I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Puketāpapa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 15 August 2019

4.00pm

Local Board Office
560 Mt Albert Road
Three Kings

 

Puketāpapa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Harry Doig

 

Deputy Chairperson

Julie Fairey

 

Members

Anne-Marie Coury

 

 

David Holm

 

 

Shail Kaushal

 

 

Ella Kumar, JP

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Selina Powell

Democracy Advisor - Puketapapa

 

6 August 2019

 

Contact Telephone: 021 531 686

Email: selina.powell@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                           6

12        Notice of Motion - Chair Harry Doig - Future site of the Cross/Star previously on the tihi of Puketāpapa/Pukewīwī/Mt Roskill                                                                      7

13        Healthy Puketāpapa Health and Wellbeing Strategic Framework and Action Plan 13

14        Puketāpapa Local Grants Round One 2019/2020 and Puketāpapa Quick Response Round One 2019/2020 grant allocations                                                                   73

15        Auckland Transport August 2019                                                                              87

16        Future development of Liston Village, Hillsborough                                               97

17        Local Board feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing                                                                         113

18        Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes   153

19        Auckland Council submission on Governments Clean Car Standard and Clean Car Discount proposals                                                                                                   177

20        Feedback on Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw                                                           191

21        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Puketāpapa Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019                                                                                              197

22        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019                                                                    227

23        Albert-Eden-Roskill Ward Councillor Update                                                         231

24        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                233

25        Board Member Reports                                                                                             239

26        Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar                                                251

27        Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes                                          255  

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

29        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               269

21        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Puketāpapa Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

b.      Attachment B Operating Performance Summary Puketāpapa                   269  

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 18 July 2019, as a true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Puketāpapa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

Under Standing Order 2.5.1 (LBS 3.11.1) or Standing Order 1.9.1 (LBS 3.10.17) (revoke or alter a previous resolution) a Notice of Motion has been received from Chair Doig for consideration under item 12.

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Notice of Motion - Chair Harry Doig - Future site of the Cross/Star previously on the tihi of Puketāpapa/Pukewīwī/Mt Roskill

File No.: CP2019/14538

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary https://acintranet.aklc.govt.nz/EN/workingatcouncil/techandtools/infocouncil/Pages/ExecutiveSummary.aspx

1.       In accordance with Standing Order 3.11.1, Chair Harry Doig has given notice of a motion that he wishes to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Deputy Chair Harry Doig and Deputy Chair Julie Fairey as seconder, is appended as Attachment A of the agenda report.

3.       Supporting information is appended as Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

Motion

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      acknowledge the mana and decision-making role of Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (TMA) in relation to maunga, and in particular their policy to remove all but strictly necessary infrastructure from the tihi (summit) of maunga across the region, including Puketāpapa / Pukewīwī / Mt Roskill.

b)      note the long history of the presence of the cross/star structure on the tihi of Puketāpapa / Pukewīwī / Mt Roskill, and the wish of many community members for this heritage to be acknowledged

c)      confirm that it will undertake a public consultation process, in the 2019 electoral term, to gather community views around:

i)        opportunities for new locations for the cross/star structure

ii)       preferred options for location, alongside details about cost, ownership, and tenure (eg temporary or permanent, for a set number of years or not)

d)      recommend to the incoming Local Board, after the 2019 election, that they consider how best to undertake this process in a respectful and inclusive manner, with an intention to ultimately re-locate the cross/star appropriately

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of Motion Harry Doig - Future site of the Cross/Star previously on the tihi of Puketāpapa / Pukewīwī / Mt Roskill

9

      Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketapapa

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Healthy Puketāpapa Health and Wellbeing Strategic Framework and Action Plan

File No.: CP2019/14211

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse Healthy Puketāpapa: A Health and Wellbeing Strategic Framework (the framework) (Attachment A).

2.       To receive the Healthy Puketāpapa: A Health and Wellbeing Action Plan (the action plan) (Attachment B).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2017 identified the development of a Healthy Puketāpapa Action Plan, including strategies to promote wellbeing through access to drinking water, healthy food, physical activity, healthy housing and less use of harmful substances.

4.       A Project Manager was recruited in March 2019 to develop the Healthy Puketāpapa framework and action plan, in collaboration with a co-creation group comprising of community and topic experts.

5.       The framework outlines a vision for Puketāpapa communities to have a sense of wellbeing and feel happy, healthy, connected and safe, with focus on the social determinants of health that shape our sense of belonging, participation, cultural identity and the environment where we live, learn, work, travel and play.

6.       The action plan focuses on environmental and system changes to support an improvement in the health and wellbeing of local residents and delivers a range of cross sector and other focussed initiatives that target those most impacted by harm or poor health outcomes.

7.       Implementation of the action plan will be overseen by a coalition of community, providers, agencies and topic experts, who will finalise the actions and determine the priorities for 2019/2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      endorse the Healthy Puketāpapa: A Health and Wellbeing Strategic Framework (Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      receive the Healthy Puketāpapa: A Health and Wellbeing Action Plan (Attachment B to the agenda report).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2017 identified the development of a Healthy Puketāpapa Action Plan, including strategies to promote wellbeing through access to water, healthy food, physical activity, healthy housing and less use of harmful substances.

9.       The 2018/2019 work programme included $35,000 for the development of a Healthy Puketāpapa Action Plan.

10.     A Project Manager was recruited in March 2019 to develop the framework and action plan.

11.     A consultation process was run in April and May 2019, which included two community hui, a local board workshop, online surveys with the local board and peoples panel, one-to-one interviews with Puketāpapa community organisations, service providers, topic experts and academia, a review of the Puketāpapa Children’s Panel findings on health and incorporation of results from an Age Friendly City hui.

12.     The results from the consultation were presented to a co-creation group comprising of community and topic experts. The group participated in three workshops in May and June 2019 and used the findings of the consultation and consideration of existing regional, national and global strategies, to theme and create the framework and associated action plan.

13.     The action plan, which supports the strategic objectives in the framework was put through an equity review to identify and address the needs of those most impacted by poor health and wellbeing outcomes. The action plan was then amended to address the findings of the equity review.

14.     The co-creation group and one-to-one interviewees from the consultation phase provided feedback on the framework and action plan. A final draft was circulated to specialist advisors in council’s Te Waka Anga Mua and was displayed for residents at the Roskill South Housing NZ subsidiary, Homes, Land, Community open day on 22 June 2019 for comment.

15.     The local board were updated on the progress of the framework and action plan development at workshops on 7 March, 4 April, 23 May and 11 July 2019. The local board provided feedback on the framework at a workshop on 25 July 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The framework outlines a vision for Puketāpapa communities to have a sense of wellbeing and feel happy, healthy, connected and safe, with focus on the social determinants of health that shape our sense of belonging, participation, cultural identity and the environment where we live, learn, work, travel and play.

17.     The framework provides an opportunity to influence these determinants through collaborative working, to positively impact the health and wellbeing of all Puketāpapa residents and address the issues and challenges faced by those most impacted by differing health outcomes.

18.     The framework and associated action plan aim to increase: 

·    understanding of 'gaps' in health responses within Puketāpapa and the communities’ ability to respond to these

·    targeted delivery on health and wellbeing initiatives                                                                                                                                                

·    community involvement in the design, development and delivery of local initiatives and activities

·    council, agency and community collaboration

·    community partnerships

·    social connectedness and sense of belonging.

19.     To provide direction and help make decisions during planning and review cycles, three signposts have been developed as part of the framework.  These will also help guide and prioritise how and where to put effort during implementation.  These signposts have been developed based on themes from the consultation process, and build on community strengths and priorities. The signposts are;

·    Mana Rangatiratanga / Our Community, Our Responsibility

·    Business and Community Protecting Mauri Ora (Wellbeing)

·    Wāhi Tākaro, Wāhi Ora / Connecting People through welcoming spaces.

20.     The framework includes the following five priorities: 

·    Wai (water) is the first and easiest choice of drink

·    Access to healthy kai (food) for all

·    Encourage movement

·    Access to healthy housing

·    Less use of harmful substances. 

21.     Each priority area has two or three objectives to drive action at the neighbourhood, environment and system level, and create links across other programmes currently being delivered in Puketāpapa.

22.     The framework includes a summary of contextual findings and data for the local board area for each priority area. The findings indicate that Puketāpapa residents from Māori, Pacific and South Asian communities have a greater burden of ill-health than residents from other ethnicities. These outcomes are also unequally impacted by socio-economic circumstances.

23.     The framework also has an enabler objective, which reflects the work that needs to be done across the five priorities including processes for review, evaluation and sharing successes and lessons learnt.

24.     The framework provides a strategy that can be used for the next five to ten years to:

·    direct how the action plan will be delivered

·    influence the decision making and plans of community organisations

·    shape projects that reflect community needs, align with ongoing work and respond to the changing demographics of this diverse community

·    guide future action plan iterations.

25.     The action plan focuses on environmental and system changes to support an improvement in the health and wellbeing of local residents and delivers a range of cross sector and focussed initiatives  that target those most impacted by harm or poor health outcomes.

26.     The action plan will be delivered through a coalition of community, provider, agencies and topic expertise and in alignment of other council, community and agency programmes.

27.     The framework gives emphasis to a commitment of building processes, structures and relationships with the Puketāpapa community to ensure Ngā Manukura (community leadership) and Te Mana Whakahaere (autonomy) are at the heart of the action plan delivery and to ensure it is responsive to local needs and priorities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The framework aligns with Outcome 1 of the Auckland Plan 2050, Belonging and Participation and related directions, and the outcomes key objectives to:

·    foster an inclusive Auckland where everyone belongs

·    improve health and wellbeing for all Aucklanders by reducing harm and disparities in opportunities.

29.     Healthy Puketāpapa has been designed as an integrated project that deliberately seeks cross council cooperation. The framework and action plan can be used by departments across council to inform their work in Puketāpapa.

30.     Council departments involved in the consultation and feedback processes include: Chief Sustainability Office, Environmental Services – Infrastructure and Environment, Parks, Sport and Recreation, Community Empowerment Unit, Auckland Transport, Community Facilities, Libraries and Information and Te Waka Anga Mua ki Uta.

31.     Council teams involved in the co-creation group include: Environmental Services – Infrastructure and Environment and Community Empowerment Unit.

32.     The cross-council relationships that were established during the development process will continue through implementation. Staff from across the organisation will be part of the ongoing implementation focussed Healthy Puketāpapa coalition.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     The framework delivers on the following Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2017 outcome:

·    Outcome: Improved wellbeing and safety

·    Objective: Provision and promotion of opportunities and services supporting healthy and active lifestyles.

34.     The framework supports the local board to achieve the following outcomes from the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2017:

·    Transport choices meet our varied travel needs

·    Urban development meets community needs

·    Vibrant and popular parks and facilities.

35.     The framework aligns with the following Puketāpapa Local board plans and strategies:

·    Puketāpapa Open Space Network Plan/Out and About Programme

·    Puketāpapa Greenways Plan

·    Puketāpapa Low Carbon Action plan.

36.     The local board were updated on the progress of the framework and action plan development at workshops on 7 March, 4 April, 23 May and 11 July 2019.

37.     The local board participated in a consultation exercise in May 2019 and their input was incorporated into the findings provided to the co-creation group.

38.     The framework and associated action plan were presented to the local board at a workshop on 11 July and 25 July 2019. Feedback received from the local board was incorporated into the framework and action plan.

39.     The local board is not responsible for the implementation of Healthy Puketāpapa. This role will be held by a coalition of community, providers, agencies and topic experts.

40.     The local board can use the framework and action plan to inform decisions that impact on the health and wellbeing of Puketāpapa residents.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     Te Pae Mahutonga, a Māori holistic model of health and wellbeing, has informed Healthy Puketāpapa development, consultations and equity analysis and will continue to be the health and wellbeing model that informs delivery and review of the framework and associated action plan.

42.     The Specialist Advisor Māori Responsiveness – Community Empowerment Unit (CEU) and Te Waka Anga Mua team within council have provided support and feedback into the process and outcomes of the framework’s development.

43.     Te Ha Oranga (Ngāti Whatua) reviewed and provided feedback on the development process, direction of the action plan and the finalised framework and action plan

44.     Hapai Te Hauora contributed to the consultation process.

45.     The coalition approach to implementation and the continued use of te Pae Mahutonga which includes Ngā Manukura (community leadership) and Te Mana Whakahaere (autonomy) are at the heart of the plan.

46.     Māori are over-represented and impacted by poor health outcomes. The framework and action plan’s focus on addressing equity is intended to create opportunities for Māori to engage and support cross cultural experiences that build community capacity and leadership across Puketāpapa.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

47.     The 2018/2019 work programme included $35,000 for the development of a Healthy Puketāpapa Action Plan.

48.     The 2019/2020 work programme includes $42,000 for the ongoing project management of Healthy Puketāpapa. 

49.     The coalition that is forming to implement the action plan are considering cost effective and/or cost neutral options for the implementation of actions relating to the 2019/2020 Healthy Puketāpapa workplans. Funding from alternative sources is likely, given the innovative and impactful nature of this work. 

50.     Staff recommend integrating the objectives and outcomes of the framework and action plan into existing work programmes to maximise opportunities for impact, without requiring additional investment from the local board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

51.     Table 1 details the risks and mitigations associated with the framework and action plan

Table 1: Risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Lack of funding to implement actions.

Prioritise actions for implementation based on community voice.  Coalition builds capabilities in funding applications.  Seek funding from academic, philanthropic and innovation sources.

Coalition partners contribute FTE to progress actions.

Stakeholders involved in subject areas continue to work in isolation.

Create structured opportunities for networking and co-operative working while relationships develop.

Maintain and develop both individual and organisational relationships.

Community ownership is not enabled due to not having capacity or capability.

Work with community on what is practical to achieve while building community capacity and capability as part of the Empowered Communities Approach outcomes and the Community Empowerment Unit’s role.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

52.     The framework and associated action plan will be distributed to coalition members to begin the process of implementation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Healthy Puketāpapa Strategic Framework

19

b

Healthy Puketāpapa Action Plan

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ailsa Wilson – Project Manager Community Empowerment Unit

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Puketāpapa Local Grants Round One 2019/2020 and Puketāpapa Quick Response Round One 2019/2020 grant allocations

File No.: CP2019/13194

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Puketāpapa Local Grants Round One 2019/2020 including multiboard applications and Puketāpapa Quick Response Round One 2019/2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received for Puketāpapa Local Grants Round One 2019/2020 (refer Attachment B) including multiboard applications (refer Attachment C) and Puketāpapa Quick Response Round One 2019/2020 (refer Attachment C).

3.       The Puketāpapa Local Board adopted the Puketāpapa Local Board Community Grants Programme 2019/2020 on 18 April 2019. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $72,000 for the 2019/2020 financial year. The local board has an unallocated budget of $2,500 from a grant that was not uplifted. This grant was allocated to the 5Tunz Communications Limited trading as Humm FM for the ‘Colors in the Park - Holi 2019’ event (LG1915-122), which will no longer proceed. A total of $12,000.00, from this budget, was allocated for the two quick response grant rounds. The remaining $62,500.00, from this budget, was allocated for the two local grant rounds.

5.       Twenty applications were received for Puketāpapa Local Grants, Round One 2019/2020, requesting a total of $76,558.22 and thirteen multiboard applications were also received requesting a total of $36,611.71.

6.       Two applications were received for Puketāpapa Quick Response, Round One 2019/2020, requesting a total of $2,000.00.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Puketāpapa Local Grants Round One 2019/2020 listed in the following table:   

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2015-103

Somali Education and Development Trust

Community

Towards the cost of delivering the 'Ethnic Youth Wellbeing project" in the local board area, specifically the meeting and workshop costs including venue hire, food, and beverages, sound system hire, petrol, stationery, promotion, and security parking.

$4,316.80

Eligible

LG2015-107

Communicare-Civilian Maimed Association (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Towards the weekly venue hire cost for the Hillsborough Friendship Centre for the period of 1 October 2019 to 30 September 2020.

$2,100.00

Eligible

LG2015-112

YMCA North Incorporated

Community

Towards “Raise Up” Puketāpapa crew, volunteer programme and event costs between 2 September 2019 to 31 May 2020.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2015-114

Bhartiya Samaj Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of running Te Reo classes for senior citizens from 2 September 2019 to 31 July 2020, specifically the cost of promotion and Maori language instructor fees.

$4,200.00

Eligible

LG2015-115

Community Approach Trust

Community

Towards the cost of pool entry tickets, barbecue hire, prizes for games and food and drinks for the "Family Fun Day" at Point Erin Pools on 6 December 2019.

$1,071.00

Eligible

LG2015-116

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of rent, English language tutors’ fees, volunteer travel reimbursement and transport for participants to attend the Safari Playgroup for the period of 2 September 2019 to 30 June 2020.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2015-120

New Zealand Centre for Gifted Education Limited

Community

Towards the specialist educators' salary to allow subsidies for the MindPlus programme for the period of 2 September 2019 to 20 December 2019.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2015-121

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of two laptop computers for youth workers.

$2,485.00

Eligible

LG2015-122

Refugees As Survivors New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards the stakeholder engagement coordinator's salary for the period of 1 September 2019 to 1 September 2020.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2015-123

Migrant Action Trust

Community

Towards the cost of event banners, posters, flyers, stationery, marketing and communication, coordinator's salary, donaitons for the volunteers and catering for the three community hui in 2020.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2015-124

Mountains To Sea Conservation Trust

Community

Towards the cost of the "Wesley Kaitiaki Programme" for seven and eight year students from Wesley Intermediate School.

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2015-129

Almanar Trust

Community

Towards the accommodation, instructor fees, gifts and prizes, tee-shirts, transportation, games and miscellaneous costs for the Youth Camp in Waihi from 27 September 2019 to 29 September 2019.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2015-131

Kids Safe with Dogs Charitable Trust

Community

Towards instructor wages, administration, and printing of activity booklets to deliver the "Kids Safe with Dogs" program to local schools.

$4,887.00

Eligible

LG2015-133

Te Karanga Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the mentor wages to facilitate the "Mentoring and Counselling Programme" for Puketapapa youth from 2 September 2019 to 16 December 2019.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2015-113

Friends of Wairaki Stream

Environment

Towards equipment and community engagement costs.

$1,800.00

Eligible

LG2015-117

Waikowhai Community Trust

Events

Towards the Molley Green Community Day on 28 March 2019 including the cost of sound equipment hire, generators, port-a-loos, fun activities, waste management and prizes.

$4,985.00

Eligible

LG2015-128

New Zealand Nepal Society Incorporated

Events

Towards 2020 Nepali Festival specifically the cost of audiovisual hire and lighting.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2015-104

Chinese Senior Citizens Health Exercise Group Incorporated.

Sport and recreation

Towards the venue hire cost to run Tai Chi, Qi Gong and other exercise classes for Chinese seniors at Fickling Convention Centre.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2015-110

Winstone Park Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of tennis balls to be used for from 1 September 2019 to 1 December 2019.

$1,485.22

Eligible

LG2015-111

Aisea Hau Ma

Over the Fence (umbrella organisation)

Sport and recreation

Towards the costs of Puketāpapa Youth Basketball League, specifically, the costs of venue hire and volunteer donations from 19 October 2019 to 14 December 2019.

$4,228.20

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$76,558.22

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Puketāpapa Multiboard Round One 2019/2020, listed in Table Two below:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB1920-123

Connect the Dots

Arts and culture

Towards the assistant tutor fee, printing of the postcards and art materials for workshops delivered in the local board area.

$2,887.58

Eligible

MB1920-152

Mika Haka Foundation Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of running the "YES Creative Hub" from 10 October 2019 to 10 October 2020, specifically the costs of rent, public liability insurance, utilities, safety officer's salary and administration cost.

$4,897.00

Eligible

MB1920-153

The Operating Theatre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards 2,000 free tickets and free transport for children from low decile schools to attend the theatre production "Greedy Cat" by Joy Cowley.

$3,103.55

Eligible

MB1920-146

Roopa Aur Aap Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of providing counselling services, victim support services, office rent and volunteer reimbursements from 2 September 2019 to 28 August 2020.

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB1920-157

PHAB Association (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of running "Youth With Disabilities Disco" event on 28 September 2019 at the Mt Albert War Memorial Hall, specifically, the cost of venue hire, dance floor hire, a photobooth, decorations, activities, prizes, catering, staffing costs, event coordination, and management.

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB1920-161

The Parkinson's New Zealand Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the salary of six Auckland Parkinson's community educators from 1 October 2019 to 1 October 2020.

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB1920-171

Basava Samithi of Australasia (New Zealand Chapter) Inc.

Community

Towards the costs of delivering the "Ageing Gracefully" workshop and seminars.

$2,526.13

Eligible

MB1920-103

The ReCreators Limited

Environment

Towards the costs for the upcycling workshops and to provide educational services..

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB1920-170

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards the purchase of native plants from Te Whangai Trust and Gulf Trees including courier costs for classroom bins, administration and office expenses for schools and preschools

$2,547.45

Eligible

MB1920-145

5Tunz Communications Ltd

Events

Towards the delivery of “Holi - Festival of Colours 2020” on 14 March 2020, including the cost of the generator, stage lighting and decor, sound, port-a-loos, waste management, security, advertising, and marquees.

$2,500.00

Eligible

MB1920-159

United North Piha Lifeguard Service Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the costs of structural engineering, detailed design and project management, consent fees for Lifeguard Facility Replacement Project.

$1,750.00

Eligible

MB1920-167

Auckland Indian Sports Club Incorporated.

Sport and recreation

Towards annual hockey turf hire fees from 1 September 2019 to 31 August 2020.

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB1920-110

The Korean Society of Auckland Incorporated

Events

Towards the annual event costs for the Korean Day event

$400.00

Ineligible

Total

 

 

 

$36,611.71

 

 

c)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Puketāpapa Quick Response Round One 2019/2020, listed in Table Two below:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2015-101

Urdu Hindi Cultural Association of New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire (Fickling Convention Centre), sound system and musician fees for the Ghazal Night.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2015-105

Roskill Chinese Group

Community

Towards the monthly meeting costs of the Roskill Chinese Group specifically venue hire, printing, and marketing costs.

$1,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$2,000.00

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Puketāpapa Local Board adopted the Puketāpapa Local Board Community Grants Programme 2019/2020 on 18 April 2019. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants. 

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

11.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $72,000 for the 2019/2020 financial year. The local board has an unallocated budget of $2,500 from a grant that was not uplifted. This grant was allocated to the 5Tunz Communications Limited trading as Humm FM for the ‘Colors in the Park - Holi 2019’ event (LG1915-122), which will no longer proceed. A total of $12,000.00, from this budget, was allocated for the two quick response grant rounds. The remaining $62,500.00, from this budget, was allocated for the two local grant rounds.

12. Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage. Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department, will provide input and advice.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Puketāpapa Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     The board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

18.     A summary of each application received through Puketāpapa Local Grants, Round One 2019/2020, multi-board and Puketāpapa Quick Response, Round One 2019/2020 is provided in Attachment B, Attachment C and Attachment D.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

20.     Seven applicants applying to local grant round one, has indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

22.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $72,000 for the 2019/2020 financial year. The local board has an unallocated budget of $2,500 from a grant that was not uplifted. This grant was allocated to the 5Tunz Communications Limited T/A Humm FM for the ‘Colors in the Park - Holi 2019’ event (LG1915-122), which will no longer proceed. A total of $12,000.00, from this budget, was tagged for the two quick response grant rounds. The remaining $62,500.00, from this budget, was tagged for the two local grant rounds.

23.     Twenty applications were received for Puketāpapa Local Grants, Round One 2019/2020, requesting a total of $76,558.22 and thirteen multiboard applications were also received requesting a total of $36,611.71.

24.     Two applications were received for Puketāpapa Quick Response, Round One 2019/2020, requesting a total of $2,000.00.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following the Puketāpapa Local Board allocating funding for the local grants , quick response and multiboard round one, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Puketāpapa Local Board Grants Programme 2019/2020

83

b

Puketāpapa Local Grants Round One 2019/2020 grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Puketāpapa Multiboard Grants Round One 2019/2020 grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Puketāpapa Quick Response Round One 2019/2020 grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Community Grants Coordinator

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Shane King - Head of Service Support

Victoira Villaraza – Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport August 2019

File No.: CP2019/13638

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Puketāpapa Local Board (the Board) on transport-related matters in its area and an update on its local board transport capital fund (LBTCF).  Also included is a progress report on the Connected Communities project and brief updates on other significant projects in the Board’s area. Relevant public consultations and decisions of Auckland Transport’s (AT’s) Traffic Control Committee as relevant to the Board area are also included.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Progress on the Board’s Mt Roskill Streetscape upgrade is briefly discussed in the report. The project is due to begin in September 2019 and be completed by December 2019.

3.       Information is given on the progress on the Board’s funded local board capital fund projects (LBTCF).  The current balance is zero, as the Board has allocated all of its LBTCF for this electoral term. If any savings are made on projects, it will be credited back to the fund. The Board will receive another allocation on 1 July 2019.

4.       The report provides a brief update to the Board on significant Auckland Transport (AT) projects in the Board area.

5.       Details of progress on AT’s Connected Communities project is included as well as information on the routes in the Board area that will be affected by this project.

6.       Relevant consultations and decisions of AT’s transport control committee are noted, as they affect the Puketāpapa Local Board area.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport August 2019 report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       This report addresses transport related matters in the local board area.

8.       AT is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. It reports on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in its Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

9.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport (AT). Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also

·    be safe

·    not impede network efficiency

·    be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Mt Roskill Streetscape Upgrade

10.     The Board has been assisted by Auckland Council to design a streetscape upgrade project in the Mt Roskill Village area. (refer Attachment A).  The project will provide a discrete enhancement to the village and it will be delivered by Auckland Transport.  Based on the successful tenderer’s programme, the works are expected to be completed by the end of November 2019.

11.     AT will engage with the local business owners to ensure that they are fully aware of the work when it takes place and that any disruption is kept to a minimum.

Update on Puketāpapa Local Board Transport Capital Funded Projects

12.     The table below reflects the status of projects which have been supported by resolution and are progressing using the LBTCF.

Project

Description

Status

Projected Cost

Keith Hay Park Lighting – Southern Section

Continuing the lighting project from the northern section to the southern end of the park past Noton Road carpark to Richardson Road.

This project is now completed.

 

$350,000

Greenway Cycling Project – Route D (modified)

This route includes shared paths on Frost Road and then a combination of traffic calming measures, signs, markings along Britton and Dornwell Roads, shared paths through the laneways and then traffic calming on Hayr Road and Haughey Avenue through to, but not across Hillsborough Rd.

Public consultation closes on the 26 July 2019.  AT has already responded to queries from our major stakeholders.  The next step is to respond to queries from the public followed by the approval of the consultation closeout report.

$600,000 (allocated)

Hillsborough Road Crossing (1)

The installation of a pedestrian refuge on Hillsborough Road, vicinity of Haughey Street/Delargey Avenue. This will support the greenway cycle route by aiding access to Monte Cecilia Park.

 

Resolved March 2019, project being set up.

 

Funding stream now confirmed.

$90,000

 

Hillsborough Road (2) Signalised Pedestrian Crossing

The installation of a signalised crossing of Hillsborough Road in the vicinity of Goodall Street.  Residents have reported that Hillsborough Road can be very difficult to cross as there is a considerable distance between pedestrian faciltiies.

 

Resolved March 2019, project being set up.

 

Funding stream now confirmed.

$338,000

Dominion Road Bus stop 8345

Improvements at bus stop 8345 on Dominion Road, including extending the hard surface and area and the provision of a new seat.

 

This is now completed.

$14,400

Mt Roskill Village Upgrade

The Board approved  a small allocation from its local board transport capital fund to move this project forward.  

The aim is to create an improved environment for pedestrians, bus passengers, shoppers and the business community at Mt Roskill village. Improved footpaths, seating and landscaping are proposed within the road corridor.

A start date for the project has not yet been confirmed but the project is expected to start in September and be completed by December 2019.

$244,787

 

Progress being made on significant investigations and projects in the Board area

Project

Details

Status

Safer Communities 2018-21

This programme focuses on walking improvements in the Mount Roskill community. It aims to create safer walking environments for local people to get to and from key destinations such as schools, public transport hubs, shops, community centres and more, on foot.



AT is currently finalising the drawings for the Carr Rd and Frost Rd proposals and expect to report back to the public and close out consultation around mid-August 2019.

 

AT will attend the Cluster workshop in September 2019 to report back on the Three Kings Plaza section.

 

Dominion Road Double Decker Route

Changes are being made to the bus stops in the village area to accommodate double decker buses.

 

Line marking and signage is now completed.

The new bus shelter has been completed and the new LED luminaires installed.

 

Carlton Street

AT has reviewed the safety audit completed by consultants and provided responses to the matters raised at the May 2018 public meeting.

AT has designed bus-friendly infrastructure designs that will ensure all vehicles travel slowly on Carlton Street.

 

The consultation results and report has now been sent out to submitters.  Changes to Carlton Street are expected to take place later in 2019 to allow the 68 bus route to use the road.

Mt Eden Road Buslane Upgrade

Tender documents have been finalised and approval from the Traffic Control Committee has been obtained. The work in the Puketapapa Board area between Mt Albert Road and Landscape Road is on hold.  Mt Eden Road reseal in the same area will be confined to the traffic lanes and flush median.

 

The work in the Puketapapa Local Board area is on hold. Reasons for this were discussed with the Board in March 2019.

Duke Street Traffic Calming

Speed calming devices will be constructed on Duke Street similar in design to the existing devices.

The project is complete.

May Road pedestrian crossings

AT is developing a design for two new signalised crossings on May Road, in the vicinity of Glynn Street and Roma Road. A pedestrian refuge is proposed close to Denny Avenue.

Board and public  consultation was completed in May 2019. Some minor changes are being made to the design as a result of the consultation. The final design will be posted on line once the consultation closeout is completed.

Community Transport

Delivered an alcohol CBT in partnership with the NZ Police
Delivered two motorcycle/moped workshops.

 

Completed

Community Transport

Deliver a Motorcycle Awareness Month campaign

 

In progress

 

Introducing ‘Connected Communities’

13.     You may remember AT introduced the Integrated Corridor Delivery Programme in a workshop in late 2018/early 2019. We have now renamed this programme ‘Connected Communities’ to better reflect the outcomes we are aiming to achieve.

14.     Connected Communities aims to make public transport, walking and cycling more attractive to Aucklanders, and provide safer, healthier streets. It brings together a range of bus, cycling, walking and road safety projects across 12 major routes and the CBD, to address traffic congestion in key parts of our growing city. AT will roll out the programme over 10-years, partially funded by the RFT and NZTA. The roads/streets included in the programme have been named by their primary road name.

·    Ponsonby Road

·    Great North Road

·    New North Road

·    Sandringham Road

·    Mt Eden Road

·    Manukau and Pah Roads

·    Remuera Road

·    Parnell Road

·    Ellerslie Panmure Highway

·    Pakuranga Road

·    Massey Road

·    Great South Road.

 

15.     Given the size, complexity and scope of the programme, we are taking the time to build the right team and to coordinate with other major projects and the wider Auckland Council group to ensure we take a joined-up approach.

16.     Connected Communities brings together a range of bus, cycling, walking and road safety projects across 12 major routes and the CBD, to address traffic congestion as Auckland continues to grow.

17.     AT has now established a highly experienced, multi-disciplinary team to support the Connected Communities programme. This took longer than expected, but expert staff are now working collaboratively as the Connected Communities team.

18.     To ensure we get things right, and given the size, complexity and scope of the programme, this team is taking the next few months to work through the planning process. This includes coordinating with other major projects and the wider Auckland Council group to ensure we take a joined-up approach.

19.     After the local elections, we will initiate what we hope will be an on-going collaboration with impacted Local Boards over the life of this programme. We have already booked two workshops with directly affected Local Boards for early 2020.

20.     The first workshop will be to provide an update on the programme, and capture your feedback on this. At the second workshop, we will seek your insights on local needs/issues, community plans we need to be aware of and how best to effectively engage with our communities. We look forward to working with Local Boards to improve our communities’ transport choices.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The impact of information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group. Any engagement with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Infrastructure and Heritage Meeting – July 2019

22.     A cluster meeting was held with the Board in July 2019.  This provided an opportunity for the board to be briefed on the outcome of the tender process for the Mt Roskill Streetscape project.

Auckland Transport Consultations

23.     AT provides the Puketapapa Local Board with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in their area.   Consultations in this period include the Board’s

Street

Proposal

Board Response

 

 

The Avenue, Lynfield

AT is proposing Broken Yellow Lines (BYLs) parking restrictions on The Avenue in Lynfield.  This proposal responds to a request from the Puketāpapa Local Board to investigate the issue of parked vehicles blocking visibility for drivers entering and exiting the carpark to the shopping complex.  The proposed restrictions are expected to make it easier and safer for those visiting the shops by preventing vehicles from parking near the carpark driveway.

 

 

 

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

24.     There were no Traffic Control Committee decisions that affected the Board area in June 2019.  The report for July 2019 was not ready at the time of the writing of this report, so any relevant decisions will be reported next month.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     There are no financial implications that result from receiving this report.

Local Board Transport Capital Fund Summary

Puketapapa Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$2,702,161

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$2,702,161

Remaining Budget left

$0

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     At will provide a further update report next month.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20190815 Mt Roskill Village Streetscape Attachment A1

93

b

20190815 Mt Roskill Village Streetscape Attachment A2

95

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lorna Stewart – Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Manager Elected Member Relationship Member Unit

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Future development of Liston Village, Hillsborough

File No.: CP2019/14413

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek the local board’s views on the future development of Liston Village at Monte Cecilia Park, Hillsborough.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Retaining housing for older people at Liston Village and expanding the entrance to Monte Cecilia Park was selected by Puketāpapa Local Board as their One Local Initiative. Funding of $17 million to $33 million was earmarked for the project.

3.       To enable decision-making on the future use of the site, staff identified four options:

·    Option one: Develop the whole of the site as open space to enhance Monte Cecilia Park (status quo)

·    Option two: Develop approximately half of the site as open space and half as social housing (up to 49 units) (One Local Initiative)

·    Option three: Develop approximately two-thirds of the site as open space and one third as social housing (up to 45 units) (enhanced One Local Initiative).

·    Option four: Develop the whole site as open space and investigate the development of temporary social housing at the Korma Road entrance to Monte Cecilia Park.

4.       This report seeks the board’s in principle support for one of these options.

5.       The options have been assessed for alignment to council strategy, open space amenity, ability to cater to growth, and value for money. Option one (status quo) scores highest against these assessment criteria. Option three and option four also score favourably.

6.       Of the three top scoring options, option three best reflects the local board’s objectives of achieving a meaningful increase in social housing for older people, low disruption to Liston Village, and improved access to Monte Cecilia Park. However, it would entail some loss of open space amenity, and carries high legal and financial risk.

7.       Option one delivers the best open space outcomes and poses a low reputational risk for council associated with the demolition of social housing stock during a time of perceived rising need. It poses a moderate reputational risk to the local board, which has long advocated for the expansion of social housing.

8.       Option four scores moderately across all criteria. It’s ability to maximise amenity at Monte Cecilia Park main entrance is largely offset by a countervailing loss of amenity at the Korma Road. It’s focus on temporary social housing outside Liston Village helps to mitigate legal and financial risk. However, this also limits its potential scale.

9.       Option two scores lowest, as it offers the least open space amenity, carries high legal risk, is most costly, and would offer only four additional units over the next best option.

10.     The next step is to prepare a report to the Environment and Community Committee (or equivalent) after the 2019 local body elections, taking into account the board’s views. Staff will engage with the incoming board to reconfirm its preferred option prior to reporting to the Committee.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

EITHER

a)      agree in principle its preferred option for the future development of Liston Village, Hillsborough from one of the four options below:

i)        the development of approximately half of Liston Village site as open space and half as social housing (Option two – One Local Initiative)

ii)       the development of approximately two-thirds of Liston Village site as open space and one third as social housing (Option three – Enhanced One Local Initiative)

iii)      the development of the whole of Liston Village site as open space and investigate the development of temporary social housing at the Korma Road entrance to Monte Cecilia Park (Option four)

iv)      the development of the whole of the Liston Village site as open space (Option one – status quo).

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Monte Cecilia Park is centrally located on the isthmus of Tāmaki Makaurau. It is situated on an elevated site with expansive views of the Manukau Harbour and Maungakiekie.

12.     The park features Pah Homestead, a ‘Category A’ heritage building, as its centrepiece. It also contains two large amphitheatre-shaped landforms and an outstanding mature tree collection.

Liston Village is being acquired as part of a major expansion and upgrade of Monte Cecilia Park

13.     Liston Village was established by the Catholic Diocese of Auckland in 1982. It sits on an 18,500m2 site, and comprises of 25 retirement homes targeted at people on lower incomes, aged 60 years of age and over.

14.     On 14 May 1998, the former Auckland City Council endorsed a concept plan for a ‘Proposed Premier Park, Hillsborough’ and resolved to commence negotiations with neighbouring landowners to acquire an additional 20,000m2 of land to expand Monte Cecilia Park.

15.       This resulted in decisions to acquire several parcels of land, including Pah Homestead, Monte Cecilia Primary School, Liston Village and residential properties on Hillsborough and Korma Roads.

16.     In 2010, the legacy council initiated a process under the Public Works Act 1981 to compulsorily acquire Liston Village from the Diocese.

17.     The reason given for the compulsory acquisition was that public ownership of the land was needed to provide for “…the public recreation area and associated facilities of Monte Cecilia Park.”

18.     At the time of acquisition all existing residents of Liston Village were granted licenses-to-occupy. This means that while they do not own the units, they may inhabit them for the rest of their lives or until they choose to vacate.

19.     To date the council has acquired 12 out of the 25 units. Council is also acquiring the underlying land. Full possession of Liston Village is estimated by 2027. The Diocese continues manage Liston Village in the interim.

20.     Liston Village is the last major acquisition anticipated by the legacy council for the expansion of Monte Cecilia Park. No further acquisitions at Monte Cecilia are anticipated.

21.     As it is being acquired for open space purposes, Liston Village is not part of the council’s wider social housing initiatives.

Provision of housing for older people at Liston Village is a priority for the local board

22.     From as early as 2011 Puketāpapa Local Board has advocated for more housing development in Puketāpapa.

23.     The board has an oversight role in respect of Monte Cecilia Park as a local park and has raised its concerns about the merits of removing functional housing for older people to expand an already large park.

24.     In 2014, the Local Board Plan sought to “...investigate options for increasing supply of affordable community and social housing, including advocating to retain existing social housing at Liston Village.”

25.     In 2015, the board commissioned an external report which concluded, amongst other things, that:

­  there should be an assessment of the potential for redevelopment of the Liston Village site to increase the amount of housing on the site

­  the merits of an alternative option of using the site to increase the street frontage and open space footprint of Monte Cecilia Park and enhance its public recreation role.

26.     In 2016, the board endorsed a report, Liston Village: Urban Design Assessment and Concept Plans prepared by consultants Harrison-Grierson. That report proposed that approximately half of the site be used for open space and half for social housing. This is illustrated in figure one below, with the indicative area for social housing shown in red.

Figure 1: Liston Village site showing indicative future land use


 

The board sought funding through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 to develop Liston Village

27.     In 2018, the board selected Liston Village as its One Local Initiative for funding under the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

28.     The board’s objectives for its One Local Initiative are to:

·    address a perceived need for social housing for older people

·    minimise disruption to existing residents at Liston Village

·    improve public access to Monte Cecilia Park.

29.     Following acquisition, development of the site could proceed in two phases:

Phase one: Reconfiguration

Phase two: Intensification

·      Six units at the front of site to be demolished and rebuilt at the rear of site

·      Cleared land to be incorporated into Monte Cecilia Park

·      Pah Stables and surrounds to be incorporated into Monte Cecilia Park

·      Four units at front of site to be retained

·      21 units at the rear of site would be demolished and replaced by 45 units

 

30.     Funding of $17 million to $33 million has been earmarked for the project, subject to the availability of the site and a business case process.

Legacy decisions pose a barrier to the local board’s initiative

31.     All resolutions of legacy councils are treated as if they were council’s own in accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009.

32.     Without a new decision by the governing body, council is required to implement the resolutions of the legacy council.

33.     In its initial consideration of the Puketāpapa One Local Initiative, the governing body directed staff to assess and report back on whether the whole of Liston Village is still required for open space purposes.

34.     A full assessment on the need for social housing, either at a local or regional level is beyond the scope of this advice and has not been undertaken. This will be assessed as part of any future business case.

There is shared decision-making allocation for open space acquisition

35.     The decision-making allocation for council to acquire or dispose of land for parks and open spaces is set out in the allocation of decision-making for non-regulatory activities in Volume Two of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

36.     The governing body is responsible for:

·     the number and general location of all new parks and the prioritisation of major upgrades to existing parks (including sports fields within parks)

·     acquisition and divestment of all park land, including the disposal of surplus parks, excluding any disposal and reinvestment made in accordance with the Service Property Optimisation Approach.

37.     Local boards are responsible for the specific location of new local parks and open spaces (including the prioritisation for acquisition), and for their subsequent design and development within budget parameters agreed with the governing body.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Development of Liston Village is consistent with Auckland Plan 2050

38.     The development of Liston Village as either open space or housing would be consistent with the following outcomes under the Auckland Plan 2050:

Outcome: Belonging and participation

·    Direction One: Foster an inclusive Auckland where everyone belongs

·    Direction Two: Improve health and wellbeing for all Aucklanders by reducing harm and disparities in opportunities.

Outcome: Homes and places

·    Direction Three: Shift to a housing system that ensures secure and affordable homes for all

·    Direction Four: Provide sufficient public places and spaces that are inclusive, accessible and contribute to urban living.

The open space provision policy sets out the requirements for destination parks

39.     The Open Space Provision Policy 2016 informs council decision-making on the type, size and location of parks and open space. Under this policy, Monte Cecilia Park is defined as a destination park.

40.     Destination parks are intended to serve large sub-regional catchments, drawing users from across Tāmaki Makaurau. Successful destination parks often become tourist attractions, bringing economic benefits to their host communities. Destination parks also serve as neighbourhood and suburb parks to nearby residents.

41.     Destination parks are typically large, capable of hosting large numbers of people for extended periods of time. Typical destination parks are more then 300,000m2, and have specialised facilities and significant or unique attributes.

42.     As a destination park, Monte Cecilia Park provides a range of amenities, including:

­  large events space for movies and music in the park

­  networks of walking circuits and trails

­  distinct natural, heritage or cultural features such as the mature tree collection, Pah Homestead and geological features

­  multiple places for gathering and socialising such as barbeque and picnic areas.

The demand for open space in Puketāpapa is increasing

43.     The population of Puketāpapa was 56,300 at the last census in 2013. This represents a 4.5 per cent increase between 2006 and 2013.[1]

44.     Council projects the population will grow by 13,900 people, or 4630 households by 2028.

45.     Puketāpapa has several areas where Housing New Zealand has a large ownership of properties. Significant redevelopment of these areas is now planned with an emphasis on an increase in housing density.

46.     In the neighbourhood of Waikowhai to the south of Richardson Road there are 298 existing Housing New Zealand homes, which are estimated to increase to 769 homes. The area of Mount Roskill South has 278 existing Housing New Zealand homes, which is expected to increase to 888 homes.

47.     The populations of the neighbouring local boards of Whau, Albert-Eden and Maungakiekie-Tāmaki have also increased and will continue to do so. This will place additional pressure on the existing open space network. 

The demand for housing for older people is also increasing

48.     Census data shows the number of older people living within Puketāpapa is small but growing. In 2013 the proportion of usual residents 65 years of age and over was 6147, up 8.3 per cent since 2006. The 2013 census indicated those 65 years of age and over formed 12 per cent of the population of the local board area.

49.     By 2028, the population of people who are expected to be 65 years of age and over in the area will increase to 11,000. This age group is on the increase following national and global trends as people are living longer.

50.     Between 2015 and 2019, the number of building consents issued for retirement village units in the Puketāpapa local board area was 143. This is 14 per cent of the total number of building consents (1041) issued over the same period.

Monte Cecilia Park is not fully functioning as a destination park

51.     In 2015, park-user research was undertaken at Monte Cecilia Park. The objective of the research was to gain an understanding of the awareness, usage and attitudes of park users.

52.     The research found:

·    extremely high satisfaction among existing users

·    17 per cent visited the park every two to three days, 23 per cent visited the park once every two to three months

·    71 per cent of users access the park on foot, 26 per cent drive

·    82 per cent of walkers travel less than 10 minutes to access the park

·    78 per cent of drivers travel under five minutes to access the park

·    20 per cent of users are 65 years of age and over.

53.     While there are limitations with the data, it suggests that the park is mainly used by residents, but not attracting visitors from further afield as would normally be expected of a destination park.

The Liston Village site has high value as open space

54.     Prospective disposals of open space are assessed against the Parks and Open Space Acquisition Policy and the Open Space Provision Policy.

55.     Staff performed two assessments of the site against the policy. The first considered the open space value of Liston Village as a whole. The second considered the potential loss of those parts of the site affected by the One Local Initiative. The key findings are outlined below:

56.     There is a need for additional open space in the surrounding area:

·    there is a gap in provision for a neighbourhood park to the immediate west of Monte Cecilia Park between Hillsborough Road and Dornwell Road.

·    neighbourhood parks are typically 3000m2 to 5000m2 in size.

·    the addition of 18,500 m2 of open space would increase the capacity of the local parks network.

57.     Monte Cecilia Park is small by regional standards:

·    in its current configuration, Monte Cecilia Park is approximately 144,000m2. This is less than half the size of a typical destination park.

·    the addition of Liston Village to Monte Cecilia Park would increase the park’s area to approximately 162,700 m2. This would enhance the recreational amenity of the park and improve its ability to function as a destination park. 

58.     Monte Cecilia Park has a low street presence:

·    The park’s eight entry points all have narrow road frontages. The main entrance off Hillsborough Road has a current street frontage of only 33 metres. This limits visual connection between the park and the street.

·    the addition of the front portion of the Liston Village site (Figure two, green area) would:

­  increase street frontage to approximately 83 metres[2]

­  improve visual connection from Hillsborough Road to Pah Homestead

­  create an entrance that is easily located by tourists and more suited to a regionally significant open space

­  enhance public safety by allowing the widening of the main access way from Hillsborough Road, via Delargey Avenue, including separation of pedestrians and cyclists from vehicles

­  support the creation of a greenway link through the park.

59.     Liston Village is a site of cultural and heritage significance:

·    both Liston Village and Monte Cecilia Park were once part of a larger fortified Maori Pa (Whataroa), which gives this space significant meaning to mana whenua.

·    the Liston Village site includes a protected heritage building, the Pah Stables (Figure two, yellow dotted area). This forms part of the original Pah Homestead. Incorporating Liston Village into Monte Cecilia Park would reconnect the Stables with the Homestead.

60.     A partial disposal would limit, but not prevent, some positive open space outcomes:

·    the proposed retention of up to four units along Delargey Avenue is problematic, as it would materially limit council’s ability to extend Monte Cecilia Park’s street frontage and improve accessibility and visibility into the park.

·    other aspects of the board’s proposal support open space outcomes

­  the rear of the site off Steins Avenue (Figure two, red area) is less integral to the physical or visual connectivity of the park. This comprises the majority of land proposed for social housing

­  a partial disposal would limit but not prevent the potential greenway link

­  no specific ecological, heritage or cultural places of significance have been identified in the parts of the site proposed for disposal

­  the proposed area of land to be retained is large enough to support informal recreational activity, while also enabling some widening of the main entrance and street frontage.


 

Figure 2: Sub-areas within the Liston Village site

There are a range of other factors to consider

Regional policy on social housing is unclear

61.     The council does not have a policy or objectives for acquiring land to expand social housing provision.

62.     The council is currently reviewing its role in the provision of social housing. A decision on the priorities around social housing has not been made.

63.     Once council’s policy has been clarified, a rationale and benefit case will need to be completed. Prioritising housing for the elderly over other social housing needs and identifying Puketāpapa over other parts of Auckland will need to be determined.

It will be legally difficult to change the use of the site

64.     There is a legal risk to council if does not carry out the public works purpose by which Liston Village is being acquired.

65.     The original decision to acquire the land and council’s compliance with the requirements of the Public Works Act 1981 could be subject to judicial review. This could result in the council being required to offer the land back to the Diocese.

66.     This risk could be mitigated if the council can demonstrate that the land is required for an alternative public work, such as social housing. This may be difficult given the site was already being used social housing prior to acquisition.

67.     Even if a new public works purpose could be established, the Diocese may still consider deviation from the original public works purpose to be contrary to its contractual agreements with council. This could result in legal action to uphold the agreement.

68.     Council could be found to be in ‘breach of contract’ because the Diocese may have not entered into the agreement if the land was to be used for another public work.

69.     The Diocese has previously written to council warning it to uphold agreement.

Open space budgets will no longer be available to fund the acquisition

70.     The purchase and conversion of Liston Village as open space is being funded from the open space acquisition budget. The primary source of this funding are development contributions charged for the provision of new open space.

71.     Development contributions can only be spent for the purpose for which they are charged. This has two implications:

·    any development contributions used to fund the acquisition of those parts of Liston Village not required for open space will need to be repaid to the open space acquisition budget or re-invested in alternative open space in the local area

·    the open space acquisition budget will be unable to fund the future acquisition of any parts of Liston Village not required for open space.

72.     In both cases, One Local Initiative funding will be needed to compensate for the loss of development contribution funding to complete the acquisition.

There are four options for decision-makers to consider

73.     Staff have identified four options for Liston Village:

·    Option one: Develop the whole of Liston Village as open space (18,500 m2) (status quo)

·    Option two: Council to provide housing for older people at Liston Village (8300m2), while using a portion (10,200 m2) of the site to widen the main entrance to Monte Cecilia Park (One Local Initiative)

·    Option three: Develop provide housing for older people at Liston Village (6070 m2), while using a larger portion of the site (12,430 m2) to widen the main entrance to Monte Cecilia Park (enhanced One Local Initiative).

·    Option four: Council to provide housing for older people at the Korma Road entrance (4376 m2) to Monte Cecilia Park and develop the whole of the Liston Village site as open space.

Option one: Develop the whole of Liston Village as open space (status quo)

74.     This option reflects the status quo under the legacy resolution. It would see council continue the approved acquisition of Liston Village as open space.

75.     The benefits of this option are:

·    it would deliver the best open space outcomes, including improved visual and physical connectivity from the Hillsborough Road to Monte Cecilia Park, reconnection of the Pah Stables with Pah Homestead and would increase the park’s street frontage to 83 metres.

·    it has no legal risks associated with the delivery of this option

·    it carries low financial risk. The acquisition of the site, demolition of existing units, and restoration of the site to grassland, will be met from within existing open space budgets. However, potential costs for the restoration and maintenance of the heritage Pah Stables building are unknown and unbudgeted.

76.     This option would not meet the local board’s intention to provide social housing in Puketāpapa. This would create a reputational risk for the local board within the local community.

Option two: Develop half of Liston Village as open space and half as housing for older people (One Local Initiative)

77.     Under this option, the Liston Village site would be divided in two:

·    approximately 10,200 m2 would be developed as open space

·    approximately 8300m2 would be deemed surplus to open space requirements, and available for another public purpose

78.     The surplus land could be developed as social housing. Four of the 10 existing accommodation units along Delargey Avenue could be retained, while up to 45 accommodation units could be developed at the rear of the site off Steins Avenue.

79.     This option reflects the agreed scope of the Puketāpapa One Local Initiative.

80.     The benefits of this option are:

·    it would constitute a large scale, long-term response to social housing pressure

·    it would deliver some open space benefits, including some improvement to the main entrance of Monte Cecilia Park, reconnection of the Pah Stables with Pah Homestead and would increase the park’s street frontage to 60 meters.

81.     However, it would carry several risks:

·    it may be difficult to establish an alternative public works purpose

·    the opportunity to maximise the functionality of Monte Cecilia Park will be lost

·    the four retained units on Delargey Avenue may be visually and physically isolated from the main concentration of 45 units off Steins Avenue

·    the local community may oppose the development of social housing as contrary to the legacy council’s original plans to expand Monte Cecilia Park

·    the Diocese may oppose the development of social housing as contrary to terms of its sale and purchase agreement with council. This could result in legal action against the council to uphold the original agreement

·    the council could be forced to offer back the land to the Diocese if it is not used to provide open space in accordance with the original public works purpose

·    a resource consent would likely be required for building works. This could be challenged by the Diocese or the wider public

·    it would trigger additional legal compliance obligations, some of which would requiring further community consultation. For example, the revocation of reserve status from part of the Liston Village site under the Reserves Act 1977.

Option three: Develop two-thirds of Liston Village as opens space and one third as housing for older people (enhanced One Local Initiative)

82.     This option is a variation on option two. It maintains the key aspects of the One Local Initiative, while also taking the findings of the open space policy assessment into account.

83.     Its single point of difference is that all housing units along Delargey Avenue would be removed under this option. This would result in the loss of four units proposed for retention under option two.

84.     The development of up to 45 units at the rear of the site could still occur.

85.     The benefits of this option are:

·    it would enable all the key open space outcomes under option one to be delivered, including improved visual and physical connectivity from the Hillsborough Road to Monte Cecilia Park, reconnection of the Pah Stables with Pah Homestead and would increase the park’s street frontage to 83 metres

·    it would still constitute a large scale, long-term response to social housing pressure

·    clustering all social housing together at the rear of the site could improve internal connectivity and sense of community within the village

·    it would cost an estimated $5 million less to implement than option two

86.     However, it would deliver less total open space than option one, and four fewer accommodation units than option two.

87.     The same financial and legal risks associated with option two would apply.

Option four: Develop the whole of Liston Village as open space and investigate the provision of temporary housing for older people at the Korma Road entrance to Monte Cecilia Park

88.     Under this option, the entire Liston Village would be converted to open space as planned. The council would investigate developing temporary social housing on 4376m2 of public open space land at Monte Cecilia Park’s Korma Road entrance. The official classification of this land would remain public open space. Those areas of the site used for social housing could be subject to a lease or licence.

89.     This option has several benefits:

·    it would deliver the same open space outcomes at main entrance to Monte Cecilia Park as under option one

·    the site is already in council ownership and has no existing structures. This means it can be developed quickly and easily

·    the site was not acquired under the Public Works Act 1981. This eliminates many of legal risks associated with the Liston Village site under option two and option three

·    the proximity of Korma Road to Liston Village site will help minimise disruption to Liston Village residents and the wider community

·    the site is close to the existing Selwyn Village on Herd Road. This could result in operating efficiencies if the Selwyn Foundation were ultimately appointed to manage the Korma Road site on the council’s behalf.

90.     However, it would carry some risks:

·    it would entail some loss of open space amenity at the Korma Road site

·    a temporary housing solution would be much smaller and lower density then what is possible under option two or option three. The actual number of units is likely to be the same or fewer then currently at Liston Village. As such, it would not constitute a large scale, long-term response to social housing pressure

·    like Liston Village, the acquisition of the Korma Road site was largely funded from development contributions. Even the temporary use of the site for social housing may be considered by some to deviate too far from the original open space purpose. This could result in pressure for council to refund the development contributions or acquire replacement open space

·    a resource consent would likely be required for building works. This could be challenged by the Diocese or the wider public

·    council’s demolition of housing from the Korma Road site was opposed by some members of the local community. Possible use of the site for social housing carries some reputational risk.

Staff have developed evaluation criteria to assess the four options

91.     Staff have developed four evaluation criteria to enable the comparison of the proposed options. These criteria are:

·    strategic alignment

·    amenity and function

·    responding to growth

·    value for money.

92.     The first criterion focuses on alignment with the provision targets and network principles in the Open Space Provision Policy and the Auckland Plan 2050 focus areas.

93.     The second considers improvements in visibility, accessibility and recreational opportunity that support the realisation of Monte Cecilia Park as a successful destination park.

94.     The third acknowledges the need to account for population change, and the ability to cater to the competing goals of open space and housing for older people.

95.     The fourth focuses on value for money. This includes consideration of legal and financial risks with the potential to increase the complexity and cost of delivery.

96.     The criteria are unweighted; each are deemed to be of equal importance. Table one provides an assessment of the option against the specific evaluation criterion.

Table 1: Assessment of options against criteria

Criteria

Strategic alignment

Amenity and function

Responding to growth

Value for money

Option one:

Develop the whole of the site as open space (status quo)

✓✓✓

✓✓✓

✓✓✓

Option two:

Develop half of the site as open space and half as social housing

✓✓

✓✓✓

Option three:

Develop two-thirds of the site as open space and one third as social housing

✓✓

✓✓

✓✓✓

Option four:

Develop the whole of Liston Village as open space and provide temporary social housing at Korma Road entrance

✓✓

✓✓

✓✓

✓✓

 

                                                                                                                             Rating scale key

Ticks

Level to which option meets criteria

No tick

Does not meet

Low

✓✓

Fair

✓✓✓

High

Options one performs best, but option three and option four also favourable

97.     When the criteria are applied, option one scores highest. Option three and option four also score favourably. Staff seek the board’s in principal support for progressing one of these three options.

98.     All options involve some trade-off between maximising open space against the ability to accommodate some social housing outcomes. The three top scoring options all recognised the value of the front portion of the Liston Village site as open space but differ in their ability to support growth or deliver value for money.

99.     Option one would entail no loss of open space amenity. It also presents no legal risk to council, low financial risk and a moderate reputational risk. However, it fails to accommodate social housing.

100.   Option four scores moderately across all criteria. It’s ability to maximise amenity at Monte Cecilia Park’s main entrance is largely offset by a countervailing loss of amenity at the Korma Road. It’s focus on temporary social housing outside Liston Village helps to mitigate legal and financial risk. However, this also limits its potential scale.

101.   Of the three top scoring options, option three best reflects the local board’s objectives of achieving a meaningful increase in social housing for older people, low disruption to Liston Village, and improved access to Monte Cecilia Park. However, it would entail some loss of open space amenity, and carries high legal and financial risk.

102.   Option two scores lowest, as it offers the least open space amenity, carries high legal risk, is most costly, and would offer only four additional units over the next best option.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

103.   The acquisition of Liston Village will continue to take place as units become available. No development of the site can be considered until acquisition has been completed.

104.   Once acquisition has been completed, Customer and Community Services will be responsible for the development and ongoing maintenance of the parks.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

105.   The local board has been an advocate for social housing since 2011, with a specific interest in Liston Village since 2014.

106.   The local board selected Liston Village as its One Local Initiative in May 2018.

107.   The views of the local board are sought through this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

108.   Both Liston Village and Monte Cecilia Park were once part of a larger fortified Maori Pa, which gives this space significant meaning to mana whenua.

109.   The provision of quality parks and open spaces has broad benefits for Māori, including:

·    helping to facilitate Māori participation in outdoor recreational activity

·    helping make Tāmaki Makaurau a green, resilient and healthy environment consistent with the Māori world view of the natural world and their role as kaitiaki of the natural environment.

110.   Mana whenua will be consulted on the development of the open space.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

111.   Table two details the indicative costs associated with the assessed options. Option one has the lowest cost implications, as it entails no housing development, and the open space acquisition aspects can be fully funded from existing budgets. Any restoration costs associated with the heritage Pah Stables building have not been budgeted for and will require separate funding.

112.   Options two, three and four would involve significant additional costs associated with the reimbursement of development contribution funding to the park acquisition budget on a pro rata basis, and the development of housing stock.

113.   It may be possible for council to offset the costs of developing social housing. Options include accessing the Income Related Rent Subsidy, administered by the Ministry of Social Development, or securing upfront partnership funding from the government or a community housing provider. These should be assessed as part of any future business case.

Table 2: Indicative financial costs

 

Reimbursement of open space budget

Cost of acquiring remaining units

Costs of delivering social housing

Net additional required funding

Option one:

Develop the whole of the site as open space

-

-

-

-

Option two:

Develop half of the site as open space and half as social housing

$13.61m

$3.60m

$15.75m

$17.21m–$33.00m

Option three:

Develop two-thirds of the site as open space and one third as social housing

$9.09m

$3.60m

$15.75m

$12.69-$28.44m

Option four:

Develop the whole of Liston Village as open space and provide temporary social housing at Korma Road entrance

$6.13m

(if required)

-

$8.75m

$8.75-$18.82m

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

114.   Table three details the risks associated with the assessed options.

Table 3: Risks pertaining to assessed options

 

Legal risk

Financial risk

Reputational risk

Option one:

Develop the whole of Liston Village as open space

None

Low

Acquisition of open space is funded

Moderate

Risk to local board of advocacy to provide housing for older people.

Option two:

Repurpose most of Liston Village as housing for older people

High

Development of social housing is contrary to the terms of the sale and purchase agreement.

Council may have to ‘offer back’ the land to the Diocese.

Moderate

Development contributions will need to be refunded and reinvested in alternative open space.

 

Moderate

Risk of public opposition to the development, as it is contrary to the original plans to expand Monte Cecilia Park.

Option three:

Repurpose part of Liston Village as housing for older people

As per option two

As per option two

As per option two

Option four:

Develop the whole of Liston Village as open space but investigate housing at Korma Road

None

Moderate

Development contributions may need to be refunded and reinvested in alternative open space.

Moderate

Risk of public opposition to the use of open space for temporary housing.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

115.   Staff will prepare report to the incoming local board following the 2019 local body elections to reconfirm the board’s preferred option.

116.   Staff will then report to the Environment and Community Committee with final recommendations.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

William Brydon - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Local Board feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing

File No.: CP2019/13424

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to formally provide feedback on the Productivity Commission’s (the commission) inquiry into local government funding and financing.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 4 July 2019, the Productivity Commission released its draft report relating to its local government funding and financing inquiry.

3.       The inquiry’s key aim is establishing whether the existing funding and financing arrangements are suitable for enabling local authorities to meet current and future cost pressures.

4.       The commission’s draft report:

·        raises eight questions

·        highlights 67 findings

·        makes 30 recommendations.

5.       Local boards are advised that their views and feedback for staff to consider when drafting the submission, need to be received by Monday, 29 July 2019.

6.       Auckland Council will make a submission on the draft report. Staff will prepare a submission for the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration at its meeting on 20 August 2019. Submissions on the inquiry close on 29 August 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Central Government asked the Commission to conduct an inquiry into local government funding and financing in July 2018. The inquiry’s terms of reference require the commission to examine the adequacy and efficiency of the current local government funding and financing framework and, where shortcomings in the current system are identified, examine options and approaches for improving the system.

8.       The inquiry’s terms of reference do not call for an assessment of, or changes to the current scope and responsibilities of local government.

9.       The Commission’s issues paper was released on 6 November 2018. The council made a submission on the issues paper which was approved by the Finance and Performance Committee. The council’s submission to the issues paper can be found as Attachment A.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The draft report is available on the commission’s website

11.     The commission’s ‘At a glance’ document can be found as Attachment B and its ‘A3 overview’ is at Attachment C.

12.     The draft report states that:

·        the current funding and financing framework is broadly sound but that councils need new tools to help them deal with some specific cost pressures

·        if councils struggle to deal with rising costs, or are not incentivised to improve their performance, communities are unlikely to reach their potential

·        the funding and financing framework for local government must incentivise good performance and enable local authorities to deliver quality amenities and services that reflect the preferences and aspirations of their communities.

13.     The commission has found that the existing funding model is insufficient to address cost pressures in the following four areas and that new tools are required:

·        supplying enough infrastructure to support rapid urban growth

·        adapting to the impacts of climate change

·        coping with the growth of tourism

·        the accumulation of responsibilities placed on local government by central government.

14.     The commission also considers the three-waters sector an important area for investigation.

15.     The inquiry’s terms of reference have also been amended to require the commission to consider whether a tax on vacant land would be a useful mechanism to improve the supply of available housing. The addition is a result of the Tax Working Group’s final report to the government.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     The council group’s impact and views will be developed and presented for the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration at its meeting on 20 August 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are advised that their views and feedback for staff to consider when drafting the submission, need to be received by Monday, 29 July 2019.

18.     Any formal feedback received after 29 July and before 19 August 2019 will be provided to the Finance and Performance Committee to seek their endorsement to incorporate in the council’s submission. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Staff will also seek input from the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     There are no financial implications in deciding to make a submission. However, there may be positive or negative financial implications if the government decides to implement any of the recommendations made by the Productivity Commission. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     If the local board does not contribute to the submission, then there is a risk that the Auckland Council family’s position on this inquiry will not reflect issues that are important to the local community.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     The council will make a submission on the draft report. Staff will prepare a submission for the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration at its meeting on 20 August 2019.

23.     A workshop to discuss the draft council submission with the Finance and Performance Committee has been scheduled for 15 August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Council submission on the issues paper - approved by the Finance and Performance Committee on 6 November 2018

117

b

'At a glance' - Local government funding and financing

147

c

'At a glance' - A3 briefing

151

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrew Duncan – Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Ross Tucker – General Manager Financial Strategy and Planning

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes

File No.: CP2019/14438

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, and to seek local board feedback on the recommended changes to the document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is currently reviewing the Auckland Film Protocol.  The Auckland Film Protocol sets out:

·        the commitment of the council group to supporting filming in Auckland;

·        expectations and rules that filmmakers must abide by when filming in Auckland; and

·        provides guidance for filmmakers on the process for approval to film in Auckland.

3.       The purpose of the review was to ensure that the Auckland Film Protocol is up-to-date and identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities that should be addressed.  Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Auckland Film Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol. 

4.       A revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in June 2019 for consideration and was approved for public consultation (resolution number ENV/2019/73). 

5.       The following is a summary of the key changes made to the Auckland Film Protocol before public consultation was undertaken:

·        Native species: new content added stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: new content added providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: new content added stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: new content added stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: new content added to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was updated to reflect current policy, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council.  Some structural and editorial amendments were also made to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

6.       Public consultation was undertaken over a three week period between 21 June and 12 July 2019.

7.       A total of 74 submissions were received during the public consultation period.  Puketāpapa Local Board residents provided a total of one submission on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, representing 1% percent of all submissions.  The views of Puketāpapa Local Board submitters were insufficient to allow a comparison with regional views or to present a summary of key submission points for the Puketāpapa Local board area.  Staff are proposing some changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address submitter concerns; the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film protocol are shown in track changes in Attachment B.

8.       This report provides a summary of public feedback and of proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address feedback.  The following is a high‑level summary of the key changes proposed to the Auckland Film Protocol in response to public consultation:

·        Natural environment: include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Native species: include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Kauri dieback: amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

·        Impact on access to public open space: include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

·        Compliance and enforcement: include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with the Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

9.       Submission themes and proposed changes are summarised in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol

b)      provide feedback on the recommended changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol

c)      note that local board feedback will be included in a report to the Environment and Community Committee in August 2019, seeking approval for the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The first version of the Auckland Film Protocol (the protocol) was adopted by the Regional Development and Operations Committee (resolution number RDO/2013/27) on 14 March 2013.  A review of fees for filming in the Auckland Region was undertaken in 2014 and a new set of region‑wide charges was recommended; providing a simplified and harmonised range of charges.  The Governing Body adopted a region‑wide schedule of film fees and revised Auckland Film Protocol on 28 May 2015 (resolution number GB/2015/36).

11.     Since the Protocol was adopted in 2015 there have been a number of changes to legislation and to Auckland Council’s policy and planning framework. The purpose of the review of the Protocol was to:

·        ensure that the Protocol is up-to-date; and

·        identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities to be addressed in the Protocol.

Content of the Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.

12.     Workshops were held in September and October 2018 to engage with local boards that experience a high volume of filming.

13.     Engagement to inform the preparation of the revised draft Protocol was also undertaken with:

·        mana whenua: mana whenua interests are represented by 19 iwi (tribal) authorities in Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland.  The 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review of the Protocol.

·        staff of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to inform the review.

·        screen sector: the screen sector was invited to participate in a survey in April 2019 to inform the review.  The survey asked a series of general questions about the Protocol and experiences of filming in public open space in Auckland. 

·        public: the People’s Panel in September 2018; a total of 4,762 responses were received.  The survey asked a series of questions on views on and experiences of filming in Auckland. 

A high-level summary of feedback (including local board feedback) is provided in Attachment C.

14.     The review recommended that a range of changes be made to the Auckland Film Protocol, the following is a summary of the key changes proposed to the Environment and Community Committee:

·        Native species: include new content stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: include new content providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include new content stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: include new content stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: include new content to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Filming on Tūpuna Maunga: update content to reflect that applications to film on Tūpuna Maunga are assessed by the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority.

·        Updates to content: update content to reflect current policy (e.g. smokefree policy), plans (Auckland Unitary Plan) and bylaws of Auckland Council.

·        Structural and editorial: amend some parts of the document to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

15.     The revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was approved by the Envrionment and Community Committee for public consultation in June 2019 (resolution number ENV/2019/73).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     Consultation on the revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol took place from 21 June to 12 July 2019.  A total of 74 submissions were received; this represents a substantial increase on the 21 submission which were received in response to the 2015 review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  Of the submissions received, 72 were submitted using the online form and 2 non‑form hardcopy submissions were received. 

17.     Submitters were asked to identify if they worked in the screen sector or not, with:

·        29 submissions (39%) received from individuals or organisations that identified themselves as working in the screen sector

·        45 submissions (61%) received from individuals or organisations that do not work in the screen sector.

The questions included in the online form varied depending on whether the submitter identified themselves as working in the screen industry or not.

18.     A breakdown of all submissions received by local board area is shown in Table 1 below.  The small number of responses from individual local board areas means that a analysis of views by local board area was not possible for all local board areas.

 

Table 1: Breakdown of submissions made by local board area.

Local Board Area

Number of respondents

Percentage of respondents

Waitākere Ranges

17

23.0%

Albert-Eden

9

12.2%

Waitematā

8

10.8%

Rodney

6

8.1%

Upper Harbour

5

6.8%

Ōrākei

5

6.8%

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

4

5.4%

Devonport-Takapuna

4

5.4%

Henderson-Massey

3

4.1%

Kaipātiki

3

4.1%

Howick

2

2.7%

Whau

2

2.7%

Māngere-Ōtahuhu

1

1.4%

Puketapapa

1

1.4%

Hibiscus and Bays

1

1.4%

Papakura

1

1.4%

Franklin

0

0%

Great Barrier

0

0%

Ōtara‑Papatoetoe

0

0%

Manurewa

0

0%

Waiheke

0

0%

Don't Know

1

1.4%

Outside Auckland

1

1.4%

Total

74

 

 

19.     A series of closed questions were asked of non‑screen sector individuals and organisations; a summary of the responses to these questions is shown in Table 2 below.  Table 2 shows that:

·        most respondents are supportive of Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach and that;

·        most respondents think that the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on residents and businesses, on public open space and historic and cultural heritage.

Table 2: Feedback on the Auckland Film Protocols management of the impacts of filming

Question

Response

Percentage of regional submissions

(number of respondents is shown in brackets)

Do you support Auckland Council's film‑friendly approach?

Yes

75% (33)

Partially

20% (9)

No

5% (2)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on residents and businesses?

Yes

56% (18)

Partially

19% (6)

No

25% (8)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on our public open space and environment?

Yes

53% (23)

Partially

33% (14)

No

14% (6)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on our historic and cultural heritage?

Yes

62% (26)

Partially

29% (12)

No

10% (4)

 

20.     The main reasons given by those who supported Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach are shown in Table 3.

Table 3: Summary of key reasons for supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Economic

·      generates employment and economic growth;

·      benefits communities and local businesses;

·      benefits a broad range of trades and industries;

·      attracts investment and businesses to Auckland.

Cultural and creative

·      has cultural benefits allowing and supporting the telling of stories visually;

·      supports the creative economy and enables people to find a future in the creative industries;

·      It’s fun and exciting to see Auckland on the screen.

Promotion and tourism

·      promotes and showcases Auckland to the world;

·      creates a positive image of Auckland.

 

21.     Table 4 showns the key reasons that respondents gave for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Table 4: Summary of key reasons given for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Access

·      the impacts on resident, including parking restrictions, road closures and ability to use public open space while filming is taking place need to be considered and managed;

·      need to ensure that film‑makers are respectful of other users of public open space.

Notification

·      there needs to be sufficient notification to ensure that residents and businesses are aware of open space being used for filming and are not inconvenienced.

Balance

·      need to consider and manage the impact that filming has on the environment and impacted residents;

·      need to balance the cumulative impacts of filming.

Equity

·      need to ensure that fees for commercial use of public places are fair.

 

22.     The key reasons given for not supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach were:

·        the cost to ratepayers of enabling filming;

·        that there is not enough protection for individuals, businesses and residents affected by filming being carried out on private property.

23.     A series of open‑ended questions were also included to elicit further information about responses to these questions and about a range of other topics.  Staff have worked through submissions to determine any changes to be recommended for the final revised Auckland Film Protocol.  Attachment A identifies key themes and submission points along with proposed staff responses.  

A summary of the most common submission themes and the proposed staff responses are shown in table 5.

Table 5: Summary of key submission themes and proposed staff responses.

Key themes

Summary of proposed responses

Use of drones for filming

Include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

Impact on natural environment

Include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Kauri dieback

Amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

Impact on native species

Include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Impact on access to public open space

Include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

Compliance and enforcement

Include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

Health and safety

Amend to enable production companies to arrange alternative timeframes for the submission of a site specific health and safety plan by agreement with Screen Auckland.

Notification

Screen Auckland to consider operational approaches to achieving wider public notification.

Impact on business

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  The protocol is intended to provide a framework that enables decisions to be made on a case‑by‑case basis.

Equity

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  Fees for commercial use of public open space are set under the Auckland Council Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 and amended through the long term plan and annual plan.

 

24.     This report seeks formal feedback from the board at its August 2019 business meeting on the recommended changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol in response to consultation feedback.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.  This included engagement with Auckland Transport, Panuku Development Auckland, and with Auckland Council community facilities, region‑wide planning, social policy and bylaws, visitor experience and heritage

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Role of local boards in film permitting

26.     Landowner approval is required to film on any public open space in the Auckland region.  Local boards are responsible for landowner approvals for local parks and reserves.  Engagement with local boards that experience a high volume of applications for film permits was undertaken in September and October 2018 to inform the review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  A summary of the key engagement themes is included in Attachment C and was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

27.     A key theme from local board engagement was that the film permit timeframes mean that landowner approval timeframes are very tight, particularly when considering complex or contentious applications.  It was also noted that the current timeframes do not allow sufficient time to consider applications at full board meetings or to consult key stakeholders.  Given this, the following options on film permit timeframes were presented to the Environment and Community Committee at a workshop in May 2019 and at the June 2019 meeting.

Option one: Status Quo

Option two: amend the permit timeframes

·        Option 2(a) the permit time frame is amended to be “up to five working days”.

·        Option 2(b) the permit time frame is increased to 5‑7 working days.

28.     Following direction from the Committee, that increasing timeframes could act as a disincentive making Auckland internationally uncompetitive, the status quo option was retained in the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     ATEED has an ongoing relationship with several mana whenua and mataawaka groups, across its whole portfolio of activity.  To inform the review of the Protocol the 19 Iwi Authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review.  In relation to film permit applications Māori views and input may be obtained in several ways where there is a potential impact on particular land or sites. This is usually coordinated either by the film facilitator, or through the relevant parks manager.

30.     Specific processes are in place for the tūpuna maunga, with all commercial filming on the maunga requiring the approval of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority).  Screen Auckland facilitates all requests for approval to film on the tūpuna maunga.  Approval to film will be subject to conditions and restrictions set by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.  Meetings were held with staff of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to inform the review and ensure that proposed amendments are consistent with the policy of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The proposed amendments to the Protocol do not impact on existing levels of service and will not impact on operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     There are no significant risks arising from the board giving feedback on the proposed changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol at this time.

33.     If adoption of the revised Auckland Film Protocol is delayed this would impact on council’s ability to implement the proposed changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Public feedback and proposed amendments to the Auckland Film Protocol will be presented to the Environment and Community Committee for approval.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key submission themes and responses

163

b

Draft 2019 Auckland Film Protocol (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Summary of preconsultation engagement

173

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Marie Jenkins – Screen Facilitation Manager ATEED

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Council submission on Governments Clean Car Standard and Clean Car Discount proposals

File No.: CP2019/14461

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal feedback from the Puketāpapa Local Board on Auckland Council’s submission on the Ministry of Transport’s Clean Car Standard and Clean Car Discount proposals.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Government has produced a discussion document on proposals to reduce emissions in the light vehicle fleet (cars, SUVs, utes, vans, light trucks). 

3.       The focus is on light vehicles because they account for almost two-thirds of transport emissions. Light vehicles have an average life of 19 years which means that the vehicles imported into New Zealand over the next five years will lock in emissions out to 2043.

4.       The closing date for submissions on the discussion document is 20 August.

5.       Staff have prepared a draft submission for Auckland Council (refer Attachment A).

6.       The draft submission notes that:

·        in November 2018, Auckland Council recommitted to its membership of the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group. This is a collective of 94 international cities acting against climate change. This committed the Auckland region to progress towards limiting the increase in temperature from climate change to within 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels

·        Auckland Council recently declared a Climate Emergency, which highlights the urgency required to transition Auckland towards a net zero carbon future

·        Auckland’s Climate Action Framework (ACAF) was endorsed for public consultation in June 2019. This document outlines a pathway to align with the C40 1.5 degrees Celsius warming limit while ensuring Auckland is prepared for future climate challenges.

7.       The key points of the draft submission are:

·        Auckland Council strongly supports the intent of the proposed Clean Car Standard and Clean Car Discount set out in the discussion paper

·        The proposals are integral for Auckland Council to achieve the emission reductions required for a 1.5 degrees Celsius warming limit

·        Auckland Council seeks that the proposals be amended to the extent required to meet New Zealand’s 2030 target level of emissions reduction.

8.       Auckland Council’s draft submission recommends:

·        additional initiatives that directly incentivise the purchase of zero emission vehicles

·        an expansion of the approach to other zero emission modes of transport, in particular electric buses and bicycles

·        continued investigation of complimentary initiatives

·        additional sub-regional social impact assessments to understand potential impacts on Māori, rural households and lower income households in Auckland.

9.       The draft submission will be reported to the Environment & Community Committee on
13 August. The submission will then be finalised, and feedback local boards feedback attached, before being submitted to the Ministry of Transport.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on Auckland Council’s submission to the Ministry of Transport’s Clean Car Standard and Clean Car Discount proposals

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

201908 Submisson to the Ministry of Transport in the matter of clean green standard and the clean car discount

179

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mary Hay - Local Board Advisor - Puketapapa

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Feedback on Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw

File No.: CP2019/14603

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the local board on the local board’s formal feedback from Member D Holm on Auckland Council’s Waste Management Bylaw and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the Puketāpapa Local Board Business Meeting on the 6 June 2019, the local board delegated member Holm to provide formal feedback to the hearings panel on 26 July 2019 about the proposed new Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw (resolution number PKTPP/2019/94).

3.       In Member Holm’s presentation to the hearings panel on 26 July 2019 he stated that the local board supports the proposed Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw, noting specific comments on a number of the proposed changes that were publicly consulted on.

4.       Further information on Member Holm’s presentation to the hearings panel can be found in Attachment A and the Local Board Feedback Attachment B.

5.       The hearings panel will consider these comments before making a final recommendation to the Governing Body for adoption of the bylaw (and amendment to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw) in August or September 2019.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      note that Member D Holm presented to the hearings panel on the 26 July 2019 the formal local board feedback on the Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20190726 Puketāpapa Local Board Presentation to the hearings panel

193

b

20190726 Puketāpapa Local Board Feedback

195

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketapapa

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Puketāpapa Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14409

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Puketāpapa Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter four, 1 April – 30 June 2019, and the overall performance for the financial year, against the agreed 2018/2019 local board work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Puketāpapa Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2018/2019 financial year.

3.       Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

4.       76 activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. 8 activities were cancelled, put on hold or deferred and 12 projects/activities have not progressed as expected during 2018/2019.

5.       Key highlights for quarter four include:

·    Events Delivery Support (ID 91): The Matariki Manu Aute Kite Day was delivered on 29 July on Puketāpapa/Pukewiwi maunga.

·    Te Auaunga Placemaking (ID 2972): The local board adopted Te Tohu Auaunga Implementation Strategy for Puketāpapa on 16 May 2019.

·    Harold Long Reserve and Fearon Park – Stage 3 (ID 2282): The new playground within Fearon Park was completed in this quarter.

·    Youth Development (ID 1033): The Puketāpapa Youth Board organized an event for local rangatahi (young people) to connect with police officers informally through sport. They also delivered a youth summit at the Mt Roskill Memorial Hall.

6.       Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme include:

·    Healthy Puketāpapa Action Plan (ID 624): A Healthy Puketāpapa Framework has been developed and consultation has occurred to inform the draft action plan before it is presented to the local board in August 2019.

·    Māori Naming of Reserves and Facilities – Phase Two (ID 584): At an extraordinary Business Meeting on 6 September 2018 the local board invited mana whenua to provide dual Māori names and narratives for 32 parks in the local board area.

·    Community Grants (ID 336): The local broad granted $129,363 in strategic relationship grants this year while also undertaking a review of the grant’s terms of reference and accountability reports.

7.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·    Open Space Service Provision Planning (ID 464): This activity includes several parks planning related projects. Some of these projects have been delayed and will be completed in the 2019/2020 financial year.

·    Waikowhai Coastal Walkway – development of priority walkway routes (ID 2738): Detailed design of priority walkway routes was not undertaken this financial year. The local board adopted the Waikowhai Walkway Action Plan in September 2019 and allocated capital budget to investigate, design and undertake physical works over the next two financial years on 20 June 2019 (resolution PKTPP/2019/106).

8.       The 2018/2019 financial performance report is attached but under confidential cover. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – expected to be made public 30 September 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter and year ending 30 June 2019.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2018/2019 are released to the NZX which are expected to be made public 30 September 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Puketāpapa Local Board has an approved 2018/2019 work programme for the following operating departments:

·    Community Services (Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; Parks, Sport and Recreation; and Service Strategy and Integration)

All budgets, excluding the Wesley Community Centre and Roskill Youth Zone Budget, were approved on 21 June 2018, resolution PKTPP/2018/93

The Wesley Community Centre and Roskill Youth Zone Budget was approved 19 July 2019, resolution PKTPP/2018/123

·    Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew and Community Leases, approved on 19 July 2018, resolution PKTPP/2018/122

·    Infrastructure and Environmental Services, approved on 21 June 2018, resolution PKTPP/2018/98

·    Local Economic Development, approved on 21 June 2018, resolution PKTPP/2018/104

·    Plans and Places, approved on 19 July 2018, PKTPP/2018/121

·    Youth Connection activities moved from the Arts, Community and Events work programme to The Southern Initiative work programme in quarter two.

10.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

 

 

 

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

11.     Operating departments have provided the last quarter delivery update against their work programme (Attachment A).

Key highlights for quarter four

12.     The key achievements to report from the quarter four period include:

·    Events Delivery Support (ID 91): The Matariki Manu Aute Kite Day was held on Puketāpapa/Pukewiwi maunga on 29 July. Approximately 500 people attended this event.

·    Te Auaunga Placemaking (ID 2972): On 16 May 2019 the local board adopted Te Tohu Auaunga Implementation Strategy for Puketāpapa. This document will guide how the tohu will be implemented along the upper catchment of Te Auaunga.

·    Harold Long and Fearon Parks – Stage 3 (ID 2282): The new playground within Fearon Park was completed in this quarter. Further upgrades are expected to be investigated in the 2019/2020 financial year.

·    Youth Development (ID 1033): The Puketāpapa Youth Board organized an event at the Wesley Community Centre in April for local rangatahi to connect with police officers informally through sport, 90 people participated in this event. The youth board also held a youth summit at the Mt Roskill Memorial Hall in June, with representatives from all three local high schools.

Overall performance against the Puketāpapa Local Board 2018/2019 work programme

13.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected (completed by the end of July 2019) or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

 

 

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

 

14.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each department’s work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes.

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

15.     The table below shows the overall performance of work programme activities (RAG status and activity status by work programme). Further details on the activity status of each work programme activity is provided in the ‘Q4 Commentary’ column within Attachment A.

Table 1: End of year Local Board Work Programmes Status

RAG Status

Activity Status

ACE

PSR

Libraries

CF

Leases

I&ES

P&P

ATEED

TSI

Green

Completed

17

4

7

17

4

6

-

1

-

In progress

-

-

-

18

1

-

-

-

1

Amber

In progress

3

1

-

2

-

1

-

-

-

Red

In progress

-

2

-

2

-

-

1

-

-

On Hold

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

Not delivered

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Grey

Merged

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Deferred

-

-

-

1

2

-

2

-

-

Cancelled

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme

16.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2018/2019 include:

·    Healthy Puketāpapa Action Plan (ID 624): A contractor has developed the Healthy Puketāpapa Framework and undertaken consultation with community groups, council units and health subject matter experts. A baseline health needs assessment was presented to the local board in May 2019 and the finalised plan is expected to be presented to the local board in August 2019.

·    Māori Naming of Reserves and Facilities – Phase Two (ID 584): At an extraordinary Business Meeting on 6 September 2018 the local board invited mana whenua to provide dual Māori names and narratives for 32 parks in the local board area.  This project will support the visibility of te reo Māori and help capture and tell the unique Māori stories of Puketāpapa and Tāmaki Makaurau.

·    Community Grants (ID 336): The local broad granted $129,363 in strategic relationship grants this year while also undertaking a review of the grant’s terms of reference and accountability reports. New changes include multi-year funding and a Capacity Development Tool. These changes were introduced at two public meetings in the second quarter of this financial year to representatives from more than 30 organisations.

Overview of work programme performance by department

Arts, Community and Events work programme

17.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 17 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), three activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled or deferred in quarter four (grey).

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

18.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are four activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), one activity that is in progress but delayed (amber), two activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled or deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed are discussed below.

19.     Open Space Service Provision Planning (ID 464): This project has a ‘red’ status and is significantly delayed. This activity includes several parks planning related projects. Projects within this activity to be completed in the 2019/2020 financial year include:

·    Consultation and approval of the Hillsborough Cemetery, Margaret Griffin and Mt Roskill War Memorial Park concept plans.

·    Approval of the Shade and Shelter Provision Assessment.

·    Investigation into story-telling opportunity in local open spaces.

20.     Māori Naming of Reserves and Facilities FY19 – Phase Two (ID 584): This project has a ‘red’ status and is significantly delayed. The first tranche of names is expected to be gifted back to the local board late 2019.

Libraries and Information work programme

21.     In the Libraries and Information work programme, there are seven activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled or deferred in quarter four (grey).

 

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

22.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 35 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), four activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and one activity that has been cancelled or deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

23.     Monte Cecilia Park – restore historic Whare (ID 2279): This project has a ‘red’ status and is on hold. The local board will be updated once the James Wallace Arts Trust confirms how they wish to proceed in relation to the potential lease and restoration of the Whare.

24.     Pah Homestead – install HVAC system (ID 2281): This project has a ‘red’ status and is significantly delayed. This activity will not be completed by the end of the first quarter of the 2019/2020 financial year due to a need to reduce the scope of works due to budget constraints.

25.     Waikowhai Coastal Walkway – development of priority walkway routes (ID 2738): This project has a ‘red’ status and is on hold. The local board has allocated capital budget to investigate, design and undertake physical works over the next two financial years (as resolved on 20 June 2019, resolution PKTPP/2019/106)

26.     Belfast Reserve – renew structure and furniture (ID 2913): This project has a ‘red’ status and is significantly delayed. This activity will not be completed by the end of the first quarter of the 2019/2020 financial year due to extensive unforeseen erosion causing significant structural risk. Sections of track have been closed while a detailed assessment is completed.

Community Leases work programme

27.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are five activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and two activities that have been deferred in quarter four (grey).

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

28.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are six activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), one activity that is in progress but is delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled or deferred in quarter four (grey).

Local Economic Development work programme

29.     In the Local Economic Development work programme, there is one activity that was completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and one activity that has been cancelled in quarter four (grey). The one activity that has been cancelled is discussed below.

30.     Puketāpapa Business Engagement (ID 356): This project has a ‘grey’ status and has been cancelled. $17,500 from this budget was reallocated to other activities (resolution PKTPP/2019/10). $7,500 was also allocated to support a PopUp Business School event from 29 April to 10 May 2019 in partnership with the Whau Local Board, Henderson-Massey Local Board and the Ministry of Social Development (resolution PKTPP/2019/9).

Plans and Places work programme

31.     In the Plans and Places work programme, there are no activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), no activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), one activity that is significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and two activities that have been cancelled or deferred in quarter four (grey). The activity that is significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered is discussed below.

32.     Mt Roskill Village revitalisation (ID 1444): This project has a ‘red’ status and is significantly delayed. Planned synchronised construction with an Auckland Transport delivered project is no longer possible and new delivery options are being investigated.

Deferred activities

33.     As part of the local board funding policy, activities funded through the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operating fund that were not delivered in 2018/2019 will either be counted as savings for the organisation or will be deferred into 2019/2020 work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to local boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.     This report informs the Puketāpapa Local Board of the performance for quarter ending 30 June 2019 and the performance for the 2018/2019 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     The Puketāpapa Local Board is committed to strengthening and formalising its relationships with mana whenua and mataawaka. “Māori are recognised and affirmed as mana whenua” is an objective within the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2017.

37.     The local board continues to work with the Ngāti Tamaoho Trust to grow the relationship that was formalised in the Relationship Agreement signed in Manukau in July 2018.

38.     The local board has included, in its Local Board Plan and work programme projects, a number of activities which mana whenua have been engaged in. These include:

·    Te Auaunga Awa Placemaking (ID 2972): Mana whenua have been engaged as a partner throughout the development of Te Auaunga Tohu and design guide. Representatives from Te Akitai Waiohua, Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāti Whātua Orākei, Te Kawerau a Maki, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, and Ngāti Whanaunga provided advice to guide development of the design guide at multiple hui and on a site walkover.

·    Māori Naming of Reserves and Facilities, Phase Two (ID 584). Work has continued with mana whenua to identify opportunities for Māori names for local parks to enhance and recognise Auckland’s Māori identity and heritage.

·    The local board has invested funding to elevate te Manu Aute Kite Day as a regional Matariki Festival event. The event was held on Puketāpapa/Pukewiwi maunga on 29 June 2019. Approximately 500 people attended the event.

39.     The local board seeks to acknowledge Te Ao Māori and tikanga through karakia before meal breaks, special meetings/workshops with mana whenua on key projects of mutual interest, and blessings when large local board projects are undertaken or concluded in the community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     This report is provided to enable the Puketāpapa Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2018/2019 work programmes and to report this to the public. This report is for information only and therefore there are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

41.     Auckland Council currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX expect to be made public on 30 September.

42.     Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

44.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Puketapapa Q4 Work Programme Update

205

b

Attachment B Operating Performance Summary Puketāpapa  - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben  Moimoi - Local Board Advisor - Puketapapa

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14442

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2018/2019 Annual Report for the Puketāpapa Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 26 September 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2018/2019 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential and will be tabled at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      adopt the 2018/2019 Puketāpapa Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A. 

b)      note that any proposed changes will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019.

c)      note that the draft 2018/2019 Puketāpapa Local Board Annual Report (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report) will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2018/2019 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities, and the overall Financial Impact Statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

6.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the NZX Debt Market (quoted bonds) maintained by NZX Limited. As a result, the council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules (listing rules) and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA). Under these obligations, local boards may not release annual financial results in any form, including publishing their agenda/minutes containing their results, until council group results are released to the NZX on 27 September 2019.  Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi relates to the local board area.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area, summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved.

Funding information

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English, and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2018/2019 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2019

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 26 September 2019

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 27 September 2018

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David Gurney - Manager Corporate Performance & Reporting

Authorisers

Kevin Ramsay - General Manager Corporate Finance and Property

Victoria Villaraza – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Albert-Eden-Roskill Ward Councillor Update

 

File No.: CP2019/13639

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the Albert-Eden-Roskill Ward Councillors to verbally update the Board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      thank Albert-Eden-Roskill Ward Councillors Cathy Casey and Christine Fletcher for their update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketapapa

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Chairperson's Report

 

File No.: CP2019/13640

 

  

 

Te take mō te p,ūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Chairperson, Harry Doig, with an opportunity to update board members on the activities he has been involved with since the last meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       It is anticipated that the Chairperson will speak to the report at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive Chair Harry Doig’s report for July 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair Harry Doig's report, 01 July - 31 July 2019

235

b

Chair Harry Doig's Local Government 2019 Conference report

237

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketapapa

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Board Member Reports

 

File No.: CP2019/13641

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the local board members on the activities they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       It is anticipated that Board members will speak to their reports at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the member reports for July 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ann-Mare Coury's Report, 01 July - 31 July 2019

241

b

Julie Fairey's Report, 05 July - 01 August 2019

243

c

David Holm's Report, 01 July - 31 July 2019

247

d

Ella Kumar's Report, 01 July - 31 July 2019

249

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketapapa

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar

 

File No.: CP2019/14488

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Puketāpapa Local Board with its updated governance forward work programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Puketāpapa Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work programme calendar for August 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar, August 2019

253

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketapapa

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes

 

File No.: CP2019/14664

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of Puketāpapa Local Board (the Board) workshop notes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The attached summary of workshop notes provides a record of the Board’s workshops held in July 2019.

3.       These sessions are held to give an informal opportunity for board members and officers to discuss issues and projects and note that no binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the Puketāpapa Local Board workshop records for 04 July, 11 July, 25 July 01 August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 04 July 2019

257

b

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 11 July 2019

261

c

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 25 July 2019

263

d

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 01 August 2019

265

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketapapa

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 

    

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Puketāpapa Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

21        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Puketāpapa Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019 - Attachment b - Attachment B Operating Performance Summary Puketāpapa

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2019 that require Audit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

   



[1] Census 2013 projects that the population of Tāmaki Makaurau will grow from 1.6 million in 2016 to 1.9 to 2.1 million in 2028.

[2] The street frontage will remain modest compared to other regionally significant open spaces: Western Park (154 metres), One Tree Hill (236 metres), Auckland Domain (256 metres), Western Springs Park (576 meters), Cornwall Park (615 metres).