I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Upper Harbour Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 15 August 2019

9.30am

Upper Harbour Local Board Office
30 Kell Drive
Albany

 

Upper Harbour Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Margaret Miles, QSM, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Lisa Whyte

 

Members

Uzra Casuri Balouch, JP

 

 

Nicholas Mayne

 

 

John McLean

 

 

Brian Neeson, JP

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Cindy Lynch

Democracy Advisor

 

8 August 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 4142684

Email: Cindy.Lynch@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 18 July 2019 7

12        Allocation of the Upper Harbour Local Board Community Safety Fund               23

13        Auckland Transport monthly report - August 2019                                                 29

14        Upper Harbour Local Grants round one 2019/2020 grant applications                35

15        Local Board feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing                                                                         179

16        Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes   219

17        Road name for unnamed public road at 260 Oteha Valley Road, Albany           303

18        Road name approval: New roads within subdivisions at 8A and 10 Scott Road, Hobsonville                                                                                                                 307

19        Upper Harbour Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019                                         317

20        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Upper Harbour Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019                                                                  321

21        Governance forward work calendar - September 2019 to August 2020              351

22        Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 11 and 25 July, and 1 August 2019                                                                                            355

23        Board members' reports - August 2019                                                                  363  

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

25        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               365

19        Upper Harbour Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

a.      Draft 2018/2019 Upper Harbour Local Board Annual Report                      365

20        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Upper Harbour Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

b.      Upper Harbour Local Board Financial Performance Report as at 30 June 2019                                                                                                                             365  

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

An apology from Deputy Chairperson L Whyte has been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy. The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

                  i.        a financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member

                 ii.        a non-financial conflict interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component. It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968. The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

Any questions relating to the code or the guidelines may be directed to the Relationship Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 18 July 2019, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.


 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Upper Harbour Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 18 July 2019

File No.: CP2019/13352

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board ordinary meeting held on Thursday, 18 July 2019, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the board only.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      note that the open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held on Thursday, 18 July 2019, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the board only and will be confirmed under item 4 of the agenda.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board open unconfirmed minutes - 18 July 2019

9

b

Upper Harbour Local Board minutes attachments - 18 July 2019

19

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

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15 August 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Allocation of the Upper Harbour Local Board Community Safety Fund

File No.: CP2019/14385

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of the report is to consider how to allocate the local board’s share of Auckland Transport’s (AT) Community Safety Fund to road safety projects in the area, and to decide on a prioritised list of projects to fully utilise the Upper Harbour Local Board’s allocation of the fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The local board has proposed several projects which have been assessed, scoped and costed by AT. The final list is included in this report to enable the board to make a decision on the prioritised list.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the Community Safety Fund allocation of $658,428 to the Gills Road footpath extension, subject to Auckland Transport finding the balance of funds required to complete the project.

b)      approve as a back-up option, the allocation of the Community Safety Fund of $658,428 to the following three projects, should Auckland Transport be unsuccessful in sourcing the balance of funds required to complete the Gills Road footpath extension as detailed in a) above, with any balance to be transferred back into the Community Safety Fund pool for use on other safety projects in the region: 

i)        pedestrian crossing on Brigham Creek Road, Whenuapai village – $260,000

ii)       safety improvements to Lonely Track Road, Albany – $80,000

iii)      raised pedestrian crossing on Schnapper Rock Road – $260,000.

c)      approve the remaining balance of $39,060 from the Upper Harbour Local Board Transport Capital Fund to the Gills Road footpath extension project.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       The 2018 Regional Land Transport Plan allocated $20 million for the 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years for local initiatives in road safety ($5 million in 2019/2020 and $15 million in 2020/2021). To promote safety at the local community level, the fund is apportioned to each local board area based on a formula that focuses on the numbers of deaths and serious injuries (DSI) in that area.

4.       The objective is to accelerate local community-initiated safety projects around identified high-risk locations and local schools. Local boards were invited to submit proposals for projects addressing safety issues identified by their communities, and also worked with AT’s Community Transport team to identify projects using the new toolbox developed for the Safe School Streets pilot. 

5.       The Upper Harbour Local Board’s share of the Community Safety Fund is $658,428 over the two-year period.

6.       Criteria for the fund includes physical measures raised by the local community to prevent, control or mitigate identified local road and street safety hazards which expose people using any form of road and street transport to demonstrable hazards, potentially resulting in death or serious harm. Individual project cost is to be no greater than $1 million.  Projects must consist of best practice components, conform to AT standards and comply with New Zealand law.

7.       The fund does not cover the following:

·        Projects that are funded by existing AT road safety or other capital works programmes including, but not limited to: setting speed limits; seal extensions; maintenance; renewals and planned footpath upgrades (can be used to augment these projects).

·        Projects not within the street, including parks, rail corridor, beaches and property not owned or controlled by AT.

·        Projects that have unacceptable effects on network efficiency or introduce unacceptable secondary hazards or effects.

·        Projects with an unacceptably high maintenance cost.

·        Projects that clash with other planned public projects.

·        Complex projects that may take longer than two years to deliver, including but not limited to: projects requiring significant engineered structures; complex resource consents; and complex traffic modelling.

·        Projects containing unconventional or unproven components, including new trials or pilot projects.

·        Projects or components of projects that have no demonstrable safety benefit, unless they are integral to a safety project.

8.       The Upper Harbour Local Board list of projects has now been costed by AT. If this costing is more than the budget allocated to the particular local board under this funding, there is an option to use any remaining budget from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund to top up the project shortfall.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The following table lists the projects proposed by the local board for assessment and costing:

Project name

Description

Status

Comment

Budget

ID

Pedestrian crossing on Brigham Creek Road, Whenuapai village

The development of new housing in Whenuapai is increasing the numbers of pedestrians using the village. There are currently no pedestrian crossing facilities.

PASS

 

 

Routine – detailed design required

Best option would be a raised zebra crossing.

$260,000

CSFU1.2

Gills Road footpath extension

Gills Road is a narrow winding road. It has a footpath at the bottom of the road which extends part of the way to the top. The absence of a footpath on the remainder of the road makes it unsafe for pedestrians.

PASS

Routine – detailed investigation required

The local board’s contribution from their Community Safety Fund will go towards funding this project, which will be $658,428.

The overall project cost will be determined by the end of August 2019.

CSFU1.4

Lonely Track Road, Albany

A range of issues have been reported and were the subject of an onsite meeting in 2018. The board has had no information on what improvements were carried out as a result of that meeting.

The board would like to consider using the Community Safety Fund to address any remaining unresolved issues.

PASS

Routine - detailed design required

To enhance recent safety measures, install two LED electronic speed feedback signs.

Cutting a sight bench into a bank batter on a corner would greatly improve the visibility through the ‘S’ bends.

$80,000

CSFU1.5

Raised pedestrian crossing on Schnapper Rock Road

There is some concern that mourners who are unable to park when attending a funeral at the North Shore Memorial Gardens in Schnapper Rock Road may not take sufficient care when crossing the road. A raised pedestrian crossing is expected to slow traffic and make road crossing safer for pedestrians.

PASS

Routine - detail design required

Raised zebra crossing.

$260,000

CSFU1.7

10.     The following table lists the projects that were put forward by the local board for consideration, but failed against eligibility criteria for the Community Safety Fund due to cost and/or complexity:

Project name

Description

Status

Comment

Budget

ID

452 Albany Highway, and other locations along the highway

As part of the Albany Highway upgrade several years ago, flax was planted in street gardens immediately outside a number of residential properties. This flax has now grown to the extent that it blocks access to water meters and letter boxes.

FAIL

 

 

Simple - no detailed design required

Fails to demonstrate road safety benefits.  Refer to Auckland Council maintenance to cut back flax over the footpath.

NIL

CSFU1.1

Caribbean Drive/Barbados Drive junction

This junction is one of the main feeder routes to and from the Upper Harbour Highway (affected by the NZ Transport Agency’s Northern Corridor Improvement project) and is adjacent to a reserve with a community house, an Early Childhood Education Centre and children’s playground.  Improved road safety for pedestrians crossing the road is desirable.

FAIL

Complex – investigation and detailed design

Projects that are funded by existing AT road safety or other capital works programmes do not meet the criteria for funding.

NIL

CSFU1.3

Ramp Road pedestrian refuge and kerb build-out

Ramp Road provides access from Sunset Road to the Constellation Drive commercial and retail area. It is also in close proximity to the Constellation busway station. Pedestrians are at risk from turning vehicles using Ramp Road.

FAIL

Routine – detailed design required

Possible kerb build-out and splitter islands.

AT’s minor improvement programme will deliver this project.

NIL

CSFU1.6

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is confined to AT and does not impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

12.     The projects allocated funding in this report will improve the road safety environment in communities within the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

13.     Receipt of the report has no impact on or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

14.     The Upper Harbour Local Board area’s allocation of the Community Safety Fund will be fully utilised if the Gills Road footpath extension goes ahead, subject to Auckland Transport’s funding the balance. In the event that Auckland Transport is unable to fund the balance of the project, the back-up option will proceed with the board funding the following projects:

·        pedestrian crossing on Brigham Creek Road, Whenuapai village – $260,000

·        safety improvements to Lonely Track Road, Albany – $80,000

·        raised pedestrian crossing on Schnapper Rock Road – $260,000.

15.     The back-up option leaves a total of $58,428 unallocated funding which will be transferred back into the Community Safety Fund pool for use on other safety projects in the region.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.     The next stage will be to progress to design and construction of the projects once approval by the local board has been received.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Owena Schuster – Elected Member Relationship Manager for Henderson-Massey, Upper Harbour and Whau Local Boards, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport monthly report - August 2019

File No.: CP2019/14542

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide:

·        an update on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

·        a summary of consultation material sent to the local board

·        transport-related information on matters of specific application and interest to the Upper Harbour Local Board and its community.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In particular, this report includes:

·        updates on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) in the Upper Harbour Local Board area

·        update on the Auckland Transport major capital works in the Upper Harbour Local Board area

·        consultation information sent to the local board for feedback.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the monthly update report from Auckland Transport for August 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       This report addresses transport-related matters in the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

4.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. AT reports monthly to local boards, as set out in local board engagement plans. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) update

5.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·        be safe

·        not impede network efficiency

·        be in the road corridor, although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome.

6.       The Upper Harbour Local Board’s LBTCF allocation was $1,835,080 for the current political term. In addition, there is a sum of $764,795 which was approved by the council and became available from 1 July 2018.

Upper Harbour Local Board Transport Capital Fund financial summary

Total funds available in current political term

$2,599,874

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$2,560,814

Remaining budget

$39,060

7.       The following table outlines the status of the LBTCF projects as at 27 June 2019:

Local Board Transport Capital Fund project status as at 27 June 2019

Rame Road project

The Rame Road project is still at the detailed design stage as per the option agreed in December 2018 (resolution number UH/2018/158) with some amendments from the local board.

AT’s internal consultation process was completed on 27 May 2019.

External consultation/public notification is to happen at the end of August 2019. A copy of the updated plan and engagement letter will be sent to the local board once approved.

The tender process will commence once the outcome of consultation is known and confirmation is received from the local board to proceed.

Kyle Road footpath

Detailed design will be approximately eight weeks, with a targeted completion date of mid-September 2019.

Tender evaluation and award will be approximately six weeks, with an intended completion date of October 2019.

Construction will be approximately eight weeks, with an intended completion date of mid-January 2020.

Upper Harbour Drive junction

AT has been researching previous works at the intersection and collating the data.

A project manager has been appointed and is currently working to engage a consultant to investigate possible options and costings.

Results can be expected in late 2019.

Kingsway Road pedestrian access upgrade

The local board allocated $34,000 to carry out improvements to Kingsway Road. The works will commence in September 2019 and will include:

·      bush on both sides of Kingsway Road to be heavily trimmed

·      northern road edge of seal to be widened at pinch points on the Kauri Road side by excavating and compacting metal and sealing with asphalt by hand

·      widening the Herald Island end – the bank at the transformer will be cut back and a low retaining wall, approximately 15m long, will be built to accommodate widening

·      reflective studs to be placed just outside the white line.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       The impact of information in this report is confined to AT and does not impact on other parts of the council group. Any engagement with other parts of the council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Spencer / East Coast Bays Roads junction traffic management issues

9.       AT has investigated the safety issue of right turning vehicles from Spencer Road into East Coast Road because of the difficulty for vehicles making this manoeuvre. Review of the previous five years of crash data available on the police database for this location reveals there have been three reported crashes relating to this manoeuvre, although none of these have resulted in injury.

10.     AT noted that when vehicles reach the limit line on Spencer Road, they have adequate visibility in each direction based on technical standards. From the site observations, there is a 50km/h speed limit repeater sign as well as a yellow diamond warning sign depicting ‘Side Road Ahead’ located on East Coast Road, as southbound vehicles approach Spencer Road on the downhill. There is also a yellow ‘Pedestrians’ warning sign at the entrance to Spencer Road. This is the appropriate signage for this location; therefore, AT do not propose any changes.

11.     A request to install ‘flexi’ safe hit posts on the flush median was received. However, based on experience elsewhere on the network, these posts are frequently damaged and can be difficult to maintain. Therefore, a permanent solution would be preferred. For this reason, AT will investigate widening the flush median on East Coast Road for drivers turning right from Spencer Road into East Coast Road. This will demarcate the sheltering space for any right-turning traffic from Spencer Road and further delineate the southbound traffic lane on East Coast Road.

12.     Although AT cannot advise an implementation date at this point, it is intended that any investigation and remedial works will be carried out by the end of the calendar year.

Consultation documents on proposed improvements

13.     Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Upper Harbour Local Board for feedback:

·        proposed resolution of traffic and parking control changes on Corinthian Drive, Albany

·        proposed changes to traffic and parking controls on Hobsonville Road, Hobsonville

·        proposed changes to improve driveway access and visibility in Apollo Drive, Rosedale.

14.     After consultation, AT considers the feedback received and determines whether to proceed further with the proposal as consulted on, or whether to proceed with an amended proposal if changes are considered necessary.

Major capital works in the Upper Harbour Local Board area

15.     The following table outlines the status of major capital works in the Upper Harbour Local Board area as at 26 July 2019:

Major capital works as at 26 July 2019

Gills Road link project and Dairy Flat Highway / The Avenue project

The Gills Road link and Dairy Flat Highway / The Avenue projects will undergo a strategic re-evaluation, taking a more holistic view of the issues and opportunities to determine the most appropriate improvements required. This will also include the Albany village area.

Medallion Drive link project

 

The Medallion Drive link project has been confirmed and is expected to be completed by mid-2021. Design has been completed and the construction phase will start in February 2020 with an expected completion time of approximately 18 months. More information about this project can be found at https://at.govt.nz/projects-roadworks/albany-developments/medallion-drive-link/

Pedestrian signal on Oteha Valley Road

 

AT has completed internal consultation and revised the concept. AT is now undertaking external consultation and once completed, feedback will be sent to the local board via the close-out letter (as per the normal process with local boards).

Dairy Flat Highway / Coatesville-Riverhead Highway intersection

 

In 2018, AT received a 1000-strong petition to lower the speed limit, which initiated engagement with the community and identified crucial enhancements to improve driving conditions and safety along the Dairy Flat Highway. AT is continuing to roll out safety improvements in Dairy Flat which have been made possible due to partial funding from the regional fuel tax. The long-awaited construction of a new roundabout at the Dairy Flat Highway and Coatesville-Riverhead Highway intersection will start this month and once complete, will help improve traffic flow and road safety in the area.

Work was scheduled to start on 29 July 2019 with site establishment, investigative and survey works. It may take some time before major construction is visible. Expected completion is approximately mid-2020. Hours of work will generally be between 7am - 7pm (Monday to Saturday). However, certain activities such as road marking will require night and/or weekend work.

Specific work to be undertaken during the project will include:

·      constructing retaining walls

·      new stormwater drainage and rain gardens

·      construction and widening of the carriageway, including new kerb and channels

·      new intersection roundabout and centre traffic islands

·      redirection of services

·      road marking and signage

·      planting and landscaping.

For the duration of the construction period, an approved traffic management plan will be in place. This is designed to provide safety for both the public and workers.

Issues investigated and responses

16.     The local board has requested the following issue be considered, which is still currently under investigation:

·        Hooton Reserve parking controls – meeting with Auckland Council parks department to discuss options for the board’s consideration.

Bush Road parking removal and afternoon/evening clearway

17.     AT has located internal feedback that has not been sufficiently closed off for the project to proceed. This is currently being dealt with and will go back to the Executive Lead Team review committee in the next few weeks. Once this has been closed off, AT will proceed to the external consultation phase. This will, unfortunately, cause a delay in delivery of the project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     Receipt of this monthly report presents no impacts on or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori or consideration of impacts and opportunities will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     There are no financial implications to the local board in receiving this monthly update.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     Receipt of this monthly report has no risks. AT has risk management strategies in place for the transport projects undertaken in the local board area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     AT provides the Upper Harbour Local Board with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in the local board area.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Owena Schuster – Elected Member Relationship Manager for Henderson-Massey, Upper Harbour and Whau Local Boards, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Upper Harbour Local Grants round one 2019/2020 grant applications

File No.: CP2019/12505

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Grants round one, including multi-board applications.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received for the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Grants round one (refer Attachment B), including multi-board applications (refer Attachment C).

3.       The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Programme on 21 March 2019. This document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $159,883 for the 2019/2020 financial year.

5.       Eighteen applications were received for the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Grants round one requesting a total of $64,761.25. Thirteen multi-board applications were received requesting a total of $67,577.58.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Grants round one, listed in the following table: 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2017-101

Literacy Aotearoa Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the programme delivery of four family literacy groups in the Upper Harbour Local Board area

$4560

Eligible

LG2017-104

Paremoremo Ratepayers and Residents Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the land rates on community's gifted land for the 2019/2020 financial year

$1035

Eligible

LG2017-108

Hobsonville Hall Society Incorporated

Community

Towards insurance cover for the Hobsonville Hall from December 2019 to December 2020

$3000

Eligible

LG2017-113

Business North Harbour Incorporated

Community

Towards ‘Meet your Neighbours’ events, including coffee van hire, food and marketing, between 04/09/2019 and 31/03/2020

$5000

Eligible

LG2017-114

The StarJam Charitable Trust

Community

Towards operational costs for ‘Albany Jazzy Jamming’ workshops between 02/09/2019 to 28/02/2020

$2815

Eligible

LG2017-117

Greenhithe Community Trust

Community

Towards the facilitator fees, materials and refreshments for the Greenhithe Community Men’s Projects Group

$5000

Eligible

LG2017-118

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the purchase of new laptops for two youth workers at the Youth and Community Development Centre in Albany

$2485

Eligible

LG2017-120

Kaipātiki Project Incorporated

Community

Towards hireage of desk spaces for the Kaipātiki Project staff at a co-working space in Hobsonville over eight months

$4800

Eligible

LG2017-123

Kids Safe with Dogs Charitable Trust

Community

Towards administration, instructors' wages and printing costs for October 2019 to July 2020

$4887

Eligible

LG2017-110

Philip and Sarah Elworthy

Environment

Towards the pruning of a pecan nut tree

$4370

Eligible

LG2017-121

Sustainable Paremoremo Group

Environment

Towards the wasp eradication project

$5000

Eligible

LG2017-112

Meadowood House Incorporated

Events

Towards a Christmas event at Meadowood on 6 December 2019

$2000

Eligible

LG2017-105

Special Olympics Greenhithe

Sport and recreation

Towards basketball court hire and equipment between 01/01/2020 and 31/12/2020

$3134.25

Eligible

LG2017-106

Greenhithe Tennis Club

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of tennis balls and a court drying machine

$5000

Eligible

LG2017-107

Albany Badminton Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards court hire at the Active Badminton Centre, Albany

$5000

Eligible

LG2017-111

East Coast Bays and Districts Cricket Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of a cargo container and the delivery fee, to store cricket equipment

$4475

Eligible

LG2017-115

Facebook Badminton Club

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire at Badminton North Harbour for an annual Facebook Badminton Club tournament

$1000

Eligible

LG2017-122

Olympic Weightlifting New Zealand

Sport and recreation

Towards grandstand seating costs for 2019 New Zealand Olympic Weightlifting Championships in November 2019

$1200

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$64,761.25

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Multi-board Grants round one listed in the following table:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB1920-153

The Operating Theatre Trust trading as Tim Bray Theatre Company

Arts and Culture

Towards the 400 ‘Gift a Seat’ project, venue and ticketing costs for The PumpHouse Theatre, Māngere Arts Centre, Te Oro, Vodafone Events Centre and TAPAC, and the provision of return bus trips

$3103.55

Eligible

MB1920-104

North Shore Centres of Mutual Aid Incorporated

Community

Towards a proportion of operational costs, excluding wages, for eight centres on the North Shore

$5000

Eligible

MB1920-113

Pegasus Flying Trust Air Training Corps

Community

Towards the installation of the electrical connection to the Trust Hangar based in Whenuapai

$2500

Eligible

MB1920-116

Chinese New Settlers Services Trust Foundation

Community

Towards venue hire and teacher facilitation fees

$2943.20

Eligible

MB1920-134

The YES Disability Resource Centre Services Trust Board

Community

Towards the costs to create a ‘Disability Youth Advisory Group’ for the North Shore, including catering, transport, coordination fees, two events and a training day

$3500

Eligible

MB1920-138

North Shore Women’s’ Centre

Community

Towards wages for a community resource worker and a social work position to support women with high and complex needs at the North Shore Women’s Centre

$1500

Eligible

MB1920-139

Epilepsy Association of New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards the educator salary, fuel costs and marketing for support services for people living with epilepsy

$2000

Eligible

MB1920-141

Royal New Zealand Foundation of The Blind Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase of digital talking books for the Blind Foundation library

$1600

Eligible

MB1920-170

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards the purchase of native plants from Te Whangai Trust and Gulf Trees and various costs, including courier costs, classroom bins, administration and office expenses, for 1217 schools and preschools

$4317.08

Eligible

MB1920-110

The Korean Society of Auckland Incorporated

Events

Towards the annual event costs for the Korean Day event

$1300

Eligible

MB1920-151

New Zealand Nepal Society Incorporated

Events

Towards the Nepal Festival 2020, including audio visual hire, insurance, waste management, marketing, legal fees, travel and operational costs

$8007.50

Eligible

MB1920-102

Badminton North Harbour Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the upgrade of the court surface

$12,000

Eligible

MB1920-169

Gymnastics Community Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of landing mats and foam cubes for the foam landing pit

$19,806.25

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$67,577.58

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme. The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grants rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

8.       The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Board Community Grants programme on 21 March 2019 and will operate three quick response, two multi-board and two local grant rounds for this financial year.

9.       The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage. Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice.

12.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and, therefore, their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Upper Harbour Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grants programme.

14.     The board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

15.     A summary of each application received through the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Grants round one and multi-board applications is provided in Attachments B and C.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

16.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

17.     Twenty-four applicants applying to local grants round one have indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

19.     The Upper Harbour Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $159,883 for the 2019/2020 financial year.

20.     In round one of the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Grants, 18 applications were received requesting a total of $64,761.25 and 13 multi-board applications were received, requesting a total of $67,577.58.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Following the Upper Harbour Local Board allocating funding for round one of the local and multi-board grants, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Programme

41

b

2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Grants applications round one

45

c

2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Grants multi-board applications round one

117

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Erin Shin - Community Grants Coordinator

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Shane King - Head of Service Support

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

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15 August 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Local Board feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing

File No.: CP2019/13135

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to formally provide feedback on the Productivity Commission’s (the commission) inquiry into local government funding and financing.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 4 July 2019, the Productivity Commission released its draft report relating to its local government funding and financing inquiry.

3.       The inquiry’s key aim is establishing whether the existing funding and financing arrangements are suitable for enabling local authorities to meet current and future cost pressures.

4.       The commission’s draft report:

·        raises eight questions

·        highlights 67 findings

·        makes 30 recommendations.

5.       Local boards are advised that their views and feedback for staff to consider when drafting the submission, need to be received by Monday, 29 July 2019.

6.       Auckland Council will make a submission on the draft report. Staff will prepare a submission for the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration at its meeting on 20 August 2019. Submissions on the inquiry close on 29 August 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Central Government asked the commission to conduct an inquiry into local government funding and financing in July 2018. The inquiry’s terms of reference require the commission to examine the adequacy and efficiency of the current local government funding and financing framework and, where shortcomings in the current system are identified, examine options and approaches for improving the system.

8.       The inquiry’s terms of reference do not call for an assessment of, or changes to, the current scope and responsibilities of local government.

9.       The commission’s issues paper was released on 6 November 2018. The council made a submission on the issues paper which was approved by the Finance and Performance Committee. The council’s submission to the issues paper can be found as Attachment A.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The draft report is available on the commission’s website

11.     The commission’s ‘At a glance’ document can be found as Attachment B and its ‘A3 overview’ is at Attachment C.

12.     The draft report states that:

·        the current funding and financing framework is broadly sound but that councils need new tools to help them deal with some specific cost pressures

·        if councils struggle to deal with rising costs, or are not incentivised to improve their performance, communities are unlikely to reach their potential

·        the funding and financing framework for local government must incentivise good performance and enable local authorities to deliver quality amenities and services that reflect the preferences and aspirations of their communities.

13.     The commission has found that the existing funding model is insufficient to address cost pressures in the following four areas and that new tools are required:

·        supplying enough infrastructure to support rapid urban growth

·        adapting to the impacts of climate change

·        coping with the growth of tourism

·        the accumulation of responsibilities placed on local government by central government.

14.     The commission also considers the three-waters sector an important area for investigation.

15.     The inquiry’s terms of reference have also been amended to require the commission to consider whether a tax on vacant land would be a useful mechanism to improve the supply of available housing. The addition is a result of the Tax Working Group’s final report to the government.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     The council group’s impact and views will be developed and presented for the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration at its meeting on 20 August 2019.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are advised that their views and feedback for staff to consider when drafting the submission, need to be received by Monday, 29 July 2019.

18.     Any formal feedback received after 29 July and before 19 August 2019 will be provided to the Finance and Performance Committee to seek their endorsement to incorporate in the council’s submission. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Staff will also seek input from the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     There are no financial implications in deciding to make a submission. However, there may be positive or negative financial implications if the government decides to implement any of the recommendations made by the Productivity Commission. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     If the local board does not contribute to the submission, then there is a risk that the Auckland Council family’s position on this inquiry will not reflect issues that are important to the local community.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     The council will make a submission on the draft report. Staff will prepare a submission for the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration at its meeting on 20 August 2019.

23.     A workshop to discuss the draft council submission with the Finance and Performance Committee has been scheduled for 15 August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Council submission on the issues paper - approved by the Finance and Performance Committee on 6 November 2018

181

b

'At a glance' - Local government funding and financing

211

c

'At a glance' - A3 briefing

215

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claes Sandstrom - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

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15 August 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes

File No.: CP2019/14453

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, and to provide feedback on the recommended changes to the document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is currently reviewing the Auckland Film Protocol. The Auckland Film Protocol sets out:

·        the commitment of the council group to supporting filming in Auckland

·        expectations and rules that filmmakers must abide by when filming in Auckland

·        provides guidance for filmmakers on the process for approval to film in Auckland.

3.       The purpose of the review was to ensure that the Auckland Film Protocol is up-to-date and to identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities that should be addressed. Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Auckland Film Protocol should be updated. Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications from across the council group was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the protocol. 

4.       A revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in June 2019 for consideration and was approved for public consultation (resolution number ENV/2019/73).

5.       The following is a summary of the key changes made to the Auckland Film Protocol before public consultation was undertaken:

·        Native species: new content added stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species.

·        Kauri dieback: new content added providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: new content added stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: new content added stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: new content added to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site-specific health and safety plan.

·        Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was updated to reflect current policy, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council. Some structural and editorial amendments were also made to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

6.       Public consultation was undertaken over a three-week period between 21 June and 12 July 2019.

7.       A total of 74 submissions were received during the public consultation period. Upper Harbour Local Board residents provided a total of five submissions on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, representing 6.8 per cent of all submissions. The views of the Upper Harbour Local Board submitters were generally similar to regional views. Staff are proposing some changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address submitter concerns; the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol are shown in tracked changes in Attachment B.

8.       This report provides a summary of public feedback and of proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address feedback. The following is a high‑level summary of the key changes proposed to the Auckland Film Protocol in response to public consultation:

·        Natural environment: include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Native species: include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Kauri dieback: amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

·        Impact on access to public open space: include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

·        Compliance and enforcement: include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with the Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

9.       Submission themes and proposed changes are summarised in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

b)      provide feedback on the recommended changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

c)      note that local board feedback will be included in a report to the Environment and Community Committee in August 2019, seeking approval for the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The first version of the Auckland Film Protocol was adopted by the Regional Development and Operations Committee (resolution number RDO/2013/27) on 14 March 2013. A review of fees for filming in the Auckland region was undertaken in 2014 and a new set of region‑wide charges was recommended providing a simplified and harmonised range of charges. The Governing Body adopted a region‑wide schedule of film fees and revised the Auckland Film Protocol on 28 May 2015 (resolution number GB/2015/36).

11.     Since the protocol was adopted in 2015, there have been a number of changes to legislation and to Auckland Council’s policy and planning framework. The purpose of the review of the protocol was to:

·        ensure that the protocol is up-to-date

·        identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities to be addressed in the protocol.

12.     Content of the protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the protocol should be updated. Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications from across the council group was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the protocol.

13.     Workshops were held in September and October 2018 to engage with local boards that experience a high volume of filming.

14.     Engagement to inform the preparation of the revised draft protocol was also undertaken with:

·        Mana whenua: mana whenua interests are represented by 19 iwi (tribal) authorities in Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland. The 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review of the protocol.

·        Staff of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to inform the review.

·        Screen sector: the screen sector was invited to participate in a survey in April 2019 to inform the review. The survey asked a series of general questions about the protocol and experiences of filming in public open space in Auckland. 

·        Public: the People’s Panel in September 2018; a total of 4762 responses were received. The survey asked a series of questions on views on and experiences of filming in Auckland. 

15.     A high-level summary of feedback (including local board feedback) is provided in Attachment C.

16.     The review recommended that a range of changes be made to the Auckland Film Protocol, and the following is a summary of the key changes proposed to the Environment and Community Committee:

·        Native species: include new content stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species.

·        Kauri dieback: include new content providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include new content stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: include new content stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: include new content to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site-specific health and safety plan.

·        Filming on Tūpuna Maunga: update content to reflect that applications to film on Tūpuna Maunga are assessed by the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority.

·        Updates to content: update content to reflect current policy (e.g. smokefree policy), plans (Auckland Unitary Plan) and bylaws of Auckland Council.

·        Structural and editorial: amend some parts of the document to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

17.     The revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was approved by the Environment and Community Committee for public consultation in June 2019 (resolution number ENV/2019/73).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Consultation on the revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol took place from 21 June to 12 July 2019. A total of 74 submissions were received; this represents a substantial increase on the 21 submissions received in response to the 2015 review of the Auckland Film Protocol. Of the submissions received, 72 were submitted using the online form and two non‑form hard copy submissions were received. 

19.     Submitters were asked to identify if they worked in the screen sector or not, with:

·        29 submissions (39 per cent) received from individuals or organisations that identified themselves as working in the screen sector

·        45 submissions (61 per cent) received from individuals or organisations that do not work in the screen sector.

20.     The questions included in the online form varied depending on whether the submitter identified themselves as working in the screen industry or not.

21.     A breakdown of all submissions received by local board area is shown in Table 1 below. The small number of responses from individual local board areas means that an analysis of views by local board area was not possible for all local board areas.

          Table 1: Breakdown of submissions made by local board area.

Local Board area

Number of respondents

Percentage of respondents

Waitākere Ranges

17

23.0%

Albert-Eden

9

12.2%

Waitematā

8

10.8%

Rodney

6

8.1%

Upper Harbour

5

6.8%

Ōrākei

5

6.8%

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

4

5.4%

Devonport-Takapuna

4

5.4%

Henderson-Massey

3

4.1%

Kaipātiki

3

4.1%

Howick

2

2.7%

Whau

2

2.7%

Māngere-Ōtahuhu

1

1.4%

Puketapapa

1

1.4%

Hibiscus and Bays

1

1.4%

Papakura

1

1.4%

Franklin

0

0%

Great Barrier

0

0%

Ōtara‑Papatoetoe

0

0%

Manurewa

0

0%

Waiheke

0

0%

Don't Know

1

1.4%

Outside Auckland

1

1.4%

Total

74

 

22.     A series of closed questions were asked of non‑screen sector individuals and organisations; a summary of the responses to these questions is shown in Table 2 below, which shows that:

·        most respondents are supportive of Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

·        most respondents think that the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on residents and businesses, on public open space and historic and cultural heritage.

          Table 2: Feedback on the Auckland Film Protocols management of the impacts of filming

Question

Response

Percentage of regional submissions

(number of respondents in brackets)

Do you support Auckland Council's film‑friendly approach?

Yes

75% (33)

Partially

20% (9)

No

5% (2)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on residents and businesses?

Yes

56% (18)

Partially

19% (6)

No

25% (8)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on our public open space and environment?

Yes

53% (23)

Partially

33% (14)

No

14% (6)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on our historic and cultural heritage?

Yes

62% (26)

Partially

29% (12)

No

10% (4)

23.     The main reasons given by those who supported Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach are shown in Table 3 below.

          Table 3: Summary of key reasons for supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Economic

·    generates employment and economic growth

·    benefits communities and local businesses

·    benefits a broad range of trades and industries

·    attracts investment and businesses to Auckland

Cultural and creative

·    has cultural benefits allowing and supporting the telling of stories visually

·    supports the creative economy and enables people to find a future in the creative industries

·    it’s fun and exciting to see Auckland on the screen

Promotion and tourism

·    promotes and showcases Auckland to the world

·    creates a positive image of Auckland

24.     Table 4 shows the key reasons that respondents gave for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

          Table 4: Summary of key reasons given for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Access

·    the impacts on residents, including parking restrictions, road closures and ability to use public open space while filming is taking place, need to be considered and managed

·    need to ensure that film‑makers are respectful of other users of public open space

Notification

·    there needs to be sufficient notification to ensure that residents and businesses are aware of open space being used for filming and are not being inconvenienced

Balance

·    need to consider and manage the impact that filming has on the environment and impacted residents

·    need to balance the cumulative impacts of filming

Equity

·    need to ensure that fees for commercial use of public places are fair

25.     The key reasons given for not supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach were:

·        the cost to ratepayers of enabling filming

·        there is not enough protection for individuals, businesses and residents affected by filming being carried out on private property.

26.     A series of open‑ended questions were also included to elicit further information about responses to these questions and about a range of other topics. Staff have worked through submissions to determine any changes to be recommended for the final revised Auckland Film Protocol. Attachment A identifies key themes and submission points along with proposed staff responses.  

27.     A summary of the most common submission themes and the proposed staff responses are shown in Table 5 below:

Table 5: Summary of key submission themes and proposed staff responses.

Key themes

Summary of proposed responses

Use of drones for filming

Include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

Impact on natural environment

Include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Kauri dieback

Amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

Impact on native species

Include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Impact on access to public open space

Include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

Compliance and enforcement

Include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

Health and safety

Amend to enable production companies to arrange alternative time-frames for the submission of a site-specific health and safety plan by agreement with Screen Auckland.

Notification

Screen Auckland to consider operational approaches to achieving wider public notification.

Impact on business

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol. The protocol is intended to provide a framework that enables decisions to be made on a case‑by‑case basis.

Equity

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol. Fees for commercial use of public open space are set under the Auckland Council Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 and amended through the long-term plan and annual plan.

28.     This report seeks formal feedback from the local board at its August 2019 business meeting on the recommended changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol in response to consultation feedback.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications from across the council group was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the protocol. This included engagement with Auckland Transport, Panuku Development Auckland, and with Auckland Council Community Facilities, Region‑wide Planning, Social Policy and Bylaws, Visitor Experience and Heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Role of local boards in film permitting

30.     Landowner approval is required to film on any public open space in the Auckland region.  Local boards are responsible for landowner approvals for local parks and reserves.  Engagement with local boards that experience a high volume of applications for film permits was undertaken in September and October 2018 to inform the review of the Auckland Film Protocol. A summary of the key engagement themes is included in Attachment C and was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

31.     A key theme from local board engagement was that the film permit time-frames mean that landowner approval time-frames are very tight, particularly when considering complex or contentious applications. It was also noted that the current time-frames do not allow sufficient time to consider applications at full board meetings or to consult key stakeholders.  Given this, the following options on film permit time-frames were presented to the Environment and Community Committee at a workshop in May 2019 and at the June 2019 meeting.

·        Option one: status quo

·        Option two: amend the permit time-frames

·        Option 2(a): the permit time-frame is amended to be ‘up to five working days’

·        Option 2(b): the permit time-frame is increased to 5‑7 working days.

32.     Following direction from the committee, that increasing time-frames could act as a disincentive and make Auckland internationally uncompetitive, the status quo option was retained in the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) has an ongoing relationship with several mana whenua and mataawaka groups across its whole portfolio of activity. To inform the review of the protocol, the 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review. In relation to film permit applications, Māori views and input may be obtained in several ways where there is a potential impact on particular land or sites. This is usually coordinated either by the film facilitator or through the relevant parks manager.

34.     Specific processes are in place for the tūpuna maunga, with all commercial filming on the maunga requiring the approval of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority). Screen Auckland facilitates all requests for approval to film on the tūpuna maunga. Approval to film will be subject to conditions and restrictions set by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority. Meetings were held with staff of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to inform the review and ensure that proposed amendments are consistent with the policy of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     The proposed amendments to the protocol do not impact on existing levels of service and will not impact on operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     There are no significant risks arising from the local board giving feedback on the proposed changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol at this time.

37.     If adoption of the revised Auckland Film Protocol is delayed, this would impact on council’s ability to implement the proposed changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     Public feedback and proposed amendments to the Auckland Film Protocol will be presented to the Environment and Community Committee for approval.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key submission themes and responses

227

b

Draft 2019 Auckland Film Protocol

237

c

Summary of preconsultation engagement

297

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Marie Jenkins – Screen Facilitation Manager, Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza – Acting General Manager

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

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15 August 2019

 

 

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15 August 2019

 

 

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15 August 2019

 

 

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15 August 2019

 

 

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15 August 2019

 

 

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15 August 2019

 

 

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15 August 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Road name for unnamed public road at 260 Oteha Valley Road, Albany

File No.: CP2019/13704

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve a road name for an existing public road vested in council as part of a subdivision at 260 Oteha Valley Road, Albany.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The road requiring a name was created by the subdivision of 260 Oteha Valley Road, which contains the Mitre 10 building within a larger retail complex. 

3.       The road is a short link road between Corban Avenue and Oteha Valley Road and was vested in council in 2018. The link was not formally named at that time as it was seen as a continuation of Davies Drive, which is located to the south of the retail complex.

4.       It is necessary to formally name the road to remove any ambiguity, particularly in relation to Auckland Transport’s parking strategy for the Albany centre and surrounding areas.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the road name Davies Drive for the short link road between Corban Avenue and Oteha Valley Road, as a continuation of the existing Davies Drive (as depicted in Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The subdivision of 260 Oteha Valley Road was completed in 2018. However, the road was not formally named at that time as it was viewed as a continuation of Davies Drive, across Corban Avenue to Oteha Valley Road.

6.       It is necessary to formally name the road to remove any ambiguity, particularly in relation to Auckland Transport’s parking strategy for the Albany centre and surrounding areas.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       Approval of a name for the link road is required to resolve the previous oversight and as this road is viewed as a continuation of Davies Drive, it is recommended that this be used. Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed this road name is acceptable.

8.       The proposed name meets the council’s road naming guidelines.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

9.       The decision sought does not trigger any significance policy and does not have any immediate impacts on any council groups.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

10.     The decision sought does not trigger any significance policy and does not have any immediate impacts on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

11.     No iwi consultation has been undertaken through this process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

12.     Auckland Transport has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed once approval is obtained for the road name.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

13.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which are then recorded on its New Zealand-wide land information database for street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Location map: 260 Oteha Valley Road - Davies Drive

303

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jan Asplet - Business Coordinator

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Road name approval: New roads within subdivisions at 8A and 10 Scott Road, Hobsonville

File No.: CP2019/14374

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve:

·        two new roads within a subdivision at 8A Scott Road, Hobsonville

·        three new roads within the adjacent subdivision at 10 Scott Road, Hobsonville

·        one new public road that extends through both the 8A and 10 Scott Road sites.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

8A Scott Road - two new roads

3.       The developer and applicant, Paramount Trustee Ltd, has proposed the following names for consideration by the local board:

8A Scott Road – proposed road names

Ref

Preferred

Alternate

Alternate

Road 1

Silverfern Avenue

Symphony Drive

Moonstone Drive

Road 2

Huljich Way

Sonata Way

Serenade Way

10 Scott Road - three new roads

4.       On behalf of the applicant, 10 Scott Road Ltd, agent CPMC Ltd has proposed the following names for consideration by the local board:

10 Scott Road – proposed road names

Ref

Preferred

Alternate

Alternate

Road 1

Rock Home Drive

Grazer Drive

Pilot Drive

Road 2

Coast Garden Drive

Toka Drive*

Caesar Drive

Road 3

Landing Path Drive

Papa Taunga Drive*

Vedette Drive

5.       Ngati Whatua o Kaipara were consulted and have suggested the above Te Reo names (indicated with an asterisk) are only to be used at the 10 Scott Road site.

Public road extending through both 8A and 10 Scott Road sites

6.       Paramount Trustee Ltd and CPMC Ltd have worked together to propose the following names for consideration by the local board:

8A and 10 Scott Road – proposed road name

Preferred

Alternate

Alternate

 

Limestone Drive

Ocean Front Esplanade

Zephyr Esplanade

 

7.       Any of the proposed road name options listed above would be acceptable for the local board to approve for use in this location, having been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met, the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region, and mana whenua were consulted.

8.       It is the local board’s decision as to the thematic suitability of the names within the local context. The road names / orders can be rearranged if desired.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve names for the following two new roads at 8A Scott Road, Hobsonville:

·    Road 1: (local board to insert chosen name)

·    Road 2 (commonly owned access lot): (local board to insert chosen name)

b)      approve names for the following three new roads at 10 Scott Road, Hobsonville:

·    Road 1: (local board to insert chosen name)

·    Road 2: (local board to insert chosen name)

·    Road 3: (local board to insert chosen name)

c)      approve the name (local board to insert chosen name) for the new public road to be extended through subdivisions at 8A and 10 Scott Road, Hobsonville.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8A Scott Road

9.       Resource consent BUN60322357 (including subdivision SUB60322360) was issued in January 2019 for the construction of 30 new residential lots, a private road, being a commonly owned access lot (COAL), and two new public roads, one of which will run into the adjacent subdivision at 10 Scott Road (see paragraph 10), as well as a local purpose reserve (pedestrian access).

10 Scott Road

10.     Resource consent BUN60315456 (including subdivision SUB60315480) was issued in August 2018 for the construction of 94 new residential lots, four new public roads, one of which will connect into the adjacent subdivision at 8A Scott Road (see paragraph 9), as well as a local purpose reserve (pedestrian access).

New public road

11.     This road naming application also includes a new public road that is to be constructed through both developments at 8A and 10 Scott Road. The local board will need to approve a road name for this road that will not only extend through 8A and 10 Scott Road, but also through the adjacent / neighbouring properties as each site is developed in future (see maps in Attachments A and B).

12.     Site and location plans of both 8A and 10 Scott Road developments, as well as the adjacent property locations, can be found in Attachments A and B respectively.

 

13.     For the information of the local board, the adjacent properties are:

·        8 Scott Road, which lies to the west of the 8A Scott Road site and will eventually have the new public road extending into it. However, the 8 Scott Road site is not under development at this time.

·        12 Scott Road, which is located directly to the east of the 10 Scott Road site and will eventually have the new public road extending into it. This site is currently under development (with separate developers).

14.     In accordance with the National Addressing Standards for road naming (the AS/NZS 4819-2011 standard), the six new roads under this application require road names because they all serve more than five lots.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for local board approval.

16.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·        a historical or ancestral linkage to an area

·        a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature, or

·        an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

17.     The applicant’s proposed road names and meanings for the 8A Scott Road site are set out in the following table:

8A Scott Road - proposed road names and meanings

Ref

Proposed names and preferences

Meaning

(as described by applicant)

Road 1

 

1.      

Silverfern Avenue

(preferred)

As the property was once used as a native plant nursery, the applicant has proposed the name ‘Silverfern Avenue’ for this road.

According to Māori legend, the silver fern also once existed in the sea. As the site is located by the Waitematā Harbour coastline, the applicant feels it would be appropriate to use this name for Road 1.

1.      

Symphony Avenue

(alternate 1)

To reference how the roads connect and run in harmony with each other.

Moonstone Avenue

(alternate 2)

This name is in keeping with the applicant’s stone theme and is complementary to the preferred name ‘Limestone Drive’ for the public road extension detailed below, as the two roads connect and intersect each other.

Named for its moon-like sheen, the moonstone properties are deeply rooted in ancient philosophies and it is believed to assist in opening the heart chakra. In Hindu tradition, the moonstone is associated with the divine feminine principle and is considered a symbol of love.

Road 2 (COAL)

 

2.      

Huljich Way   

(preferred)

Chosen to commemorate the first-generation settlers of the Huljich family, the family having lived in the area since 1931. The applicant proposes that this name will carry on the legacy of the past, a theme in keeping with existing ‘Scott Road’ and ‘Clark Road’, which were also named after the early settling families in the area.

It should be noted that the developer/applicant themselves carry the Huljich family name.  

1.      

Sonata Way

(alternate 1)

Sonata is a type of musical composition that typically consists of two to four movements or sections. The applicant proposes this name to reference how the roads connect with each other and join together in harmony.

Serenade Way

(alternate 2)

Another type of musical composition, a performance delivered in honour of someone or something.

18.     The applicant’s proposed road names and meanings for the 10 Scott Road site are set out in the following table:

10 Scott Road – proposed road names and meanings

Ref

Proposed names and preferences

Meaning

(as described by applicant)

Road 1

3

Rock Home Drive

(preferred)

Applicant’s reference to the proposed development, in which they aim to provide high quality, solid homes.

1.      

Grazer Drive

(alternate 1)

Reference to the previous land use of the site; as grazing for stock.

Pilot Drive

(alternate 2)

Reference to Hobsonville’s well-known aviation / airbase history.

Road 2

 

4.      

Coast Garden Drive  

(preferred)

Reference to the development’s oceanside location, as well as to stay in theme with surrounding road names that have recently been approved, such as ‘Picnic Point Road’ at 20 Scott Road.

1.      

Toka Drive*

(alternate 1)

Māori word meaning: (verb) To be firm, solid, satisfied; (noun) rock, large stone, boulder.

*Suggested by Ngāti Whatua o Kaipara to reference Hobsonville and the surroundings/connections to this area. This name was suggested by iwi and is only to be used for the 10 Scott Road site.

Caesar Drive (alternate 2)

Previous site owner’s dog's name.

Road 3

 

5.      

Landing Path Drive

(preferred)

Reference to Hobsonville’s airbase history. The subject site would have been ideally located to view all historical air force aircraft as they took off or landed from the airbase.

1.      

Papa Taunga Drive*

(alternate 1)

Māori word meaning: Airfield, Airstrip, Landing place for planes.

*Suggested by Ngāti Whatua o Kaipara to reference Hobsonville and the surroundings/connections to this area. This name was suggested by iwi and is only to be used for the site at 10 Scott Road.

Vedette Drive

(alternate 2)

'Vedette' is a mounted sentry positioned beyond an army's outposts to observe the movements of the enemy. This word is to reference the local history of the area - an emplacement was located at the subject site.

19.     Both of the applicant’s proposed names and meanings for the public road and its future extension are set out in the table below:

1.      

(alternate 1)

Public road extending through 8A and 10 Scott Road – proposed road names and meanings

Ref

Proposed names and preferences

Meaning

(as described by applicant)

Public road and future extension

 

6.      

Limestone Drive

(preferred)

The name ‘limestone’ has historic relevance to the area. From 1869 to 1929 R O Clark and Joshua Carder operated a clay brickworks company known for its limestone kilns. Remnants of these kilns can be found on the coastal edge of the property, now known as Limeburners Bay. As this public road runs parallel to Limeburners Bay, the use of this name would be appropriate for the road.

Ocean Front Esplanade

Reference to the development’s location, directly adjoining the coastline and ocean, which gains impressive harbour views.

Zephyr Esplanade

(alternative 2)

Reference to the surrounding environment where residents would be able to enjoy the ocean view and breeze.

20.     The names proposed by the applicants have been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met and the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region. Therefore, the local board’s decision as to the thematic suitability of the names within the local context.

21.     The road names / orders can be rearranged if desired, noting that Ngāti Whatua o Kaipara were consulted and have suggested Te Reo names that are only to be used at the 10 Scott Road site, denoted by an asterisk in the tables above.

22.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use and are not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

23.     Drive, Way, Avenue and Esplanade are all acceptable road types for the new public and private roads, suiting the form and layouts of the roads, as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

24.     All relevant local iwi were emailed and invited to comment for both developments at 8A Scott Road and 10 Scott Road and the following responses were received:

·        10 Scott Road: Ngāti Whatua o Kaipara proposed Te Reo names that are only to be used at the 10 Scott Road site. Two of the four originally suggested names were already approved as part of another road naming application and therefore were not acceptable for use. The remaining two acceptable names have been included as the applicant’s proposed names in the tables above (denoted with an asterisk). Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua deferred to Ngati Whatua o Kaipara. No other responses were received.

·        8A Scott Road: Ngāti Whatua o Kaipara commented that they preferred Te Reo Māori road names but did not suggest any for this site. Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei commented that 8A Scott Road is outside of their area of primary interest and therefore deferred to other relevant iwi groups, who in turn did not respond.

25.     No other iwi groups provided responses or comments for either site. It is therefore implied that the iwi that did not respond were not opposed to the use of any of the proposed names in these locations, and/or did not have an active interest in the sites or developments.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The review sought from the Upper Harbour Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome, ‘a Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world’. The use of Māori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Māori identity. Names suggested by Ngāti Whatua o Kaipara have been included in this proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ who records them on the New Zealand-wide land information database, which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site plans - 8A and 10 Scott Road

313

b

Location plans - 8A and 10 Scott Road

315

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Upper Harbour Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14243

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2018/2019 Annual Report for the Upper Harbour Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 26 September 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2018/2019 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      adopt the 2018/2019 Upper Harbour Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A.

b)      note that any proposed changes will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019.

c)      note that the draft 2018/2019 Upper Harbour Local Board Annual Report (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report) will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2018/2019 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities, and the overall Financial Impact Statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

6.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the NZX Debt Market (quoted bonds) maintained by NZX Limited. As a result, the council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules (listing rules) and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA). Under these obligations, local boards may not release annual financial results in any form, including publishing their agenda/minutes containing their results, until council group results are released to the NZX on 27 September 2019.  Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi relates to the local board area.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area, summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved.

Funding information

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English, and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2018/2019 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2019

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 26 September 2019

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 27 September 2018

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2018/2019 Upper Harbour Local Board Annual Report (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David Gurney - Manager Corporate Performance & Reporting

Authorisers

Kevin Ramsay - General Manager Corporate Finance and Property

Victoria Villaraza – Acting General Manager

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Upper Harbour Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/13549

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the performance report for financial quarter four (1 April to 30 June 2019) and overall performance against the agreed 2018/2019 local board work programme for the financial year ending 30 June 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides a retrospective overview of the progress of the Upper Harbour Local Board work programmes at the end of quarter four (Q4) of the 2018/2019 financial year. It also provides an integrated view of financial performance and delivery against the agreed 2018/2019 Upper Harbour Local Board work programmes.

3.       Key highlights for quarter four include:

·        selection of community provider for Headquarters and Sunderland Lounge (ID 666)

·        Albany Family Fun Day event delivered in May 2019 (ID 688)

·        license for off-site grazing at Brigham Creek Road (ID 2816)

·        completion of walkway at Centorian Reserve (ID 2881)

·        interior refurbishment works completed for Sunderland Lounge (ID 2966).

4.       Overall, 89 activities within the agreed 2018/2019 work programmes were delivered, including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Five activities were put on hold, two activities were deferred, and four activities have not progressed as expected during 2018/2019. There were no cancelled or undelivered activities in this financial year.

5.       Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme include:

·        transition Hobsonville Headquarters and Sunderland Lounge from interim council management to community-led management (ID 666)

·        a total of 274 students from nine schools, ranging from Years 4 to 13, participate in Our Local Streams project (ID 362)

·        a 49 per cent increase in attendance at events or programmes delivered by the Libraries team to support customer and community connection and celebrate cultural diversity and local places, people and heritage (ID 1183)

·        completion of Rosedale Park sports field renewals (ID 1678)

·        redevelopment of Hobsonville Headquarters (ID 1677).

6.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·        Inclusion and Diversity – Age Friendly Upper Harbour (ID 687) did not progress as planned due to the original provider withdrawing because of lack of capacity

·        the Sunderland Lounge interior and exterior renewal (ID 2966) was delayed due to additional works required.

7.       Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

8.       The 2018/2019 financial performance report is attached under confidential cover. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the New Zealand’s Exchange (NZX), expected to be made public 30 September 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for financial quarter four (1 April to 30 June 2019) and overall performance against the agreed 2018/2019 local board work programmes for the financial year ending 30 June 2019.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2018/2019 are released to the New Zealand’s Exchange which are expected to be made public on 30 September 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Upper Harbour Local Board has an approved 2018/2019 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Community Services: Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; Parks, Sport and Recreation; and Service Strategy and Integration (resolution number UH/2018/66)

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew and Community Leases (resolution number UH/201878)

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services (resolution number UH/2018/65)

·        Local Economic Development (resolution number UH/2018/67).

10.     The following graph shows how the work programme activities meet 2017 Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph:

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local board work programme snapshot

11.     Operating departments have provided the last quarter delivery update against their work programme (refer Attachment A).

Key highlights for quarter four

12.     The key achievements to report from the quarter four period include:

·        Transition of Hobsonville Headquarters and Sunderland Lounge from interim council management to community-led management (ID 666) – the local board approved the Hobsonville Community Trust (HCT) as the provider of community centre services for both the Headquarters and Sunderland Lounge community facilities at Hobsonville.

·        Placemaking Albany (ID688) – an Albany Family Fun Day was held at the Albany Community Hub in May 2019 and attracted approximately 2000 people. Community engagement conversations on the day led to over 200 surveys being completed. Information gained from this activity will inform activities that will assist with the development of a welcoming and connected Albany community.

·        License for off-site grazing at Brigham Creek Road (ID2816) – deed of license was executed.

·        Centorian Reserve (ID 2881) – the construction of a walkway to create a connection to Windsor Park was completed in April 2019.

·        Sunderland Lounge renewal (ID 2966) - interior refurbishment works were completed in Q4.

Overall performance against the Upper Harbour Local Board 2018/2019 work programme

13.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities as follows:

·        Green: activities delivered as expected (completed by the end of June 2019) or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned

·        Amber: activities in progress but with issues that are being managed

·        Red: activities that are undelivered or have significant issues

·        Grey: activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged.

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

14.     The following graph shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each department’s work programme. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes:

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

15.     The table below shows the overall performance of work programme activities (RAG status and activity status by department):

 Table 1: End of year Local Board Work Programmes Status

Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme

16.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2018/2019 include:

·        The Sustainable Schools Project – Our Local Streams (ID 362) provided expertise and assistance for a total of nine schools in the Upper Harbour Local Board area to help students connect with their local streams. A total of 274 students ranging from Years 4 to 13, participated in activities to improve water quality.

·        Successful transition of Hobsonville Headquarters and Sunderland Lounge from interim council management to community-led management (ID 666).

·        A 49 per cent increase in attendance at events or programmes, delivered by the Libraries team to support customer and community connection and celebrate cultural diversity and local places, people and heritage (ID 1183).

·        Rosedale Park sports field renewals (ID 1678) – infrastructure works, the turf grow-in, and installation of new softball artificial bases have all been completed in 2018/2019.

·        The Hobsonville Headquarters redevelopment (ID1677) experienced delays throughout the year with engineering compliance sign-off for the car park works, as well as a forced closure due to failure of the existing wastewater connection and delayed completion of new wastewater infrastructure. These matters were resolved by July 2019 and the building is ready to re-open.

Overview of work programme performance by department

Arts, Community and Events work programme

17.     The Arts, Community and Events work programme had 20 activities: 19 activities were completed by the end of the year (green), and one activity is in progress but delayed (amber). This activity is discussed below:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Inclusion and Diversity

Amber

In progress

Age Concern North Shore originally agreed to deliver this work but subsequently withdrew due to lack of capacity. The Salvation Army North was identified by staff as an appropriate provider. However, they do not have capacity to support this activity until October 2019, so budget was proposed to carry forward to the 2019/2020 financial year. Planning will start with Salvation Army Home Visiting Service in September 2019 for an intergenerational event to mark the International Day of Older Persons in October 2019.

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

18.     The Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme had 11 activities: 10 activities were completed by the end of the year (green), and one activity was deferred (grey).

19.     Deferred activity details:

·        The Equitable Access to Sport and Recreation (ID 561) is intended to provide funding to schools, communities and sporting organisations to support equitable access to sport and recreation. Funding is to be informed by the Third Party Sport and Recreation Service Assessment which was not completed in 2018/2019, leading to the deferral of this activity.

Libraries and Information work programme

20.     The Libraries and Information work programme had a total of six activities that were completed by the end of the year (green). This work programme was delivered in its entirety. 

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

21.     The Service Strategy and Integration work programme had a total of two activities pertaining to multi-year projects which progressed as expected by the end of the year (green).

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

22.     The Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme had a total of 45 activities: 38 activities were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), two activities are in progress but are delayed (amber), and five activities are on hold (red). These five activities are discussed below:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Hooton Reserve – improvements

Red

On Hold

Auckland Transport (AT) will be undertaking major projects around the reserve in the near future which will have an impact on the site. Project put on hold to coordinate future planning with AT’s work programme. 

Limeburners Reserve – develop esplanade with walkway

Red

On Hold

No funding available for physical works of the boardwalk as per concept plan.

Implement actions from the Marine Sport Facility audit

Red

On Hold

The marine facility audit is yet to be completed. Actions will be investigated once the outcome of the audit is available.

Gills Reserve – install concrete walkway

Red

On Hold

This project is dependent and impacted by an AT project. Advice from AT is pending on when its project is likely to be progressed so this project can be programmed.

Implement actions from the Greenways Plan

Red

On Hold

Project is on hold pending outcome from the Greenways Plan refresh currently underway.

Community Leases work programme

23.     The Community Leases work programme had a total of eight activities: seven activities were completed by the end of the year (green), and one activity was significantly delayed (red). This activity is discussed below:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

321 Library Lane, Albany, Albany Hall Committee (formerly Fruitgrowers Association)

Red

In progress

A report to the local board on the number of car park spaces required for the ground lease was expected to be delivered in Q4, following discussions with the group. Discussions on suitable parking arrangements with the local board and occupant group are continuing and reporting during Q4 was not available. These discussions and a decision are part of the 2019/2020 work programme.

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

24.     The Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme had a total of five activities that were completed by the end of the financial year (four activities) or will be by July 2019 (one activity).

Local Economic Development work programme

25.     The Local Economic Development work programme had a total of two activities, both of which were completed by the end of the year (green).

Deferred activities

26.     As part of the local board funding policy, activities funded through the locally driven initiatives (LDI) operating fund that were not delivered in 2018/2019 will be deferred into 2019/2020 work programmes.

Cancelled activities

27.     There are no cancelled activities.

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

28.     There are no activities merged with other activities for efficient delivery.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     When developing the work programmes, council group impacts and views are presented to local boards. As this is an information only report, there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     This report informs the Upper Harbour Local Board of the performance for the quarter ending 30 June 2019 and the performance for the 2018/2019 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     Legacy Auckland Regional Services Trust (ARST) contestable funding: Upper Harbour allocation (ID 1718):

·    the local board allocated the balance of its ARST funding to the Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust (MKCT) who developed a sculpture for installation in the Albany area in Q4

·    final decisions on design and location are expected to be carried out in Q1 of 2019/2020 financial year

·    this agreement furthers the relationship agreement signed between the local board and Ngāti Manuhiri in 2017.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     This report is provided to enable the Upper Harbour Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2018/2019 work programmes and to report this to the public. This report is for information only and therefore there are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

33.     Auckland Council currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZX. As a result, council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013, Sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX and are expected to be made public on 30 September 2019.

34.     Due to these obligations, the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is under separate confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

36.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board work programme Q4 update

329

b

Upper Harbour Local Board Financial Performance Report as at 30 June 2019 (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rita Bento-Allpress - Senior Local Board Advisor Upper Harbour

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

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15 August 2019

 

 

Governance forward work calendar - September 2019 to August 2020

File No.: CP2019/13353

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Upper Harbour Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·     ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·     clarifying what advice is expected and when

·     clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the Upper Harbour Local Board governance forward work calendar for the period September 2019 to August 2020, as set out in Attachment A to this agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar - September 2019 to August 2020

353

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 11 and 25 July, and 1 August 2019

File No.: CP2019/14116

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An Upper Harbour Local Board workshop was held on Thursday 11 and 25 July, and 1 August 2019. Copies of the workshop records are attached (refer to Attachments A, B and C).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 11 and 25 July, and 1 August 2019 (refer to Attachments A, B and C to the agenda report).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 11 July 2019

357

b

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 25 July 2019

359

c

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 1 August 2019

361

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Board members' reports - August 2019

File No.: CP2019/14117

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for members to update the Upper Harbour Local Board on projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

[Note: This is an information item and if the board wishes any action to be taken under this item, a written report must be provided for inclusion on the agenda.]

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal board members’ reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

     

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

15 August 2019

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Upper Harbour Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

19        Upper Harbour Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019 - Attachment a - Draft 2018/2019 Upper Harbour Local Board Annual Report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that could give an individual access to this information prior to public release, gaining an improper advantage over others.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

20        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Upper Harbour Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019 - Attachment b - Upper Harbour Local Board Financial Performance Report as at 30 June 2019

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that could give an individual access to this information prior to public release, gaining an improper advantage over others.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.