial trees by Glover Park. The rededication included a speech by Coco Lance who won the ANZAC speech competition held by the board.

17.     The Ōrākei Community Centre delivered (878) a successful EcoMatters Bike Hub programme. The programme included a free Bike Fix drop-in session to teach participants new skills such as how to tune gears and brakes.

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

18.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are nine activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), and one activity that is significantly delayed (red).

19.     During quarter four the Churchill Park: Golf clubhouse site plan (2798) was publicly consulted on. The updated concept plan will be provided to Community Facilities to prepare a detailed design for implementation.

20.     The Ecological volunteers and environmental programme (542) has focused on ongoing restoration work and animal pest control as well as rubbish clean-ups throughout the board area. This included a Matariki celebration through a ‘traditional uses of native plants’ walk at Tahuna Torea.

21.     Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

OR: Service provision for parks and recreation (1440)

Red

In progress

$10,000 of the budget has been spent on wattle control at Colin Maiden Park. The remaining $30,000 will not be spent before the end of the financial year.

Additional budget was required to fund the transport analysis for the Colin Maiden Precinct. The additional budget was allocated at the local board’s June business meeting. The project is currently being tendered and it is anticipated to have a supplier approved by August 2019.

OR: specific implementation plan for Auckland’s Urban Forest (Ngahere) Strategy (482)

Amber

In progress

The draft Ngahere local assessment has been completed for review by the local board. It is anticipated to be workshopped by August and feedback incorporated into the final report which will conclude the ‘Knowing’ phase.

This is a multi-year project with the ‘Growing’ starting in 2019/2020.

Waiatarua Reserve: prepare an integrated plan (1469)

Amber

In progress

A draft plan was presented in quarter four with further changes requested which has delayed the plan going out for consultation.

The plan will be going to consultation in July and formally reported to the board in September 2019 for adoption.

Libraries and Information work programme

22.     In the Libraries and Information work programme, all seven activities were completed by the end of the year or will be by the end of July 2019 (green).

23.     The libraries in Ōrākei Local Board area saw an increase in digital and eCollections usage (1145) over the last quarter. Whilst both libraries held a writing workshops for local students with authors as part of the Win with Words competition (1146).

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

24.     In the Service Strategy and Integration work programme, both the two activities were completed by the end of the year or will be by the end of July 2019 (green).

25.     During quarter four, the scope for the investigation into the provision of St Heliers library and community facilities (1408) was confirmed with the local board. The activity is a multi-year project and will continue to be progressed in 2019/2020.

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

26.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 47 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), five activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), two activities that are on hold (red), and two activities that are deferred (grey) in quarter four.

27.     Anderson Beach – renew retaining seawall (2283) continues to be progressed with the contractor having to work intermittently due to works being in the tidal zone. It is expected that works will be completed in October 2019.

28.     Shore Road Reserve – install sand carpet and lighting on field 3 (3354) is no longer deferred and has been started ahead of time. Officers are drafting concept designs for the site to be presented to the local board before consent applications.

29.     Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Tahuna Torea – remove mangroves (2308)

Red

On hold

The hui with iwi was delayed which has meant the formal report to the local board for a decision was not completed during quarter four. The report is due to be presented at the August business meeting.

St Heliers Library – comprehensive renewal (3120)

Red

On hold

Renewal works are on hold whilst further investigations are undertaken as part of a wider project to analyse community service provision in St Heliers.

Due to the library’s seismic rating, St Heliers has been prioritised for this analysis.

Ladies Bay Steps, 69 Cliff Road, St Heliers – remediate major slip (2288)

Amber

In progress

The archaeological findings on site has delayed the project. Issues have now been resolved and a contractor has been assigned with physical works starting at the end of July and completed before the end of Quarter One 2019/2020.

Ōrākei – LDI minor CAPEX fund 2018/19 (2305)

Amber

In progress

A report seeking allocation of some funding has not been delivered in quarter four and is expected to be formally reported at the September business meeting. The funding will be carried forward for the board to use in the next financial year.

Ōrākei Spine shared path – develop feeder links (2314)

Amber

In progress

An archaeological site has been found and works stopped. Consent to continue work is being sought from the NZ Heritage Authority.

Tahapa Reserve East – improvements (2317)

Amber

In progress

An archaeological site has been found and works stopped. Consent to continue work is being sought from the NZ Heritage Authority.

The Landing Reserve – develop a dinghy access ramp (2319)

Amber

In progress

Investigation for alternative solutions that are cost effective are being continued. A strategic assessment is also underway. Work will be presented to the local board for approval once complete.

Michaels Ave Reserve – design and install 4 toilets and 4 changing rooms (2977)

Grey

Deferred

This project cannot be progressed as the funding from council is contingent on funding from the Ellerslie Sports Club. The club has begun fundraising for their portion and are working with Community Services staff to meet timeframes.

Ngahue Reserve Road extension (3195)

Grey

Deferred

Work is on hold until the transport analysis for the Colin Maiden Precinct (1440) has been completed to inform a route and detailed design.

Community Leases work programme

30.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are six activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), three activities that are significantly delayed (red) and three activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey).

31.     Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold, not delivered, deferred or cancelled are discussed below:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Little Rangitoto Reserve 6 Crown Lane Remuera. Lease to the Scout Association of NZ – St Aidans Scout Group (2610)

Red

In progress

Due to resourcing issues the activity has not been delivered in time.

A site visit has been requested of the group.

Atkin Avenue Reserve 19-23 Atkin Avenue Mission Bay. Lease to Tāmaki Yacht Club Incorporated (2611)

Red

In progress

Reclassification of the land was supported by iwi and is going for public notification in early July.

The lease will be rolled over on a month by month basis until the Omnibus Management Reserve Plan for the Ōrākei Local Board area is completed.

Thomas Bloodworth Park 32B Shore Road Remuera. Lease to the Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust (2620)

Red

In progress

The group has requested a variation to their lease. Upon investigation, Legal Services has established that the Hobson Community Board resolved to approve the surrender of the existing lease and issue a new lease once a Code of Compliance for the building was issued.

Staff will amend the original lease and advise the board of next steps.

138 Main Highway Ellerslie Lease the Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust (2612)

Amber

In progress

Approval for the new lease will be sought at the local board’s August 2019 business meeting.

Michaels Ave Reserve 46 Michaels Ave Ellerslie. Lease to Ellerslie Sports Club Incorporated (2615)

Amber

In progress

The memorandum for renewal of the lease is being reviewed and will seek endorsement from the local board in quarter one of 2019/2020.

Clubrooms, Madills Farm Reserve, 6 Baddeley Ave, Kohimarama: Lease to Kohimarama Yacht Club Incorporated (1357)

Grey

Deferred

Following a workshop with the board, this activity has been deferred and put on hold pending the outcome of discussions with the group over the redevelopment of their clubrooms on Tāmaki Drive and the proposed redevelopment of the Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club clubrooms.

Madills Farm Reserve, 6 Baddeley Avenue, Mission Bay. Lease to Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club Incorporated (2609)

Grey

Deferred

Following a workshop with the board, this activity has been deferred and put on hold pending the outcome of discussion with the group over the proposed redevelopment of the clubrooms.

The Tāmaki Yacht Club Incorporated (1472)

Grey

Cancelled

This activity has been cancelled following direction from the board that they wish to retain the space for public use including the Yacht Club.

 

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

32.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are 19 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), and one activity that is in progress but delayed (amber).

33.     In May 2019 a community planting day was held at Madills Farm as part of the Stream restoration project (890). In total 75 volunteers planted 1000 native plants in the riparian margins of the stream.

34.     During quarter four the Hobson Bay Catchment Care project in Waiata Reserve (892) prepared the site for weed control and planting. In late June a planting day was held with 1000 plants being planted by 103 volunteers.

35.     Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below -

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Environmental Enhancement Plan (1534)

Amber

In progress

Procurement issues has meant the Environmental Enhancement Plan will not be completed by the end of the financial year 2018/2019.

The plan will be workshopped with the local board in late July and reported in September for formal adoption.

 

Local Economic Development work programme

36.     In the Local Economic Development work programme, there are two activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), and one activity that is not delivered (red).

37.     Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below -

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Supporting local businesses (1525)

Red

Not delivered

Funding of $5,000 was set aside to support a new business network within the Lunn Avenue business precinct. There was low to no interest in a network and no other projects have been identified for delivery.

 

Deferred activities

38.     As part of the local board funding policy, activities funded through the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operating fund that were not delivered in 2018/2019 will be deferred into 2019/2020 work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     This report informs the Ōrākei Local Board of the performance for quarter ending 30 June 2019 and the performance for the 2018/2019 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     The Ōrākei Local Board’s work programme contains a number of projects that provide direct outcomes for Māori, including but not limited to:

·   An archaeological site was found at Tahapa Reserve. As a result of this find Tahapa Reserve East – improvements (2317) and Ōrākei Spine shared path – develop feeder links (2314) were put on hold whilst officers work with iwi and the NZ Heritage Authority to obtain permissions to continue works.

·   During this quarter 800 native trees and shrubs were purchased from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei nursery for planting as part of the Victoria Portland Significant Ecological Area restoration (602).

·   As part of the Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori. Whakatipu i te reo Māori – Ōrākei (1150), Matariki was celebrated at the two local libraries with storytimes and craft activities. Libraries staff also continue to work with kaumātua at the Ōrākei marae to assist with building their technology skills.

42.     The local board has increased its funding of projects to improve the natural environment, in particular through pest management, weed eradication and revegetation programmes. This aligns to iwi outcomes pertaining to enhancing the environment.

43.     The Ōrākei Local Board Chair and the Deputy Chairman met with Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei kaumatua on 18 June 2019 to continue building their relationship and work on shared outcomes for the local board area.

44.     Mana whenua customary practices are embedded into events and openings of board projects such as the tree planting and blessing at Ōrākei Basin to celebrate the opening of the renewed track and steps (Ōrākei Basin – improve open space 2897).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     This report is provided to enable the Ōrākei Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2018/2019 work programmes and to report this to the public. This report is for information only and therefore there are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

46.     Auckland Council currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – expected to be made public from 30 September 2019.

47.     Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

49.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

50.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Quarterly Performance Report June 2019 - Local Board Work Programme Update 2018/2019 Q4

35

b

Ōrākei Quarterly Performance Report June 2019 - Financial Appendix - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Hayley King  - Local Board Advisor - Ōrākei

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 



























Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport August 2019 report to the Ōrākei Local Board

File No.: CP2019/14575

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Auckland Transport monthly report to the Ōrākei Local Board for August 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each month, Auckland Transport provides an update to the Ōrākei Local Board on transport-related matters and relevant consultations in its area, Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects and decisions of Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee.

3.       The Auckland Transport update for August 2019 is attached to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport August 2019 update report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport update report - August 2019

63

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes

File No.: CP2019/14601

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, and to provide feedback on the recommended changes to the document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is currently reviewing the Auckland Film Protocol.  The Auckland Film Protocol sets out:

·   the commitment of the council group to supporting filming in Auckland;

·   expectations and rules that filmmakers must abide by when filming in Auckland; and

·   provides guidance for filmmakers on the process for approval to film in Auckland.

3.       The purpose of the review was to ensure that the Auckland Film Protocol is up-to-date and identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities that should be addressed.  Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Auckland Film Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol. 

4.       A revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in June 2019 for consideration and was approved for public consultation (resolution number ENV/2019/73). 

5.       The following is a summary of the key changes made to the Auckland Film Protocol before public consultation was undertaken:

·   Native species: new content added stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·   Kauri dieback: new content added providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·   Drones: new content added stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·   Historic heritage: new content added stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·   Health and safety: new content added to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·   Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was updated to reflect current policy, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council.  Some structural and editorial amendments were also made to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

6.       Public consultation was undertaken over a three week period between 21 June and 12 July 2019.

7.       A total of 74 submissions were received during the public consultation period.  Ōrākei Local Board residents provided a total of 5 submissions on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, representing 7 per cent of all submissions.  The views of Ōrākei Local Board submitters were generally consistent with regional views. Staff are proposing some changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address submitter concerns; the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film protocol are shown in track changes in Attachment B.

8.       This report provides a summary of public feedback and of proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address feedback.  The following is a high‑level summary of the key changes proposed to the Auckland Film Protocol in response to public consultation:

·   Natural environment: include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·   Native species: include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·   Kauri dieback: amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

·   Drones: include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

·   Impact on access to public open space: include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

·   Compliance and enforcement: include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with the Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

9.       Submission themes and proposed changes are summarised in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol

b)      provide feedback on the recommended changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol

c)      note that local board feedback will be included in a report to the Environment and Community Committee in August 2019, seeking approval for the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The first version of the Auckland Film Protocol (the protocol) was adopted by the Regional Development and Operations Committee (resolution number RDO/2013/27) on 14 March 2013.  A review of fees for filming in the Auckland Region was undertaken in 2014 and a new set of region‑wide charges was recommended; providing a simplified and harmonised range of charges.  The Governing Body adopted a region‑wide schedule of film fees and revised Auckland Film Protocol on 28 May 2015 (resolution number GB/2015/36).

11.     Since the Protocol was adopted in 2015 there have been a number of changes to legislation and to Auckland Council’s policy and planning framework. The purpose of the review of the Protocol was to:

·   ensure that the Protocol is up-to-date; and

·   identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities to be addressed in the Protocol.

Content of the Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.

12.     Workshops were held in September and October 2018 to engage with local boards that experience a high volume of filming.

13.     Engagement to inform the preparation of the revised draft Protocol was also undertaken with:

·   mana whenua: mana whenua interests are represented by 19 iwi (tribal) authorities in Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland.  The 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review of the Protocol.

·   staff of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to inform the review.

·   screen sector: the screen sector was invited to participate in a survey in April 2019 to inform the review.  The survey asked a series of general questions about the Protocol and experiences of filming in public open space in Auckland. 

·   public: the People’s Panel in September 2018; a total of 4,762 responses were received.  The survey asked a series of questions on views on and experiences of filming in Auckland. 

A high-level summary of feedback (including local board feedback) is provided in Attachment C.

14.     The review recommended that a range of changes be made to the Auckland Film Protocol, the following is a summary of the key changes proposed to the Environment and Community Committee:

·   Native species: include new content stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·   Kauri dieback: include new content providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·   Drones: include new content stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·   Historic heritage: include new content stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·   Health and safety: include new content to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·   Filming on Tūpuna Maunga: update content to reflect that applications to film on Tūpuna Maunga are assessed by the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority.

·   Updates to content: update content to reflect current policy (e.g. smokefree policy), plans (Auckland Unitary Plan) and bylaws of Auckland Council.

·   Structural and editorial: amend some parts of the document to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

15.     The revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was approved by the Envrionment and Community Committee for public consultation in June 2019 (resolution number ENV/2019/73).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     Consultation on the revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol took place from 21 June to 12 July 2019.  A total of 74 submissions were received; this represents a substantial increase on the 21 submission which were received in response to the 2015 review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  Of the submissions received, 72 were submitted using the online form and 2 non‑form hardcopy submissions were received. 

17.     Submitters were asked to identify if they worked in the screen sector or not, with:

·   29 submissions (39 per cent) received from individuals or organisations that identified themselves as working in the screen sector

·   45 submissions (61 per cent) received from individuals or organisations that do not work in the screen sector.

The questions included in the online form varied depending on whether the submitter identified themselves as working in the screen industry or not.

18.     A breakdown of all submissions received by local board area is shown in Table 1 below.  The small number of responses from individual local board areas means that an analysis of views by local board area was not possible for all local board areas.

Table 1: Breakdown of submissions made by local board area.

Local Board Area

Number of respondents

Percentage of respondents

Waitākere Ranges

17

23.0%

Albert-Eden

9

12.2%

Waitematā

8

10.8%

Rodney

6

8.1%

Upper Harbour

5

6.8%

Ōrākei

5

6.8%

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

4

5.4%

Devonport-Takapuna

4

5.4%

Henderson-Massey

3

4.1%

Kaipātiki

3

4.1%

Howick

2

2.7%

Whau

2

2.7%

Māngere-Ōtahuhu

1

1.4%

Puketapapa

1

1.4%

Hibiscus and Bays

1

1.4%

Papakura

1

1.4%

Franklin

0

0%

Great Barrier

0

0%

Ōtara‑Papatoetoe

0

0%

Manurewa

0

0%

Waiheke

0

0%

Don't Know

1

1.4%

Outside Auckland

1

1.4%

Total

74

 

 

19.     A series of closed questions were asked of non‑screen sector individuals and organisations; a summary of the responses to these questions is shown in Table 2 below.  Table 2 shows that:

·   most respondents are supportive of Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach and that;

·   most respondents think that the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on residents and businesses, on public open space and historic and cultural heritage.

Table 2: Feedback on the Auckland Film Protocols management of the impacts of filming

Question

Response

Percentage of regional submissions

(number of respondents is shown in brackets)

Do you support Auckland Council's film‑friendly approach?

Yes

75% (33)

Partially

20% (9)

No

5% (2)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on residents and businesses?

Yes

56% (18)

Partially

19% (6)

No

25% (8)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on our public open space and environment?

Yes

53% (23)

Partially

33% (14)

No

14% (6)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on our historic and cultural heritage?

Yes

62% (26)

Partially

29% (12)

No

10% (4)

 

20.     The main reasons given by those who supported Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach are shown in Table 3.

Table 3: Summary of key reasons for supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Economic

·      generates employment and economic growth;

·      benefits communities and local businesses;

·      benefits a broad range of trades and industries;

·      attracts investment and businesses to Auckland.

Cultural and creative

·      has cultural benefits allowing and supporting the telling of stories visually;

·      supports the creative economy and enables people to find a future in the creative industries;

·      It’s fun and exciting to see Auckland on the screen.

Promotion and tourism

·      promotes and showcases Auckland to the world;

·      creates a positive image of Auckland.

 

21.     Table 4 shows the key reasons that respondents gave for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Table 4: Summary of key reasons given for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Access

·      the impacts on resident, including parking restrictions, road closures and ability to use public open space while filming is taking place need to be considered and managed;

·      need to ensure that film‑makers are respectful of other users of public open space.

Notification

·      there needs to be sufficient notification to ensure that residents and businesses are aware of open space being used for filming and are not inconvenienced.

Balance

·      need to consider and manage the impact that filming has on the environment and impacted residents;

·      need to balance the cumulative impacts of filming.

Equity

·      need to ensure that fees for commercial use of public places are fair.

 

22.     The key reasons given for not supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach were:

·   the cost to ratepayers of enabling filming;

·   that there is not enough protection for individuals, businesses and residents affected by filming being carried out on private property.

23.     A series of open‑ended questions were also included to elicit further information about responses to these questions and about a range of other topics.  Staff have worked through submissions to determine any changes to be recommended for the final revised Auckland Film Protocol.  Attachment A identifies key themes and submission points along with proposed staff responses.  

A summary of the most common submission themes and the proposed staff responses are shown in table 5.

Table 5: Summary of key submission themes and proposed staff responses.

Key themes

Summary of proposed responses

Use of drones for filming

Include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

Impact on natural environment

Include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Kauri dieback

Amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

Impact on native species

Include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Impact on access to public open space

Include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

Compliance and enforcement

Include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

Health and safety

Amend to enable production companies to arrange alternative timeframes for the submission of a site specific health and safety plan by agreement with Screen Auckland.

Notification

Screen Auckland to consider operational approaches to achieving wider public notification.

Impact on business

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  The protocol is intended to provide a framework that enables decisions to be made on a case‑by‑case basis.

Equity

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  Fees for commercial use of public open space are set under the Auckland Council Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 and amended through the long term plan and annual plan.

 

24.     This report seeks formal feedback from the board at its August 2019 business meeting on the recommended changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol in response to consultation feedback.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.  This included engagement with Auckland Transport, Panuku Development Auckland, and with Auckland Council community facilities, region‑wide planning, social policy and bylaws, visitor experience and heritage

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Role of local boards in film permitting

26.     Landowner approval is required to film on any public open space in the Auckland region.  Local boards are responsible for landowner approvals for local parks and reserves.  Engagement with local boards that experience a high volume of applications for film permits was undertaken in September and October 2018 to inform the review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  A summary of the key engagement themes is included in Attachment C and was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

27.     A key theme from local board engagement was that the film permit timeframes mean that landowner approval timeframes are very tight, particularly when considering complex or contentious applications.  It was also noted that the current timeframes do not allow sufficient time to consider applications at full board meetings or to consult key stakeholders.  Given this, the following options on film permit timeframes were presented to the Environment and Community Committee at a workshop in May 2019 and at the June 2019 meeting.

Option one: Status Quo

Option two: amend the permit timeframes

·   Option 2(a) the permit time frame is amended to be “up to five working days”.

·   Option 2(b) the permit time frame is increased to 5‑7 working days.

28.     Following direction from the Committee, that increasing timeframes could act as a disincentive making Auckland internationally uncompetitive, the status quo option was retained in the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     ATEED has an ongoing relationship with several mana whenua and mataawaka groups, across its whole portfolio of activity.  To inform the review of the Protocol the 19 Iwi Authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review.  In relation to film permit applications Māori views and input may be obtained in several ways where there is a potential impact on particular land or sites. This is usually coordinated either by the film facilitator, or through the relevant parks manager.

30.     Specific processes are in place for the tūpuna maunga, with all commercial filming on the maunga requiring the approval of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority).  Screen Auckland facilitates all requests for approval to film on the tūpuna maunga.  Approval to film will be subject to conditions and restrictions set by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.  Meetings were held with staff of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to inform the review and ensure that proposed amendments are consistent with the policy of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The proposed amendments to the Protocol do not impact on existing levels of service and will not impact on operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     There are no significant risks arising from the board giving feedback on the proposed changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol at this time.

33.     If adoption of the revised Auckland Film Protocol is delayed this would impact on council’s ability to implement the proposed changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Public feedback and proposed amendments to the Auckland Film Protocol will be presented to the Environment and Community Committee for approval.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key submission themes and responses

81

b

Draft 2019 Auckland Film Protocol (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Summary of preconsultation engagement

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Marie Jenkins, Screen Facilitation Manager, ATEED

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza, Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Local Board feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing

File No.: CP2019/14310

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to formally provide feedback on the Productivity Commission’s (the commission) inquiry into local government funding and financing.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 4 July 2019, the Productivity Commission released its draft report relating to its local government funding and financing inquiry.

3.       The inquiry’s key aim is establishing whether the existing funding and financing arrangements are suitable for enabling local authorities to meet current and future cost pressures.

4.       The commission’s draft report:

·   raises eight questions

·   highlights 67 findings

·   makes 30 recommendations.

5.       Local boards are advised that their views and feedback for staff to consider when drafting the submission, need to be received by Monday, 29 July 2019.

6.       Auckland Council will make a submission on the draft report. Staff will prepare a submission for the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration at its meeting on 20 August 2019. Submissions on the inquiry close on 29 August 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Central Government asked the Commission to conduct an inquiry into local government funding and financing in July 2018. The inquiry’s terms of reference require the commission to examine the adequacy and efficiency of the current local government funding and financing framework and, where shortcomings in the current system are identified, examine options and approaches for improving the system.

8.       The inquiry’s terms of reference do not call for an assessment of, or changes to the current scope and responsibilities of local government.

9.       The Commission’s issues paper was released on 6 November 2018. The council made a submission on the issues paper which was approved by the Finance and Performance Committee. The council’s submission to the issues paper can be found as Attachment A.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The draft report is available on the commission’s website

11.     The commission’s ‘At a glance’ document can be found as Attachment B and its ‘A3 overview’ is at Attachment C.

12.     The draft report states that:

·   the current funding and financing framework is broadly sound but that councils need new tools to help them deal with some specific cost pressures

·   if councils struggle to deal with rising costs, or are not incentivised to improve their performance, communities are unlikely to reach their potential

·   the funding and financing framework for local government must incentivise good performance and enable local authorities to deliver quality amenities and services that reflect the preferences and aspirations of their communities.

13.     The commission has found that the existing funding model is insufficient to address cost pressures in the following four areas and that new tools are required:

·   supplying enough infrastructure to support rapid urban growth

·   adapting to the impacts of climate change

·   coping with the growth of tourism

·   the accumulation of responsibilities placed on local government by central government.

14.     The commission also considers the three-waters sector an important area for investigation.

15.     The inquiry’s terms of reference have also been amended to require the commission to consider whether a tax on vacant land would be a useful mechanism to improve the supply of available housing. The addition is a result of the Tax Working Group’s final report to the government.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     The council group’s impact and views will be developed and presented for the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration at its meeting on 20 August 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are advised that their views and feedback for staff to consider when drafting the submission, need to be received by Monday, 29 July 2019.

18.     Any formal feedback received after 29 July and before 19 August 2019 will be provided to the Finance and Performance Committee to seek their endorsement to incorporate in the council’s submission. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Staff will also seek input from the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     There are no financial implications in deciding to make a submission. However, there may be positive or negative financial implications if the government decides to implement any of the recommendations made by the Productivity Commission. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     If the local board does not contribute to the submission, then there is a risk that the Auckland Council family’s position on this inquiry will not reflect issues that are important to the local community.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     The council will make a submission on the draft report. Staff will prepare a submission for the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration at its meeting on 20 August 2019.

23.     A workshop to discuss the draft council submission with the Finance and Performance Committee has been scheduled for 15 August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Council submission on the issues paper - approved by the Finance and Performance Committee on 6 November 2018

99

b

'At a glance' - Local government funding and financing

129

c

'At a glance' - A3 briefing

133

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2019/14566

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues since last reported.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

a)      That the report be received.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairperson's report - August 2019

137

b

Ōrākei OLI Dashboard June 2019

141

c

Correspondence - Parenting Place

143

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Board Member Report - Carmel Claridge

File No.: CP2019/14615

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the report be received.

b)      That the Ōrākei Local Board request Auckland Transport to investigate limited parking removal either side of the pedestrian refuge situated sea side of Tāmaki Drive east of Kohimarama Rd, to enable room for safer on road navigation by cyclists.

c)      That the Ōrākei Local Board request Auckland Transport investigate and report on the current use of the bus stops near the vicinity of the Arthur St / Pukerangi Crescent location for parking and reopen them if necessary to ensure the safety of students accessing school bus services.

 

Portfolio Lead: Transport

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Parks and Reserves

Waiata Reserve: Palm Fronds

A member of the public approached me at the Waiata Planting Day on 29th June espressing her concern about a pile of palm fronds that have been trimmed and now left at the entrance to the Reserve from Ōrākei Rd. This presents as a health and safety issue as the spikes on these fronds and a member of the public has already sustained a nasty injury from them.  The fronds should either be moved away from the pathway where they present a danger to the public, or disposed of completely. Community Facilities have been alerted and I have requested the removal of the fronds. The job has been logged by Community Facilities who will be following this up with the eco team for removal as a pest plant on the regional watch list.

Disposal Bag Units for Dog Owners:

I continue to check the disposable bag units at Waiatarua Reserve and Ōrākei Basin on a regular basis. I continue to collect old filled dog poop bags each time and then properly dispose of them. It is apparent that some members of our community continue to be confused about these units and are using them improperly. The problem needs to be addressed by clearer signage or removal of the units.

Transport

Meadowbank Shopping Centre Pathway:

The walkway from Grand Drive to the Meadowbank Shopping Centre is in dire need of some attention. After receiving complaints from members of the public at the regular Meadowbank St Johns Residents’ Association I conducted a site visit. Two of the lights on the pathway are not working and there are overgrown weeds and litter that need removing. I contacted Auckland Transport who have advised that this walkway is not their asset, and is privately owned by the Shopping Centre. I have spoken to the Countdown Supermarket Manager who will be passing on the concerns to the property management.

Ōrākei Basin Walkway Stage 3 – Surfacing:

Many of the panels on the Stage 3 surfacing are already deteriorating. This is not an isolated problem and I have identified several panels showing erosion as shown in photographs attached to this report. Confirmation is required that the contractors will be remedying this problem on ALL surface areas – not just a patch job – at their cost not Council’s. Signs should then be erected at both ends of the pathway advising members of the public that the problem is being addressed and solved at no cost to ratepayers.

Hilltop St Issues:

With the advent of the winter sports season the same parking problems that have occurred in previous years at this location are reoccurring. The intersection continues to pose problems for motorists entering and exiting Hilltop, and the junction is hazardous for pedestrians as children are dropped off or picked up for sports games and practices.

Rutherford Tce – Ruthford Reserve Pathway:

This is an access way from Rutherford Terrace to Rutherford Reserve in Meadowbank to the park and the scout den at the end of the driveway. There are also several private properties accessed by owners’ vehicles. The one streetlamp that provides illumination has been out of operation since at least the end of daylight saving this year. A local resident has rung both the main Council call centre, and Auckland Transport at least 8 times, and been in to visit the Local Board office in Meadowbank on two separate occasions to report on this matter.

Many children use this accessway in the evenings. The St Chads Scout Hall is located at the bottom of the accessway and is attended by two Kea groups (ages 6-8), two Cub groups (ages 8-11), two Scout groups (ages 11-14) and a Venturer unit (ages 14-18) each week, as well as various other community groups.

This is a steep and busy path used by both vehicles and pedestrians.  It is a matter of urgency that lighting be reinstated to an appropriate CPTED standard before someone is hurt. Community Facilities have followed up on this matter at my request and advise that a scissor-lift has been booked for Wednesday 8th August and the job should be completed by contractors on this date.

Pedestrian Refuge Tāmaki Drive:

This week I attempted to cycle the stretch of Tāmaki Drive on road where this pedestrian refuge is located and can confirm that it poses significant and dangerous ‘pinch point’ problems for people on bikes. The removal of a small number of parking spaces, to enable on road cyclists to navigate access to the narrow lane of traffic would be a simple, albeit only partial, solution to what is currently a disaster waiting to happen. The Bike Tāmaki Drive group raised this matter with the Board some time ago, and it needs to be addressed.

Harapaki Intersection Feedback:

Feedback was received from one other Board member supporting the proposal for broken yellow lines at the Harapaki Rd/ Meadowbank Rd intersection. I sought the views of the Meadowbank St Johns Residents’ Association committee who confirmed their approval given the long history of concerns that residents have voiced about the dangers of this intersection. The Board’s feedback is attached to this report.

Ellerslie Bus Stops – Arthur St /Pukerangi Crescent

There is currently an unacceptable situation with the use of the discontinued bus stops near the Arthur St /Pukerangi intersection where a substantial building development is taking place. These stops are labelled ‘closed’ and are being used for parking. Many of the vehicles parked appear to  be vans and commercial vehicles visiting the development site. However, local residents have advised that the stops are still servicing school bus routes. Morning and afternoons see a very dangerous mix of buses trying to pull up to the stops where vehicles are parked with school children having to get on and off while negotiating their way through the parking and traffic. There have been a large number of comments on this issue on the Ellerslie Community social media page and a groundswell of concern is growing amongst residents.

Activities: 8th July – 3rd August

Date                           Activities

9th July                       Auckland Transport Meeting

9th July                       Meadowbank St Johns Residents’ Assoc Meeting

11th July                     Ōrākei Local Board Workshop

11th July                     Constituent Meeting

12th July                     Constituent Meeting

15th July                     Business Meeting Agenda Run Through

16th July                     Leases Update

18th July                     Attendance at Auckland Town Hall – Freedom Camping Panel Hearing

18th July                     CABAC Meeting

18th July                     Ōrākei Local Board Business Meeting

19th July                     MSJRA update – committee member

19th July                     Pourewa Valley Steering Group Meeting

22nd July                    Meeting with OBC member

22nd July                    Constituent Meeting

22nd July                    Attendance – Hobson Bay Walkway Consultation event

23rd July                     Site Attendance with Officers & Board – Whakatakataka Reserve

24th July                     Site Attendance – Tāmaki Yacht Club

25th July                     Ōrākei Local Board Workshop

27th July                     St Heliers – Eastern Songbird Trap Handout

31st July                     Eastern Bays Network Meeting

31st July                     Auckland Transport Meeting

1st August                   Ōrākei Local Board Workshop

2nd August                  Ōrākei Marae attendance – Powhiri to Honour Matt Maihi

3rd August                   Attendance at Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan Consultation – Mens’                     

                                    Shed, Waiatarua Reserve.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board Feedback - Harapaki Road safety improvements

149

b

Photographs - August 2019

151

    

Signatory

Author

Carmel Claridge - Ōrākei Local Board Member

Date: 4 August 2019


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Board Member Report - Troy Churton

 

File No.: CP2019/14599

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues since the last meeting.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the report be received.

b)      That the Ōrākei Local Board delegate speaking rights to Member Churton to attend a Governing Body meeting to discuss how private helipad and helicopter use applications in residential areas should be treated under the Unitary Plan.

 

Portfolio Lead: Resource Consenting and Regulatory

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Heritage; Environment

Resource Consenting and Regulatory

Development at Purewa Road, beside Ōrākei Basin, 1-3 Purewa Road, Meadowbank

2.       The Duty Commissioner has determined limited notification on neighbours for this application, which is a good reflection of the effort made with the support of community to influence participation options for a project that will impact on our walkway plans.

Unitary Plan and private Helicopter pad / use proposals in residential areas

3.       On receiving a memo to the governing body (attached) regarding the lack of guidelines for potential private helicopter applications, say as per the high profile Rod Duke case or the threatened Paratai Drive case, I have expressed my personal RMA views to the Mayor and planning representative as follows:

4.       Private (non-emergency) helicopter activity in any urban residential zone must be a PROHIBITED activity, not a non-complying one.

5.       Even as a non-complying activity, it should be basic from any so-called guidelines that any such application is considered a 'special circumstance' necessitating full public notification always.

6.       I will seek the Board's mandate and look forward to addressing you at a Planning Committee / GB meeting on this.

Private mass parking on Kepa Road

7.       In response to regulatory concerns from locals about one individual parking his fleet of cars in public spaces along the Z station area and RSA area of Kepa Road, I suggested a temporary or trial set of parking restrictions be considered for the area and AT’s monitoring officer is reporting back on that regulatory option after liaison with AT design advisors.

Mission Bay Retail Tower development

8.       Along with Colin and David, I presented formal feedback to the hearing of this development indicating the danger of granting it and creating a permitted baseline for subsequent developer applications in the area, and advocating that “transformative” development under the Unitary Plan does not need to mean “at the expense of the past or current values”, and can instead be about complying with standards and integrating sensitively. The decision should be ready by next Board meeting. Our presentation was greeted with strong thanks from many local residents who were present.

Public reserve at Hakumaru area beside OBC

9.       Delegations of OBC reps have again asserted suggestions to purchase the recreational reserve.

10.     The degree of fencing and barrier arm that remain is preventing the public from having access to this amenity or being able to determine how valued this amenity might be for them.

11.     I have had a few discussions with residents who see future value in the space as a passive respite in what is otherwise a busy stretch of Tāmaki Drive and have asked what Council is doing to enable access to the recreation reserve.

I have attended several workshops, meetings, been lobbied to from various interested parties. I am eager to state my view transparently of the best governance approach to move towards a long-term solution without making a determination about what that long term solution is, as a matter of public record:

i.      An appropriate interim outcome is the formalise an extended license area covering the tar-sealed area within the reserve zone and installing bollards to demarcate the tarsealed area from the grassed area.

ii.     That short term licence situation would continue until the entire reserve area (inclusive of commercial golf area and coffee drive in area) is considered for a full management / concept plan purpose. The management / concept plan would require full public consultation.

iii.    As a matter of good governance, It would be unwise in my personal view to enable greater exclusive licensed use area beyond the tar seal for OBC use now before taking that prospect to public consultation in the context of a concept plan per ii .

iv.    As a matter of good governance I also think it is unwise to enable greater exclusive licensed use beyond the tar seal now before Council has obtained the re-introduction of public access to the existing recreational reserve space.

v.     I am aware OBC aspire to the entire recreational reserve becoming marina use related with credible region-wide maritime arguments for that vision. The success of that vision would, in my view, be benefited by the suggested good governance above  – including restoring easy public access from Tāmaki Drive to the grassed area now, and from the suggested public consultation above.

vi.    I am aware OBC has material relying on historical use of the reserve area by them and by trailer parking in order to advocate for future maritime use of the Council recreational reserve.

vii.   What I have not seen is any concession from OBC that they have directly contributed to the status of non -public use of the reserve space by other passive reserve users due to the fence and barrier arms etc. However, I am also of the view that Council has not acted to enforce public access appropriately for a long time.

viii.  I am confident that through good governance steps as suggested above that the use of the entire area can be optimised for a range of users far more optimally than currently.

ix.    I have told a rep of OBC that my personal view is that the best thing OBC could do to assist its future aspirations now is to facilitate  full public access to the grass reserve along the Tāmaki Drive frontage and  work with Council to contain its operations and ensure safety etc with appropriate bollards etc as we work through a management / concept plan process and consultation.

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo - The management of helicopter flights and helicopter landing areas under the Auckland Unitary Plan, operative in part, 2016

157

    

 Signatory

Author

Troy Churton - Ōrākei Local Board Member

Date: 2 August 2019

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Board Member Report - Colin Davis

File No.: CP2019/14580

 

  

 

Purpose

To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues since last reported.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the report be received.

b)      That the Board approve the re-location of the heritage Crimean War Trophy Gun from The Landing to a new, Council-owned, site at 19 Tāmaki Drive; that restoration of the gun be approved; that the lessees and occupants of the building at 19 Tāmaki Drive be informed; that the Royal Akarana Yacht Club be formally thanked for their care and storage of the gun over many years; and that an information sign be prepared and erected. 

c)      That the local reserve at 9-15 Hapimana Street, presently named Hapimana Reserve, Ōrākei, be also named Biddick Reserve in accordance with the Board’s Parks and Reserves, Parks Features and Parks Facilities Naming Policy and Guidelines, and that signage be erected accordingly.

d)      That the Ōrākei Local Board feedback on the Proposed Tūpuna Maunga Authority Integrated Management Plan Strategies be formally endorsed.

 

Portfolio Lead:  Parks and Reserves (joint); Arts and Libraries; Heritage

Alternate portfolio holder: Environment; Resource Consenting and Regulatory

Other - internal appointments: Mayor’s WWI Memorial Advisory Group; Quality Advice Political Advisory Group

Other - appointments to external community organisations: Stonefields Residents Association Inc. (Lead); St Heliers/Glendowie Residents Association Inc. (Alternate); Auckland Netball Centre Inc. (Lead); Friends of Churchill Park (Lead); Ōrākei Basin Advisory Group (joint parks portfolio holder); St Heliers Bay Village Association (Alternate); Michaels Avenue Reserve Community Liaison Committee (Alternate).

Heritage

(1)     Tāmaki Drive Searchlights

I am pleased to report that the searchlight emplacements restoration project is now complete, with Auckland Transport having re-aligned the existing lamps attached to the power poles, to cast light across the shutters of the restored emplacements nos. 1 and 2 and floodlighting no. 3, to illuminate them at night to dramatic effect. Photographs are attached.

 

A separate project would be to install a light to illuminate at night the perforated artwork, the image of a soldier operating one of the searchlights, from inside emplacement no. 2.

(2)     Heritage Plaques, Mission Bay

I have met on-site with the contractor who is now manufacturing the two small plaques for the Millennium Bridge, Mission Bay. The original plaque affixed to the side of the seawall, although difficult to read, will remain for heritage purposes. The two new plaques will be installed on either side of the bridge on top of the seawall at the Tāmaki Drive entrance. I am hoping that the two plaques will be installed by the end of August 2019.

 

I have also discussed with parks staff on-site the need for the floor of the bridge to be regularly cleaned to highlight the art work embedded in it, the meaning of which is recorded on one of the plaques.

(3)     The Crimean War Trophy Gun

The Board has the responsibility for the Auckland Council-owned heritage Crimean War Trophy Gun, presently in storage on The Landing in the care of the Royal Akarana Yacht Club. It was originally located in front of the Club’s building on the seaward side, as indicated in the Board’s 2013 Pathways to the Sea Concept Plan for The Landing, but was removed during construction of the Club’s new building. It is understood that the Akarana Marine Charitable Trust and the Club have not expressed interest in continuing the guardianship of the gun.

 

Originally manufactured in 1817 this rare heritage gun was captured at Sevastopol, Ukraine, following the Crimean War, in 1856. The markings on the gun makes it the oldest of the 10 guns sent to New Zealand and Australia. It and a near identical gun were gifted by the British Government to the Auckland Provincial Council in 1857 and arrived at Auckland on 17 March 1859.

 

With the completion of the Club’s premises, it is appropriate for the Board to consider where the gun should be sited. The original site, the grassed area in front of the Club’s premises, is currently used for maritime purposes and may be used as event space. Given the increasing role of The Landing for the forthcoming NACRA international yachting event and the America’s Cup, this area is not recommended as the site for the gun. Board Chairman Parkinson and I have been exploring suitable options and sites and recommend that the gun be re-located to the Council-owned grassed area outside the headquarters of TS Achilles at 19 Tāmaki Drive. This has been discussed with PSR staff, a specialist restorer, and the Commanding Officer of TS Achilles. The gun can be moved to the new location with restoration being done later on site.  

 

PSR staff are currently investigating the cost of restoration and reinstatement of the gun, but the project has not yet been approved as part of the Board’s work programme. The gun is listed in the Council’s asset register and restoration costs would be covered by LDI renewals and if the re-location and restoration projects are supported by the Board, this would be part of the Community facilities 2020/2021 annual work programme.

 

I have illustrations and information about the gun which could be used for an illustrated information sign to be erected near the gun.

(4)     Heritage Book

I have also been working with staff editing the second edition of the book: Heritage Sites of Significance and Public Artwork in the Ōrākei Local Board Area.

Parks and Reserves

Naming

At the Board’s business meeting on 18 October 2018, I recommended and the Board adopted this resolution: That the process be started for the naming of the unnamed local reserve at 9-15 Hapimana Street, Ōrākei, in accordance with the Board’s Parks and Reserves, Parks Features and Parks Facilities Naming Policy and Guidelines.   

This reserve covers the actual site of the now demolished Biddick family homes, and is presently known as Hapimana Reserve, which name the staff have been researching to determine when and how it was so named. Nine months have elapsed since the resolution was passed and there has been no officer report. Apart from a reference to the name “Hapimana” in the Council’s GIS system, there is no evidential report confirming that name. It is probable the reserve was named after the name of the street it is on, although part of the road was previously called Utakura Street and part was called Biddick Terrace.

 

It is appropriate that the site with its historical connections to the Biddick family, at Biddick’s Bay, retains its link to that family, given also it probably fronted Biddick Terrace.

Principle 2, paragraphs (1) and (2) in particular, of the Policy and Guidelines state:

(1)     Names are important landmarks in history, culture and identity. …. A park name can, and often does, reflect our local history and our context ….. . Locations often have layers of informal and formal names that have been used over time.”

(2)     Proposed names should reflect the historical, cultural or existing thematic or environmental identity of an area, and recognise the unique characteristics of that area and the community.”

It is clear that adopting the name “Biddick” for this reserve meets these principles.   

The Policy and Guidelines state that the appropriate staff team will report to the Board in a timely manner and that new parks will be named within twelve months of acquisition. The Policy and Guidelines also state that the final decision regarding the name rests with the Ōrākei Local Board. 

I propose that the reserve also carry the name “Biddick Reserve”

Proposed Tūpuna Maunga Authority Integrated Management Plan Strategies

Attached is the Board’s feedback on the Tūpuna Maunga Authority’s proposed integrated management plan strategies for its maunga, for formal endorsement.

The Board has only one maunga under the Authority’s jurisdiction within its local board area vis Ōhinerau / Mount Hobson.

Resource Consenting and Regulatory

On 22 July Board Member Wong and I presented the Board’s submissions to the planning Commissioners regarding the resource consent application by Oceania Healthcare Ltd for a retirement village development at Waimarie Street, St Heliers.

On 1 August Board Members Churton and Wong and I presented submissions to the planning Commissioners on the resource consent application by Drive Holdings Ltd to demolish all existing buildings on its site in Tāmaki Drive, Patteson Avenue and Marau Cresent, Mission Bay, and to construct seven multi-level commercial/residential buildings.

Activities (since 5 July 2019)

As well as assisting with a range of citizens’ enquiries, attending meetings, and involvement with other community activities, I have also attended the following to date:

11 July the Ōrākei Local Board workshop various topics.

11 July the public talk at the Remuera library given by Council archivists, hosted by Remuera Heritage.

15 July a meeting with the Chairman regarding the agenda for the Board’s business meeting.

15 July a meeting of the St Heliers/Glendowie Residents Association.

16 July the leases portfolio briefing.

17 July as Chairman of the Auckland Library Heritage Trust, a heritage presentation at the central library.

18 July a meeting with representatives of the Citizens Advice Bureau Auckland City Inc regarding the relocation of CAB services from Victoria Avenue, Remuera, to the Ōrākei Community Centre. This move was endorsed by the representatives who also indicated their approval for proposed alterations to the Centre to accommodate the CAB. Both the relocation and the alterations were subsequently formally approved by resolution of the Board.

18 July the Ōrākei Local Board business meeting.

19 July a meeting to prepare the Board’s supplementary submission to the Planning Commissioners re the proposed Waimarie Street retirement development.

19 July a Pourewa Valley planning meeting to discuss a proposed stakeholders’ workshop regarding an enhancement plan for Pourewa Valley.

19 July the Fire by the Sea display at St Heliers Village, arranged by the Village Association.

22 July presented the Board’s submissions to the Planning Commissioners deciding on the proposed Waimarie Street retirement village development.

22 July the public consultation on the proposed Wilson’s Beach/Shore Road walkway.

23 July the onsite meeting at Whakatakataka Reserve, Ngapipi Road, Ōrākei, to discuss the proposal to use the reserve for entry/exit of Stage 4 of the Glen Innes/Tāmaki Drive shared path and the probable widening of the Ngapipi Road footpath for the shared path.

24 July onsite meeting to discuss the Tāmaki Yacht Club’s request to license part of the Council’s parking area for Club use.

24 July the first meeting of the St Heliers Working Group regarding Auckland Transport’s proposals for St Heliers.

24 July a meeting of the Stonefields Residents Association.

25 July the Ōrākei Local Board workshop various topics.

26 July on-site meetings (1) at the millennium bridge to discuss the location of the two new plaques; and (2) at The Landing to view the heritage Crimean War Trophy Gun.

27 July the St Heliers Village sustainable, plastic-free day event. I presented awards to various prize winners.

30 July an on-site meeting with a Remuera resident regarding formal protection of a 100-year Puriri tree on her property which she has been trying so-far unsuccessfully to get on the Council’s Notable Trees list in the Unitary Plan.

30 July a meeting with Board members Churton and Wong to prepare the Board’s supplementary submission regarding the proposed Mission Bay residential/commercial redevelopment.

31 July as Chairman of the Auckland Library Heritage Trust, a talk at the Auckland Central Library given by a Trust scholarship winner.

1 August the hearing by the planning Commissioners and with members Churton and Wong presented the Board’s submissions on the proposed Mission Bay residential/commercial development.

1 August the Ōrākei Local Board workshop various topics.

1 August the AGM of the Ōrākei Community Association.

2 August the powhiri at the Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei marae for kaumatua Matt Maihi, who is retiring from his various positions at the marae. This 5-hour event included formal speeches, presentations, a video of Matt’s life, and a sit-down lunch. It was a privilege to have been invited to participate in a wonderful event to honour Matt who has worked for a long time over a wide-range of community activities. 

3 August the public consultation on the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan, and inspected the alterations at the Mens Shed.

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board Feedback - Tūpuna Maunga Authority Integrated Management Plan Strategies

171

b

Board Report Photo Attachment - August 2019

173

 

 

Signatory

Author

Colin Davis – Member, Ōrākei Local Board of the Auckland Council

Date: 3 August 2019

   


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Board Member Report – Toni Millar

File No.: CP2019/14560

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Recommendation

a)      That the report be received.

 

Portfolio Lead: Environment

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Arts and Libraries; Transport (Joint)

Rats in St Heliers

Great progress has been made, after recent publicity, to finally eradicate the rats from St Heliers foreshore.  The huge holes made by burrowing rats had made the land around the park benches most unsafe.  The health and safety aspects include:

1.     eradicating the vermin and

2.     filling in the holes which anyone could trip up in, and which also were undermining the park benches.

Two most successful Environmental events have occurred in the OLB

1.     St Heliers Market Day – a superb event with great community input – great place for community to learn about pest eradication, environmentally friendly practices and things to create.

2.     The Men’s Shed hosted the Public Consultation of the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan. 

Activities

4 July                          OLB Workshop

11 July                        OLB Workshop

18 July                        OLB meeting with Remuera CAB

OLB Business Meeting – St Chads

19 July                        Fire by the Sea in St Heliers Bay

24 July                        Tāmaki Yacht Club H&S assessment

25 July                        Remuera CAB present to Rotary Club of St Johns Meeting re planned development

OLB Workshop

Meeting Re OBC and the park

1 August                      OLB Workshop

27 June                       OLB Workshop

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Signatory

Author

Toni Millar – Local Board Member

Date: 5 August 2019

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Board Member Report – Ros Rundle

File No.: CP2019/14570

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Recommendations

a)      That the report be received.

b)      That the Ōrākei Local Board support the Remuera Business Association in its ongoing project to beautify the Remuera Town Centre, and in particular, as part of that beautification to brighten the centre, by decoratively wrapping some utility boxes with appropriate designs.

c)      That the Ōrākei Local Board request that some funding be allocated from its Arts budget towards the proposed Remuera Town Centre beautification project subject to an application from the Business Association detailing costs, how much the Association is contributing to the project, the location of the boxes and advice that approvals have been received from the utility companies.

 

Portfolio Lead: Economic Development

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Community; Transport (Joint)

Economic Development

Remuera Business Association

The Business Association are wishing to beautify the town centre. 

Possible ways are to have the gardens improved, wrapping or painting the utility boxes, having some of the bare walls painted with murals.

The Association would like to activate the top level of the Clonbern Carpark for pedestrians. Suggestions – large chess set and snakes and ladders, a marquee for market days and much more.  Panuku have advised that they are responsible for the carpark and have a duty of care to the public to take responsible steps to prevent or minimize known hazards on the site.  Permission cannot be given to activate the top level until Panuku have fully understood the history and extent of the structural defects and other issues on site before determining an appropriate future course of action.

Mission Bay Business Association

Safety planting to infill gaps in the gardens on the streetscape still not done.

Asset upgrades for Mission Bay – changing rooms/toilet and playground will both undergo upgrades in 2019/20.

The Association received funding for lighting the clock tower an also for the on-going safer cities connection and associated costs.

St Heliers Business Association

Discussion regarding the AT working group for the safety improvements in St Heliers.

Plastic free day on 27 July was well attended by different community groups. 

Community

Orākei Community Association 

AGM scheduled for 1 August 2019.

Eastern Bays Network Meeting

Meeting 31 July with several community groups networking.

Activities: As well as answering many queries from our community I attended the following:

1 – 31 July 2019

Date                           Activities

July                            

2                                  Attended Mission Bay Business Association

4                                  Attended Ōrākei Local Board workshop

9                                    Attended a Auckland Transport update with AT Bruce Thomas and Hayley King

11                                  Attended Ōrākei Local Board Workshop

                                      Attended Ōrākei Community Association monthly meeting

16                                  Attended Community Leases meeting

18                                  Attended CAB presentation to the OLB

                                      Attended OLB Business Meeting

22                                  Attended the Hobson Bay Walkway consultation

23                                  Meeting with Manager, Remuera Business Association

                                      Attended Remuera Business Association meeting

                                      Attended a site visit at Whakatakaka Reserve for GI to Tāmaki share path

24                                  Attended an on-site visit to Tāmaki Yacht Club

25                                  Attended a presentation from Ryman Healthcare

                                      Attended the OLB workshop

                                      Attended a presentation regarding the OBC neighbouring land

31                                  Attended the Eastern Network meeting

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Photo Gallery - July 2019

183

     

Signatory

Author

Ros Rundle - Ōrākei Local Board Member

Date:  5 July 2019

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Board Member Report – David Wong

File No.: CP2019/14643

 

  

 

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board Members on projects, activities and issues.

 

Recommendation/s

a)      That the report is received.

b)      That the Ōrākei Local Board note an amendment to Council Planners (Attachment D; per business meeting 18 July 2019) on the Kohimarama Yacht Club – boat storage and ramp whereby the Board are supportive of the initiative and the Board would encourage more expansive design to hold more boat storage.

 

Portfolio Lead: Community

Other (alternate portfolio holder): Economic Development; Events, Landowner Approvals and Leases; Resource Consenting and Regulatory (Joint)

Local Government NZ Annual Conference

2.       On behalf of Ōrākei Local Board – I attended the 2019 LGNZ annual conference held in Wellington from 7-9 July 2019.

3.       The 2019 conference theme was "Riding the localism wave: Putting communities in charge". It was about communities and empowering them to take charge of their social, economic, environmental and culture well-being through localism.  This is a global concept, reshaping governments around the world, recognising that best outcomes are a result of local people making local decisions about the places they live.

4.       In spite of our highly centralised governance political system, examples of localism abound in New Zealand.  The conference focused on these best practice examples, and how we apply the lessons from these examples to how communities, local government and central government engage with each other.

5.       Approximately 600 delegates attended, such as mayors, chairs, chief executives, councillors and senior management from New Zealand's councils, along with key players from the private sector, business, government and non-government agencies.

Community (& Youth)

6.       Barfoot and Thompson Stadium Board meeting – discussion on Selwyn College/Ministry of Education deed of lease to ECCT;

7.       Key impact of the new lease is a clause requiring the lessee to remove the building and any capital works – no later than the expiry date. The Board is seeking legal advice from Kensington Swan to establish a more equitable lease term.

8.       Advice provided on next steps to assess a right of renewal under the Old lease (which had expired in 2016)

9.       Ellerslie Residents Association – 15 July; covered discussion on the Ladies Mile cycle way removal. The ERA refuted the AT response – AT did not support the removal based on lack of crash data for cyclists. ERA welcomed further investigation by AT on the Ballarat Paper Road and access requirements. ERA were planning a candidates and mayoralty public meeting ahead of the October elections.

10.     Highlighted safety concerns of the Ellerslie Village pedestrian crossing and the need for similar features as a recent designed crossing outside St Mary’s primary school. This has been communicated to AT.

11.     Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association – requested a visitation to the Mission Bay Bowling club facility to evaluate future options. The response from Panuku is outlined in Attachment A. MBKRA considered the response ineffective and not considerate to their request.

Events

12.     Have your Say consultation on the Hobson Bay walkway took place on 22 July to seek neighbouring constituents and the wider public’s views and feedback.

13.     Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan public consultation took place on 3 August 2019- seeking feedback on key initiatives around the reserve including an environment centre and other ecological initiatives.

Resource Consenting and Regulatory

14.     The Waimarie Street- Oceania Retirement village development went to the Hearing Panel on 22 July 2019. In attendance with Member Davis – we reiterated OLB’s key feedback and constituent view on the development. Refer Attachment B

15.     The Mission Bay shopping development as proposed by Drive Holdings was taken to the Hearings Panel on 30 July to 6 August. With Members Churton and Davis – OLB’s feedback and constituent views were presented.

Key summary points:-

·   Overall, the Ōrākei Local Board believes this proposal as it stands affects the well-being of communities within its Board area positively; however, the adverse effects from several infringements as stated are significant and so negative as to warrant not granting the proposal.

·   The Board view is that development on this site and in this zone needs to comply with the Unitary Plan to create a cohesive built local environment over time.

·   Granting development with significant infringement creates risk of a dangerous permitted baseline that has potential to influence subsequent development and distort the policies and objectives of the zone in this highly visited, landmark location.

·   The Board’s planning portfolio holder also sought feedback about the well-being of communities from local resident associations before collating this Board statement with the local board portfolio team.

Activities: 6 July 2019 – 3 August 2019

Date

Activities

7-9 July 2019

·    Attendance Local Government NZ Conference -Wellington

11 July 2019

·    OLB workshop

15 July 2019

·    Ellerslie Residents Association

18 July 2019

·    Remuera Citizens Advice Bureau debrief on relocation to Ōrākei Community Centre

·    OLB Business meeting

19 July 2019

·    Waimarie Street –Oceania retirement village panel hearing preparation with Member Davis

22 July 2019

 

·    Hearing Panel presentation on behalf of OLB on the proposed Waimarie St/Oceania retirement village – with Member Davis

·    Have your Say – consultation on Hobson Walkway - Wilsons to Shore Road - Drop in session

25 July 2019

·    OLB workshop

30 July 2019

·    Barfoot and Thompson Stadium meeting

·    Mission Bay – Drive Holdings shopping development – planning session with Members Churton and Davis

1 August 2019

·    Hearing Panel - Mission Bay – Drive Holdings shopping development – Commissioners session with Members Churton and Davis

·    OLB workshop

3 August 2019

·    Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan –Consultation; Men’s Shed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Panuku response to request from Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association for visitation to the Mission Bay Bowling Club

189

b

Summary recommendations to the Hearing Panel – for the Waimarie St/Oceania Retirement Village development

191

c

Photos - August 2019

193

     

Signatory

Author

David Wong - Ōrākei Local Board Member

Date: 3 August 2019

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2019/14641

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Ōrākei Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Ōrākei Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the draft governance forward work calendar as at August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar - August 2019

199

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Proceedings

File No.: CP2019/14299

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the records for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held following the previous business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local Board workshops are an informal forum held primarily for information or discussion purposes, as the case may be, and at which no resolutions or decisions are made.

3.       Attached are copies of the Ōrākei Local Board workshop records taken during workshops held on 4, 11 and 25 July 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board records for the workshops held on 4, 11 and 25 July 2019 be noted.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop proceedings - 4 July 2019

203

b

Workshop proceedings - 11 July 2019

205

c

Workshop proceedings - 25 July 2019

209

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Resolutions Pending Action

File No.: CP2019/14639

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an opportunity to track reports that have been requested from staff.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board resolutions pending action report be noted.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resolution pending action register - August 2019

215

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Ōrākei Local Boards

 



Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the confidential status of Attachment A - Draft 2018/2019 Ōrākei Local Board Annual

Report to item 13: Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019 and Attachment B - Ōrākei

Quarterly Performance Report June 2019 - Financial Appendix to item 14: Auckland

Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter four

2018/2019.

 

13        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019 - Attachment a - Draft 2018/2019 Ōrākei Local Board Annual Report

 

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2019 that require final Audit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

14        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019 - Attachment b - Ōrākei Quarterly Performance Report June 2019 - Financial Appendix

 

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2019 that require final Audit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.