I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Rodney Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday 15 August 2019

2.00pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre,

50 Centreway Rd,

Orewa

 

Rodney Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Beth Houlbrooke

 

Deputy Chairperson

Phelan Pirrie

 

Members

Brent Bailey

 

 

Tessa Berger

 

 

Cameron Brewer

 

 

Louise Johnston

 

 

Allison Roe, MBE

 

 

Colin Smith

 

 

Brenda Steele

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Robyn Joynes

Democracy Advisor - Rodney

 

8 August 2019

 

Contact Telephone: +64 212447174

Email: robyn.joynes@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

Board Member

Organisation

Position

Brent Bailey

Royal NZ Yacht Squadron

 

Member

 

Tessa Berger

 

 

Mahurangi Action Incorporated Mahurangi

Coastal Trail Trust

The Merchandise Collective

Friends of Regional Parks

Matakana Coast Trail Trust

 

Crimson Education

 

President

Chairperson

Founder/Director

Committee Member

Member Forum representative

Director

Cameron Brewer

Riverhead Residents & Ratepayers Association

Cameron Brewer Communications Limited

Spire Investments Limited

Member

 

Director

Shareholder

Beth Houlbrooke

Kawau Island Boat Club

ACT New Zealand

Member

Vice President

Louise Johnston

Blackbridge Environmental Protection Society

Treasurer

Phelan Pirrie

Muriwai Volunteer Fire Brigade

Best Berries (NZ) Ltd 

Grow West Ltd

North West Country Incorporated

Officer in Charge

Director/Shareholder

Director

Manager

Allison Roe

Waitemata District Health Board

Matakana Coast Trail Trust

Elected Member

Chairperson

Colin Smith

 

 

Brenda Steele

 

Te Uri o Hau Incorporation

Beacon Pathway

Secretary/Beneficiary

Board member

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Mahurangi Wastebusters                                                                                    5

8.2     Animal Refuge                                                                                                      6

8.3     Omaha basketball hoops                                                                                     6

8.4     Omaha basketball hoops                                                                                     6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Tuna Place Reserve, Omaha: retrospective landowner application for court resurfacing and basketball hoops                                                                               9

12        Lease for additional premises to Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated for the newly completed and occupied art centre extension adjacent to its original art centre at 296 - 300 Main Road, Huapai                                                                                      15

13        Variation of the draft community lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand (Motutara-Waimauku Scout Group) for land at Blomfield Reserve, Waimauku to update the premises plan and endorse overnight accommodation                      27

14        Auckland Transport Update to the Rodney Local Board Transport, Infrastructure and Environment Committee August 2019                                                               41

15        Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate update                                           57

16        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Rodney Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019                                                                               71

17        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019                                                                    111

18        Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes   115

19        New road name in the Peter McMillan subdivision at 99 & 107  McKinney Road, Warkworth                                                                                                                  195

20        New road name in the Mary J Holdings Limited subdivision at 200 Tawa Road, Kumeu                                                                                                                         203

21        New road names in the Fulton Hogan Land Development Limited, Milldale Stage 2 Subdivision at 17 Old Pine Valley Road, Pine Valley                                            211

22        Rodney Local Board Chairperson's report                                                             223

23        Deputations and public forum update                                                                     225

24        Rodney Local Board Transport, Infrastructure and Environment Committee workshop record                                                                                                        229

25        Governance forward work calendar                                                                        235

26        Rodney Ward Councillor update                                                                              239  

27        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

28        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               241

16        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Rodney Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

b.      Rodney Local Board Quarterly Performance Report June 2019 - Financial Appendix                                                                                                           241

17        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

a.      Draft Rodney Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019                                  241  

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

Apologies from Chairperson B Houlbrooke and Member B Steele have been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 18 July 2019, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Rodney Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Mahurangi Wastebusters

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Mahurangi Wastebusters have requested a deputation to present an overview of plans and visions for the community recycling centres at the Lawrie Road, Snells Beach and Rustybrook Road, Wellsford transfer station sites.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank Mahurangi Wastebusters for their presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Animal Refuge

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       There has been a request for deputation to discuss the non-notification of an animal refuge by affected residents.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank those in attendance for their presentation.

 

 

 

8.3       Omaha basketball hoops – Jenni Marsh

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Jenni Marsh has requested a deputation to discuss the installation of basketball hoops in Omaha.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank Ms Marsh for her presentation.

 

 

 

8.4       Omaha basketball hoops – Bruce Coombes

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Bruce Coombes from the Omaha Beach Residents Society has requested a deputation to discuss the basketball courts at Tuna Place.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank Mr Coombes from the Omaha Beach Residents Society for his presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Tuna Place Reserve, Omaha: retrospective landowner application for court resurfacing and basketball hoops

File No.: CP2019/14037

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request a retrospective landowner approval on behalf of Omaha Beach Residents Society Incorporated for the resurfacing of the courts and addition of basketball hoops at Tuna Place Reserve, Omaha.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Omaha Beach Residents Society Incorporated have resurfaced the courts and installed basketball hoops on two courts at Tuna Place Reserve. The Omaha Beach Residents Society Incorporated currently lease two other areas in Omaha; Pukemateko Reserve Omaha South and Manuhiri Reserve.

3.       The Omaha Beach Residents Society Incorporated state that the Tuna Place Reserve was omitted from the 2002 lease documents completed by the former Rodney District Council for Pukemateko Reserve legally described as Lot 828 DP 206443 and Manuhiri Reserve legally described as Lot 815 DP 206443. There is no record of any lease agreement for Tuna Place Reserve.

4.       Tuna Place Reserve is zoned as Open Space – Informal Recreation and is a neighbourhood park. Informal hard courts are specifically provided for in open space - informal recreation zones. The resurfacing is completed to a high standard and will future proof the courts for many years.

5.       Complaints have been received from adjoining residents due to the increased noise from the use of the basketball courts. The residents are concerned about the use and more specifically in the latter part of the evening when families and children have returned home. It has been reported that young people are using the courts and playing loud music, swearing and drinking. 

6.       An alternative solution from one of the residents was to reduce the noise by removing one set of hoops and relocating to Pukemateko Reserve. This reserve is surrounded by a car park and playground area so there are a smaller number of residents adjoining the courts.

7.       The land within Tuna Place Reserve is legally described as Lot 873 DP 349224 and is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as an unclassified recreation reserve and is subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

8.       Staff recommend approving the retrospective application as provision of a multi-use basketball court is appropriate in response to high season demand. A strategic assessment to investigate other sites for basketball use is recommended. The removal of one set of hoops to Pukemateko Reserve could lessen the noise and use to an acceptable level and could be considered as part of the strategic assessment to be completed at the time the leases are revised by the community lease specialist.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the retrospective landowner application from Omaha Beach Residents Society Incorporated for the resurfacing and installation of basketball hoops at Tuna Place Reserve, legally described as Lot 873 DP 349224

b)      request Parks Sport and Recreation team undertake a strategic assessment for basketball sites at Omaha when the existing Omaha Beach Residents Society Incorporated community leases are revised

c)      note that the community lease specialist will present revised community leases for Omaha Beach Residents Society Incorporated to incorporate Tuna Place Reserve, for consideration by the local board in due course.

 

Horopaki

Context

Site details

9.       The council land is known as Tuna Place Reserve is legally described as Lot 873 DP 349224 and is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as an unclassified recreation reserve and is subject to the Reserves Act 1977. The reserve is designated as Open Space- Informal Recreation and as a neighbourhood park. Informal hard courts are specifically provided for in the Open Space - Informal Recreation zone. There is no record of any lease agreement for Tuna Place Reserve.

10.     The Omaha census area unit contains a permanent population of only 621. Omaha is a holiday destination and the population swells significantly during weekends and holidays with a large number of children and young people. There are no clubs or sports organisations associated with the hard courts and the courts are not a venue for formal organised sports competition, so they are consistent with the intent of the zoning. Provision of a multi-use basketball court is appropriate in response to high season demand.

11.     The Omaha Beach Residents Society Incorporated state that the Tuna Place Reserve was omitted from the 2002 lease documents completed by the former Rodney District Council for Pukemateko Reserve legally described as Lot 828 DP 206443 and Manuhiri Reserve legally described as Lot 815 DP 206443. There is no record of any lease agreement for Tuna Place Reserve.

12.     The community lease specialist for the Rodney Local Board will write a subsequent report applying for a decision regarding Tuna Place Reserve to be included as part of the Omaha Beach Residents Society Incorporated (the Society) leased area.

Complaints

13.     Local residents state that the change in use of the tennis court asset was undertaken by the Society without any consultation with affected parties. The adjoining residents are concerned about the value of their properties decreasing due to the basketball hoops being installed at the courts. Residents have also stated that the noise level is significantly higher from basketball courts compared to tennis and that people are drinking and playing loud music at courts. When residents have approached the players and supporters to turn down the music they have been abused and feel threatened in their homes.

14.     The Society provide an onsite security service that monitors the use of the Society’s leased areas and Tuna Place Reserve. This service could be contacted to reduce direct contact for residents to alleviate any negative reactions.

Planning Context

15.     The application aligns with the Rodney Local Board Plan 2017, specifically “Parks and sports facilities that everyone can enjoy” by providing an active recreation space that is accessible by bike for teenagers and young adults and “Communities are influential and empowered” as the work was undertaken by the Society on behalf of the community.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The options for the local board are to approve or decline the landowner request for the retrospective resurfacing and basketball hoops.

17.     Tuna Place Reserve offers the only basketball facility in Omaha. There is a basketball court at Whangateau Reserve which is approximately 15 minutes’ drive and the next nearest public facilities would be the half court at Snells Beach or the courts at Warkworth Showgrounds, which are both approximately 20 minutes’ drive away. There are courts at Warkworth Primary and Mahurangi College (indoor). The highest users of basketball courts tend to be teenagers and young adults who are less likely to be independently able to drive these distances to reach alternative facilities.

18.     Latent demand for basketball in the area is evident in the high use of the courts at Tuna Place Reserve. A junior basketball programme in Warkworth has doubled its numbers this year to 50 participants. Growing interest in basketball in Omaha would be consistent with parks sport and recreation team’s observation of outdoor basketball courts in the Auckland region which tend to be popular when well-located and maintained.

19.     The complainants provided a video showing the use of the courts. A large number of young people arrived on bicycles to access the courts. If the video is representative of the normal level of use, the parks sport and recreation team’s perspective is that these courts are delivering excellent outcomes which the council would not wish to lose.

20.     If any unacceptable behavior was occurring onsite security can be contacted to deal with the situation as required and report to police if any civil matters arise.

21.     The possible change of hoops to one court only at Tuna Place Reserve and the second set of hoops transferred to Pukemateko Reserve may lessen the use and associated noise and still provide the recreational facility as required to meet demand. As discussed above this location and other sites could be considered as part of a strategic assessment at the time the lease is reviewed.

22.     The advantages of approving the landowner application are that: 

·     the resurfacing and installation of basketball hoops has already occurred

·     there is extensive use of the courts by locals with teenagers riding their bikes to use the courts

·     the closest courts would be too far away for biking.

23.     If the Rodney Local Board declines the landowner application the basketball hoops will have to be removed and accessibility for locals without car access will not be possible. Opportunities for local community members for basketball will require car access and this will inhibit teenagers and young adults use and enjoyment of this type of facility. This option is not recommended by staff.


 

Land use and specialists’ comments/consultation 

24.     Auckland Council’s senior maintenance coordinator, sport and recreation lead, parks and places specialist, community lease specialist and senior land use advisor have reviewed the proposal and are in support of the hoops remaining until a strategic assessment has been completed to see if an alternative location is suitable or if it is appropriate to spread the load and have one court operating in Tuna Place Reserve and an alternative court used for the second set of hoops.

Recommendation

25.     The recommendation to the Rodney Local Board is to support the continued use of these courts for basketball and to consider the relocation of either all the hoops or one set of hoops when a strategic assessment has been completed and the lease areas for the Society are being reviewed at a later date. 

26.     Alternative locations can be investigated such as the Community Centre or Pukemateko Reserve as part of a strategic assessment by the Parks Sport and Recreation team. By either moving one set of hoops or both it would lessen the effects.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     There are no council controlled organisations with an interest in the proposal.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     This activity aligns with the Rodney Local Board Plan 2017: “Parks and sports facilities that everyone can enjoy” as outlined above. The outcome supports parks to be active in and that are easily accessible.  It also aligns with “Communities are influential and empowered” as the work was undertaken by the Society on behalf of the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     There are no sites of value or significance to mana whenua identified in the Auckland Unitary Plan – Operative in Part in relation to the application. Iwi consultation was therefore not undertaken as there are no readily identifiable impacts on Māori and any impacts will be no different to those on others.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     There are no financial operational implications for the local board over and above the existing maintenance requirements of this reserve land. If the decision was to remove the hoops the Society would be responsible for all costs.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     If the council decides to remove the hoops the recreation facility will revert to tennis use and basketball will not be available for residents at Omaha unless an alternative location is proposed. There was associated noise reported by residents when the courts were solely used for tennis.  

32.     The lack of consultation by the Society increases the risk to the council as it could potentially partially divide the community near the courts. This risk to the council can be alleviated with a future strategic assessment of all possible sites at Omaha and alternatives provided or to spread the load and have one court only at Tuna Place Reserve to reduce the numbers at this site and another court situated in an alternative location.

33.     Any other risks associated with the granting of landowner approval are considered to be relatively minor as the change from tennis to basketball courts has already occurred. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     If the application is approved the decision will be communicated to the applicant with a formal land owner approval letter.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Raewyn Sendles - Land Use Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Lease for additional premises to Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated for the newly completed and occupied art centre extension adjacent to its original art centre at 296 - 300 Main Road, Huapai

File No.: CP2019/14469

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a lease for additional premises to Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated for the newly completed and occupied art centre extension adjacent to its original art centre at 296 - 300 Main Road, Huapai.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated has a community lease for its original premises at Huapai. The lease commenced 1 August 2013 for an initial term of five years and provides for one right of renewal for five years. At its business meeting of 20 September 2018, the Rodney Local Board, Parks and Recreation Committee granted a renewal and variation of the lease to Kumeu Arts (resolution number RODPC/2018/30).

3.       Council has recently completed the art centre extension adjacent to Kumeu Arts original premises and Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated has taken occupation. As such, a lease for additional premises is required to record each party’s rights and responsibilities relating to the occupancy.

4.       The lease terms and conditions for the additional premises will align with the current community lease agreement between Auckland Council and Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated dated 20 January 2014. Similarly, the renewal and variation of the lease dated 4 June 2019.

5.       This report recommends that the Rodney Local Board grant a lease for additional premises to Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated for the art centre extension adjacent to its original art centre at 296 - 300 Main Road, Huapai.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      grant a lease for additional premises (65 square metres more or less) to Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated for the council-owned art centre extension adjacent to its original art centre premises located at 296 - 300 Main Road, Huapai on land legally described as Lot 1 DP 204544 (Attachment A to the agenda report) subject to the following conditions:

i)       term – three years and 11 months commencing 1 September 2019

ii)      all other terms and conditions will accord with the lease agreement between Auckland Council and Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated dated 20 January 2014 and the subsequent renewal and variation agreement dated 4 June 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       This report considers the leasing issues with respect to Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated’s occupation of the new art centre extension.

7.       The Rodney Local Board, Parks and Recreation Committee is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Land, current community lease and requirement for a lease for additional premises

8.       The underlying land at 296 – 300 Main Road Huapai is held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and is legally described as Lot 1 DP 204544.

9.       At its business meeting of 10 June 2013, the Rodney Local Board granted the Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated a new community lease for the council-owned building (RD/2013/169). The community lease provides for an initial term of five years with one right of renewal for five years expiring 31 July 2023.

10.     At its business meeting of 20 September 2018, the Rodney Local Board, Parks and Recreation Committee granted a renewal and variation of the lease to Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated (resolution number RODPC/2018/30).

11.     The purpose for varying the lease agreement at renewal was to correctly record the legal description of the land on which the premises are situated. Additionally, to reduce the amount of public risk insurance that Kumeu Arts must hold from $5 million to $2 million to align with current community lease conditions.

12.     A lease variation that increases the area of the premises acts as a surrender and re-grant of the original lease. Due to this common law principle, to enable Kumeu Arts to occupy a further area, it is recommended that a lease for additional premises be granted and that it record that the additional premises lease is subject to the same terms, conditions and covenants as the original, operative lease.

13.     Kumeu Arts has formally applied to council for the grant of a lease for additional premises for the art centre extension (Attachment B to the agenda report).

Public notification

14.     As the underlying land at 296 – 300 Main Road Huapai is subject to the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002, public notification is usually required pursuant to section 138 of the Act. Section 138(1) provides that council must consult with the public on any proposal to dispose of a park or part of a park.

15.     However, due to circumstances surrounding the application for additional premises, staff advise that the local board can forego public notification based on:

a)      The relatively short period of time before the long-term occupation of the additional premises will be publicly notified, it is proposed that public notification will take place during 2023

b)      The additional premises consists of approximately 65 square meters and is intended to be used for artistic endeavours, the Kumeu Arts Centre is therefore ideally placed to manage and maintain the premises on behalf of council until such time as public notification is able to take place.

Art Centre extension

16.     The construction project took nine months from design to build completion (June 2018 to April 2019) at a cost of $375,000.00 (Attachment C to the agenda report). Construction materials comprise:

·        foundations – screw piles

·        flooring – plywood

·        internal walls – pre-finished birch polar ply

·        external cladding – shadowclad

·        ceiling – MDF

·        joinery – aluminium

·        roofing – Trimline profiled metal roof.

Annual subsidised operational maintenance fee

17.     In accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, Kumeu Arts currently pays an annual subsidised fee to council in the amount of $500.00+GST. The fee is calculated on the size of the premises occupied.

18.     In this instance, the fee in the amount of $500.00 covers the size range over 100 square metres and less than 500 square metres. As the original premises are 280 square metres and the extension is 65 square metres, which together are still under the 500 square metre threshold for the annual subsidised fee in the amount of $500.00+GST (Attachment D to the agenda report).

Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated

19.     The Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated was incorporated under the Incorporated Societies Act 1908 on 22 August 2002.

20.     The arts centre provides a range of artistic services to its community such as classes, music nights, workshops, events, fundraising auctions, exhibitions and un-tutored groups. The arts centre works alongside other community groups (special needs providers, rest homes, mental health recovery groups, local schools and pre-schools and minority ethnic groups).

21.     The arts centre has been working closely with Huapai Hub convening group to ensure that the Huapai Hub’s development plans for the area behind the arts centre’s existing building integrate well with the arts centre.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     The Arts and Culture Advisor, Arts Community and Events Department endorses the proposed lease for additional premises to Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated for the newly completed and occupied extension adjacent to the existing arts centre. It is expected that the community will benefit from additional classes and the opportunity to utilise the space to deliver community-led meetings, classes and programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     The recommendations within this report support the Rodney Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes for:

·     communities are influential and empowered

·     arts and culture is vibrant and strong.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     There are no changes in use or operational activities being conducted on the land. As such, council staff considered that neither mana whenua nor mataawaka would be impacted by the lease for additional premises proposal and as such, did not undertake engagement.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     There is no direct cost to council associated with this proposal.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     Should the Rodney Local Board resolve not to grant a lease for additional premises to the arts centre, this decision will mean that there is no formal documentation to record council’s and Kumeu Arts rights and responsibilities relating to the occupancy (including tenure and maintenance, etc).

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Subject to the local board grant of lease for additional premises, council’s community leasing staff will work with the arts centre to finalise the required documentation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Plan showing art centre extension

19

b

Letter to council from Kumeu Arts Centre Incorporated requesting a lease for additional premises

21

c

Image showing new art centre extension

23

d

GIS aerial view showing Kumeu Art Centre Incorporated original premises and excerpt from page 14 of Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 relating to maintenance fees

25

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Karen Walby - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 



Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Variation of the draft community lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand (Motutara-Waimauku Scout Group) for land at Blomfield Reserve, Waimauku to update the premises plan and endorse overnight accommodation

File No.: CP2019/14475

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To vary the draft community lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand (as parent body for the Motutara-Waimauku Scout Group) for land at Blomfield Reserve, Waimauku to update the premises plan and endorse overnight accommodation at the site.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its business meeting of 21 September 2017, the Rodney Local Board, Transport Infrastructure and Environment Committee resolved to grant landowner approval, agreement to lease, community lease and a non-exclusive licence to occupy to The Scout Association of New Zealand (Motutara-Waimauku Scout Group) for land at Blomfield Reserve, Waimauku (resolution number RODTP/2017/36).

3.       The purpose of the landowner approval and agreement to lease was to enable the Motutara-Waimauku Scout Group to apply for the necessary resource and building consents associated with its project to relocate a vacant scout hall from Riverpark Reserve in Henderson (within the Henderson-Massey Local Board area) to Blomfield Reserve in Waimauku.

4.       Motutara-Waimauku Scout Group updated and submitted its plans for its resource consent application. The updated plans provide for the installation of a septic tank and waste-water disposal evapotranspiration beds. As such, the existing premises plan, attached to the draft lease as the First Schedule, will need to be amended to more clearly reflect the requirements of the latest resource consent application. 

5.       The agreement to lease, clause 13.1, expressly permits the landlord to make alterations or modifications to the lease, which includes the premises plan, on the condition that the Tenant’s rights are not materially affected.

6.       Staff advise that the alteration to the premises plan is minor and that it will serve to better identify the Tenant’s rights and obligations in terms of the occupancy agreement and is in no way detrimental to any existing rights contained in the agreement.

7.       Additionally, and pursuant to section 44(1) of the Reserves Act 1977, the Rodney Local Board must endorse the proposed overnight accommodation at the site. Endorsement by the Rodney Local Board will enable the General Manager, Community Facilities to approve overnight accommodation as provided for under the terms of the community lease.

8.       This report recommends that the Rodney Local Board approves a variation to the draft community lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand to update the premises plan and endorse overnight accommodation.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve a variation to the draft community lease agreement to The Scout Association of New Zealand (Motutara-Waimauku Scout Group) to update the premises plan for the land at Blomfield Reserve, 71 Pollard Lane, Waimauku legally described as Section 1 SO 356956 (Attachment A to this agenda report)

b)      endorse, pursuant to section 44(1) of the Reserves Act 1977 that proposed overnight accommodation at Blomfield Reserve will be a provision of the lease.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       This report considers the leasing issues with respect to The Scout Association of New Zealand (as parent body for Motutara-Waimauku Scout Group).

10.     The Rodney Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Land

11.     In 2005, the former Rodney District Council acquired a parcel of land located at 71 Pollard Lane, Waimauku. The land was purchased for recreation purposes and is known as Blomfield Reserve, being named after the former landowner. The land is legally described as Section 1 SO 356956, classified as recreation reserve and subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977. There is no operative reserve management plan for Blomfield Reserve.

Building, resource consenting processes and requirement for new premises plan

12.     In February 2018, the Motutara-Waimauku Scout Group commenced the regulatory processes to obtain building and resource consents for its project. This required engaging an environmental architect, a civil engineer, commercial planning consultants, an arborcultural specialist and a geotechnical specialist. In February 2018, scouts obtained the building consent.

13.     Scouts were required to update its plans for its resource consent application. The updated plans included the installation of a septic tank and waste-water disposal evapotranspiration beds. As such, this necessitates an updated premises plan for the community lease agreement. Scouts currently await its resource consent due to many delays outside of its control.

14.     In order to accurately record the scouts’ maintenance obligations, the premises plan needs to be updated to reflect the approximate location of the waste-water disposal evapotranspiration beds.

Local board endorsement of overnight accommodation by scouts at Blomfield Reserve

15.     Overnight camping is one of the many activities integral to ‘scouting’ and proposed for Blomfield Reserve. The table below contains information on scouts’ proposal (included in its application for resource consent) to camp at the site:

Location on site

Within the square area shown on Attachment B (smaller camps would be held behind the den).

Lighting required for camping

Battery operated portable LED lighting (in accordance with relevant health and safety regulations).

Musical instruments and singing

No amplified musical instruments but an acoustic guitar and the singing of ceremonial scouting songs and for the prayers associated with the evening meals.

16.    Section 44(1) of the Reserves Act 1977 provides that, except with the consent of the Minister of Conservation, siting of tents on the reserve overnight is not legally permitted (Attachment C to the agenda report). Endorsement by the Rodney Local Board will enable the General Manager, Community Facilities, under delegated authority from the Minister to approve overnight accommodation as provided for under the terms of the community lease.

Timeline and status of Motuara-Waimauku Scout Group’s project

17.     In 2018, a series of hold ups began with the resource consent application process, due to complicated open reserve planning requirements. As such, scouts were required to engage an additional planning specialist at an extra cost of $10,000.00.

18.     With the generous offer from Craig Walker, Building Removals Limited, scouts had originally planned to relocate its scout hall during the dry period of the 2018 to 2019 summer. As a result of the extra steps required in the resource consenting process, scouts missed its window of opportunity in which Craig Walker would have been able to relocate the hall.

19.     Scouts made a deputation to the Henderson-Massey Local Board at its business meeting of 16 July 2019 during which scouts respectfully requested the Henderson-Massey Local Board approval for an extension of time to February 2020 to remove the vacant scout hall from Riverpark Reserve.

20.     Earlier in July 2019, scouts were advised that its resource consent application would need to be dealt with by a duty commissioner before a final decision could be made or resource consent granted.

21.     Scouts has been donated building materials, has trade labour at the ready and many willing parents on standby for its project. Scouts has worked diligently during the past two years raising in excess of $120,000.00 from its fund-raising activities.

The Scout Association of New Zealand

22.     The Scout Association of New Zealand is a body corporate incorporated under a private act – The Scout Association of New Zealand Act 1956. The Scout Association of New Zealand was registered as an incorporated society on 25 July 1966. The aims and objectives of the Association are to:

·        Encourage the physical, mental, emotional, social and spiritual development of young people so that they may take a constructive place in society

·        The method of achieving the aim of the Association is by providing an enjoyable and attractive scheme of progressive training based on the Scout Law and Promise and guided by adult leadership.

23.     The Scout Association of New Zealand was registered as a charitable entity under the Charities Act 2005 on 4 July 2007.

Motuara-Waimauku Scout Group

24.     Currently, scouts has 117 young people in its troupe and is struggling to accommodate its growing numbers at its existing site operating out of the community hall on Glasgow Park. At present, scouts operate two nights a week and it has requested a third night on a monthly basis.

25.     Glasgow Park Hall, however, is fully subscribed, precluding scouts from increasing its usage of the space. Scouts would prefer not to split its operations over too many weekdays (to accommodate its growing membership) as that would place a greater burden on troupe leaders and parents.

26.     Scouts currently utilise areas on Blomfield Reserve for its outdoor activities although this is on an informal basis. Scouts vision in terms of its proposal for a community lease and non-exclusive licence to occupy on a portion of Blomfield Reserve is to:

·        utilise the relocatable scout hall to accommodate its growing numbers

·        share with girl guides, local schools and other community groups

·        create an outdoor education centre and confidence course

·        host and provide for weekend camps and nature walks

·        plant native trees on the hilly areas of the reserve.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     Staff from council’s service strategy and integration team provided feedback to the proposal to vary the community lease to the scouts to update the premises plan and permit accommodation at the site as follows:

‘The development of a local park management plan for Rodney is currently underway and as a general rule leasing matters are on hold until the plan is completed’.

‘The main body of the development of a lease for the Scout Association at Blomfield Reserve has already been undertaken including the public consultation and an agreement to lease is in place. As the lease proceeding as per the agreement to lease I would have no problem with the lease proceeding while we are developing the Rodney local park management plan’.

28.     Staff from council’s parks, sports and recreation (active recreation) team provided feedback to the proposal to vary the community lease to the scouts to update the premises plan and permit accommodation at the site as follows:

‘Scouts deliver sport and recreation outcomes’

‘From a sport and recreation perspective, I am happy for the proposed project to proceed’.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     At its business meeting of 21 September 2017, the Rodney Local Board, Transport Infrastructure and Environment Committee resolved to grant landowner approval, agreement to lease, community lease and a non-exclusive licence to occupy to The Scout Association of New Zealand (Motutara-Waimauku Scout Group) for land at Blomfield Reserve, Waimauku resolution number RODTP/2017/36 (Attachment D to the agenda report).

30.     In February 2019, staff from council’s land use team presented the Rodney Local Board, Parks and Recreation Committee with a memorandum by way of email relating to the requirement to update the 2017 landowner approval to include the wastewater disposal system including the evapotranspiration beds.

31.     On 18 February 2019, the Rodney Local Board, Parks and Recreation chair approved the Manager, Land Advisory Services exercising their staff delegation to provide the updated Landowner Approval.

32.     The scouts’ proposal aligns with outcomes in the 2017 Rodney Local Board Plan as follows:

·        Communities are influential and empowered

·        Parks and sports facilities that everyone can enjoy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     In 2017, staff undertook engagement with mana whenua regarding scout’s proposal. This involved email contact containing detailed information and inviting iwi representatives to hui and or for a kaitiaki site visit to comment on any spiritual, cultural or environmental impact with respect to the proposal. Of the five iwi that responded, none indicated any concerns with the proposal.

34.     Scouts has engaged directly with a key representative at the local Rewiti Marae for the purpose of partnering opportunities in terms of delivering youth programmes. Local iwi will be encouraged to utilise the scout hall for its community programmes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     There is no direct cost to council associated with this proposal.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     Should the Rodney Local Board resolve not to approve the variation of the community lease agreement to scouts to update the premises plan and endorse overnight accommodation, this will:

·        prevent staff from accurately recording the lease area and as such, may impact on council’s and scouts’ rights and responsibilities under the community lease agreement

·        legally preclude scouts from camping at the site.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Should the Rodney Local Board approve the variation to the community lease to update the premises plan and endorse accommodation at the site, council staff will update the premises plan and insert a suitable clause describing the provisions for overnight accommodation in the draft community lease agreement.

38.     On the issue of code compliance certificate, staff will send the community lease agreement to The Scout Association of New Zealand for signing and sealing and subsequent execution by council.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Updated community lease premises plan on land at Blomfield Reserve, 71 Pollard Road, Waimauku legally described as Section 1 SO356956

33

b

Site plan showing indicative areas proposed for overnight camping

35

c

Section 44 of the Reserves Act 1977

37

d

Resolution number RODTP/2017/36

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Karen Walby - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport Update to the Rodney Local Board Transport, Infrastructure and Environment Committee August 2019

File No.: CP2019/14328

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Rodney Local Board’s Transport, Infrastructure and Environment Committee on transport related matters in its area, including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund and Auckland Transport’s Community Safety Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      This report covers:

·   A summary of the board’s transport capital fund

·   Update on Auckland Transport’s community safety fund

·   A summary of consultation activity

·   Traffic Control Committee resolutions

·   An update on issues raised

·   Araparera Forestry and Regional Land Transport Plan Seal Extension Programme updates

·   Matakana Link Road update

·   Dairy Flat and Coatesville-Riverhead Highways roundabout update

·   Update on Speed Limits Bylaw.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport August 2019 update report

b)      agree in principle to the allocation of the local board’s transport capital funds to top up any funding shortfall for the Community Safety Fund projects (agreed at the business meeting on 20 June 2019 [RODTP/2019/22]), subject to the details being confirmed and approved in any future agenda report

c)      note that the first package of roads to be sealed using the Araparera Road Sealing funds (Underwood Road, Whitmore Road and Tauhoa Road, School Road, and Wharehine Road) are now substantially complete, with the timing for the remaining roads to be confirmed over the coming year.

Horopaki

Context

3.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report on a regular basis to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

4.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important to their communities but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·    be safe

·    not impede network efficiency

·    be in the road corridor (although projects in parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

5.       The Rodney Local Board’s share of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) allocated with effect from 1 July 2018, as per the local board funding policy, is $1,115,764 per annum.

6.       Taking into account recent commitments, the total remaining funds in the Rodney Local Board’s TCF to 30 June 2020 is $633,257, comprising monies available from the 2019/2020 financial year’s allocation.

7.       The table below shows the local board’s Transport Capital Fund Summary for this term:

Rodney Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$2,743,817

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$2,110,560

Remaining Budget left

$633,257

8.      The status of projects to which LBTCF has already been committed are shown in the table below:

Status update on current of Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects

Project Description

Current status

Changes since last  update

Funds allocated in current political term

99 - Great North Road, Riverhead Footpath

Completed

No

$6,732

497 - Pohutukawa to The Landing Footpath

Completed

No

$59,828

593 - Matakana Valley Road Swales

Construction Approved

No

$177,000

619 - Rodney Footpath Designs and Construction

Allocation Approved

Yes

$1,867,000

656 - Hudson Road Footpath - Albert to SH1

Detailed Design Approved

Yes

(Detailed Design under Project 619)

Total

$2,110,560

 

9.       Project 593, Matakana Valley Road Swales, is being constructed through a collaboration between Auckland Council’s Healthy Waters and AT’s maintenance team. Local Board Chair, Beth Houlbrooke and a representative of the Matakana Community have been updated on the methodology for the road rehabilitation, which will be carried out on completion of the Healthy Waters’ work. Further updates will be provided when the AT-related work progresses.

10.     The local board allocated $500,000 from its Local Board Transport Capital Fund towards the preparation of detailed designs and firm cost estimates for construction of several footpaths (RD/2018/87). Subsequently, the chairperson of the Transport, Infrastructure and Environment Committee (TIEC), under delegated authority previously granted (RD/2018/87), has approved construction of the following footpaths based on firm cost estimates discussed at a meeting on 8 March:

·    Blue Gum Drive, Warkworth (full length) – $219,000;

·    Springs Road, Parakai (number 33 to end of road) – $624,000;

·    Arthur Street, Riverhead – $299,000; 

·    Falls Road, Warkworth – a contribution to the total cost of the construction by a local developer.

11.     Construction of the footpath on Blue Gum Drive, Warkworth, has been completed.

12.     Contracts for the construction of the footpaths on Springs Road, Parakai and Arthur Street, Riverhead have been awarded and construction will begin in late August/September.

13.     It is intended that a contribution from the local board will allow a local developer to construct a footpath on Falls Road, Warkworth, between Hudson Road and Mansel Drive, improving connections for the local community and allowing for cost sharing and efficiencies. The cost of this project is already included in the $1,867,000 allocated for Rodney Footpath Designs. The footpath will be constructed during the 2019/2020 financial year. 

14.     At its meeting on 21 February 2019 the TIEC committed to the detailed design for construction of a footpath between number 33 Hudson Road and SH1, Warkworth (project 656, Hudson Road Footpath – Albert to SH1), based on a rough order of costs of $729,000 (RODTP/2019/4). The cost of this project is included in the allocated $1,867,000 for Rodney Footpath Designs. The decision as to whether the footpath on Hudson Road will be constructed has been delegated to the chairperson of the TIEC and further discussions will take place on completion of the design. A consultant has been appointed and detailed design and investigation work is progressing.

15.     The local board agreed that a portion of the $500,000 previously allocated for footpath design would be spent engaging the services of a safety consultant to investigate the feasibility of a footpath outside Dairy Flat school. The consultant’s report has been completed and recommendations made by the consultant to improve safety at the school will be discussed with the local board at a workshop on 5 September. 

16.     Discussions will also take place at a workshop on 5 September regarding a design being prepared by a local consultant, who indicated he was willing to provide professional services at no cost for the planning and supervision for constructing a footpath on Omaha Drive, Omaha. As advised previously, if the local board agrees to fund construction of the footpath, the consultant will seek landowner approvals and those resource consents necessary before handing the project over to AT for internal assessment and approval before the consultant finalises the design and firm cost estimate. The local board is yet to allocate funding to this project, construction of which will be tendered out to AT’s preferred supplier panel.


 

Community Safety Fund

17.     Auckland Transport’s Community Safety Fund (CSF) comprises $20 million in total allocated across all 21 local boards, with $5 million to be allocated during the 2019/2020 financial year and the balance of $15 million over the 2020/2021 financial year. The Rodney Local Board was allocated $2,061,165.

18.     The purpose of the fund is to allow local communities to address long-standing road safety issues that have yet to become regional priorities and therefore not yet been addressed by AT.

19.     At a workshop on 6 June, AT’s CSF Programme Manager provided rough order costs for each project nominated by the local board. At its meeting on 20 June, the local board recommended the following list of projects for funding from Auckland Transport’s Community Safety Fund (RODTP/2019/22):

i)       Motutara Road Crossing

ii)      Motutara Road Footpath extension

iii)     Coatesville Pedestrian Crossing

iv)     Matakana Kea Crossing – Matakana Primary School

v)      Matua / Tapu Road Micro Roundabout

vi)     Safe crossing point at the intersection of Matua and Oraha Road, Huapai

vii)    Rata Street Pedestrian Crossing

viii)   Kaipara College Pedestrian Crossing, Rautawhiri Road

ix)     Waitoki School Kea Crossing

x)      Whangateau Speed Warning Signs

20.    The following projects were recommended for funding from the CSF if there is sufficient funding remaining after the projects in resolution b) above have been costed:

i)       Kumeu Signalised Midblock

ii)      Woodcocks Road crossing.

21.     Since the June meeting, it has been established that AT is able to fund construction of the Kumeu Signalised Midblock from its Minor Improvement Programme. The local board therefore no longer needs to draw funds for this project from its CSF allocation.

22.     The CSF is a finite fund that must be spent by June 30, 2021. If final pricing for a particular project post-tender exceeds the available budget, local boards will have the option of either re-allocating some of their CSF budget (meaning not doing another of the CSF projects chosen by the local board) or using their LBTCF to top-up the budget, as opposed to being unable to fund the project. This will allow each local allocation of the CSF to be fully utilised.

23.    Members are therefore encouraged to indicate their willingness to provide top-up funding from their LBTCF to cover this situation at this meeting by way of the recommendation in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is/are confined to Auckland Transport and do/does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Auckland Transport consultations

25.     Over the last reporting period, AT has invited the local board to provide its feedback on the following proposals:

Location

Proposal

Details and Local Board Feedback

Muriwai Road, Waimauku

Proposed new footpath Muriwai Road, Waimauku.

Documentation explaining a new footpath along Muriwai Road, Waimauku, proposed as part of AT's region-wide footpath programme, was forwarded to members on 11 July 2019. Together with the new footpath, a raised zebra crossing on Muriwai Road between Denehurst Drive and Freshfields Road; a new pram crossing on Rosella Grove; and No Stopping At All Times (NSAAT) restrictions, to improve the visibility of people crossing at both new and existing pedestrian crossing points were proposed. Member Pirrie requested that a link between the new subdivision footpath, and that the local board be kept updated on any decisions made before moving to tendering and construction. Members Johnston and Bailey expressed unreserved support for the proposal.

SH16, Huapai

Proposed signalised crossing SH16, Huapai.

Documentation describing a proposal to install a signalised pedestrian crossing on SH16, Huapai, was forwarded to members on 11 July 2019. The works will include widening portions of the footpath to shorten the crossing distance for pedestrians and removing on-street parking to make space for the crossing. Members Steele and Bailey expressed unreserved support for the crossing. Member Pirrie expressed qualified support, requesting relocation of the bus stop and time restrictions in the parking areas.  Member Pirrie also asked that the local board be kept updated on the project and what would be done to address the car parking loss before any final decisions are made.

Matakana Road, Matakana

Proposed signalised pedestrian crossing on Matakana Road, Matakana.

Documentation describing a signalised pedestrian crossing on Matakana Road, Matakana, proposed by the Rodney Local Board through AT’s Community Safety Funding was forwarded to members on 15 July. The proposal also includes new side islands, pram ramps, road markings and additional NSAAT restrictions to prevent parked cars from blocking visibility of the crossing. Member Houlbrooke advised she was in full support of this pedestrian crossing, also forwarding comments from the Matakana School Board of Trustees and Principal in support of the crossing.

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

26.     AT's resolution and approval process ensures the most appropriate controls and restrictions are put in place and can be legally enforced. Decisions made by AT’s Traffic Control Committee in relation to regulatory processes relevant to the Rodney Local Board during May and June are listed below. There were no decisions made during March relevant to the Rodney Local Board.

Decision

Report Type

Nature of Restriction

Decision

Coatesville-Riverhead Highway, Riverhead

Permanent Traffic and parking changes combined

One-Way, No Right Turn, Lane Arrow Markings, No Stopping At All Times, Bus Stop, Traffic Island, Footpath, Give-Way Control, Roundabout Controlled By Give-Way, Flush Median, Edge Line

Carried

Victoria Street, Warkworth

Permanent Traffic and parking changes

No Stopping At All Times

Carried

Korako Drive / Eric Farley Drive, Huapai

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Event- Sweet Tooth Productions-TV Production - 10/6/2019 and 11/6/2019)

Temporary Traffic and Parking restrictions

Carried

Mahurangi East Road / Amanda Lane / Rangimaarie Crescent / Goodall Road, Snells Beach

Permanent Traffic and parking changes combined

No Stopping At All Times, Bus Stop, Bus Shelter, Traffic Islands, Pedestrian Crossing, Kea Crossing, School Patrol, Give-Way Control, Stop Control, Edge Lines, No Passing

Carried

Issues Raised by Elected Members

27.     Most issues raised by elected members and local board staff are resolved promptly by AT’s Elected Member Relationship Manager. Those which require further investigation are responded to by the relevant department of AT through its customer response team. The list appended to this report at Attachment A summarises these issues to 30 July 2019.

Araparera Forestry and Regional Land Transport Seal Extension Programme Updates

28.     The seal extension programme enabled by the proceeds from the Araparera Forestry joint venture is being procured by AT in two separate work packages:

·        Package 1 – Underwood Road, Whitmore Road and Tauhoa Road;

·        Package 2 – School Road, Krippner Road, Smith Road, Wharehine Road, Dennis Road, Rodney Road.

29.     Package 2 comprises roads that, due to land encroachment, arborist and ecological issues, needed further assessment and possibly resource consents.


 

30.     The table below summarises the status of the Araparera Seal extension sites:

Sites Stage 1

Construction Start Date

Works in progress

Planned Completion Date

Underwood Road

4 March

Sealing works complete. Speed limit signs to be installed.

Substantially complete

Whitmore Road

11 March

Sealing works complete. Speed limit signs to be installed.

Substantially complete

Tauhoa Road

16 May

Sealing works complete. Speed limit signs to be installed.

Substantially complete

School Road

4 June

Sealing works complete. Speed limit signs to be installed. Speed cushions installation to be completed by the week ending 9 August 2019.

Substantially complete

Wharehine Road

4 June

Sealing works complete. Speed limit signs to be installed.

Substantially complete

 

Sites Stage 2

Construction Start Date

Work in progress

Planned Completion Date

Krippner Road 250m

To be confirmed

Design optioneering – issue over the extent of retaining wall that may be required, which may have a significant impact on cost. Geotech investigations progressing.

To be confirmed – 2019/2020 FY

Smith Road 400m

To be confirmed

Design complete. Heritage issue has been resolved. Can now be procured for delivery.

To be confirmed – 2019/2020 FY

Dennis Road 700m

To be confirmed

Design substantially complete, however due to the steep undulating topography, road width is a little constrained at certain points. Resource consent for vegetation trimming being prepared.

To be confirmed – 2019/2020 FY

Rodney Road 600m

To be confirmed

Design substantially complete. Property encroachment issues to be finalised, preferably before construction start. An option is to leave the section of road affected by the property issue out of planned works if this cannot be quickly resolved.

To be confirmed – 2019/2020 FY

31.     The Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) Seal Extension Programme is continuing in tandem with the Araparera Forestry Programme. The table below summarises the status of the RLTP funded Seal Extension programme:

Sites Stage 1

Construction Start Date

Works in progress

Planned Finish Date

Ngarewa Drive 600m

To be confirmed

Re-design 90% complete following agreement for section of priority lane operation. Application for an amendment to the resource consent being prepared.

To be confirmed – 2019/2020 FY

Ahuroa Road 9000m

To be confirmed

Re-design following cost and fit for purpose review of initial scheme design progressing. Planning and property encroachment issues are being worked through.  Construction staging also being planned given the extensive length of unsealed road, budget availability and consideration of disruptive impact of works. Full length will be delivered over several years, with worst sections given priority. Full consultation will be undertaken with residents, Local Board and other affected parties as the project progresses closer to construction phase. At this stage construction of the first section is planned to start early 2020.

To be confirmed – 2019/2020 FY

Wellsford Valley Road 4000m

To be confirmed

Design well underway with new consultant, following poor performance of previous. Site has property encroachment and consenting issues to be resolved.

To be confirmed – 2019/2020 FY

Matakana Link Road Update

32.     The Board of AT has approved the design, land purchase and construction of the Matakana Link Road, the 1.35km link between State Highway 1 and Matakana Road that will provide additional resilience to the Warkworth transport network.

33.     The new road aims to:

·    Provide for strong east-west connections and north-south connections which bypass central Warkworth; and

·    Improve access to new growth areas.

34.     The aim is to complete construction of the link road in time for the opening of NZTA’s Pūhoi to Warkworth project in October 2021, depending on land acquisition and the resolution of any outstanding Resource Management Act appeals.

35.     AT will shortly be seeking construction prices for two designs, with funding approval from NZTA already granted for the base design, a two-lane road with 800 metres of four lane road capacity to just before the new bridge, together with off-road facilities for walking and cycling. Under the base design the remaining four-laning would be added as a second stage at a later time.

36.     AT’s pre-qualified construction companies will also be asked for prices on the option of four lanes for the full length of the road, including the new bridge, to be built in one stage, with the intent that construction pricing may allow the four lane work to be done within the current approved budget.

37.     Further information about the Matakana Link Road project can be found at https://at.govt.nz/projects-roadworks/matakana-link-road/.

Dairy Flat Highway and Coatesville Riverhead Road intersection

38.     AT continues to roll out safety improvements in Dairy Flat with work starting on the long-awaited new roundabout at the Dairy Flat Highway and Coatesville Riverhead Road intersection in July.  

39.     The roundabout is just one improvement being made together with right turn bays, centre median safety barriers, side barriers and intersection upgrades. Speed restrictions were put in place along sections of the highway earlier this year. The safety improvements in Dairy Flat have been made possible due to partial funding from the Regional Fuel Tax, from which $225m has been allocated to improving road safety in both urban and rural areas.

40.     Construction of the roundabout is scheduled to be completed by mid-2020. Traffic management will be in place during the entire construction period, and anticipated delays will be communicated to the public with regular project updates.

41.     Other work being carried out as part of the project:

·    Improved road markings at the intersections of Wilks Road and Pine Valley Roads, as well as new signage to provide drivers with more time to slow down before the intersections.

·    Intersection upgrade at Kahikatea Flat Road.

·    New right turn bay into Bawden Road, along with intersection improvements.

·    Changing passing lanes to a slow vehicle bay from Durey Road to Potter Road to encourage slower speeds.

·    New centre median safety barriers and new right turn bay into Potter Road.

42.     For more information and project updates visit https://at.govt.nz/projects-roadworks/dairy-flat-highway-safety-improvements/.

Speed Limits Bylaw

43.     A total of 11,719 submissions were received on the proposed speed limit changes around Auckland, each of which is now being read and analysed.

44.     Much of the feedback received was location specific with a high level of detail provided. Amongst the feedback, 5,415 comments on roads included in the Speed Limits Bylaw were received, and 2,158 comments were received on 776 roads where no speed limit changes had been proposed. Feedback requesting speed limit reductions on 876 kilometres of roads which were not part of the proposal consulted on was also received.

45.     A team of road safety engineers is reviewing all of this feedback and carrying out further investigations where necessary. Over 6,500 hours had been invested in considering the views of Aucklanders who submitted on the proposal to the end of June.

46.     Because AT is determined to review and consider all the feedback provided, more time is needed to ensure the process is rigorous and there can be confidence in any decision that may be taken. As a result, the decision-making timeline has been extended and AT’s Board of Directors will now deliberate on the proposed Bylaw during September 2019. Although this is later than anticipated, it is necessary due to the volume of submissions and level of detail provided.

47.     Further information and updates on the Speed Limits Bylaw is available on AT’s Safe Speeds Programme project page

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

49.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.     Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for the transport projects undertaken in the local board area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Auckland Transport will provide a further update report to the Transport, Infrastructure and Environment Committee at its next meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney transport issues list

53

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ellen Barrett – Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate update 

File No.: CP2019/14861

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Rodney Local Board on the progress of individual projects funded through the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides information about delivery of projects funded by the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

3.       This report provides a summary of progress as follows:

·    Communications and Marketing:

The communications and marketing programme and activities have been implemented to adequately inform relevant people and organisations of the new bus services.

·    Bus Services:

All tasks required to finalise and implement all bus services have been completed.

·    Park and Ride Facilities:

The mandate that instructs Auckland Transport’s Delivery Team to design, consent, and procure construction of the Park and Ride facilities has been completed. The contract for the design and construction of the Park and Ride facilities has been awarded and the detailed design of the Park and Ride facilities is underway. 

·    Bus Stops:

With the exception of a few bus stops still under design, the majority of the bus stops and footpaths for the bus services delivered under the targeted rate have been constructed.

·    Footpath Programme:

The local board reviewed the Footpath Prioritisation Summary (Attachment A to the agenda report) prepared by the project team and has requested that the project team move forward with getting rough order costings done on the footpaths in order to get determine the estimated budget for the Footpath Programme.

·    Financials:

To date, approximately $4.18m of the targeted rate has been collected and expenditure is $761,595. This is on track and the surplus will start building a reserve that will be needed to fund capital items in later years.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the progress of the delivery of passenger transport services and related infrastructure funded through the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

b)      request that Auckland Transport use transport targeted rate funding to obtain rough order costings for the footpath segments identified to be delivered by the targeted rate.

Horopaki

Context

4.       In May 2018 the Rodney Local Board requested that the Governing Body strike a targeted rate to accelerate investment in the passenger transport services in the Rodney Local Board area.

5.       In August 2018 a workshop was held to discuss options and priorities for delivery of projects.  The outcome of this workshop were the following targeted rate projects:

·        A new bus service from Wellsford to Warkworth

·        A new bus service from Helensville to Silverdale (Hibiscus Coast Station) via Kaukapakapa

·        Riverhead bus services

·        Building park and ride facilities at Warkworth and at Huapai or Kumeu.

6.       In September 2018 the local board approved the use of the targeted rate funding to investigate and design the above projects.

7.       Subsequently, a decision was made to investigate and design a bus service between Westgate and Albany.

8.       The details of the above three bus services were presented to the Rodney Local Board Transport, Infrastructure and Environment Committee  at a workshop in  October 2018, and the details of the proposed park and ride facilities were presented to the local board in July 2019.

9.       This report provides a summary of the progress since the presentation to the local board on 4 July 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Communications and Marketing

10.     The communications and marketing programme and activities have been implemented to adequately inform relevant people and organisations of the new bus services.

Bus Services

11.     All tasks required to finalise and implement all new bus services have been completed.

12.     Passenger usage numbers for the bus services are on target or exceeding targets for the first year of service, as illustrated in Table 1 below:

Table 1 Bus Patronage vs. Targets

Bus Stops

13.     The majority of the bus stops and footpaths for the bus services delivered under the targeted rate have been constructed.  Table 2 below shows the status of the new bus stop infrastructure that has been delivered:

Table 2 Status of New Bus Stop Infrastructure

Street Number

Street Name

Routes

Phase

799

Kaipara Coast Highway

128

Design

799 opp

Kaipara Coast Highway

128

Design

1409

Coatesville-Riverhead Hwy

126

Design

1409 opp

Coatesville-Riverhead Hwy

126

Design

1158

Coatesville-Riverhead Hwy

126

Delivered

opp 1170

Coatesville-Riverhead Hwy

126

Delivered

1135

Coatesville-Riverhead Hwy

126

Delivered

opp 1093

Coatesville-Riverhead Hwy

126

Delivered

1074 opp

Coatesville-Riverhead Hwy

126

Delivered

1068

Coatesville-Riverhead Hwy

126

Delivered

1010

Coatesville-Riverhead Hwy

126

Delivered

1011

Coatesville-Riverhead Hwy

126

Delivered

1047

Coatesville-Riverhead Hwy

126

Delivered

1049 opp

Coatesville-Riverhead Hwy

126

Delivered

312

Coatesville-Riverhead Hwy

126

Delivered

311

Coatesville-Riverhead Hwy

126

Delivered

Exit lane

Opoto Place

128

Delivered

37 opp

Station Road

998

Delivered

1578

Kahikatea Flat Road

128

Delivered

1591 East

Kahikatea Flat Road

128

Delivered

1091

Kahikatea Flat Road

128

Delivered

1091 opp

Kahikatea Flat Road

128

Delivered

14.    The local board has requested that Auckland Transport (AT) consider installing a pair of bus stops for the 126 service near 1409 Coatesville Riverhead Highway. AT is investigating an option for temporary stops at this location due to the construction of a roundabout at the intersection with State Highway 16 (SH16) by the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA). The roundabout has an indicative construction date of 2020. AT has investigated options for this location and will be seeking local board input for the preferred option before progressing with design and further investigations.

15.     AT continues to have discussion with NZTA to confirm the incorporation of two sets of permanent bus stops into the roundabout design near the intersection of SH16 and Coatesville Riverhead Hwy. NZTA has not confirmed any proposed locations of the stops as they are relevant to Stage 2 of the roundabout which has yet to be designed. Conversations with NZTA and AT will resume in September when there will be further information on the timeline.

Park and Ride Facilities

16.     The mandate that instructs AT’s Delivery Team to design, consent, and procure construction of the Park and Ride facilities has been completed. The contract for the design and construction of the Park and Ride facilities has been awarded and the detailed design of the Park and Ride facilities is underway.  The Park and Ride Facilities are currently estimated to cost between $3m-$6m, subject to further investigation. The indicative programme is as follows:

·   Concept design completed (and NZTA approval) by early September 2019

·   RMA consent applications (subject to land owner approvals) are to be lodged by end of October 2019

·   Detailed design to be completed by end of October 2019

·   Physical works tender is to be advertised by end of November 2019.

Footpath Programme

17.     When the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate (RLBTTR) was struck in 2018, it included an unprioritised (and uncosted) list of 29 potential footpath segments to be created to support the new transport improvements associated with the rate. The project team reviewed these segments and prepared a Footpath Prioritisation summary to the local board.

18.     The local board has requested that the project team move forward with getting rough order costings done on the footpaths in order to get determine the estimated cost for the Footpath Programme, which can then be prioritised to meet the budget as it becomes available. The information collected from the costings will determine whether the list of footpath segments will need to be further refined due to financial constraints.

19.     Rough order costings were previously completed for three out of the 29 segments identified in the Footpath Prioriorisation summary. At the request of the local board, the footpath proposed in Matakana was removed from the list as it is no longer required. Rough order costings will need to be acquired for the remaining segments. It is recommended that the local board request that Auckland Transport use transport targeted rate funding to obtain rough order costings for the footpath segments identified to be delivered by the targeted rate.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     AT is working with Council’s Parks, Sport and Recreation department in order to address any impact related to the proposed Park and Ride facilities in the vicinity of the Huapai Domain. Discussions are ongoing and will continue as investigations proceed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Auckland Transport consultations

21.     The key local impacts are related to the construction of the new bus stops at this stage.  Due to the tight timeframe to implement the services, consultation was only undertaken with directly-affected property owners. 

22.     AT has provided expert advice to the Rodney Local Board on the routes, timetables and infrastructure for the bus services established with the Transport Targeted Rate. The bus stop design were also reviewed by local board members. Further requests for additional stops have since been made and will need to be assessed by AT in due course.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out in association with individual projects.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The amount of the targeted rate collected to date to 30 June (being the full 2018/2019 year) is approximately $4.18 million.  To date expenditure is $761,595 (leaving approximately $3.4 million unspent this year).  Current expeditures are related to communications, park and ride investigations, bus stop infrastructure, bus services, footpath construction and some design costs.

25.     The unspent money this year is planned for as the need to setup the various programmes through planning, design and implementation takes time but relatively little expenditure. Additionally, the targeted rate was designed with only a small capacity to borrow funding in advance if required, and the footpath program in particular was always expected to be delivered once a reserve fund of capital had built up and was available. 

26.     Over the next three years (2019-2022) budgeted expenditure will increase sharply once all new bus stops are constructed, park and ride design and construction are undertaken, footpath programme initiated and all bus services have run a full year of operation. During this period, expenditure is currently forecast to exceed the income from the targeted rate, making use of the underspend in the 2018/2019 year. The majority of this is forecast to be spent on park and rides. It is expected that from 2022/2023 onwards, the income and expenditure will begin to keep pace with each other (as illustrated in Figure 1 below):

 

Figure 1 Forecasted Annual Expenditures and Income Collection

27.     The currently expected expenditure on the targeted rate programe is illustrated in Figure 1 below. It is important to note that costs for the footpath programme are not yet determined and will be developed once rough order costings are obtained. Final costs for the Park and Rides are not known. Cost changes will require an adjustment to the program as they become known:

Figure 2 Forecasted Programme Expeditures

28.     In the original targeted rate report dated 24 May 2018, bus services were proposed from Huapai to Westgate ($230,000 per annum) and Riverhead to Westgate ($520,000 per annum). These services were replaced with the bus service from Westgate to Albany which was originally costed at $420,000 per annum. There is a difference in the original estimates and the actual costs due to refinement of the scope of services provided between the time the services were presented for the report and the retention of an operator for services. The differences have been presented through previous updates to the local board and the detail of all previous changes have not been replicated in this report. The breakdown of the expected annual costs to deliver the current bus services are (costs for the part of the 2018/2019 year the service was running is in brackets):


 

·        Wellsford to Warkworth (998) - $520,000 ($143,252)

·        Helensville to Hibiscus Coast (128) - $752,000 ($380,023)

·        Westgate to Albany (126) - $760,000 ($107,839)

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     Risks and mitigations are detailed throughout this report. The largest risk is that the major capital works on the Park and Rides end up being significantly higher than anticipated (currently budgeted at $4.5 million). That would require work to be rephased or reprioritised as appropriate, in discussion with the local board.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     AT will provide updates as required.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Footpath prioritisation summary

65

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tiffany Robinson – Senior Transport Planner, Harrison Grierson

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 



Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Rodney Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14467

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Rodney Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter four, 1 April – 30 June 2019, and the overall performance for the financial year, against the agreed 2018/2019 local board work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Rodney Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2018/2019 financial year.

3.       Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

4.       One hundred and thirteen activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered, including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Thirteen activities were either undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred, and 18 projects/activities have not progressed as expected during 2018/2019.

5.       Key highlights for quarter four include (work programme ID in brackets):

·    Muriwai Beach – renew and upgrade playground (1850) was completed and the new playground equipment in use since May 2019

·    Coatesville Settlers Hall – replace roof components (1839) physical works were completed in June 2019

·    Puhoi Pioneers Memorial Park – remove failed structures (2824) was completed in May 2019, with the timber from the dilapidated barn used, amongst other things, to rebuild a school in Tonga that had been ravaged by a storm

·    Rodney Healthy Harbours Riparian Restoration Fund (358) was fully allocated this quarter, with $127,869 granted to 12 applicants to replant riverbanks and erect almost 9.5km of stock proof fencing. The fund was supplemented by an additional investment of $99,030 from the Water Quality Targeted Rate.

6.       Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme include (work programme ID in brackets):

·     Algies Bay Reserve – renew south-eastern seawalls (1837) was substantially completed, with only some minor works left to complete

·     Rautawhiri Park – renew courts (1856) and Rodney recreational walkways - Rautawhiri Park – development (1885) were completed, with fully refurbished tennis and netball courts and a perimeter path provided for users of the park

·     Kumeu Arts Centre – improve assets (3057) was completed in April 2019 with new studio space, decking and paths to connect with the existing arts centre

·     Wellsford War Memorial – renew active youth space (1899) was completed in September 2018 and provided a completely overhauled and expanded playspace and skatepark for Wellsford.

7.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include (work programme ID in brackets):

·    Rodney – renew community facilities (1863) is on hold pending the completion of strategic assessments and building condition assessments

·    Whangateau Reserve – renew toilet waste water system (3000) is on hold pending advice from Healthy Waters on the wider investigation on waste water solutions for the area

·    RD: Investigate options to deliver local paths has not progressed as quickly as anticipated due to project complexity and the number of stakeholder groups to consult with. Development of the draft document will continue into quarter two of 2019/2020.

8.       The 2018/2019 financial performance report is attached but under confidential cover. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – expected to be made public 30 September 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter and year ending 30 June 2019

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2018/2019 are released to the NZX which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Rodney Local Board has an approved 2018/2019 work programme for the following operating departments:

·    Community Services (Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; Parks, Sport and Recreation; and Service Strategy and Integration) approved on 21 June 2018

·    Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew and Community Leases, approved on 19 July 2018

·    Infrastructure and Environmental Services, approved on 21 June 2018.

10.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

11.     Operating departments have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery for the financial quarter and year ending 30 June 2019 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

Key highlights for quarter four

12.     The key achievements to report from the quarter four period include (work programme ID in brackets):

·    Muriwai Beach – renew and upgrade playground (1850) was completed and the new playground equipment is now in use

·    Coatesville Settlers Hall – replace roof components (1839) physical works were completed in June 2019

·    Puhoi Pioneers Memorial Park – remove failed structures (2824) was completed in May 2019, with the timber from the dilapidated barn used, amongst other things, to rebuild a school in Tonga that had been ravaged by a storm

·    Rodney Healthy Harbours Riparian Restoration Fund (358) was fully allocated this quarter with $127,869 granted to 12 applicants to replant riverbanks and erect almost 9.5km of stock proof fencing. The fund was supplemented by an additional investment of $99,030 from the Water Quality Targeted Rate.

Overall performance against the Rodney Local Board 2018/2019 work programme

13.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected (completed by the end of July 2019) or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

14.     The graph below shows the status and stage of the activities in each department’s work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

15.     The table below shows the overall performance of work programme activities (RAG status and activity status by work programme).

Table 1: End of year Local Board Work Programmes Status

RAG Status

Activity Status

ACE

PSR

Libraries

SS&I

CF

Leases

I&ES

Green

Completed

16

2

9

-

31

8

3

In progress

-

2

-

2

40

-

-

Amber

In progress

1

2

-

-

11

2

-

Red

In progress

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

On Hold

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

Grey

Deferred

-

-

-

-

-

9

-

Cancelled

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

 

Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme

16.     Key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2018/2019 include:

·    Algies Bay Reserve – renew south-eastern seawalls (1837) was substantially completed, with only some minor works left to complete

·    Rautawhiri Park – renew courts (1856) and Rodney recreational Walkways - Rautawhiri Park – development (1885) were completed, with fully refurbished tennis and netball courts and a perimeter path provided for users of the park

·    Kumeu Arts Centre – improve assets (3057) was completed in April 2019 with new studio space, decking and paths to connect with the existing arts centre

·    Wellsford War Memorial – renew active youth space (1899) was completed in September 2018 and provided a completely overhauled and expanded playspace and skatepark for Wellsford.

Overview of work programme performance by department

Arts, Community and Events work programme

17.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 16 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), and one activity is in progress but delayed (amber) as noted below:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Community Participation and Placemaking (1049)

Amber

In progress

More time is required to ensure meaningful engagement is undertaken with iwi regarding the Warkworth, Helensville and Wellsford town centre/placemaking improvements for each location. Staff will propose that this budget is carried forward into the 2019/2020 year to complete this work. 

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

18.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are four activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), and one activity that is significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red). Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

RD: Investigate options to deliver local paths (447)

Red

In Progress

Due to project complexity and multiple stakeholder groups, development of the draft documents will continue in 2019/2020 and is anticipated to be completed in Q2.

Libraries and Information work programme

19.     In the Libraries and Information work programme, all nine activities were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green).

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

20.     In the Service Strategy and Integration work programme, the two multiyear activities have progressed as anticipated for the 2018/2019 year and are continuing into the 2019/2020 year (green).

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

21.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 71 activities that were completed by the end of the year, or will be by end of July 2019, or are multiyear projects that have progressed as anticipated during the 2018/2019 year (green).  There are 11 activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), two activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red), and two activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Rodney – renew community facilities (1863)

Red

On Hold

This project is awaiting strategic assessments to determine the scope of works, as well as building condition assessments

Whangateau Reserve – renew toilet waste water system (3000)

Red

On Hold

Healthy Waters are completing wider investigations of waste water solutions for this area. The project is on hold until all renewal items are identified in conjunction with the Healthy Waters solution for the entire reserve.

49 Commercial Road, Helensville – implement works from structural review and replace roof at the centre (1835)

Amber

In Progress

Additional items have been identified that need to be addressed to meet the requirements of the current building code. Consultants have been engaged to provide architectural full service, design, tender and contract administration for short term repairs.

49 Commercial Road, Helensville – renew carpark storm water system (1836)

Amber

In Progress

Given the impact that physical works will have on the operation of the Arts Centre and Budgeting Services, as well as interruption for Library car park users, physical works have been delayed until January/February 2020.

Kumeu Library – replace roof, interior and exterior walls, repaint and renew ceiling (1845)

Amber

In Progress

Ongoing investigations into the scope of works required have meant that an estimated completion date cannot be confirmed at this stage.  An offer of service for targeted renewal works is currently being reviewed prior to issuing a contract.

Port Albert - renew reserve assets 2018/2019 (1853)

Amber

In Progress

Physical works were delayed due to health and safety issues, but are now underway and 70 per cent complete.

Tauhoa Hall – renew kitchen (1891)

Amber

In Progress

Physical works were delayed while investigations into solar panels for the roof identified structural issues that will require future works. The roof renewal will be programmed for future years; the kitchen renewal will proceed in due course

Rodney Recreation Walkways – Kowhai Park Reserve – develop walkway/cycleway (3045)

Amber

In Progress

Delays were incurred due to difficulties obtaining private landowner approval to cross a section of jointly owned land.  An alternative route was approved at the business meeting on 20 June 2019 and the project can now continue.

Huapai Service Centre Riverbank – develop community space

Amber

In Progress

The project was delayed as a flow on from delays with the Kumeu Arts Centre building consent.  Consent for the platform was also delayed and design changes have been commissioned to progress the consent application.

Community Leases work programme

22.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are eight activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), one activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and nine activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Huapai Reserve: Norwest United Association Football & Sports Club Inc

Red

In Progress

Staff are awaiting the submission of a new lease application from the lessee.  This matter has been deferred to the 2019/2020 work programme. 

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

23.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, all three activities were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green).

Deferred activities

24.     As part of the local board funding policy, activities funded through the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operating fund that were not delivered in 2018/2019 will be deferred into 2019/2020 work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     This report informs the Rodney Local Board of the performance for quarter ending 30 June 2019 and the performance for the 2018/2019 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Māori, as stakeholders in the council, are affected and have an interest in any report on the quarterly financial results. However, the recommendation to the local board of receiving the report has no particular benefit to, or adverse effect on, Māori.

28.     As part of the local board work programme item ‘Rodney Healthy Harbours Riparian Restoration Fund’ staff continue to work with the local board’s iwi partners, Te Uri o Hau, who are providing plants for the project from their nursery in Te Arai.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     This report is provided to enable the Rodney Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2018/2019 work programmes and to report this to the public. This report is for information only and therefore there are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

30.     Auckland Council currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX expect to be made public on 30 September.

31.     Due to these obligations the financial performance to the quarterly report (Attachment B to this agenda) is under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

33.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work programme Q4 report

81

b

Rodney Local Board Quarterly Performance Report June 2019 - Financial Appendix (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jonathan Hope – Senior Local Board Advisor - Rodney

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 



Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


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Rodney Local Board

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Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14279

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2018/2019 Annual Report for the Rodney Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 26 September 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2018/2019 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the New Zealand Stock Exchange Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013, local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      adopt the 2018/2019 Rodney Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A to this agenda report.

b)      note that any proposed changes will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019.

c)      note that the draft 2018/2019 Rodney Local Board Annual Report (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report) will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2018/2019 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities, and the overall Financial Impact Statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.


 

6.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market (quoted bonds) maintained by NZX Limited. As a result, the council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules (listing rules) and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA). Under these obligations, local boards may not release annual financial results in any form, including publishing their agenda/minutes containing their results, until council group results are released to the NZX on 27 September 2019.  Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi relates to the local board area.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area, summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved.

Funding information

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English, and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2018/2019 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2019

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 26 September 2019

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 27 September 2018

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Rodney Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019 (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David Gurney - Manager Corporate Performance & Reporting

Authorisers

Kevin Ramsay - General Manager Corporate Finance and Property

Victoria Villaraza – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes

File No.: CP2019/14431

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, and to provide feedback on the recommended changes to the document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is currently reviewing the Auckland Film Protocol. The Auckland Film Protocol sets out:

·        the commitment of the Council Group to supporting filming in Auckland;

·        expectations and rules that filmmakers must abide by when filming in Auckland; and

·        provides guidance for filmmakers on the process for approval to film in Auckland.

3.       The purpose of the review was to ensure that the Auckland Film Protocol is up-to-date and identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities that should be addressed.  Content of the Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Auckland Film Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Auckland Film Protocol. 

4.       A revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in June 2019 for consideration and was approved for public consultation (resolution number ENV/2019/73). 

5.       The following is a summary of the key changes made to the Auckland Film Protocol before public consultation was undertaken:

·        Native species: new content added stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: new content added providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: new content added stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: new content added stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: new content added to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was updated to reflect current policy, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council.  Some structural and editorial amendments were also made to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

6.       Public consultation was undertaken over a three week period between 21 June and 12 July 2019.

7.       A total of 74 submissions were received during the public consultation period.  Rodney Local Board residents provided a total of six submissions on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, representing 8.1 percent of all submissions.  The views of submitters from the Rodney Local Board area were generally consistent with regional views. Staff are proposing some changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address submitter concerns; the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film protocol are shown in track changes in Attachment B to the agenda report.

8.       This report provides a summary of public feedback and of proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address feedback.  The following is a high‑level summary of the key changes proposed to the Auckland Film Protocol in response to public consultation:

·        Natural environment: include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Native species: include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Kauri dieback: amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

·        Impact on access to public open space: include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

·        Compliance and enforcement: include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with the Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

9.       Submission themes and proposed changes are summarised in Attachment A to the agenda report.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol

b)      provide feedback on the recommended changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol

c)      note that local board feedback will be included in a report to the Environment and Community Committee in August 2019, seeking approval for the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

Horopaki

Context

10.     The first version of the Auckland Film Protocol (the Protocol) was adopted by the Regional Development and Operations Committee (resolution number RDO/2013/27) on 14 March 2013.  A review of fees for filming in the Auckland Region was undertaken in 2014 and a new set of region‑wide charges was recommended; providing a simplified and harmonised range of charges.  The Governing Body adopted a region‑wide schedule of film fees and revised Auckland Film Protocol on 28 May 2015 (resolution number GB/2015/36).

11.     Since the Protocol was adopted in 2015 there have been a number of changes to legislation and to Auckland Council’s policy and planning framework. The purpose of the review of the Protocol was to:

·        ensure that the Protocol is up-to-date; and

·        identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities to be addressed in the Protocol.

Content of the Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.

12.     Workshops were held in September and October 2018 to engage with local boards that experience a high volume of filming.

13.     Engagement to inform the preparation of the revised draft Protocol was also undertaken with:

·        mana whenua: mana whenua interests are represented by 19 iwi (tribal) authorities in Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland.  The 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review of the Protocol.

·        staff of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to inform the review.

·        screen sector: the screen sector was invited to participate in a survey in April 2019 to inform the review.  The survey asked a series of general questions about the Protocol and experiences of filming in public open space in Auckland. 

·        public: the People’s Panel in September 2018; a total of 4,762 responses were received.  The survey asked a series of questions on views on and experiences of filming in Auckland. 

A high-level summary of feedback (including local board feedback) is provided in Attachment C to the agenda report.

14.     The review recommended that a range of changes be made to the Auckland Film Protocol, the following is a summary of the key changes proposed to the Environment and Community Committee:

·        Native species: include new content stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: include new content providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include new content stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: include new content stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: include new content to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Filming on Tūpuna Maunga: update content to reflect that applications to film on Tūpuna Maunga are assessed by the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority.

·        Updates to content: update content to reflect current policy (e.g. smokefree policy), plans (Auckland Unitary Plan) and bylaws of Auckland Council.

·        Structural and editorial: amend some parts of the document to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

15.     The revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was approved by the Environment and Community Committee for public consultation in June 2019 (resolution number ENV/2019/73).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     Consultation on the revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol took place from 21 June to 12 July 2019.  A total of 74 submissions were received; this represents a substantial increase on the 21 submission which were received in response to the 2015 review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  Of the submissions received, 72 were submitted using the online form and 2 non‑form hardcopy submissions were received. 

17.     Submitters were asked to identify if they worked in the screen sector or not, with:

·        29 submissions (39%) received from individuals or organisations that identified themselves as working in the screen sector

·        45 submissions (61%) received from individuals or organisations that do not work in the screen sector.

The questions included in the online form varied depending on whether the submitter identified themselves as working in the screen industry or not.

18.     A breakdown of all submissions received by local board area is shown in Table 1 below.  The small number of responses from individual local board areas means that an analysis of views by local board area was not possible for all local board areas.

Table 1: Breakdown of submissions made by local board area.

Local Board Area

Number of respondents

Percentage of respondents

Waitākere Ranges

17

23.0%

Albert-Eden

9

12.2%

Waitematā

8

10.8%

Rodney

6

8.1%

Upper Harbour

5

6.8%

Ōrākei

5

6.8%

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

4

5.4%

Devonport-Takapuna

4

5.4%

Henderson-Massey

3

4.1%

Kaipātiki

3

4.1%

Howick

2

2.7%

Whau

2

2.7%

Māngere-Ōtahuhu

1

1.4%

Puketapapa

1

1.4%

Hibiscus and Bays

1

1.4%

Papakura

1

1.4%

Franklin

0

0%

Great Barrier

0

0%

Ōtara‑Papatoetoe

0

0%

Manurewa

0

0%

Waiheke

0

0%

Don't Know

1

1.4%

Outside Auckland

1

1.4%

Total

74

 

19.    A series of closed questions were asked of non‑screen sector individuals and organisations; a summary of the responses to these questions is shown in Table 2 below.  Table 2 shows that:

·        most respondents are supportive of Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach and that;

·        most respondents think that the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on residents and businesses, on public open space and historic and cultural heritage.

Table 2: Feedback on the Auckland Film Protocols management of the impacts of filming

Question

Response

Percentage of regional submissions

(number of respondents is shown in brackets)

Do you support Auckland Council's film‑friendly approach?

Yes

75% (33)

Partially

20% (9)

No

5% (2)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on residents and businesses?

Yes

56% (18)

Partially

19% (6)

No

25% (8)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on our public open space and environment?

Yes

53% (23)

Partially

33% (14)

No

14% (6)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on our historic and cultural heritage?

Yes

62% (26)

Partially

29% (12)

No

10% (4)

20.    The main reasons given by those who supported Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach are shown in Table 3.

Table 3: Summary of key reasons for supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Economic

·      generates employment and economic growth;

·      benefits communities and local businesses;

·      benefits a broad range of trades and industries;

·      attracts investment and businesses to Auckland.

Cultural and creative

·      has cultural benefits allowing and supporting the telling of stories visually;

·      supports the creative economy and enables people to find a future in the creative industries;

·      It’s fun and exciting to see Auckland on the screen.

Promotion and tourism

·      promotes and showcases Auckland to the world;

·      creates a positive image of Auckland.

21.    Table 4 showns the key reasons that respondents gave for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Table 4: Summary of key reasons given for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Access

·      the impacts on resident, including parking restrictions, road closures and ability to use public open space while filming is taking place need to be considered and managed;

·      need to ensure that film‑makers are respectful of other users of public open space.

Notification

·      there needs to be sufficient notification to ensure that residents and businesses are aware of open space being used for filming and are not inconvenienced.

Balance

·      need to consider and manage the impact that filming has on the environment and impacted residents;

·      need to balance the cumulative impacts of filming.

Equity

·      need to ensure that fees for commercial use of public places are fair.

22.    The key reasons given for not supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach were:

·        the cost to ratepayers of enabling filming;

·        that there is not enough protection for individuals, businesses and residents affected by filming being carried out on private property.

23.     A series of open‑ended questions were also included to elicit further information about responses to these questions and about a range of other topics.  Staff have worked through submissions to determine any changes to be recommended for the final revised Auckland Film Protocol.  Attachment A identifies key themes and submission points along with proposed staff responses.  

A summary of the most common submission themes and the proposed staff responses are shown in table 5.

Table 5: Summary of key submission themes and proposed staff responses.

Key themes

Summary of proposed responses

Use of drones for filming

Include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

Impact on natural environment

Include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Kauri dieback

Amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

Impact on native species

Include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Impact on access to public open space

Include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

Compliance and enforcement

Include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

Health and safety

Amend to enable production companies to arrange alternative timeframes for the submission of a site specific health and safety plan by agreement with Screen Auckland.

Notification

Screen Auckland to consider operational approaches to achieving wider public notification.

Impact on business

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  The protocol is intended to provide a framework that enables decisions to be made on a case‑by‑case basis.

Equity

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  Fees for commercial use of public open space are set under the Auckland Council Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 and amended through the long term plan and annual plan.

24.    This report seeks formal feedback from the board at its August 2019 business meeting on the recommended changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol in response to consultation feedback.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.  This included engagement with Auckland Transport, Panuku Development Auckland, and with Auckland Council community facilities, region‑wide planning, social policy and bylaws, visitor experience and heritage

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Role of local boards in film permitting

26.     Landowner approval is required to film on any public open space in the Auckland region.  Local boards are responsible for landowner approvals for local parks and reserves.  Engagement with local boards that experience a high volume of applications for film permits was undertaken in September and October 2018 to inform the review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  A summary of the key engagement themes is included in Attachment C to the agenda report and was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

27.     A key theme from local board engagement was that the film permit timeframes mean that landowner approval timeframes are very tight, particularly when considering complex or contentious applications.  It was also noted that the current timeframes do not allow sufficient time to consider applications at full board meetings or to consult key stakeholders.  Given this, the following options on film permit timeframes were presented to the Environment and Community Committee at a workshop in May 2019 and at the June 2019 meeting.

Option one: Status Quo

Option two: amend the permit timeframes

·        Option 2(a) the permit time frame is amended to be “up to five working days”.

·        Option 2(b) the permit time frame is increased to 5‑7 working days.

28.     Following direction from the Committee, that increasing timeframes could act as a disincentive making Auckland internationally uncompetitive, the status quo option was retained in the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     ATEED has an ongoing relationship with several mana whenua and mataawaka groups, across its whole portfolio of activity.  To inform the review of the Protocol the 19 Iwi Authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review.  In relation to film permit applications Māori views and input may be obtained in several ways where there is a potential impact on particular land or sites. This is usually coordinated either by the film facilitator, or through the relevant parks manager.

30.     Specific processes are in place for the tūpuna maunga, with all commercial filming on the maunga requiring the approval of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority).  Screen Auckland facilitates all requests for approval to film on the tūpuna maunga.  Approval to film will be subject to conditions and restrictions set by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.  Meetings were held with staff of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to inform the review and ensure that proposed amendments are consistent with the policy of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The proposed amendments to the Protocol do not impact on existing levels of service and will not impact on operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     There are no significant risks arising from the board giving feedback on the proposed changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol at this time.

33.     If adoption of the revised Auckland Film Protocol is delayed this would impact on council’s ability to implement the proposed changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Public feedback and proposed amendments to the Auckland Film Protocol will be presented to the Environment and Community Committee for approval.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key submission themes and responses

123

b

Draft 2019 Auckland Film Protocol

131

c

Summary of preconsultation engagement

191

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Marie Jenkins – Screen Facilitation Manaager, ATEED

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 


 


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15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

New road name in the Peter McMillan subdivision at 99 & 107  McKinney Road, Warkworth

File No.: CP2019/14191

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve a road name for the new public road in the Peter McMillan subdivision at 99 and 107 McKinney Road, Warkworth.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

3.       The applicant, Peter McMillan, has submitted the following name for the new road serving the new subdivision at McKinney Road in the Peter McMillan subdivision at 99 and 107 McKinney Road, Warkworth.

Preferred Name

Alternative Name

Three Brothers Place

Six Sons Place

Taitamariki Place

Rangatahi Place

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the name Three Bothers Place for the new public road in the Peter McMillan subdivision at 99 and 107 McKinney Road, Warkworth, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 and as referenced in Attachment A and B to the agenda report

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       The subdivision into 20 residential lots has been approved and the council reference is BUN60323737.

5.       A condition of the subdivision consent was to suggest to council a name for the new road.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the local noard’s approval.


 

7.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

·    A historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·    A particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·    An existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

·    The use of Māori names is actively encouraged.

8.       The applicant has submitted the following names for consideration.

Preferred Name

Meaning

Three Brothers Place

Each family who originally lived on the land had three sons.

Taitamariki Place

 

Younger generation (this captures the six sons)

Alternative Names

Meaning

Six Sons Place

Both families each had three sons.

Rangatahi Place

Older/younger generation (this captures the three brothers)

9.      The Wardenaar and Rawlings/McMillan families each had three sons who all spent their childhood and adolescence at their homes on McKinney Road. The applicant has requested that the name of the road reflect the families’ connection with this land. He feels strongly about this.

10.     The applicant has contacted Ngati Manuhuri who have commented that while they have taken into account the suggested names they would prefer a Māori road name in this area.

11.     The officer acknowledges that where possible the use of Māori names is encouraged in the Auckland Plan.

12.     Land Information New Zealand has confirmed that the proposed road names are unique and acceptable.

13.     The proposed names are deemed to meet the council’s road naming guidelines and the officer’s recommendation is to approve the applicant’s choice.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significance policy and is not considered to have any immediate impacts on any council groups.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significance policy and is not considered to have any immediate impacts on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

16.     The applicant has written to Ngati Manuhuri, who have replied stating that they would prefer Māori names in this area but understood the reasoning behind the developer’s request.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

17.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

18.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

19.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

McKinney Road Scheme Plan

199

b

McKinney Road Locality Map

201

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Angove – Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

New road name in the Mary J Holdings Limited subdivision at 200 Tawa Road, Kumeu

File No.: CP2019/14213

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve a new road name for the private way in the Mary J Holdings Limited subdivision at 200 Tawa Road, Kumeu.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

3.       The applicant, Mary J Holdings Limited, has submitted the following names for the private way serving the new subdivision at 200 Tawa Road, Kumeu.

Preferred Name

Alternative Name

Aurea Terrace

Farm View Lane

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve Aurea Terrace as the name for the private way at the Mary J Holdings Limited subdivision at 200 Tawa Road, Kumeu, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 and as referenced in Attachment A and B to the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       The subdivision into 14 rural residential lots through the protection of 48.7 ha of indigenous vegetation and 17.6 hectares of “Significant Ecological Area” (SEA) native bush, both at Wilson Road, Wayby Valley, and 11.6 hectares of SEA indigenous vegetation at Douglas Road, Awhitu have been approved and the council reference is BUN60317008. The development rights to create this subdivision come from transferable title rights from other areas.

5.       In accordance with the national standard for addressing the private way require to be named as it serves more than five lots.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the local board’s approval.


 

7.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

·        A historical or ancestral linkage to an area

·        A particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·        An existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area

·        The use of Māori names is actively encouraged.

The applicant has submitted the following names for consideration:

Preferred Name

Meaning

Aurea Terrace

A grove of beautiful, rare, native Pohutukawa trees.

Alternative Name

Meaning

Farm View Lane

The property has a 180 degrees rural outlook from the high ridge.

8.      The applicant has a small native plant nursery on Tawa Drive and specialises in revegetation native plants and some rare and endangered native species.

9.       They grow a particular species of Pohutukawa with yellow flowers which originates from Motiti Island in the Bay of Plenty. The botanical name for this species is Metrosideros Aurea. Aurea is Latin for yellow or golden.

10.     The applicant will be planting a grove of these trees in the subdivision and the proposed road name refers to them.

11.     The applicant has contacted Ngati Whatua O Kaipara for their comments and they support the applicant’s choice.

12.     The officer acknowledges that where possible the use of Maori names is encouraged in the Auckland Plan.

13.     Land Information New Zealand has confirmed that the proposed road name is unique and acceptable.

14.     The proposed name is deemed to meet the council’s road naming guidelines and the officer’s recommendation is to approve the applicant’s choice.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger the significance policy and is not considered to have any immediate impacts on any council groups.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger the significance policy and is not considered to have any immediate impacts on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     The applicant has written to Ngati Whatua O Kaipara, who supports the applicant’s choice.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

200 Tawa Road, Kumeu Locality Map

207

b

200 Tawa Drive, Kumeu Scheme Plan

209

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Frank Lovering – Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

New road names in the Fulton Hogan Land Development Limited, Milldale Stage 2 Subdivision at 17 Old Pine Valley Road, Pine Valley

File No.: CP2019/14248

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve new road names for ten public roads and names for two extensions of existing roads in the Fulton Hogan Land Development Limited subdivision (Milldale Stage 2) at 17 Old Pine Valley Road, Pine Valley.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       The applicant, Fulton Hogan Land Development Limited, has submitted the following names for the new public roads serving Stage 2 of the Milldale subdivision at 17 Old Pine Valley Road, Pine Valley.

Road Names

John Fair Drive

Lordland Road

Siren Street

Ricketts Road

Betsy Lane

Henry Tayler Rise

Maryvale Road

Edward Abell Street

Louisa Lane

Dendro Ring Road

4.      No alternative names were provided. As with the process for Milldale Stage 1, the applicant has spent a lot of time researching the history of the area and tying the road names to events or people relevant to that land. They do not want other names considered which would not have the same specific relevance as the preferred names.

5.       Approval is also sought to name the extensions of the following existing roads with the same names:

·    Maurice Kelly Road

·    Ahutoetoe Road


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the new road names for the ten new public roads as set out in the table below:

Road Names

John Fair Drive

Lordland Road

Siren Street

Ricketts Road

Betsy Lane

Henry Tayler Rise

Maryvale Road

Edward Abell Street

Louisa Lane

Dendro Ring Road

for the Fulton Hogan Land Development Limited subdivision (Milldale Stage 2) at 17 Old Pine Valley Road, Pine Valley, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 and as referenced in Attachment A, B and C to the agenda report

b)      approve the names for the extension of Maurice Kelly Road and Ahutoetoe Road in the Fulton Hogan Land Development Limited subdivision (Milldale Stage 2) at 17 Old Pine Valley Road, Pine Valley, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 and as referenced in Attachment A, B and C to the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The staged subdivision at Silverdale has been approved and the council reference is BUN60313354.

7.       A condition of the subdivision consent was to suggest to council names for the new roads.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the local board’s approval.

9.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect:

·        A historical or ancestral linkage to an area

·        A particular landscape, environment or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·        An existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area

·        The use of Māori names is actively encouraged.


 

10.     The applicant has submitted the following names for consideration:

Road Names

John Fair Drive

Lordland Road

Siren Street

Ricketts Road

Betsy Lane

Henry Tayler Rise

Maryvale Road

Edward Abell Street

Louisa Lane

Dendro Ring Road

11.    The meaning or significance of each name is set out in the ‘Milldale Road Naming - Overview’ in Attachment to the agenda report.

12.     The area is in an undulating valley between the Orewa and Weiti Rivers that was once covered in dense forest, milled extensively, then cleared for orchards and dairy farming.

13.     All communication with Iwi has been with Fiona McKenzie of the Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust. Notes to this effect are included in the ‘Milldale Road Naming – Overview’.

14.     This communication is in combination with extensive research and reference to Robin Grover’s books: “The story of Silverdale “Alias the Wade” and "Why the Hibiscus" - as referenced in the first submission for Stage 1 and Warren Frogley’s presentation to the local board in August 2018.

15.     The officer acknowledges that where possible the use of Māori names is encouraged in the Auckland Plan.

16.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that the road names are unique and acceptable, although some similar names occur in some southern suburbs of Auckland. However, LINZ is satisfied that given the significant distance apart, the use of different road types, and being located in separate suburbs, this will ensure that no confusion will arise.

17.     The proposed names are deemed to meet the council’s road naming guidelines and the officer’s recommendation is to approve the applicant’s choice.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger the significance policy and is not considered to have any immediate impacts on any council groups.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger the significance policy and is not considered to have any immediate impacts on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The applicant has written to the Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust, who supports the applicant’s choice.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

23.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Milldale Stage 2 Locality Map

215

b

Milldale Stage 2 Scheme Plan

217

c

Milldale Stage 2 Road Naming Overview

219

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Angove - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 



Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 



Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Rodney Local Board Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2019/00152

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached for members’ information is an update from the Rodney Local Board chairperson, Beth Houlbrooke, for August 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Rodney Local Board chairperson has provided a report on recent activities for the information of the members.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the chairperson’s report for August 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor - Rodney

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Deputations and public forum update

File No.: CP2019/00193

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       As part of its business meetings Rodney Local Board and its committees (Transport, Infrastructure and Environment, and Parks and Recreation) has a period of time set aside for deputations/presentations and public forum during which time members of the public can address the local board on matters within its delegated authority.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Orders there is provision for deputations/presentations to the local board. Applications for deputations/presentations must be in writing setting forth the subject and be received by the relationship manager at least seven working days before the meeting concerned, and subsequently have been approved by the chairperson.  Unless the meeting determines otherwise in any particular case, a limit of ten minutes is placed on the speaker making the presentation.

3.       Standing Orders allows three minutes for speakers in public forum.

4.       Requests, matters arising and actions from the deputations/presentations and public forum are recorded and updated accordingly.  The Rodney Local Board deputations/presentations and public forum update is attached as attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the deputation and public forum update for 18 July 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Deputation and public forum update

227

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor - Rodney

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Rodney Local Board Transport, Infrastructure and Environment Committee workshop record

File No.: CP2019/00203

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached is the Rodney Local Board Transport, Infrastructure and Environment Committee workshop record for 4 July and 1 August 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Rodney Local Board and its committees hold regular workshops.

3.       Attached for information is the record of the most recent workshop meetings of the Rodney Local Board’s Transport, Infrastructure and Environment Committee. The workshop records for the Rodney Local Board and the Parks and Recreation Committee will appear on the relevant agendas of the local board and the committee.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the Rodney Local Board Transport, Infrastructure and Environment Committee workshop records for 4 July and 1 August 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 4 July 2019

231

b

Workshop record 1 August 2019

233

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor - Rodney

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2019/00174

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Rodney Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Rodney Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

2.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·        clarifying what advice is required and when

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar as at August 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar

237

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor - Rodney

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 


 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Rodney Ward Councillor update

File No.: CP2019/00166

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Rodney Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillor, Greg Sayers, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank Cr Sayers for his update on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes - Democracy Advisor - Rodney

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

     

 


Rodney Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Rodney Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

16        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Rodney Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019 - Attachment b - Rodney Local Board Quarterly Performance Report June 2019 - Financial Appendix

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2019 that require final Audit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

17        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019 - Attachment a - Draft Rodney Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2019 that require final Audit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.