I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waiheke Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 22 August 2019

5.15pm

Local Board Office
10 Belgium Street
Ostend
Waiheke

 

Waiheke Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cath Handley

 

Deputy Chairperson

Paul Walden

 

Members

Shirin Brown

 

 

John Meeuwsen

 

 

Bob Upchurch

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Safia Cockerell

Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

 

14 August 2019

 

Contact Telephone: 021 283 8212

Email: safia.cockerell@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Councillor's update                                                                                                       7

12        Kauri Dieback Disease - Local Park Track Mitigation in the Waiheke Local Board Area                                                                                                                                 9

13        Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes     33

14        Auckland Transport Waiheke Local Board update August 2019                         117

15        ATEED six-monthly report to the Waiheke Local Board August 2019                121

16        Chairperson's report                                                                                                 127

17        Board member's report                                                                                             131

18        Waiheke Local Board workshop record of proceedings                                      135

19        Governance Forward Work Programme                                                                 143

20        List of resource consents                                                                                         147

21        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019                                                                    157

22        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Waiheke Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019                                                                             161  

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

24        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               191

21        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

a.      Draft 2018/2019 Waiheke Local Board Annual Report                                 191

22        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Waiheke Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

b.      Waiheke Local Board financial report as of 30 June 2019                          191  

 


1          Welcome

 

Kua uru mai a hau kaha, a hau maia, a hau ora, a hau nui,

Ki runga, ki raro, ki roto, ki waho

Rire, rire hau…pai marire

 

Translation (non-literal)  - Rama Ormsby

Let the winds bring us inspiration from beyond,

Invigorate us with determination and courage to achieve our aspirations for abundance and sustainability

Bring the calm, bring all things good, bring peace….good peace.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 25 July 2019, as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waiheke Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Councillor's update

File No.: CP2019/13607

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Councillor Mike Lee with an opportunity to update the Waiheke Local Board on Governing Body issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         note the verbal update from the Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor, Mike Lee.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Kauri Dieback Disease - Local Park Track Mitigation in the Waiheke Local Board Area

File No.: CP2019/15013

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for the proposed mitigation work on tracks in local parks to protect healthy kauri and prevent kauri dieback spread within the Waiheke Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       There are 307 local parks throughout the Auckland region that contain kauri. Protection of healthy kauri is the primary objective of council’s kauri dieback management approach and isolation of any diseased specimens.

3.       To protect healthy kauri and prevent the spread of kauri dieback, staff have analysed all local parks and reserves in the Auckland region and developed recommended mitigation measures for each park.

4.       An interim report was presented to the Waiheke Local Board on 28 March 2019 (WHK/2019/58). This report obtained the local board’s endorsement of the proposed high-level kauri protection measures prior to the development of a detailed programme of works.

5.       This report focuses on the results of the prioritisation of local parks and outlines the specific programme of works for each park, including the associated costs and timeframes.

6.       There are currently 47 local parks across Auckland subject to partial or full track closures. These closures were implemented between April and July 2019, as a temporary measure while mitigation options were developed.  Temporary closures will continue until the mitigation works have been completed and tracks have been upgraded to be kauri-safe. On Waiheke, tracks in four parks have been closed temporarily.

7.       Sixteen local parks on Waiheke were initially assessed and prioritised. Two of these were subsequently removed from the list as no kauri were found in these parks and others are not easily accessible and therefore low risk.  Detailed investigation was carried out in seven parks to determine appropriate mitigation measures (Attachment A).

8.       A workshop was held on 4 July 2019, with representatives from the Waiheke Local Board and Forest and Bird to discuss the proposed detailed mitigation programme. A further workshop is planned to be held with the Waiheke Local Board on 15 August 2019.

9.       Recommended mitigation measures include re-alignment or re-routing of tracks, installation of new track surface, steps, boardwalks and installation of hygiene stations. Where appropriate, indefinite track closure is also considered as a mitigation option.  Public education and engagement is always a part the proposed mitigation measures.

10.     A variety of mitigation measures are proposed for the seven local parks on Waiheke (Attachment A), including indefinite track closure and track upgrades. Location maps are provided in Attachment B and Attachment C.

11.     Further detailed design and tendering is planned for September and October 2019. The identified mitigation works are planned to be undertaken from November 2019 to March 2020, subject to any required consent and other approvals.

12.     Track mitigation works will be carried out in accordance with the dry track standards and specifications provided by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) for Kauri Dieback Management.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      approve the following proposed mitigation work programme to protect healthy kauri and prevent kauri dieback spread on Waiheke.

Park

Recommendation

Physical work Cost Estimate

1.    McKenzie Reserve

Track S13 - indefinite closure with barriers and planting

Track S14 – realigned and upgraded to kauri-safe standard.

Installation of Hygiene Stations as required.

$ 30,200

2.     Te Matuku Bay Walkway

Keep track closed until exit route connection is established at future date.

$0

3.    Te Matuku Awaawaroa Walkway

Keep track temporarily closed and undertake track re-alignment to avoid the kauri area.

Estimated cost will be available at time of board meeting

4.    Fisher Road Reserve

Indefinite closure, supported by barrier fencing and planting.

$6,500

5.    Te Aroha Accessway Reserve

Upgrade track to kauri-safe standard.

$10,000

6.    Alison Park

Indefinite closure of small section of track and mulching around kauri trees to protect kauri roots from being accessed.

$8,100

7.    Onetangi Sports Park

Re-route of informal mountain bike track supported by barrier fencing and planting.

$4,500

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     There are 307 local parks throughout the Auckland region that contain kauri. The funding available from the natural environment targeted rate will not be able to provide for the protection of all kauri in the region.

14.     To manage investment across the region, a risk-based prioritisation approach has been applied. Local parks have been analysed in terms of kauri ecosystem value, recreational value and kauri health status, noting that the council’s primary objective is the protection of healthy kauri.

15.     This report outlines the proposed mitigation works for parks that have been prioritised, including the associated implementation costs and estimated timeframes.

16.     An interim report (Resolution number WHK/2019/58) regarding proposed kauri dieback mitigation in local parks was presented to the Waiheke Local Board on the 28 March 2019.  The local board resolved the following:

a)      endorse the following high-level kauri protection measures for local parks and reserves and subject to communication with affected parties and the community at large:

i)       undertake detailed investigations to determine appropriate mitigation measures (such as track upgrades, track re-alignment, track re-routing, or other physical works)

ii)       temporary closure of at-risk tracks within McKenzie Reserve (Category A) until mitigation works are completed to protect symptom free high value kauri ecosystems

iii)      temporary closure of Te Aroha Reserve Accessway (Category A) to nonresidents until mitigation works are completed to protect symptom free high value kauri ecosystems

iv)     maintain temporary closure of the following Category A parks until mitigation works are completed to protect symptom free high value kauri ecosystems:

•        Fisher Road

•      Te Matuku to Awaawaroa Walkway

v)      discourage public access through barrier planting and signage in Category B parks

vi)     note that the remaining parks are considered to be lower value kauri ecosystems that will undergo investigations to determine appropriate mitigation measures, which in some cases may include the installation of cleaning stations at strategic locations.

b)      endorse the General Manager Environmental Services and General Manager Parks, Sport and Recreation, in consultation with the Waiheke Local Board Chair, to exercise their delegation to undertake any additional temporary closures deemed necessary as further investigations are completed.

c)       note that a detailed kauri dieback mitigation programme with costs and timelines will be developed and submitted to a local board business meeting in mid-2019 for approval.

d)      support Waiheke to be designated as a Kauri sanctuary through the National Pest Management Plan.

17.     Funding from the natural environment targeted rate will be integrated with existing renewals budgets where available. Natural environment targeted rate funding will be focused on tracks, or sections of tracks where kauri are located within 30 metres of the track.  Funding will initially focus on high priority (Category A) local parks (identified in accordance with the categorisation process that has been undertaken and detailed previously) but will also be used to protect kauri in lower priority parks.

18.     The kauri dieback budget is dedicated to protecting kauri and preventing the spread of kauri dieback disease, through the provision of new assets or upgrading of existing assets. Natural environment targeted rate budget cannot be used for the renewal of tracks in kauri forest, unless it is specifically allocated to protecting kauri.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     The interim report provided to the Waiheke Local Board on 28 March 2019 (WHK/2019/58) included the results of the prioritsation of local parks and sought endorsement of the recommended high-level kauri protection actions prior to the development of the detailed programmed of woks.

 

20.     There are currently 47 local parks across Auckland subject to partial of full track closures. These closures were implemented between April and July 2019, as a temporary measure while mitigation options were developed. On Waiheke, tracks in four parks have been closed temporarily. These closures have been supported by Forest and Bird - Hauraki Gulf Branch. The tracks are in the following parks:

·        McKenzie Reserve

·        Fisher Road Reserve

·        Te Matuku to Awaawaroa Walkway

·        Te Matuku Bay Walkway (this track was never formally opened to the public).

21.     Sixteen local parks on Waiheke were initially assessed and prioritised. Two of these were subsequently removed from the list as no kauri were found in these parks.  Others are already closed for other reasons or are not accessible to the public. Detailed investigation was carried out in seven parks to determine appropriate mitigation measures (Attachment A and Attachment C).

22.     Each park/track was assessed and prioritised on the following basis:

·        the value of the kauri ecosystem, which was classified as high, medium or low. A kauri ecosystem value was assigned by council ecologists based on the work undertaken by Singers et al (2017): Indigenous terrestrial and wetland ecosystems of Auckland

·        the health status of the kauri, which was noted as infected, possibly infected or symptom free. This information was sourced from the council’s active surveillance programme, which includes soil sampling

·        the recreational value of the park, which was identified as high, medium or low. The analysis considered key recreational activities such as recreational trails, active transport, visitor destinations, volunteer activity and sports and recreation use, whether there were alternative tracks available and potential future growth.  Reviews of reserve management plans (if applicable) and any other relevant strategic documents were undertaken.

23.     The priority for natural environment targeted rate funding is on formal tracks with high value kauri areas and high recreational use. Mitigation of unformed or informal tracks is generally not a high priority. Those tracks are normally recommended for indefinite closure.

24.     Consultation has been undertaken with the local board, key park stakeholders and mana whenua.

25.     The kauri dieback disease mitigation programme below identifies some of the key milestones.  Timeframes are estimates only, and are subject to resourcing, weather conditions (for construction) and the actual scope of the works that are required to be undertaken.

 

26.     The mitigation options for seven parks on Waiheke are described in detail in Attachment A.  Location maps are provided in Attachment B and Attachment C. 

The recommended mitigation works are summarised as follows:

a.       McKenzie Reserve: Upgrade track S14 and close track S13 indefinitely. The estimated cost is $30,200. The estimated timeframe for completion of the works is March 2020, subject to contractor availability and weather conditions.

b.       Te Matuku Bay Walkway: Keep track closed unit exit route connection is established at a future date.

c.       Te Matuku Awaawaroa Walkway: Keep track temporarily closed and undertake track re-alignment to avoid the kauri area. The estimated cost will be provided at the board meeting. The estimated timeframe for completion of the works is March 2020, subject to possible consent requirements, contractor availability and weather conditions.

d.       Fisher Road Reserve: Indefinite track closure, supported by barrier fencing and planting. The estimated cost is $6,500. The estimated timeframe for completion of the works is March 2020, subject to contractor availability and weather conditions.

e.       Te Aroha Accessway Reserve: Upgrade track to kauri-safe standard. The estimated cost is $10,000. The estimated timeframe for completion of the works is March 2020, subject to contractor availability and weather conditions.

f.       Alison Park: Indefinite closure of small section of track and mulching around kauri trees to protect kauri roots from being accessed.  The estimated cost is $8,100. The estimated timeframe for completion of the works is March 2020, subject to contractor availability and weather conditions.

g.       Onetangi Sports Park: Re-route of informal mountain bike track, supported with barrier fencing and planting. The estimated cost is $4,500. The estimated timeframe for completion of the works is March 2020, subject to contractor availability and weather conditions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     The recommendations in this report have been developed through collaboration between council’s Environmental Services department, Parks, Sports and Recreation department and Community Facilities department.

28.     Representatives from these key departments are working as part of a dedicated and ongoing project team, to ensure that all aspects of the kauri dieback mitigation programme is undertaken in an integrated manner.

29.     Auckland Council Biosecurity specialists and kauri dieback team members have visited all parks in the Auckland regions that have kauri in close proximity to tracks to assess possible mitigation options.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The Waiheke Local Board identified in its 2017 local board plan that it is vital that Waiheke remain free of kauri dieback. The local board has recently endorsed the Waiheke Kauri Dieback Action Plan (Resolution number WHK/2019/144), which outlines key actions that will be undertaken to protect kauri ecosystems on Waiheke from the spread of kauri dieback.

31.     On 4 July 2019, a workshop was held with representatives from the Waiheke Local Board and Forest and Bird Hauraki Gulf Branch to discuss the proposed detailed mitigation programme. A further workshop is planned to be held with the Waiheke Local Board on 15 August 2019.

32.     Closing tracks in parks or reserves will have an impact on recreational activities available in the local board area. These impacts were taken into consideration when determining suitable kauri dieback mitigation measures.

33.     Key stakeholder groups that use the tracks have been informed regarding the proposed mitigation works and will continue to be kept informed on the timing for the planned track works.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents: the Auckland Plan, the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.

35.     Tāmaki Makaurau mana whenua kaitiaki kaimahi representatives have stressed the importance of the kauri species and expressed a desire to work more closely with the council and the Department of Conservation. Staff will work with mana whenua on the approach to kauri dieback on a site by site basis, where appropriate.

36.     Mana Whenua engagement was undertaken by way of an email to seek feedback regarding the project and proposed mitigation works. At the time of writing this report no feedback had been received. An update regarding any feedback received will be provided at the business meeting.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     In May 2018, the Governing Body approved a natural environment targeted rate to support environmental initiatives, including addressing kauri dieback. The rate will raise $311 million over the duration of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 (resolution GB/2018/91).

38.     The natural environment targeted rate provides funding for kauri dieback control, including new infrastructure such as track upgrades to kauri dry track standard.

39.     Where track works are already programmed in the renewals budget, additional works required to protect kauri, such as removing muddy sections of track where kauri are at risk, will be funded by the natural environment targeted rate.

40.     Due to the required new standards and hygiene operating procedures the costs for building tracks to kauri dry track standard are expected to be higher than previous track projects.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     The main risk is the spread of kauri dieback disease, where tracks are located within three times the drip line length of kauri.

42.     Closing tracks in parks and reserves, whether temporary (until upgrade works are completed) or indefinitely (where upgrade works are not recommended), will have an impact on the recreational activities available in the local board area. This may result in additional recreational pressure on other parks and reserves.

43.     To mitigate this risk, information will be provided to the public about alternative recreational activities. As part of the kauri dieback community engagement and education programme, the public is provided with information about the reasons for the track closures, the objectives of the kauri dieback mitigation programme and hygiene around kauri.

44.     There is also a risk of non-compliance, where mitigation measures are disregarded by the public, particularly with respect to track closures (where tracks continue to be used despite closure notices) and hygiene stations (where hygiene stations are not used, or not used correctly).

45.     Risk mitigation includes the provision of appropriate information and effective implementation of track closures, including signage and physical barriers. Surveillance equipment and intelligence gathering may be used for compliance purposes.

46.     In undertaking the mitigation works, strict adherence to the standards and hygiene operating requirements will be required and enforced to reduce the risk of the spread of kauri dieback disease by contractors, volunteers and council staff.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

47.     Following the local board’s decision on the recommendations provided in this report, further design, consenting (if required) and tendering will be undertaken. Contractors will then be engaged to undertake park/track mitigation works in late 2019 and/or early 2020.

48.     A priority system will be in place to determine the order of works, taking into account the impact on the community, volume of track users, alternative routes and safety.

49.     The local board and the local community will be kept updated and informed on the timing for the planned works.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Proporsed mitigation works

17

b

Waiheke Island Map

29

c

Onetangi Sports Park Map

31

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Grant Jennings - Principal Sports Parks Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

PDF Creator



Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes

File No.: CP2019/14452

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, and to provide feedback on the recommended changes to the document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is currently reviewing the Auckland Film Protocol.  The Auckland Film Protocol sets out:

·        the commitment of the council group to supporting filming in Auckland;

·        expectations and rules that filmmakers must abide by when filming in Auckland; and

·        provides guidance for filmmakers on the process for approval to film in Auckland.

3.       The purpose of the review was to ensure that the Auckland Film Protocol is up-to-date and identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities that should be addressed.  Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Auckland Film Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol. 

4.       A revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in June 2019 for consideration and was approved for public consultation (resolution number ENV/2019/73). 

5.       The following is a summary of the key changes made to the Auckland Film Protocol before public consultation was undertaken:

·        Native species: new content added stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: new content added providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: new content added stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: new content added stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: new content added to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was updated to reflect current policy, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council.  Some structural and editorial amendments were also made to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

6.       Public consultation was undertaken over a three week period between 21 June and 12 July 2019.

7.       A total of 74 submissions were received during the public consultation period.  There were no submissions from Waiheke Local Board residents on the draft Auckland Film Protocol. Staff are proposing some changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address submitter concerns; the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film protocol are shown in track changes in Attachment B.

8.       This report provides a summary of public feedback and of proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address feedback.  The following is a high‑level summary of the key changes proposed to the Auckland Film Protocol in response to public consultation:

·        Natural environment: include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Native species: include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Kauri dieback: amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

·        Impact on access to public open space: include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

·        Compliance and enforcement: include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with the Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

9.       Submission themes and proposed changes are summarised in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

b)      provide feedback on the recommended changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

c)      note that local board feedback will be included in a report to the Environment and Community Committee in September 2019, seeking approval for the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The first version of the Auckland Film Protocol (the protocol) was adopted by the Regional Development and Operations Committee (resolution number RDO/2013/27) on 14 March 2013.  A review of fees for filming in the Auckland Region was undertaken in 2014 and a new set of region‑wide charges was recommended; providing a simplified and harmonised range of charges.  The Governing Body adopted a region‑wide schedule of film fees and revised Auckland Film Protocol on 28 May 2015 (resolution number GB/2015/36).

11.     Since the Protocol was adopted in 2015 there have been a number of changes to legislation and to Auckland Council’s policy and planning framework. The purpose of the review of the Protocol was to:

·        ensure that the Protocol is up-to-date; and

·        identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities to be addressed in the Protocol.

Content of the Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.

12.     Workshops were held in September and October 2018 to engage with local boards that experience a high volume of filming.

13.     Engagement to inform the preparation of the revised draft Protocol was also undertaken with:

·        mana whenua: mana whenua interests are represented by 19 iwi (tribal) authorities in Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland.  The 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review of the Protocol.

·        staff of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to inform the review.

·        screen sector: the screen sector was invited to participate in a survey in April 2019 to inform the review.  The survey asked a series of general questions about the Protocol and experiences of filming in public open space in Auckland. 

·        public: the People’s Panel in September 2018; a total of 4,762 responses were received.  The survey asked a series of questions on views on and experiences of filming in Auckland. 

A high-level summary of feedback (including local board feedback) is provided in Attachment C.

14.     The review recommended that a range of changes be made to the Auckland Film Protocol, the following is a summary of the key changes proposed to the Environment and Community Committee:

·        Native species: include new content stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: include new content providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include new content stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: include new content stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: include new content to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Filming on Tūpuna Maunga: update content to reflect that applications to film on Tūpuna Maunga are assessed by the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority.

·        Updates to content: update content to reflect current policy (e.g. smokefree policy), plans (Auckland Unitary Plan) and bylaws of Auckland Council.

·        Structural and editorial: amend some parts of the document to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

15.     The revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was approved by the Envrionment and Community Committee for public consultation in June 2019 (resolution number ENV/2019/73).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     Consultation on the revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol took place from 21 June to 12 July 2019.  A total of 74 submissions were received; this represents a substantial increase on the 21 submission which were received in response to the 2015 review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  Of the submissions received, 72 were submitted using the online form and 2 non‑form hardcopy submissions were received. 

17.     Submitters were asked to identify if they worked in the screen sector or not, with:

·        29 submissions (39%) received from individuals or organisations that identified themselves as working in the screen sector

·        45 submissions (61%) received from individuals or organisations that do not work in the screen sector.

The questions included in the online form varied depending on whether the submitter identified themselves as working in the screen industry or not.

18.     A breakdown of all submissions received by local board area is shown in Table 1 below.  The small number of responses from individual local board areas means that a analysis of views by local board area was not possible for all local board areas.

 

Table 1: Breakdown of submissions made by local board area.

Local Board Area

Number of respondents

Percentage of respondents

Waitākere Ranges

17

23.0%

Albert-Eden

9

12.2%

Waitematā

8

10.8%

Rodney

6

8.1%

Upper Harbour

5

6.8%

Ōrākei

5

6.8%

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

4

5.4%

Devonport-Takapuna

4

5.4%

Henderson-Massey

3

4.1%

Kaipātiki

3

4.1%

Howick

2

2.7%

Whau

2

2.7%

Māngere-Ōtahuhu

1

1.4%

Puketapapa

1

1.4%

Hibiscus and Bays

1

1.4%

Papakura

1

1.4%

Franklin

0

0%

Great Barrier

0

0%

Ōtara‑Papatoetoe

0

0%

Manurewa

0

0%

Waiheke

0

0%

Don't Know

1

1.4%

Outside Auckland

1

1.4%

Total

74

 

 

19.     A series of closed questions were asked of non‑screen sector individuals and organisations; a summary of the responses to these questions is shown in Table 2 below.  Table 2 shows that:

·        most respondents are supportive of Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach and that;

·        most respondents think that the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on residents and businesses, on public open space and historic and cultural heritage.

Table 2: Feedback on the Auckland Film Protocols management of the impacts of filming

Question

Response

Percentage of regional submissions

(number of respondents is shown in brackets)

Do you support Auckland Council's film‑friendly approach?

Yes

75% (33)

Partially

20% (9)

No

5% (2)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on residents and businesses?

Yes

56% (18)

Partially

19% (6)

No

25% (8)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on our public open space and environment?

Yes

53% (23)

Partially

33% (14)

No

14% (6)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on our historic and cultural heritage?

Yes

62% (26)

Partially

29% (12)

No

10% (4)

 

20.     The main reasons given by those who supported Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach are shown in Table 3.

Table 3: Summary of key reasons for supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Economic

·      generates employment and economic growth;

·      benefits communities and local businesses;

·      benefits a broad range of trades and industries;

·      attracts investment and businesses to Auckland.

Cultural and creative

·      has cultural benefits allowing and supporting the telling of stories visually;

·      supports the creative economy and enables people to find a future in the creative industries;

·      It’s fun and exciting to see Auckland on the screen.

Promotion and tourism

·      promotes and showcases Auckland to the world;

·      creates a positive image of Auckland.

 

21.     Table 4 showns the key reasons that respondents gave for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Table 4: Summary of key reasons given for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Access

·      the impacts on resident, including parking restrictions, road closures and ability to use public open space while filming is taking place need to be considered and managed;

·      need to ensure that film‑makers are respectful of other users of public open space.

Notification

·      there needs to be sufficient notification to ensure that residents and businesses are aware of open space being used for filming and are not inconvenienced.

Balance

·      need to consider and manage the impact that filming has on the environment and impacted residents;

·      need to balance the cumulative impacts of filming.

Equity

·      need to ensure that fees for commercial use of public places are fair.

 

22.     The key reasons given for not supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach were:

·        the cost to ratepayers of enabling filming;

·        that there is not enough protection for individuals, businesses and residents affected by filming being carried out on private property.

23.     A series of open‑ended questions were also included to elicit further information about responses to these questions and about a range of other topics.  Staff have worked through submissions to determine any changes to be recommended for the final revised Auckland Film Protocol.  Attachment A identifies key themes and submission points along with proposed staff responses.  

A summary of the most common submission themes and the proposed staff responses are shown in table 5.

Table 5: Summary of key submission themes and proposed staff responses.

Key themes

Summary of proposed responses

Use of drones for filming

Include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

Impact on natural environment

Include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Kauri dieback

Amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

Impact on native species

Include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Impact on access to public open space

Include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

Compliance and enforcement

Include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

Health and safety

Amend to enable production companies to arrange alternative timeframes for the submission of a site specific health and safety plan by agreement with Screen Auckland.

Notification

Screen Auckland to consider operational approaches to achieving wider public notification.

Impact on business

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  The protocol is intended to provide a framework that enables decisions to be made on a case‑by‑case basis.

Equity

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  Fees for commercial use of public open space are set under the Auckland Council Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 and amended through the long term plan and annual plan.

 

24.     This report seeks formal feedback from the board at its August 2019 business meeting on the recommended changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol in response to consultation feedback.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.  This included engagement with Auckland Transport, Panuku Development Auckland, and with Auckland Council community facilities, region‑wide planning, social policy and bylaws, visitor experience and heritage

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Role of local boards in film permitting

26.     Landowner approval is required to film on any public open space in the Auckland region.  Local boards are responsible for landowner approvals for local parks and reserves.  Engagement with local boards that experience a high volume of applications for film permits was undertaken in September and October 2018 to inform the review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  A summary of the key engagement themes is included in Attachment C and was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

27.     A key theme from local board engagement was that the film permit timeframes mean that landowner approval timeframes are very tight, particularly when considering complex or contentious applications.  It was also noted that the current timeframes do not allow sufficient time to consider applications at full board meetings or to consult key stakeholders.  Given this, the following options on film permit timeframes were presented to the Environment and Community Committee at a workshop in May 2019 and at the June 2019 meeting.

Option one: Status Quo

Option two: amend the permit timeframes

·        Option 2(a) the permit time frame is amended to be “up to five working days”.

·        Option 2(b) the permit time frame is increased to 5‑7 working days.

28.     Following direction from the Committee, that increasing timeframes could act as a disincentive making Auckland internationally uncompetitive, the status quo option was retained in the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     ATEED has an ongoing relationship with several mana whenua and mataawaka groups, across its whole portfolio of activity.  To inform the review of the Protocol the 19 Iwi Authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review.  In relation to film permit applications Māori views and input may be obtained in several ways where there is a potential impact on particular land or sites. This is usually coordinated either by the film facilitator, or through the relevant parks manager.

30.     Specific processes are in place for the tūpuna maunga, with all commercial filming on the maunga requiring the approval of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority).  Screen Auckland facilitates all requests for approval to film on the tūpuna maunga.  Approval to film will be subject to conditions and restrictions set by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.  Meetings were held with staff of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to inform the review and ensure that proposed amendments are consistent with the policy of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The proposed amendments to the Protocol do not impact on existing levels of service and will not impact on operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     There are no significant risks arising from the board giving feedback on the proposed changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol at this time.

33.     If adoption of the revised Auckland Film Protocol is delayed this would impact on council’s ability to implement the proposed changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Public feedback and proposed amendments to the Auckland Film Protocol will be presented to the Environment and Community Committee for approval.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key submission themes and responses

43

b

Draft 2019 Auckland Film Protocol

53

c

Summary of preconsultation engagement

113

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Marie Jenkin -, Screen Facilitation Manager, ATEED

Authorisers

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

Victoria Villaraza -Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport Waiheke Local Board update August 2019

File No.: CP2019/13608

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.         To provide an update to the Waiheke Local Board on transport related matters in their area including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The report focuses on a number of current issues:

·        10 Year Transport Plan consultation.

·        Community Safety Fund project.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Report August 2019.

b)      allocate the Community Safety Fund to the Causeway Westbound Cyclepath.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       This report addresses transport related matters on Waiheke and includes information on the status of the local board transport capital fund.

4.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. They report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in their Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·        be safe

·        not impede network efficiency

·        be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       A summary of the LBTCF is contained in the below.

Waiheke Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$1,214,794

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$153,274

Remaining Budget left

$1,061,520

 

Community Safety Fund project

7.       Further investigation of the Causeway Cyclepath (Westbound) has determined that the project is in fact constructible for the budget available and will not require complicated consenting processes. The Causeway has sustained a certain amount of damage at the margin with the coastal edge and once this is repaired there will be sufficient room to establish a cyclepath on the westbound side of the Causeway.

8.       The two other Community Safety Fund candidate projects have been ruled out of contention for the following reasons. The Donald Bruce roundabout improvements are going to be undertaken by Auckland Transport itself and the Surfdale Shops cycle improvements have been determined to be too complicated and expensive for the budget available.

9.       It is therefore recommended that the Board allocate its Community Safety Fund the Causeway Westbound Cyclepath.

Project Name

Project Description

Project cost

Causeway Cyclepath - Westbound

Cyclists using Causeway Rd or the foreshore path at Ostend Reserve by the Waiheke Boating Club are directed to cross a busy main road to the shared path on the northern side of the road, which is extremely dangerous. This project seeks to address this problem by providing a cyclepath on the southern side.

 

$320,000

 

Ten Year Transport Plan

10.     The 10 Year Transport Plan for Waiheke Island, a key aspect of the new MOU signed between the Waiheke Local Board and Auckland Transport, is currently being consulted on with the public. Brochures detailing the plan and submission process have been distributed to all properties and ratepayers and four consultation events have been held over the past few weeks.

11.     Events have been held at Matiatia Wharf, the Saturday market, the Waiheke Library and at the Ostend Hall. All events attracted significant interest and a steady stream of submissions are being received, with more coming in every day. Submissions close on Sunday 25 August and on past experience there is usually a significant number of submissions that come in within the last couple of days.

Npū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report are confined to AT and do not impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Traffic Controls Committee decisions

Street Name

Suburb

Type of Report

Resolution ID

Nature of Restriction

Committee Decision

Ocean View Road

Oneroa

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

15505

Parking Zone, P2 Day Parking, Angle Parking

Carried

Matiatia Car Park

Oneroa

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

15503

Paid Parking, Parking Zone, No Stopping At All Times, Angle parking, P30 Time-Restricted parking, Mobility parking, Motorcycle parking, Authorised Vehicle parking, Small PSV Stand, Traffic Island

Carried

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

13.     Interactions with mana whenua is done on a project specific basis. There is no direct impact because of this report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

14.     If the Board allocates its Community Safety Fund to the Causeway Westbound Cyclepath this will fully utilise the Board’s allocation under this fund.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

15.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for the transport projects undertaken in the local board area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

16.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board in September 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jonathan Anyon - Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Jonathan Anyon - Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

ATEED six-monthly report to the Waiheke Local Board August 2019

File No.: CP2019/15011

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides the Waiheke Local Board with highlights of ATEED’s activities in the Waiheke Local Board area as well as ATEED’s regional activities for the six months 1 January to 30 June 2019.

2.       This report should be read in conjunction with ATEED’s Quarter 3 report to Auckland Council (available at www.aucklandnz.com) and the forthcoming Quarter 4 report to the Auckland Council CCO Finance and Performance Committee (available 17 September). Although these reports focus primarily on the breadth of ATEED’s work at a regional level, much of the work highlighted has significant local impact.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report provides the Waiheke Local Board with relevant information on the following ATEED activities: 

·    Supporting local business growth

·    Filming activity

·    Young Enterprise Scheme

·    Youth employment pathways

·    Youth connections

·    Offshore talent attraction

·    Local and regional destination management and marketing

·    Delivered, funded and facilitated events

 

4.       Further detail on these activities is listed under Analysis and advice.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         receive ATEED’s update to the Waiheke Local Board – August 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.    ATEED has two areas of focus:

Economic Development – including business support, business attraction and investment, local economic development, trade and industry development, skills employment and talent and innovation and entrepreneurship.

 

Destination - supporting sustainable growth of the visitor economy with a focus on destination marketing and management, major events, business events (meetings and conventions) and international student attraction and retention.

 

6.       These two portfolios also share a common platform relating to the promotion of the city globally to ensure that Auckland competes effectively with other mid-tier high quality of life cities.

7.       ATEED works with local boards, Auckland Council and CCOs to support decision-making on local economic growth and facilitates or co-ordinates the delivery of local economic development activity. ATEED ensures that the regional activities that ATEED leads or delivers are fully leveraged to support local economic growth and employment.

8.       In addition, ATEED’s dedicated Local Economic Development (LED) team works with local boards who allocate locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget to economic development activities. The LED team delivers a range of services such as the development of proposals, including feasibility studies that enable local boards to directly fund or otherwise advocate for the implementation of local initiatives.

9.       ATEED delivers its services at the local level through business hubs based in the north, west and south of the region, as well as its central office at 167B Victoria Street West.

10.     Additional information about ATEED’s role and activities can be found at www.aucklandnz.com/ateed

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     As at 30 June[1], 3303 businesses had been through an ATEED intervention or programme. Of these, 47 businesses were in the Waiheke Local Board area – 35 businesses went through Destination-related programmes and 12 businesses went through Economic Development-related programmes.

 

Economic Development

Supporting Local Business Growth

12.     This area is serviced by the Business and Enterprise team in the central hub, located at 167B Victoria Street West. The team comprises of two Business and Innovation Advisors and administration support. The role of this team is to support the growth of Auckland’s key internationally competitive sectors and to support to provide quality jobs.

 

13.     A key programme in achieving this is central government’s Regional Business Partnership Network (RBPN). This is delivered by ATEED’s nine Business and Innovation Advisors (BIA), whose role is to connect local businesses to resources, experts and services in innovation, R&D, business growth and management. 

 

14.     ATEED’s BIAs engage 1:1 with businesses through a discovery meeting to understand their challenges, gather key data, and provide connections / recommendations via an action plan.

 

15.     Where businesses qualify (meet the programme criteria and/or align to ATEED’s purpose as defined in the SOI) the advisors facilitate government support to qualifying businesses, in the form of:

·   Callaghan Innovation R&D grants (including Getting Started, project and student grants (https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/grants)

·   Callaghan Innovation subsidised innovation programmes

(https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/innovation-skills)

·   RBPN business capability vouchers (NZTE), where the business owner may be issued co-funding up to $5,000 per annum for business training via registered service providers. Voucher co-funding is prioritised to businesses accessing this service for the first time, in order to encourage more businesses to engage with experts to assist their management and growth.

·   NZTE services such as Export Essentials (https://workshop.exportessentials.nz/register/)

·   Referrals to NZ Business Mentors via The Chamber of Commerce.

 

16.     During the reporting period, ATEED Business and Innovation Advisors met with four businesses in the Waiheke Local Board area, one for innovation advice and services and four for business growth and capability advice and services (one business saw an advisor for both services). From these engagements:

·   One RBPN voucher were issued to assist with business capability training

·   Six connections were made to Callaghan Innovation services and programmes

·   One referral was made to Business Mentors New Zealand

·   Four connections were made to ATEED staff and programmes

·   Twenty-five connections were made to other businesses or programmes.

 

Filming activity within the Waiheke Local Board area

17.     ATEED’s Screen Auckland team provides film facilitation services as part of ATEED’s support for the screen and digital sector of Auckland’s economy. Screen Auckland facilitates, processes and issues film permits for filming activity in public open space. This activity supports local businesses and employment, as well as providing a revenue stream to local boards for the use of local parks.

 

18.     Between 1 January and 30 June 2019, 305 film permits were issued in the Auckland region across 379 locations and 404 days of filming. On average, 37 crew work on each shoot day. This does not reflect filming that also takes place in studios, private property or low impact activity that wouldn’t have required a permit. During the period, 81 permits were issued for TV commercials (TVC), making up 27 per cent of permits issued. A quarter of the TVC permits were destined for an international market.

 

19.     Auckland is becoming a popular destination for international television networks to pilot an episode of a new TV series to allow them to gauge if a series will be successful. Permits were issued for locations across the Auckland region earlier this year for two new US pilots.

 

Young Enterprise Scheme (YES)

20.     The Auckland Chamber of Commerce has delivered the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) since January 2018. ATEED maintains a strategic role. During the period, there were 58 schools participating in the Auckland YES programme, representing 1376 students completing the programme. There are currently no schools in the Waiheke Local Board area participating in the YES programme.

 

Youth employment pathways

21.     The Go with Tourism campaign was successfully launched on 5 April, attracting 170 employers and more than 700 youth by year-end. The campaign is designed to shift perceptions many young people have about careers in tourism and address the skills gap in the industry.  

 

22.     ATEED delivered the Future Ready Summit on 26 June at the Vodafone Events Centre in Manukau. Approximately 250 employers, 40 young people and 20 speakers (eight under the age of 24). The Youth Employer Pledge partners were the primary audience. The Future Ready Auckland: Driving economic development through technology and transformation insights paper was also released, attracting strong media attention - including a lead story on Radio NZ Nine to Noon The research insights aim to better understand Auckland’s future skill needs, including future growth sectors. ATEED is currently working with pledge partners to harness the network, with a focus on south and west Auckland now that Youth Connections has transferred to The Southern Initiative.

 

Local Jobs and Skills Hubs

23.     ATEED is the regional partner for the network of Auckland Jobs and Skills Hubs. These multi-agency hubs support employers at developments where there is a high and sustained demand for local labour and skills development. The Auckland network includes Ara (Auckland Airport development), City Centre and Tāmaki hubs. As at 30 June, 377 people had been placed into employment via the ATEED-facilitated CBD hub, 1,914 training outcomes were delivered, and 11 apprenticeships were facilitated. About 36 per cent of those employed are Māori, against a target of 40 per cent. ATEED has developed a school engagement pilot programme with interested employers and schools aimed at engaging students with career opportunities in the construction and infrastructure sector. ATEED also provided funding to a Progressive Employment Programme for at-risk youth, supporting cadet training and developing youth-ready capability within businesses working on the City Rail Link. The City Centre hub is a training partner for this programme.

 

Offshore talent attraction

24.     The Auckland. We’re Hiring campaign ran from January to March 2019. The campaign is designed to attract high-skilled offshore construction and technology talent to Auckland. The campaign resulted in 2295 job applications.

 

Destination

Local destination management and marketing activity

25.     During the period, ATEED’s Tourism team worked with the local board to develop baseline local and visitor data in order to assist with planning. ATEED is also actively involved in the Matiatia Enhancement Planning process, and able to use this data and other research to support the needs and future expectations regarding arrivals and commuter movements to and from the island.

 

26.     ATEED’s Destination Innovation team travelled to Waiheke to plant trees with the Waiheke Resources Trust for a community day. Approximately 50 trees were planted along wetlands.

 

27.     ATEED continues to support and promote the Waiheke Tourism Cluster, with a special focus on digital skills development. During the period, the Destination Innovation team actively engaged with the Hauraki Gulf Marine Forum and other interlocking initiatives focused on sustainability. This includes working with planners and the local board on developing the Long-Term Plan.

 

Regional destination management and marketing activity

28. The Elemental AKL winter festival website went live on 29 April. The festival ran from 1-31 July and is developed to promote sustainable tourism growth by encouraging visitation more evenly throughout the year, and dispersing visitors across the region. The programme included more than 60 free and ticketed events across the themes of light, food, entertainment, and culture. Elemental Feast went live on 4 June, with 120 restaurants participating in plating up unique festival dishes using ingredients sourced from the Auckland region and inspired by the elements. 

 

28.     The Short Break campaign, aimed at leisure travellers on Australia’s eastern seaboard, ran during Q3 and Q4. There were three bursts of the campaign, focused on themes of nature, food and wine, and ultimate things to do in Auckland featuring different parts of the region including Waiheke Island, the city life and coastline. As part of the campaign, ATEED hosted news.com.au and lifestyle.com.au in Auckland, showcasing the city’s unique offering that is promoted in the campaign. News.com.au has a reach of six million and will produce a dedicated feature on Auckland as well as share one article on Facebook with their 1.1m followers. Lifestyle.com.au has a reach of 1.2m unique viewers and will produce two dedicated online features.

 

Delivered, funded and facilitated events

29.     During the period, ATEED delivered the 2019 Auckland Lantern Festival at the Auckland Domain. Customer satisfaction was 89 per cent, an increase of nine per cent compared to the previous year. Some key findings from the customer survey found that respondents were very positive about what the event meant for the city, with 96 per cent of respondents agreeing that Auckland Council should continue to support events like the Lantern Festival and 94 per cent saying that the event brought people from different ethnic and cultural groups together (compared to 95 per cent and 91 per cent respectively in the previous year). The Auckland Lantern Festival’s sustainability objectives through the Cultural Festivals Strategy resulted in 62 per cent of waste being diverted from landfill. This has nearly doubled in two years, with the diversion being 34 per cent in 2017.

 

30.     Given the need to prioritise police resourcing following the events in Christchurch on 15 March, the 2019 Pasifika festival, which was due to run on 23 and 24 March, was cancelled. Although the festival would have been an opportunity to bring Auckland’s communities together at a time of national mourning, given the unprecedented nature of what happened and after discussions with the New Zealand Police, it was agreed that Police must prioritise resourcing to ensure the safety of communities across the city.

 

31.     During the period, residents of the Waiheke Local Board area were also able to enjoy events funded or facilitated by ATEED across the Auckland region, including the ASB Classic, Splore Music and Arts Festival, Sculpture on the Gulf, the New Zealand Comedy Festival, the Auckland Writers Festival, the Auckland Art Fair, Warhorse, and Auckland Wine Week.

 

32.     A full schedule of major events is available on ATEED’s website, aucklandnz.com

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     ATEED assesses and manages our initiatives on a case-by-case basis and engages with the Council group where required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     Local board views are not sought for the purposes of this report. Local board views were sought for some of the initiatives described in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds to any impact that our initiatives may have on Māori on a case-by-case basis.

 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with our initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     ATEED will provide the next six-monthly report to the Local Board in February 2020 and will cover the period 1 July to 31 December 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Samantha-Jane Miranda, Operational Strategy Advisor (ATEED)

Authoriser

Quanita Khan, Manager Operational Strategy and Planning (ATEED)

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2019/13609

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Chairperson Cath Handley with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues she has been involved with and to draw the board’s attention to any other matters of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the report from Chairperson Cath Handley.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairs Report August 2019

129

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Board member's report

File No.: CP2019/13615

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with and to draw the board’s attention to any other matters of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note board member Shirin Brown’s report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Board member report August 2019

133

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Waiheke Local Board workshop record of proceedings

File No.: CP2019/13610

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached is a copy of the record of proceedings of the Waiheke Local Board workshops held on 18 July, 25 July and 8 August 2019.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the record of proceedings of the Waiheke Local Board workshops held on 18 July, 25 July and 8 August 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20190718 Waiheke Local Board Workshop proceedings

137

b

20190725 Waiheke Local Board Workshop proceedings

139

c

20190808 Waiheke Local Board Workshop proceedings

141

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Programme

File No.: CP2019/13611

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.         Attached is a copy of the Governance Forward Work Programme for Waiheke which is a schedule of items that will come before the board at business meetings and workshops over the next 12 months.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Programme.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Programme

145

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

List of resource consents

File No.: CP2019/13613

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.         Attached are the lists of resource consent applications related to Waiheke Island received from 14 to 20 July, 21 to 27 July, 28 July to 3 August and 4 to 10 August 2019.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the lists of resource consents lodged related to Waiheke Island from 14 to 20 July, 21 to 27 July, 28 July to 3 August and 4 to 10 August 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resource consent applications received from 14 to 20 July 2019

149

b

Resource consent applications received from 21 to 27 July 2019

151

c

Resource consent applications received from 28 July to 3 August 2019

153

d

Resource consent applications received from 4 to 10 August 2019

155

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Safia Cockerell - Democracy Advisor - Waiheke

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14270

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2018/2019 Annual Report for the Waiheke Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 26 September 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2018/2019 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      adopt the 2018/2019 Waiheke Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A.

b)      note that any proposed changes will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019.

c)      note that the draft 2018/2019 Waiheke Local Board Annual Report (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report) will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2018/2019 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities, and the overall Financial Impact Statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

6.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the NZX Debt Market (quoted bonds) maintained by NZX Limited. As a result, the council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules (listing rules) and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA). Under these obligations, local boards may not release annual financial results in any form, including publishing their agenda/minutes containing their results, until council group results are released to the NZX on 27 September 2019.  Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi relates to the local board area.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area, summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved.

Funding information

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English, and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2018/2019 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2019

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 26 September 2019

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 27 September 2018

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2018/2019 Waiheke Local Board Annual Report (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David Gurney - Manager Corporate Performance & Reporting

Authorisers

Kevin Ramsay - General Manager Corporate Finance and Property

Victoria Villaraza - Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Waiheke Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14325

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the performance report for financial quarter four (1 April to 30 June 2019) and overall performance against the agreed 2018/2019 local board work programme for the financial year ending 30 June 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Waiheke Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2018/2019 financial year.

3.       Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

4.       Seventy-nine activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Thirteen activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred and three projects have not progressed as expected during 2018/2019.

5.       Key highlights for quarter four include:

·    Approval of the draft Waiheke Ten-Year Transport Plan for consultation.

·    Approval of the draft Little Oneroa Concept Plan for consultation.

·    Commencement of consultation on the draft Tawaipareira Reserve Concept Plan.

6.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·    The Omnibus Waiheke Parks Management Plan and the Rangihoua Reserve / Onetangi Sports Park Management Plan have been delayed due to the volume of work involved.

·    The Rakino Hall and Seawall is delayed. Cost estimates are significantly higher than expected and more options will need to be considered.

·    The Waiheke Area Plan timeline has been delayed due to complex issues requiring additional workshops.

7.       Further information is provided within the body of this report.

8.       The 2018/2019 financial performance report is attached but under confidential cover. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – expected to be made public 30 September 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter and year ending 30 June 2019.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2018/2019 are released to the NZX which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Waiheke Local Board has an approved 2018/2019 work programme for the following operating departments:

·    Community Services (Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; Parks, Sport and Recreation; and Service Strategy and Integration) approved on 28 June 2018

·    Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew and Community Leases, approved on 26 July 2018

·    Infrastructure and Environmental Services, approved on 28 June 2018

10.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

11.     Operating departments have provided the last quarter delivery update against their work programme (Attachment A).

Key highlights for quarter four

12.     The key achievements to report from the quarter four period include:

·      Waiheke Ten-Year Transport Plan: The local board and Auckland Transport in conjunction with the Waiheke Transport Forum have developed a ten-year plan which identifies and prioritises transport projects including walking and cycling, to be undertaken over ten years from 2020. The plan is currently out for consultation with stakeholders and community.

·    Little Oneroa Concept Plan: A draft concept plan has been approved for consultation. The plan formalises the carpark and updates the playground and play elements in the reserve. There are a number of other works to improve access around the reserve and to protect the shoreline, such as additional planting and the installation of two sand ladders to encourage single point access. Delivered will be in stages following consultation and prioritisation, with the playground renewal being the initial focus.

·    Tawaipareira Reserve Concept Plan: Consultation has opened on the concept plan ahead of the skatepark renewal project. The board, along with Ngati Paoa, are planning an extensive redevelopment of the reserve to create a unique park, focusing on facilities for youth and families. The project is expected to be delivered in stages once the concept plan is approved, starting with the skatepark renewal.

 

Draft Tawaipareira Reserve concept plan

Overall performance against the Waiheke Local Board 2018/2019 work programme

13.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected (completed by the end of July 2019) or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

14.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

15.     The table below shows the overall performance of work programme activities (RAG status and activity status by work programme).

Table 1: End of year Local Board Work Programmes Status

 

RAG Status

Activity Status

ACE

PSR

Libraries

SS&I

CF

Leases

I&ES

P&P

Green

Completed

18

3

6

-

22

8

3

-

In progress

-

2

-

-

16

-

1

-

Amber

In progress

-

1

-

1

1

-

-

2

Red

In progress

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

On Hold

-

1

-

-

6

-

-

-

Not delivered

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Grey

Deferred

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

Cancelled

-

1

-

-

1

-

-

-

 

Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme

16.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2018/2019 include:

 

Local Board Plan Outcome 1: Inclusive planning and placemaking

1.       Waiheke Area Plan:  Complex issues are requiring more time for discussion during working party meetings. This has delayed the timeline and the draft area plan is now due for public consultation early 2020.

2.       Development of the Lightscape Management Plan continues. Expert advice indicates revision and further consultation with Auckland Transport will be required.

3.       Local Parks Management Plan:  Informal consultation has concluded for the local Parks Management Plan and the Rangihoua Reserve / Onetangi Sports Park Plan. Staff will review comments and workshop with the board over the coming months, prior to drafting of the management plans. Once the board have approved the draft plans a formal consultation period will follow.

 

Local Board Plan Outcome 2: A sustainable economy and positive visitor experience

4.       Waiheke Community Art Gallery:  The total number of visitors to the gallery during this quarter was 13,000. This was lower than usual due to construction works outside the front of the gallery. There were 273 volunteer hours new exhibits such as Sea Conversations, Ontogency and Design Lab.

5.       Artworks Theatre:  Some highlights during this quarter included the annual Jazz Festival which attracted over 600 participants, the Louise Emma Academy of Dance show, Creatures of the Night, Korero Kids, and various sea scout workshops.

6.       Volunteer Day / Community Service Award: Community Networks Waiheke delivered a ‘volunteers’ long lunch’ which was attended by 80 volunteers. A video highlighting the work of Waiheke volunteers will also be produced with local board funding.

7.       Arts and Culture response: Two facilitated session were held with Waiheke arts organisations and practitioners, which involved participants inputting into and feeding back on the draft arts community strategy.

8.       Community and Social economic development: The Waiheke Community Childcare Centre are developing an architect’s brief based on results of community consultation regarding weather coverage around the RSA and Ostend Hall. They will report back to the board shortly.

 

Local Board Plan Outcome 3: Waiheke's environment is treasured

9.       Ecological restoration contract: The programme is continuing positively, with an estimated 535 volunteer hours and 1885 trees planted this quarter.  The Waiheke Resources Trust have continued weed control and plant releasing across all five sites (Matiatia, Rangihoua, Little Oneroa, Te Toki and Te Matuku. A workshop was held with the board in late May to present the annual report.

10.     Ecological volunteers programme: An additional 1277 volunteer hours have been provided under the volunteers’ programme, focussing on maintaining plantings and controlling weeds at McKenzie Reserve and Newton Reserve. Friends of Te Aroha Ave Reserve have been planting and weeding.  There has been an addition 30 predator management projects on private land in response to community demand. Much of this work is being led by the Ratbusters programme.

11.     Project Little Oneroa - The Waiheke Resources Trust hosted two septic tank workshops during this quarter, with over 25 residents attending.  There has been an update of discounted septic inspections following issuing of abatement notices, over 50 discounted inspections have been delivered across the island during this financial year.

12.     Onetangi beach planting: Community facilities, in collaboration with the biodiversity and coastal team, have been working with volunteers to plan 7000 dune grasses at the beach. They will progressively plant out areas of eroding bank and restrict pedestrian access. Planting is also planned at Palm Beach.

 

13.     Sustainable schools: 180 students from the four schools involved in this initiative are undertaking tree planting, community beach clean-ups, sea-stainable sushi, drain filters, freshwater monitoring, raising awareness on the human impact on the marine environmental and predator monitoring in the wetlands.

 

Local Board Plan Outcome 4: Thriving, strong and engaged communities

14.     Youth Hub:  During this quarter the Waiheke Youth Centre Trust have delivered youth workshops on healthy cooking and alcohol and drug safety. They have also worked with Youth Voice and the Youth Network to plan further events at the hall.

15.     Youth Voice:  Waiheke Youth Voice (WYV) have focussed on encouraging youth to get involved and network with other community organisations. They helped to organise Waiheke’s climate strike events which included a beach clean-up, and a youth event at the library.

16.     Maori responsiveness: The E Tipu e Rea Rangatahi Mentoring project, funded by the board and run by the Waiheke Art Gallery, opened on 28 June 2019. The project involved 20 rangatahi from the Waiheke community.

17.     Community leases:  During this period, new or renewed community leases were approved for the Artworks Cinema, the Art Gallery, the Ostend Sports Club and for the Waiheke Sea Scouts at Putiki Reserve.

 

Local Board Plan Outcome 5: Vibrant places for people

18.     Swimming Pool: The draft feasibility study was presented to the board during this period. The board have requested an extension of the study to look at further options which will be reported back in the next quarter.

19.     Renewal park furniture and fixings: A focus over this period was renewal and replacement of seats, tables, bins, plaques, and signage. 

 

20.     Art Gallery and Cinema Building:  The exterior structure of the Art Gallery building including façade, wooden ramp and decking is being replaced. Vinyl flooring at the gallery has also been replaced. The foyer of the gallery and cinema has been painted, and there are new toilets on the ground floor.

 

 

 

Overview of work programme performance by department

Arts, Community and Events work programme

21.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 18 activities that were completed by the end of the year, and no activities that are delayed, not delivered or cancelled. 

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

22.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are five activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), one activity that is in progress but is delayed (amber), one activity that is on hold and one activity that has been cancelled. Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Matiatia: Implementing parks related Matiatia Gateway Masterplan

Red

On hold

Panuku managed leases have now been handed over to Community Facilities, however agreement on allocation of budget or leases has not yet been confirmed. Workshops have been scheduled to agree direction by September 2019.

Waiheke Recreation Centre Community Access grant

Amber

In progress

The annual report from the Waiheke Recreation Centre Trust is due in July 2019 and will be workshopped with the board in Q1. This activity will be complete by end of Q1 next financial year.

 

Libraries and Information work programme

23.     In the Libraries and Information work programme, there are six activities that were completed by the end of the year, and no activities that are delayed, not delivered or cancelled. 

 

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

24.     In the Service Strategy and Integration work programme, there is one activity that is in progress but delayed (amber), and no activities that are not delivered or cancelled.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Omnibus Waiheke Parks Management Plan and Rangihoua Reserve/ Onetangi Sports Park Management Plan

Amber

In progress

Current state analysis is complete, and work has commenced to develop options. Ngati Paoa have indicated they do not wish other iwi to be involved. There is a risk that timeframes are not met due to the volume of work involved. Further committee workshops are scheduled for August 2019.

 

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

25.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 38 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), one activity that is in progress but is delayed (amber), seven activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and two activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey).

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Catherine Mitchell Society – drainage and renew carpark

Red

On hold

Carpark will be monitored during winter now that kerb and channel works have been completed on Putiki Road.

Little Oneroa Reserve – renew playground

Red

On hold

Consultation on the draft concept plan commenced July 2019. Feedback on design and priorities to be confirmed once consultation is complete.

Boat ramp and pontoons - improvements

Red

On hold

Estimated budget to be confirmed once project assessment and scope is finalised.

Waiheke - implement greenways plan

 

Red

On hold

Implementation of the greenways plan is aligned with the 10-year Transport Plan which is currently out for consultation. Staged delivered will be prioritised following finalisation of the transport plan.

Rakino Hall and Seawall - investigate options for works

 

Red

In progress

An external quantity surveyor has recently prepared a cost estimate that is significantly higher than expected. As a result, the physical works is not expected to go ahead as anticipated.

530 Orapiu Rd, Waiheke - install track

 

Red

On hold

Project is in negotiations with a resident regarding encroachment issues. The project cannot proceed until these issues have been resolved. Section of track also includes Kauri and so has been deferred to the Kauri Die Back Management team.

Te Whau Esplanade Reserve - renew Hitapa track

 

Red

On hold

Temporary repairs on the March 2017 storm damage and slips have already been completed. A memo has been sent to the local board about the proposal to reallocate the funds from this project to the Hekerua Bay access project.

Albert Cres to Wharf Road – renew walkway and retaining wall

Amber

In progress

Project is in strategic assessment awaiting outcomes from the geotechnical team. Confirmed design expected near end of financial year or Q1 next financial year.

Renew access at Anzac Reserve

Grey

Cancelled

Project cancelled as Community Facilities maintenance have completed the work.

 

Community Leases work programme

26.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are eight activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), and no activities that are delayed, not delivered or cancelled. 

 

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

27.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are four activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), and no activities that are delayed, not delivered or cancelled. 

 

Plans and Places work programme

28.     In the Plans and Places work programme, there are two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber) as discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

An area plan for Waiheke

 

Amber

In progress

Workshopping key issues continued through the quarter with more complex issues requiring several workshops. The extended workshopping process will delay the preparation of a draft area plan for public consultation for early 2020.

 

Lightscape management plan

 

Amber

In progress

Draft plan prepared and workshopped with the local board. Expert advice received indicates revision and further consultation with AT on street lighting will be required.

 

Deferred activities

29.     As part of the local board funding policy, activities funded through the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operating fund that were not delivered in 2018/2019 will be deferred into 2019/2020 work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     This report informs the Waiheke Local Board of the performance for the quarter ending 30 June 2019 and the performance for the 2018/2019 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     The Matiatia planning project aims to prepare a strategic plan for Matiatia which reflects the aspirations of the Waiheke community and respects the interests and rights of mana whenua for the future use of that land. Ngati Paoa has representation on the project working group and are working to identify their aspirations for the site. 

33.     Hui have been held on site at Tawaipareira Reserve and Mātiatia Reserve with Ngati Paoa Trust Board representatives to discuss projects currently underway.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     This report is provided to enable the Waiheke Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2018/2019 work programmes and to report this to the public. This report is for information only and therefore there are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

35.     Auckland Council currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX expect to be made public on 30 September.

36.     Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

38.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board work programme update

173

b

Waiheke Local Board financial report as of 30 June 2019 - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Janine Geddes - Senior Local Board Advisor Waiheke

Authoriser

Helgard Wagener - Relshp Mgr - Great Barrier and Waiheke

 



Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

    

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Waiheke Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

21        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019 - Attachment a - Draft 2018/2019 Waiheke Local Board Annual Report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2019 that require final Audit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

22        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Waiheke Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019 - Attachment b - Waiheke Local Board financial report as of 30 June 2019

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular,  the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2019 that require final Audit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

   



[1] FY 2018/19 result for ATEED’s SOI KPI2