I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 22 August 2019

6.00pm

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Office
39 Glenmall Place
Glen Eden

 

Waitākere Ranges Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Greg Presland

 

Deputy Chairperson

Saffron Toms

 

Members

Sandra Coney, QSO

 

 

Neil Henderson

 

 

Steve Tollestrup

 

 

Ken Turner

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Brenda  Railey

Democracy Advisor - Waitakere Ranges

 

16 August 2019

 

Contact Telephone: +64 21 820 781

Email: brenda.railey@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               6

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          6

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       6

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          6

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    6

8.1     Deputation: Nick Kearns - Skate and play area in Titirangi                            6

8.2     Deputation: Ed King - Titirangi Community House activities update            7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Waitākere Ward Councillor Update                                                                             9

12        Waitākere Ranges Local Grants Round One 2019/2020 grant allocations           11

13        Allocation of Waitākere Ranges Local Board Community Safety Fund             165

14        Auckland Transport's update for August 2019                                                      169

15        Proposed changes to the legacy Waitākere City Council septic tank pump-out targeted rate and service                                                                                          173

16        Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development's (ATEED) report for the period January to June 2019                                                                                    183

17        Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes   191

18        Confirmation of Workshop Records                                                                        279

19        Governance Forward Work Programme                                                                 295

20        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Waitākere Ranges Local Board for Quarter four 2018/2019                                                                  299

21        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019                                                                    357  

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

23        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               361

20        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Waitākere Ranges Local Board for Quarter four 2018/2019

b.      Waitākere Ranges Financial Performance Report 30 June 2019               361

21        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

a.      Draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019                361  

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

Members were reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

            Specifically members are asked to identify any new interests they have not previously disclosed, an interest that might be considered as a conflict of interest with a matter on the agenda.

The following are declared interests of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

Board Member

Organisation/Position

Sandra Coney

-   Waitemata District Health Board – Elected Member

-   Women’s Health Action Trust – Patron

-   New Zealand Society of Genealogists – Member

-   New Zealand Military Defence Society – Member

-   Cartwright Collective – Member

-   Portage Trust – Trustee

-   West Auckland Trust Services – Director

-   Community Waitakere – family member has contract

Neil Henderson

-   Portage Trust – Elected Member

-   West Auckland Trust Services (WATS) Board – Trustee/Director

-   Kaipatiki Project - Employee

Greg Presland

-   Lopdell House Development Trust – Trustee

-   Whau Coastal Walkway Environmental Trust – Trustee

-   Combined Youth Services Trust – Trustee

-   Glen Eden Bid – Member

-   Titirangi Ratepayers and Residents Association – Member

-   Waitakere Ranges Protection Society - Member

-   Titirangi RSA - Member

-   Maungakiekie Golf ClubMember

Steve Tollestrup

-   Waitakere Licensing Trust – Elected Member

-   Waitakere Task force on Family Violence – Appointee

-   Piha RSA - Member

Saffron Toms

Nil

Ken Turner

Nil

 

 

 

 

 

 

Member appointments

Board members are appointed to the following bodies. In these appointments the board members represent Auckland Council:

Board

Organisation/Position

Sandra Coney

-   Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Trustee

Neil Henderson

-   Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Trustee

-   Rural Advisory Panel - Member

Steve Tollestrup

-   Glen Eden Business Improvement District - Member

-   Aircraft Noise Consultative Committee Group - Member

-   Local Government New Zealand Zone One Committee - Member

Greg Presland

-   Glen Eden Business Improvement District (alternate)

Saffron Toms

-   Ark in the Park

-   Manukau Harbour Forum - Chair

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 11 July 2019, as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: Nick Kearns - Skate and play area in Titirangi

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a deputation from Nick Kearns and supporters regarding use of Watercare land for a skate and play area in Titirangi.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       We wish to present to the Board our proposal for a community-led development of the Watercare reservoir site at 166-176 Konini Road Titirangi 0604 into a mixed-use skate and play area.  The particulars of what we are trying to achieve are set out in our petition to Watercare, which can be accessed at: http://chng.it/QFbjpJb24t.

2.       The group that will be presenting on 22 August includes:

·    Myself, a parent of young children and resident on Kohu Rd

·    Richard Smith, a Laingholm local and skatepark designer (see more at http://www.richlandscapes.co.nz/)

·    Amber Clyde, a girls skate teacher (see more at https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/other-sports/114073093/auckland-skateboarder-bullied-out-of-sport-says-girls-belong-in-skate-parks-too)

·    Reuben Derham (a 17 year old Parau local, Green Bay High student and skater)

·    Dylan Leckey (a Titirangi local and skater)

·    Melissa Cowie (a Titirangi local and playground designer)

·    Ant Vile (a Konini Rd resident and urban designer).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on a mixed-use skate and play area in Titirangi and thank Nick Kearns and supporters for their attendance.

 

 

8.2       Deputation: Ed King - Titirangi Community House activities update

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a deputation from Ed King, chair of the Titirangi Community House

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ed King will provide an update on the Titirangi Community House activities, changes and trends in the use of the houses and opportunities and challenges going forward to better understanding the work of Community Houses.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on the Titirangi Community House activities and thank Ed King, chair of the Titirangi Community House, for his attendance.

 

 

9          Public Forum

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Waitākere Ward Councillor Update

 

File No.: CP2019/14027

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the Waitākere Ward Councillors to verbally update the Board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      thank Waitākere Ward Councillors Linda Cooper and Penny Hulse for their update.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor - Waitakere Ranges

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Waitākere Ranges Local Grants Round One 2019/2020 grant allocations

File No.: CP2019/15131

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Waitākere Ranges Local Grants, Round One 2019/2020, including multi-board applications.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Waitākere Ranges Local Board Local Grants, Round One 2019/2020 and multi-board grants, Round One (refer to Attachment B).

3.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board adopted the Waitākere Ranges Local Grants Programme 2019/2020 on 18 April 2019 (refer to Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

4.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $75,000.00 for the 2019/2020 financial year.

5.       Sixteen applications were received for Waitākere Ranges Local Board Local Grants Round One 2019/2020, requesting a total of $48,916.30 and fourteen multi-board applications were received, requesting a total of $43,164.42.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Waitākere Ranges Local Board Local Grants Round One, listed in table one and table two below.

Table One: Waitākere Ranges Local Grants, Round One 2019/2020

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2019-102

Titirangi Baptist Church

Community

Towards equipment costs for the Green Bay High School Carnival Day.

$1,508.30

Eligible

LG2019-103

Glen Eden Community House Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost and installation of play matting for the outside playground area.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2019-107

Titirangi Potters

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire and marketing costs for the Titirangi Ceramics Film Festival from 10 to 12 October 2019.

$1,500.00

Eligible

LG2019-108

The Going West Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the costs of the “Going West” festival closing event on 15 September 2019.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2019-109

Interacting Theatre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire and tutor costs for the InterACT Festival from 21 to 25 October 2019.

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2019-110

Titirangi Residents and Ratepayers Association Incorporated

Historic Heritage

Towards printing costs for the Titirangi heritage tour booklet.

$3,413.00

Eligible

LG2019-111

Friends of Arataki And Waitakere Ranges Regional Parkland Incorporated

Community

Towards costs of the “Friends of Arataki Free Kids Day” on 10 November 2019.

$1,120.00

Eligible

LG2019-112

Glen Eden Business Association Incorporated

Community

Towards Glen Eden main street makeover.

$19,500.00

Eligible

LG2019-113

The Waiatarua Ratepayers & Residents Association Incorporated

Environment

Towards the cost of traps for the Waiatarua trap library.

$6,390.00

Eligible

LG2019-114

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards two new laptops for youth workers at the “Youth and Community Development Centre”.

$2,485.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$48,916.30

 

 

Table Two: Waitākere Ranges Multi-board Grants Round One 2019/2020

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB1920-103

The ReCreators Limited

Environment

Towards the costs for upcycling workshops and to provide educational services in the local board area.

$5,000.00

 Eligible

MB1920-106

Womens Centre Waitakere

Community

Towards operational costs at Womens Centre Waitakere from October 2019 to September 2020.

$1,500.00

Eligible

MB1920-119

CNSST Foundation, formerly known as Chinese New Settlers Services Trust

Community

Towards the teacher facilitation fees and the purchase of two tablets.

$3,243.20

Eligible

MB1920-126

Age Concern Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards the provision of an accredited visitor service and field social support services across West and Central Auckland.

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB1920-127

Rutherford College Community Education

Community

Towards distribution costs of the 2020 West Auckland Adult and Continuing Education booklets to over 55,000 households.

$750.00

Eligible

MB1920-131

Violence Free Communities Incorporated

Community

Towards event costs for the "Toddler Day Out" on 22 February 2020.

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB1920-153

The Operating Theatre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards 2,000 free show tickets and free transport to children from low decile schools in the local board area to attend the theatre production "Greedy Cat" by Joy Cowley.

$3,103.55

Eligible

MB1920-156

Dance Therapy NZ

Community

Towards venue hire, marketing, facilitation, equipment, coordination and administration costs for the "Dance 4 Us West" programme from February to June 2020.

$1,000.00

Eligible

MB1920-159

United North Piha Lifeguard Service Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the costs of structural engineering, detailed design, project management and consent fees for the North Piha Lifeguard facility replacement project.

$5,250.00

Eligible

MB1920-161

The Parkinson's New Zealand Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the salary of six Auckland Parkinson's Community educators for the period of 1 October 2019 to 1 October 2020.

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB1920-168

Thrive Teen Parent Support Trust

Community

Towards the young parents' group activities including venue hire, food, transport, communications, volunteers and a speaker contribution from September 2019 to June 2020.

$1,000.00

Eligible

MB1920-170

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards the purchase of native plants from Te Whangai Trust and Gulf Trees and courier fees for delivering classroom bins, administration and office expenses for recycling for schools and preschools in the local board area.

$3,317.67

Eligible

MB1920-176

Garden to Table

Community

Towards the programme coordinator salary and travel costs to deliver a food education programme to schools in West Auckland.

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB1920-179

Te Pou Theatre - Ruia Taitea Creative Limited

Arts and culture

Towards "Kōanga Festival 2019" including event management, marketing and “Kaumatua and Whanau Day” costs.

$2,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$43,164.42

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

 

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme. Waitākere Ranges Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2019/2020 on 18 April 2019 and will operate two quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year. 

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close; and

·     any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department, will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

12.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Waitākere Ranges Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

14.     The board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

15.     A summary of each application received through Waitākere Ranges Local Grants, Round One is provided (refer to Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to the council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes. No organisations applying in this round identified themselves to be a Māori organisation, and eleven organisations applying in this round have indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.     The allocation of grants to community groups or individuals is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

16.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $75,000.00 for the 2019/2020 financial year.

17.     Sixteen applications were received for Waitākere Ranges Local Board Local Grants Round One 2019/2020, requesting a total of $48,916.30 and fourteen multi-board applications were received, requesting a total of $43,164.42

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

18.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

19.     Following the Waitākere Ranges Local Board allocating funding for round one local and multi-board grants, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitākere Ranges Local Board Grants Programme 2019/2020

19

b

Waitakere Ranges Local Grant and multi-board 2019/2020 grant applications

23

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Robert Walsh - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Shane King - Head of Service Support

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

Allocation of Waitākere Ranges Local Board Community Safety Fund

File No.: CP2019/15279

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To allocate the Community Safety Fund to a prioritised list of road safety projects in the local board area

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has put forward a number of potential projects, these have been assessed, scoped and an estimated cost developed. The scoped and costed list of projects have been workshopped with the Board and a prioritised list developed.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      agree the following prioritised list to utilise the Community Safety Fund allocated to the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area:

1.   Swanson Train Station – Raised Crossing

2.   Konini School – Raised Crossing – Paewai Rd

3.   Konini School – Raising Crossing – 12 Annison Road

4.   Konini School – Raised Crossing – 2 Annison Road

5.   Tititarangi and South Titirangi Road intersection Safety.

b)      agree in principle to allocating a modest top up for the lowest ranking project from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund, should this be required, to enable that project to be delivered.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       The 2018 Regional Land Transport Plan allocated $20 million for Financial Year 2019/2020 and Financial Year 2020/2021 for local initiatives in road safety. ($5 million in Financial Year 2019/2020 and $15 million in Financial Year 2020/2021).  In order to promote safety at the local community level, the fund is apportioned to each local board area based on a formula that focuses on the numbers of Deaths and Serious Injuries (DSI) in that area.

4.       The objective is to accelerate local community initiated safety projects, around identified high-risk locations and local schools. Local Boards were invited to submit proposals for projects addressing safety issues their communities have identified and also worked with Auckland Transport’s Community Transport Team to identify projects using the new toolbox developed for the Safe School Streets pilot. 

5.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board share of the Community Safety Fund is $707,303 over the two year period.

6.       Criteria for the fund includes physical measures raised by the local community to prevent, control or mitigate identified local road and street safety hazards which expose people using any form of road and street transport to demonstratable hazards which may result in death or serious harm. Individual project cost is to be no greater than $1 million.  Projects must consist of best practice components, conform to AT standards and comply with New Zealand law.

7.       The fund does not cover the following:

a)    Projects that are funded by existing AT road safety or other capital works programmes including, but not limited to setting speed limits, seal extensions, maintenance, renewals and planned footpath upgrades (but can be used to augment these projects)

b)    Projects not within the street, including parks, rail corridor, beaches and property not owned or controlled by AT

c)    Projects that have unacceptable effects on network efficiency or introduce unacceptable secondary hazards or effects 

d)    Projects with an unacceptably high maintenance cost

e)    Projects that clash with other planned public projects

f)     Complex projects that may take greater than 2 years to deliver including but not limited to projects requiring significant engineered structures, complex resource consents and complex traffic modelling 

g)    Projects containing unconventional or unproven components including new trials or pilot projects

h)    Projects or components of projects that have no demonstratable safety benefit unless they are integral with a safety project

8.       Waitākere Ranges Local Board developed a list of projects over workshop sessions and received advice from AT’s Community Transport team in regard to requests for safety measures from local schools.

9.       That list of projects has now been costed by AT. If this costing is more than the budget allocated to the particular local board under this funding, then it has the option of using any of its available Local Board Transport Capital Fund to top up the project budget.

10.     The Board prioritised its list of projects at an August

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The list of projects put forward for assessment and costing by the Board is below:

Qualifying Projects

Project Name

Description

Status

Comment

Budget

ID

Swanson Road Train Station

Raised crossing to limit speed and allowing safer crossing

Qualify

Upgrade existing refuge island at 755 to a raised crossing and retain 735 as a pedestrian refuge.

$260k

CSFWR1.1

Konini School

Raised table for pedestrian crossing.

Qualify

Raised zebra crossing on Paewai Rd

$200k

CSFWR1.4A

Konini School

Raised table for pedestrian crossing.

Qualify

Raised zebra at 12 Annison Rd

$200k

CSFWR1.4B

Konini School

Raised table for pedestrian crossing.

Qualify

Raised zebra at 2 Annison Rd

$200k

CSFWR1.4C

Lopdell House Intersection

Confusing intersection on the corner of South Titirangi and Titirangi Roads.

Qualify

Clearer marking and lane delineation. Details to be designed.

$50k

CSFWR1.5

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     The impact of information or decisions in this report are focused to AT.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     The projects allocated funding in this report will improve the road safety environment in the communities within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board area’s allocation of the Community Safety Fund is fully utilised.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.     Design and construction of approved list of projects.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Bruce Thomas – Auckland Transport Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Auckland Transport Elected Member Relationship Team Manager

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport's update for August 2019

File No.: CP2019/15283

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Waitākere Ranges Local Board on transport matters in the local board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report updates the Board on the Community Safety Fund, Candia Road footpath, road repairs and Parua Road pedestrian safety.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport update for August 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       This report addresses transport related matters in the local board area.

4.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways and reports on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

5.       The Community Safety Fund was workshopped on Thursday 8 August. A separate report recommends the prioritised safety projects for funding.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

6.       The other issues reported are confined to Auckland Transport and do not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Road Repairs

7.       Winter weather and a car crash have caused a number of deteriorations to the road due to slips. These have been remediated, or need to be. They include:

a)    Victory Road – this remains AT’s highest priority and AT is currently in discussions with adjoining land owners prior to construction. The project is expected to be completed later this calendar year.

b)    Lone Kauri Road, Karekare – there are two slips. Designs for these repairs have been completed and AT has gone out to tender to undertake these repairs. The works will be undertaken over the summer months, starting early next year.

c)    Scenic Drive – due to a car crash part of the part on the fencing and footpath has been destroyed. Cones currently mark the edge of the footpath to ensure pedestrian safety. Construction drawings are being progressed with construction planned for early September.

d)    North Marine Parade, Piha – AT contractors are dealing with pot holes and ponding exacerbated by winter weather.

Candia Road Footpath

8.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board received a petition in February regarding a request to build a footpath along Candia Road. The road runs from Swanson Road in the Henderson Massey Board area to Henderson Valley Road in the Waitakere Ranges Board area. Candia Road also crosses the Rural Urban Boundary (RUB) in the Auckland Unitary Plan. The topography is challenging in some areas, which makes constructing a footpath both challenging and expensive.

9.       Candia Road is on AT’s footpath request list, and the 250m section furthest north on the eastern side of the road is being investigated as its priority score is relatively high. This indicates that we are targeting to build this section of footpath in the 2021/22 financial year, depending on footpath funding availability and competing priorities.

10.     The board will be updated in the new term.

Parua Road Pedestrian Safety

11.     Feedback on the proposal to construct a footpath and related safety measures on Huia Road between Shirley Road and Staley Road closed on 9 July. The Board will be updated on this project at its next meeting

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

12.     For all projects, consideration of impacts and opportunities for engagement will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

13.     The recommendation to receive this report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

14.     The recommendation to receive this report has no risks. AT has risk management strategies in place for the transport projects undertaken in the local board area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

15.     AT provides the Waitākere Ranges Local Board with the opportunity to comment on the transport projects being delivered in the local board area.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Bruce Thomas – Elected Members Relationship Manager (Western Boards), Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Manager Elected Member Relationship Unit, Auckland Transport

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Proposed changes to the legacy Waitākere City Council septic tank pump-out targeted rate and service

File No.: CP2019/15138

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To recommend to the Governing Body that a local targeted rate septic tank pump-out programme for the Waitākere Ranges Local area be developed and consulted on in the draft 2020/2021 Annual Budget.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In 1998, in an effort to improve water quality, the legacy Waitākere City Council established a targeted rate for property owners with septic tank systems to fund a three-yearly pump-out of their system. These properties now sit within the Waitākere Ranges, Henderson-Massey and Upper Harbour local board areas. It is currently applied to 4,228 septic tanks (assets).

3.       There are 3,461 private wastewater treatment devices in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area that fall under this service, at an annual cost of $198.43 (including GST) per device and applied to 3,210 properties. These private wastewater treatment devices comprise septic tanks, long drops, grease traps and greywater systems, but not other systems.

4.       Public feedback about the proposed removal of the septic tank pump-out targeted rate and service was sought during the draft Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation process.

5.       Waitākere Ranges residents and the Waitākere Ranges Local Board indicated strong support for retaining the pump out service. Henderson-Massey and Upper Harbour Local Boards and residents did not indicate a strong desire to retain the service in their areas.

6.       The Finance and Performance Committee then resolved to retain the pump-out rate until 2021 and asked staff to provide options for a future model to respond to the feedback received from the Waitākere Ranges area (resolution FIN/2019/55).

7.       To enable a decision to be considered as part of the development of the 2020/20201 Annual Budget, Healthy Waters commissioned an independent analysis to determine options for a Waitākere Ranges pump out programme from July 2021.

8.       Two options have been developed:

·    Option A – a three-year pump-out – continue the current service at an approximate cost of $277 per year or $830 over three years per asset (including GST)

·    Option B – a three-year pump-out with an additional enhanced inspection of the entire onsite wastewater system to ensure compliance with the current standards – at an approximate cost of $314 per year or $942 over three years per asset (including GST).

9.       The two options were assessed against various criteria such as their convenience for residents, potential to improve water quality, cost and risk to the council.

·    Overall, staff recommend option A – a three yearly pump-out service, because while both provide equal water quality outcomes, option B carries a number of additional risks and uncertainties to council including uncertainty and variability of costs, contractor capacity to be upskilled for the inspection requirement and the potential creation of liability for council if a system fails owing to an issue missed in the inspection.

10.     These options, and feedback from the Waitākere Ranges Local Board, will be considered at the Environment and Community Committee in September 2019 so the proposal can be included in the development of the 2020/2021 Annual Budget and public consultation after the 2019 local government election.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      recommend that the Environment and Community Committee support the development and consultation of a local targeted rate for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area for a septic tank pump-out scheme at an estimated cost of $277 per annum per asset, for inclusion as part of the 2020/2021 Annual Budget.

b)      recommend that the Environment and Community Committee forward these changes to the septic tank pump-out scheme and associated targeted rate to the Governing Body for inclusion in the draft Annual Budget 2020/2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     In an effort to improve environmental outcomes, the legacy Waitākere City Council established a targeted rate for property owners with septic tank systems to fund a three-yearly pump-out of their system.

12.     It is currently applied to 4,228 assets across the Waitākere Ranges, Henderson-Massey, and Upper Harbour local board areas.

13.     There are 3,461 assets in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area that currently receive this service. In 2019/2020 the annual rate is $198.43 (including GST) per asset. Some properties have multiple assets and so pay a higher rate.

Regional compliance programme for wastewater systems

14.     A region-wide water quality targeted rate was introduced in July 2018 which funds a wastewater compliance programme.

15.     With the compliance programme being developed and being trailed in some areas, staff considered the scope of the legacy Waitākere septic tank pump-out service and identified issues with the overall efficacy of the pump-out programme as follows:

·     it services approximately half the onsite wastewater systems in the local board area

·     it only pumps the sludge out of the septic tank, long drop or grease trap

·     it cannot include secondary or advanced systems

·     it does not cover the inspection or maintenance of all system components

·     it set expectations that property owners do not need to do any further inspections or maintenance of their systems in between pump-outs.

16.     The original recommendation to discontinue the scheme was made in order to provide region-wide consistency in the management of onsite wastewater systems. The compliance work being delivered by the regional water quality targeted rate will monitor maintenance work for all systems (primary, secondary, and advanced). It emphasizes the property-owner’s responsibility keeping their system functioning well to avoid water contamination.

Consultation on ending the targeted rate through the Annual Budget 2019/2020

17.     In the draft Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation process, submitters were asked to indicate their support for six proposed changes to targeted rates and fees, including removal of the Waitākere septic tank pump-out targeted rate.

18.     In Waitākere Ranges Local Board, 253 people provided general feedback on the regional targeted rates proposals.

19.     184 of these submitters specifically mentioned the septic tank pump-out targeted rate. Of these, 7 per cent (12 people) supported removal of the rate and 93 per cent (172 people) opposed the removal of the rate.

20.     Due to this strong support from Waitākere Ranges residents for retaining the septic tank pump-out targeted rate, the Finance and Performance Committee resolved to retain the rate and service until 2021. They also asked staff to provide options for a future model for a new contract from 1 July 2021 (resolution FIN/2019/55).

21.     The options that staff have considered all involve restricting the service to the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area. This is because the Henderson-Massey and Upper Harbour Local Boards both supported the removal of the septic tank pump-out targeted rate in their local board areas from 1 July 2021 (resolutions UH/2018/116 and HM/2019/1).

Timelines

22.     The current contract for the pump out service is due to expire in 2021. To enable procurement on any option a council decision is needed no later than 30 June 2020.

23.     Due to the timing of the 2019 local government election staff must present a preferred option to Environment and Community Committee for their consideration on 10 September 2019. The committee will then be asked to forward the endorsed option to the Governing Body for inclusion in the draft 2020/2021 Annual Budget.

24.     This report seeks Waitākere Ranges Local Board feedback on their preferred option for the future scope of the targeted rate and service.

Impact of regional wastewater compliance programme on homeowners

25.     In developing options for the septic tank pump-out targeted rate, staff have considered the impact of the regional compliance programme which is being developed.

26.     The water quality targeted rate compliance programme currently involves targeted investigations in priority areas around Auckland which have shown poor water quality results in SafeSwim analysis. Properties in Piha, Little Oneroa, Huia, and Te Henga have been investigated so far.  

27.     As part of investigations, compliance staff request inspection records from property owners and follow up with enforcement actions if there are maintenance issues. These investigations have shown low compliance with maintenance requirements, with most properties not having their systems suitably inspected and maintained. Prior to investigations, 10 per cent of properties in the Piha investigation area had compliant inspection records. As a result of the investigations, 98 per cent of properties are now compliant.

28.     The Auckland Unitary Plan sets the inspection frequency and requires property owners to provide their service records to council upon request. A primary system (septic tank) must be inspected every three years. A system must be pumped-out when 50 per cent of the tank’s volume is occupied by sludge and solids.

29.     From 2021, staff aim to be able to request inspection records from all property owners with onsite wastewater in the Auckland region - approximately 40,000 properties.

30.     The inspection currently offered through the septic tank pump-out targeted rate is not sufficient for compliance purposes. This means property owners must pay an additional fee (usually $100 to $180, depending on the system and company) to a private company for a service, consistent with all other properties across Auckland.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options analysis – Preferred approach to providing the pump-out service

31.     The Annual Budget consultation 2019/2020 showed both public concern for water quality and strong support for the septic tank pump-out service as a convenience to homeowners. Staff have considered these factors, as well as potential risks in assessing the options.

32.     Two feasible options for the Waitākere Ranges septic tank pump out scheme have been developed:

·     Option A: a three yearly pump-out

·     Option B: a three-yearly pump-out and an enhanced inspection of the entire onsite wastewater system to ensure compliance.

33.     The costs of the service (including labour, sucker truck, disposal and contractors’ costs) and council costs (including contract administration and management and the cost of managing the rate) have been estimated as per table one below.

34.     Staff have analysed the two options against key criteria such as cost, likely impact on water quality, convenience to rate payers and noted risks or assumptions for each. In each option it is assumed that the regional compliance scheme will apply to all wastewater systems from July 2021.

          Table 1. Analysis of options for pump-out service against key criteria

Option

Rate per asset (including GST)

Water quality*

Convenience

Risks and assumptions

Option A: pump-out of primary systems

(recommended)

$277 per year

Over three years:

Service cost: $571

Council cost: $259

Total: $830

Moderate: Multiple factors contribute to water quality.

Additional service needs rely on owner

Moderate: Additional inspection must be booked separately.

Additional maintenance may be required.

Property owners will arrange additional inspections to meet regional compliance requirements

Option B:             pump-out and enhanced inspection of primary systems

$314 per year

Over three years:

Service cost: $682

Council cost: $260

Total: $942

 

Moderate: Multiple factors contribute to water quality.

Additional maintenance needs rely on owner.

High: Service would provide full 3-yearly service and inspection requirements. Additional maintenance may be required.

Council will be potentially liable for the cost of failure if any issues with the system are not picked up during inspection. Potential higher cost (contractor time).

The cost estimate is more subject to change than option A as it requires putting in a new service.

Options Eliminated

Status Quo – a pump out programme at the same cost as 2019/2020

An objective of target rates are for cost of the service to be covered by the rate. As the contract rates for the service will need to be re-negotiated to reflect the change in geographical scope (from a larger catchment to a smaller more distant one) of service, as well as additional contract management costs to be incurred by council in managing this local rate and service (for instance due to increase waste disposal fees) a status quo option is not realistic.

Servicing all types of onsite systems

Several contracts would be needed under this option, due to the complexity of advanced systems which, in some cases, can only be inspected by staff qualified by the manufacturer. Due to the complexity of engaging multiple suppliers through different contracts and the increased pricing that would result, staff have eliminated this option.

*Because septic tanks are only one contributor to water quality issues, it is difficult to estimate how much changes to this service will change water quality in the local board area.

35.     Most homeowners (2,990) in the local board area only have one asset on their property and therefore would only pay the costs listed above. A small number of properties have multiple assets and would therefore pay multiple targeted rates under these proposals.  For example, 196 properties have two septic tanks and their cost would be twice as high.

36.     A very small number (24 properties) have more than two septic tanks and will pay correspondingly more.

37.     Both options proposed are aligned with two objectives in the 2017 local board plan:

·     People actively protect the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area: Many properties are within the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area and so have a potential to impact sensitive receiving environments. Staff will continue to work with and help landholders and residents to understand their duty of care for the fragile heritage area.

·     Our unique natural habitats are protected and enhanced: The options proposed support protection of marine and coastal environments by actively managing potential contaminant sources.

Variables impacting on the cost and effectiveness of septic tank pump-out options

38.     There are several variables that influence the cost and effectiveness of the pump-out programme and impacted on staff’s options analysis.

Geographic area

39.     Properties that are easy to access and closer Rosedale disposal plant are cheaper to service, and therefore subsidise the higher cost of more remote rural properties in areas such as Karekare. There are more remote properties in Waitākere Ranges than in the other two local board areas.

40.     A reticulated wastewater network is being developed in the Whenuapai structure plan in the Upper Harbour Local Board Area, as a result it is anticipated that the onsite wastewater systems will be removed as the new subdivisions are connected to the reticulated sewerage system.

41.     Reducing the number of properties serviced through the pump-out from the 4,228 assets currently serviced to the 3,461 in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area reduces the service’s efficiency of scale.

42.     Both factors increase the cost per property for future options for the pump-out service.

Level of service

43.     Increasing the inspection quality will increase the cost as it would take more time and may require different equipment or a second staff member, to undertake the full inspection as well as pumping out the tank.

44.     Costings in this report assume that one staff member could complete the enhanced inspection at the same time as the pump-out. However, if an enhanced inspection is introduced then suppliers may need to provide the inspections and pump-out separately due to the different skill sets and equipment required. This will significantly increase the cost.

Increasing the types of systems covered

45.     If the service were expanded to cover all onsite wastewater systems, several contracts would be needed due to the complexity of advanced systems which, in some cases, can only be inspected by staff qualified by the manufacturer. It would also be difficult to estimate how long an inspection should take, affecting the average pricing estimates. Due to the complexity of engaging multiple suppliers through different contracts and the increased pricing that would result, staff have eliminated this option.

Other options assessed

46.     The variables above were considered as part of initial assessments. Staff discussed the option of ceasing the service but discounted this option due to the strong support for continuing it from the local board and residents.

47.     Some other options were considered unfeasible, such as a regionwide service for all system types. This would duplicate the regional compliance programme, be complex to implement and create a significantly increased cost for all owners of wastewater systems.

Recommended option – Provide pump-out only service in the Waitākere Ranges

48.     Within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area, staff identified that both options are likely to have a similar impact on water quality. Under both options properties will receive regular pump-outs and inspections – thus ensuring their tanks are being maintained correctly.

49.     Both options will cost more than the current targeted rate because:

·     they will cover the full cost to council for administering the service

·     the service area is reduced, removing the properties that were cheaper to service.

50.     Option B is likely to be more convenient for homeowners as they will receive both the pump-out and inspections at the same time and will not have to organise their own inspections.

51.     However, option B also has some significant drawbacks. These include:

·     Cost Variability. Due to the potential variability of inspections, it is difficult to establish a fixed cost per property, as the layout for each private onsite wastewater device will vary. Of issue is the identification of disposal field locations. Staff are undertaking pilot studies to develop some non-invasive inspection techniques to identify disposal field location (such as thermal imaging), but it is unlikely to have a proven methodology in place for contract negotiations. If the tender process reveals the need for additional staff, increased training or additional visits, the current inspection estimate cost of $314 may significantly increase.

·     Council liability for system failures. The systems are private assets and the responsibility for maintenance and repair sits with the owner. If the council is inspecting these systems, there is a risk of assumed liability if part of that system fails following a council run inspection. This would not only result increased requests for service and management of potential complaints outside of the contract scope, but also potentially complicate compliance actions if required.

·     Contractor capacity. All contractor staff would need to be skilled for the higher level of inspection, which industry have advised to council are typically above the current skills required of sucker truck operatives.

52.     For these reasons staff recommend option A - a three-yearly pump-out of septic tanks in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area only.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

53.     Healthy Waters continues to work closely with both Watercare and Regulatory Services to improve water quality outcomes. Specifically, in this area we are working collaboratively on compliance of permitted sites through the water quality targeted rate work programme.

54.     Staff from Healthy Waters, Finance, and Licensing and Compliance have worked collaboratively to consider the future of this rate so that there is alignment with the objectives and work of the water quality targeted rate.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

55.     The Henderson-Massey and Upper Harbour Local Boards will be affected by this proposal. Through the draft Annual Budget 2019/2020 consultation process both boards indicated support for removal of the septic tank pump-out targeted rate from their local board areas (resolutions UH/2018/116 and HM/2019/2).

56.     Both Henderson-Massey and Upper Harbour Local Boards received a memo in July 2019 about the proposal to remove the rate and service from their areas. This memo asked them to indicate if they wished to provide further feedback. Neither local boards have provided any further feedback to date.

57.     Any proposal to expand or reinstate the previous targeted rate to include other areas would require full consultation with impacted boards and communities and would not be able to be completed in time for the finalisation of the 2020/2021 Annual Budget.

58.     The Waitākere Ranges Local Board’s preferred option will be provided to the Environment and Community Committee for consideration in September 2019, to inform the Mayoral Proposal for the draft 2020/2021 Annual Budget consultation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

59.     It is recognised that preventing waterway contamination is of high importance to Māori. Te Kawerau ā Maki support the regional compliance work being delivered by the water quality targeted rate. They did not provide specific feedback on the pump-out rate during the 2019/2020 Annual Budget consultation

60.     No specific engagement on this proposal has been undertaken with mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

61.     The cost of the current three yearly pump out for each asset is $198.43 (including GST) per annum, an increase of $3.89 from 2018/2019.

62.     Auckland Council absorbed approximately $100,000 of additional costs from delivering the septic tank pump-out service in 2018/2019. The existing targeted rate would need to increase to cover these costs, regardless of any changes to the service level and scope from 1 July 2021. The new estimated rate should cover all known costs of council administering the pump-out programme and estimated costs have been calculated to reflect the cost of administrating this service. The expected rate is summarized in Table 2 below.

 

 

            Table 2: Estimated rate expectations Waitākere Ranges Septic Tank Programme Options (including GST)

2019/2020 rate per asset per year

Option A rate per asset per year

pump-out of primary systems

Option B rate per asset per year

pump-out and enhanced inspection of primary systems

$198.43

$277

$314

63.     Under option A, homeowners will also have to arrange their own inspections with a private company every three years. This usually costs between $100 and $180.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

64.     The risks and potential mitigations for both options are shown in Table 3 below.

          Table 3. Risks and mitigations Septic Tank Pump Out Options Waitākere Ranges

Risks

Mitigations

Option A

 

No water quality improvement from investment - the current pump-out service by itself has not shown to have a significant impact on water quality.

Compliance enforcement is being introduced to better address wider septic tank issues, particularly regular inspections and maintenance when faults occur. With this option property owners will be required to arrange their own inspections with a private company every three years.

Option B

 

Inspection limitations

The enhanced inspection will be considered sufficient for compliance purposes as an assessment of the function of the system. However, it will not assess whether the system is being used as originally designed.

Additional compliance auditing of the inspection records would be required to monitor quality of inspections and compare current system (as built) to designed system (consent).

Council Liability for failures under enhanced inspection

If a council-provided inspection declares a system as compliant, and part of the system subsequently fails, the council could be held liable for repair or replacement costs, which could be significant.

This risk is difficult to mitigate because the council will hold legal liability for systems functioning effectively.

It is more appropriate for private companies to hold this risk and the mitigation is suggested to occur through not recommending this option.

Cost Uncertainties

The estimated rate this option could increase, depending on the outcomes of the tender process. Costs included in this report are the likely estimate, not the maximum estimate.

These risks can be mitigated through the contract negotiation and on-going management of the rate, and through additional work being undertaken under the water quality targeted rate.

Staff have been working closely with suppliers to understand costs

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

65.     The Environment and Community Committee will consider this targeted rate proposal on 10 September 2019. Pending approval of the recommended option this decision will then be recommended to the appropriate committee of Auckland Council for inclusion in the 2020/2021 Annual Budget process. Staff will include the Waitākere Ranges Local Board preference in the committee report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Nick FitzHerbert - Relationship Advisor

Elizabeth Johnson - Senior Healthy Waters Specialist

Janet Kidd - Principal Wai Ora Strategic Programmes

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development's (ATEED) report for the period January to June 2019

File No.: CP2019/15021

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides the highlights of Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development’s (ATEED) activities in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area as well as ATEED’s regional activities for the six months 1 January to 30 June 2019.

 

2.       This report should be read in conjunction with ATEED’s Quarter 3 report to Auckland Council (available at www.aucklandnz.com) and the forthcoming Quarter 4 report to the Auckland Council CCO Finance and Performance Committee (available 17 September). Although these reports focus primarily on the breadth of ATEED’s work at a regional level, much of the work highlighted has significant local impact. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report provides the Waitākere Ranges Local Board with relevant information on the following ATEED activities:

 

-     Locally driven initiatives: Glen Eden investment attraction

-     Supporting local business growth

-     Filming activity

-     Young Enterprise Scheme

-     Youth employment pathways

-     Youth connections

-     Offshore talent attraction

-     Local and regional destination management and marketing

-     Delivered, funded and facilitated events

 

4.       Further detail on these activities is listed under Analysis and advice.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive ATEED’s Quarter three update for 1 January to 30 June 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       ATEED has two areas of focus:

          Economic Development – including business support, business attraction and investment, local economic development, trade and industry development, skills employment and talent and innovation and entrepreneurship.

 

          Destination - supporting sustainable growth of the visitor economy with a focus on destination marketing and management, major events, business events (meetings and conventions) and international student attraction and retention.

 

7.       These two portfolios also share a common platform relating to the promotion of the city globally to ensure that Auckland competes effectively with other mid-tier high quality of life cities.

 

8.       ATEED works with local boards, Council and CCOs to support decision-making on local economic growth and facilitates or co-ordinates the delivery of local economic development activity. ATEED ensures that the regional activities that ATEED leads or delivers are fully leveraged to support local economic growth and employment.

 

9.       In addition, ATEED’s dedicated Local Economic Development (LED) team works with local boards who allocate locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget to economic development activities. The LED team delivers a range of services[1] such as the development of proposals, including feasibility studies that enable local boards to directly fund or otherwise advocate for the implementation of local initiatives.

 

10.     ATEED delivers its services at the local level through business hubs based in the north, west and south of the region, as well as its central office at 167B Victoria Street West.

 

11.     Additional information about ATEED’s role and activities can be found at www.aucklandnz.com/ateed

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     As at 30 June[2], 3303 businesses had been through an ATEED intervention or programme. Of these, 70 businesses were in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area – 26 businesses went through Destination-related programmes and 44 businesses went through Economic Development-related programmes.

 

Economic Development

Locally Driven Initiatives:

13.     Glen Eden investment attraction: It was agreed by the Local Board that the allocated funds would be used to purchase Marketview reports to enable the Local Board to better understand how the centre is performing.

 

Supporting Local Business Growth

14. This area is serviced by the Business and Enterprise team in the West hub, based in the Henderson Service Centre. The team comprises of two Business and Innovation Advisors and administration support. The role of this team is to support the growth of Auckland’s key internationally competitive sectors and to support to provide quality jobs.

 

15. A key programme in achieving this is central government’s Regional Business Partnership Network (RBPN). This is delivered by ATEED’s nine Business and Innovation Advisors (BIA), whose role is to connect local businesses to resources, experts and services in innovation, R&D, business growth and management. 

 

16. ATEED’s BIAs engage 1:1 with businesses through a discovery meeting to understand their challenges, gather key data, and provide connections / recommendations via an action plan.

 

17. Where businesses qualify (meet the programme criteria and/or align to ATEED’s purpose as defined in the SOI) the advisors facilitate government support to qualifying businesses, in the form of:

 

-     Callaghan Innovation R&D grants (including Getting Started, project and student grants (https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/grants)

-     Callaghan Innovation subsidised innovation programmes

       (https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/innovation-skills)

-     RBPN business capability vouchers (NZTE), where the business owner may be issued co-funding up to $5,000 per annum for business training via registered service providers. Voucher co-funding is prioritised to businesses accessing this service for the first time, in order to encourage more businesses to engage with experts to assist their management and growth.

-     NZTE services such as Export Essentials (https://workshop.exportessentials.nz/register/)

-     Referrals to NZ Business Mentors via The Chamber of Commerce.

 

18.     During the reporting period, ATEED Business and Innovation Advisors met with 17 businesses in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area, five for innovation advice and services and 13 for business growth and capability advice and services (two were returning clients and one business saw advisors for both services). From these engagements:

 

-     Seven RBPN vouchers were issued to assist with business capability training

-     Six connections were made to Callaghan Innovation services and programmes

-     Seven referrals were made to Business Mentors New Zealand

-     Ten connections were made to ATEED staff and programmes

-     Nearly 70 connections were made to other businesses or programmes.

 

Other support for new businesses

19.     During the period, ATEED also ran workshops and events aimed at establishing or growing a new business and building capability. Seven people from the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area attended an event below:

-     Starting off Right workshop - 1

-     Business clinic – 3

-     Innovation clinic – 3.

 

Filming activity within the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area

20.     ATEED’s Screen Auckland team provides film facilitation services as part of ATEED’s support for the screen and digital sector of Auckland’s economy. Screen Auckland facilitates, processes and issues film permits for filming activity in public open space. This activity supports local businesses and employment, as well as providing a revenue stream to local boards for the use of local parks.

 

21.     Between 1 January and 30 June 2019, 305 film permits were issued in the Auckland region across 379 locations and 404 days of filming. Of these, 40 permits were issued in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area – the second highest in the region. The Waitākere Ranges Local Board area’s share of film permit revenue was $16,078.26 for the period (total for all boards combined was $51,191.30).

 

22.     On average, 37 crew work on each shoot day. This does not reflect filming that also takes place in studios, private property or low impact activity that wouldn’t have required a permit. During the period, 81 permits were issued for TV commercials (TVC), making up 27 per cent of permits issued. A quarter of the TVC permits were destined for an international market.

 

23.     Some of the key film productions that were issued permits to film in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area were:

-     Ahikāroa Season 2 (web series)

-     Falling Inn Love (feature film)

-     Power Rangers

-     The Luminaries

-     Shortland Street

-     Westside S5 (TV series)

 

24.     Auckland is becoming a popular destination for international television networks to pilot an episode of a new TV series to allow them to gauge if a series will be successful. Permits were issued for locations across the Auckland region earlier this year for two new US pilots. One of these productions made a donation to the Surf Life Saving Club in the Bethells Beach community.

 

Young Enterprise Scheme (YES)

25. The Auckland Chamber of Commerce has delivered the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) since January 2018. ATEED maintains a strategic role. During the period, there were 58 schools participating in the Auckland YES programme, representing 1376 students completing the programme. There are currently no schools in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area participating in the YES programme.

 

Youth employment pathways

26.     The Go with Tourism campaign was successfully launched on 5 April, attracting 170 employers and more than 700 youth by year-end. The campaign is designed to shift perceptions many young people have about careers in tourism and address the skills gap in the industry.  

 

27.     ATEED delivered the Future Ready Summit on 26 June at the Vodafone Events Centre in Manukau. Approximately 250 employers, 40 young people and 20 speakers (eight under the age of 24). The Youth Employer Pledge partners were the primary audience. The Future Ready Auckland: Driving economic development through technology and transformation insights paper was also released, attracting strong media attention - including a lead story on Radio NZ Nine to Noon.  The research insights, aims to better understand Auckland’s future skill needs, including future growth sectors. ATEED is currently working with pledge partners to harness the network, with a focus on south and west Auckland now that Youth Connections has transferred to The Southern Initiative.

 

Local Jobs and Skills Hubs

28.     ATEED is the regional partner for the network of Auckland Jobs and Skills Hubs. These multi-agency hubs support employers at developments where there is a high and sustained demand for local labour and skills development. The Auckland network includes Ara (Auckland Airport development), City Centre and Tāmaki hubs.  As at 30 June, 377 people had been placed into employment via the ATEED-facilitated CBD hub, 1,914 training outcomes were delivered, and 11 apprenticeships were facilitated. About 36 per cent of those employed are Māori, against a target of 40 per cent. ATEED has developed a school engagement pilot programme with interested employers and schools aimed at engaging students with career opportunities in the construction and infrastructure sector. ATEED also provided funding to a Progressive Employment Programme for at-risk youth, supporting cadet training and developing youth-ready capability within businesses working on the City Rail Link. The City Centre hub is a training partner for this programme.

 

 

 

Offshore talent attraction

29.     The Auckland. We’re Hiring campaign ran from January to March 2019. The campaign is designed to attract high-skilled offshore construction and technology talent to Auckland. The campaign resulted in 2295 job applications.

Destination

Local destination management and marketing activity

30.     ATEED’s Destination Innovation team continued to work with businesses in the three western boards, to continue to develop the Waitākere Tourism Networking Group cluster. The goal is to establish well-timed product identification, mentoring and sustainable business practices that will ensure the area benefits from local tourism activities.

 

31.     The Northern Journeys tourism promotion to encourage visitors to travel along the western scenic routes is being developed. ATEED launched the refreshed AA visitor maps during the period, which again focuses on places in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area.

 

Regional destination management and marketing activity

32.     The Elemental AKL winter festival website went live on 29 April. The festival ran from 1-31 July and is developed to promote sustainable tourism growth by encouraging visitation more evenly throughout the year, and dispersing visitors across the region. The programme included more than 60 free and ticketed events across the themes of light, food, entertainment, and culture. Elemental Feast went live on 4 June, with 120 restaurants participating in plating up unique festival dishes using ingredients sourced from the Auckland region and inspired by the elements. Farm to Table Gourmet Weekend, Winter Lights at Paradice Ice Skating, the Matariki Glow Show, Sounds at the Grounds and Fire in the Western Sky were events held in the western part of the city.

 

33.     The Short Break campaign, aimed at leisure travellers on Australia’s eastern seaboard, ran during Q3 and Q4. There were three bursts of the campaign, focused on themes of nature, food and wine, and ultimate things to do in Auckland featuring West Coast Beaches, CBD, Rangitoto and Waiheke Islands. As part of the campaign, ATEED hosted news.com.au and lifestyle.com.au in Auckland, showcasing the city’s unique offering that is promoted in the campaign. News.com.au has a reach of six million and will produce a dedicated feature on Auckland as well as share one article on Facebook with their 1.1m followers. Lifestyle.com.au has a reach of 1.2m unique viewers and will produce two dedicated online features.

 

Delivered, funded and facilitated events

34.     During the period, ATEED delivered the 2019 Auckland Lantern Festival at the Auckland Domain. Customer satisfaction was 89 per cent, an increase of nine per cent compared to the previous year. Some key findings from the customer survey found that respondents were very positive about what the event meant for the city, with 96 per cent of respondents agreeing that Auckland Council should continue to support events like the Lantern Festival and 94 per cent saying that the event brought people from different ethnic and cultural groups together (compared to 95 per cent and 91 per cent respectively in the previous year). The Auckland Lantern Festival’s sustainability objectives through the Cultural Festivals Strategy resulted in 62 per cent of waste being diverted from landfill. This has nearly doubled in two years, with the diversion being 34 per cent in 2017.

 

35.     Given the need to prioritise police resourcing following the events in Christchurch on 15 March, the 2019 Pasifika festival, which was due to run on 23 and 24 March, was cancelled. Although the festival would have been an opportunity to bring Auckland’s communities together at a time of national mourning, given the unprecedented nature of what happened and after discussions with the New Zealand Police, it was agreed that Police must prioritise resourcing to ensure the safety of communities across the city.

 

36.     During the period, residents of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area were also able to enjoy events funded or facilitated by ATEED across the Auckland region, including the ASB Classic, Splore Music and Arts Festival, Sculpture on the Gulf, the New Zealand Comedy Festival, the Auckland Writers Festival, the Auckland Art Fair, Warhorse, and Auckland Wine Week.

 

37.     A full schedule of major events is available on ATEED’s website, aucklandnz.com

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     ATEED assesses and manages our initiatives on a case-by-case basis and engages with the Council group where required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     Local Board views are not sought for the purposes of this report. Local Board views were sought for some of the initiatives described in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds to any impact that our initiatives may have on Māori on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with our initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     ATEED will provide the next six-monthly report to the Local Board in February 2020 and will cover the period 1 July to 31 December 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Samantha-Jane Miranda, Operational Strategy Advisor (ATEED)

Authorisers

Quanita Khan, Manager Operational Strategy and Planning (ATEED)

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes

File No.: CP2019/15174

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, and to provide feedback on the recommended changes to the document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is currently reviewing the Auckland Film Protocol (the Protocol).  The Protocol sets out:

·    the commitment of the Council Group to supporting filming in Auckland

·    expectations and rules that filmmakers must abide by when filming in Auckland and

·    provides guidance for filmmakers on the process for approval to film in Auckland.

3.       The purpose of the review was to ensure that the Protocol is up-to-date and identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities that should be addressed.  Content of the Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol. 

4.       A revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in June 2019 for consideration and was approved for public consultation (resolution number ENV/2019/73). 

5.       The following is a summary of the key changes made to the Auckland Film Protocol before public consultation was undertaken:

·     Native species: new content added stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·     Kauri dieback: new content added providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·     Drones: new content added stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·     Historic heritage: new content added stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·     Health and safety: new content added to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·     Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was updated to reflect current policy, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council.  Some structural and editorial amendments were also made to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

6.       Public consultation was undertaken over a three week period between 21 June and 12 July 2019.

7.       A total of 74 submissions were received during the public consultation period.  Waitākere Ranges Local Board residents provided a total of 17 submissions on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, representing 23 percent of all submissions.  The views of submitters from the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area were generally similar to regional views.   Key submission themes from submitters in the Waitakere Ranges Local Board area included:

·     filming has positive impacts but submitters agree that there is a need to consider and manage the potential impacts of filming;

·     concerns that drones may impact on privacy and can spook horses and livestock and agreement that drone use for filming should be regulated;

·     need to take a collaborative approach to realise the benefits of filming and ensure that streamlined and efficient processes are in place.

8.       Staff are proposing some changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address submitter concerns; the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film protocol are shown in track changes in Attachment B.

9.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board provided written feedback on the draft revised Auckland Film Protocol.  A summary of feedback from the Waitākere Ranges Local Board and proposed responses are shown in Attachment D.

10.     This report provides a summary of public feedback and of proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address feedback.  The following is a high‑level summary of the key changes proposed to the Auckland Film Protocol in response to public consultation:

·     Natural environment: include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·     Native species: include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·     Kauri dieback: amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

·     Drones: include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

·     Impact on access to public open space: include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

·     Compliance and enforcement: include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with the  Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

11.     Submission themes and proposed changes are summarised in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

b)      endorse the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol and provide any further feedback.

c)      note that local board feedback will be included in a report to the Environment and Community Committee in September 2019, seeking approval for the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     The first version of the Auckland Film Protocol was adopted by the Regional Development and Operations Committee (resolution number RDO/2013/27) on 14 March 2013.  A review of fees for filming in the Auckland Region was undertaken in 2014 and a new set of region‑wide charges was recommended; providing a simplified and harmonised range of charges.  The Governing Body adopted a region‑wide schedule of film fees and revised Auckland Film Protocol on 28 May 2015 (resolution number GB/2015/36).

13.     Since the Protocol was adopted in 2015 there have been a number of changes to legislation and to Auckland Council’s policy and planning framework. The purpose of the review of the Protocol was to:

·     ensure that the Protocol is up-to-date; and

·     identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities to be addressed in the Protocol.

Content of the Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.

14.     Workshops were held in September and October 2018 to engage with local boards that experience a high volume of filming.  A high-level summary of the key feedback from these workshops is provided in Attachment C.

15.     Engagement to inform the preparation of the revised draft Protocol was also undertaken with:

·     mana whenua: mana whenua interests are represented by 19 iwi (tribal) authorities in Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland.  The 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review of the Protocol.

·     staff of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to inform the review.

·     screen sector: the screen sector was invited to participate in a survey in April 2019 to inform the review.  The survey asked a series of general questions about the Protocol and experiences of filming in public open space in Auckland.  A high-level summary of key feedback received to date is provided in Attachment C.

·     public: the People’s Panel in September 2018; a total of 4,762 responses were received.  The survey asked a series of questions on views on and experiences of filming in Auckland.  A high‑level summary of key feedback is provided in Attachment C.

16.     The review recommended that a range of changes be made to the Auckland Film Protocol, the following is a summary of the key changes proposed to the Environment and Community Committee:

·     Native species: include new content stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·     Kauri dieback: include new content providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·     Drones: include new content stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·     Historic heritage: include new content stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·     Health and safety: include new content to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·     Filming on Tūpuna Maunga: update content to reflect that applications to film on Tūpuna Maunga are assessed by the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority.

·     Updates to content: update content to reflect current policy (e.g. smokefree policy), plans (Auckland Unitary Plan) and bylaws of Auckland Council.

·     Structural and editorial: amend some parts of the document to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

17.     The revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was approved by the Envrionment and Community Committee for public consultation in June 2019 (resolution number ENV/2019/73).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Consultation on the revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol took place from 21 June to 12 July 2019.  A total of 74 submissions were received; this represents a substantial increase on the 21 submission which were received in response to the 2015 review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  Of the submissions received, 72 were submitted using the online form and 2 non‑form hardcopy submissions were received. 

19.     Submitters were asked to identify if they worked in the screen sector or not, with:

·     29 submissions (39%) received from individuals or organisations that identified themselves as working in the screen sector

·     45 submissions (61%) received from individuals or organisations that do not work in the screen sector.

The questions included in the online form varied depending on whether the submitter identified themselves as working in the screen industry or not.

20.     A breakdown of all submissions received by local board area is shown in Table 1 below.  The small number of responses from individual local board areas means that a analysis of views by local board area was not possible for all local board areas.

          Table 1: Breakdown of submissions made by local board area.

Local Board Area

Number of respondents

Percentage of respondents

Waitākere Ranges

17

23.0%

Albert-Eden

9

12.2%

Waitematā

8

10.8%

Rodney

6

8.1%

Upper Harbour

5

6.8%

Ōrākei

5

6.8%

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

4

5.4%

Devonport-Takapuna

4

5.4%

Henderson-Massey

3

4.1%

Kaipātiki

3

4.1%

Howick

2

2.7%

Whau

2

2.7%

Māngere-Ōtahuhu

1

1.4%

Puketapapa

1

1.4%

Hibiscus and Bays

1

1.4%

Papakura

1

1.4%

Franklin

0

0%

Great Barrier

0

0%

Ōtara‑Papatoetoe

0

0%

Manurewa

0

0%

Waiheke

0

0%

Don't Know

1

1.4%

Outside Auckland

1

1.4%

Total

74

 

21.     A series of closed questions were asked of non‑screen sector individuals and organisations; a summary of the responses to these questions is shown in Table 2 below.  Table 2 shows that:

·     the majority respondents are supportive of Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach and that;

·     most respondents think that the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on residents and businesses, on public open space and historic and cultural heritage.

          Table 2: Feedback on the Auckland Film Protocols management of the impacts of filming

Question

Response

Percentage of regional submissions

(number of respondents is shown in brackets)

Do you support Auckland Council's film‑friendly approach?

Yes

75% (33)

Partially

20% (9)

No

5% (2)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on residents and businesses?

Yes

56% (18)

Partially

19% (6)

No

25% (8)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on our public open space and environment?

Yes

53% (23)

Partially

33% (14)

No

14% (6)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on our historic and cultural heritage?

Yes

62% (26)

Partially

29% (12)

No

10% (4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22.     The main reasons given by those who supported Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach are shown in Table 3.

          Table 3: Summary of key reasons for supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Economic

·      generates employment and economic growth;

·      benefits communities and local businesses;

·      benefits a broad range of trades and industries;

·      attracts investment and businesses to Auckland.

Cultural and creative

·      has cultural benefits allowing and supporting the telling of stories visually;

·      supports the creative economy and enables people to find a future in the creative industries;

·      It’s fun and exciting to see Auckland on the screen.

Promotion and tourism

·      promotes and showcases Auckland to the world;

·      creates a positive image of Auckland.

 

23.     Table 4 shown the key reasons that respondents gave for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

          Table 4: Summary of key reasons given for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Access

·      the impacts on resident, including parking restrictions, road closures and ability to use public open space while filming is taking place need to be considered and managed;

·      need to ensure that film‑makers are respectful of other users of public open space.

Notification

·      there needs to be sufficient notification to ensure that residents and businesses are aware of open space being used for filming and are not inconvenienced.

Balance

·      need to consider and manage the impact that filming has on the environment and impacted residents;

·      need to balance the cumulative impacts of filming.

Equity

·      need to ensure that fees for commercial use of public places are fair.

 

24.     The key reasons given for not supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach were:

·     the cost to ratepayers of enabling filming;

·     that there is not enough protection individuals, businesses and residents affected by filming being carried out on private property.

25.     A series of open‑ended questions were also included to elicit further information about responses to these questions and about a range of other topics.  Staff have worked through submissions to determine any changes to be recommended for the final revised Auckland Film Protocol.  Attachment A identifies key themes and submission points along with proposed staff responses.  

 

 

 

A summary of the most common submission themes and the proposed staff responses are shown in table 5.

            Table 5: Summary of key submission themes and proposed staff responses.

Key themes

Summary of proposed responses

Use of drones for filming

Include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

Impact on natural environment

Include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Kauri dieback

Amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

Impact on native species

Include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Impact on access to public open space

Include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

Compliance and enforcement

Include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

Health and safety

Amend to enable production companies to arrange alternative timeframes for the submission of a site specific health and safety plan by agreement with Screen Auckland.

Notification

Screen Auckland to consider operational approaches to achieving wider public notification.

Impact on business

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  The protocol is intended to provide a framework that enables decisions to be made on a case‑by‑case basis.

Equity

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  Fees for commercial use of public open space are set under the Auckland Council Trading and Events in public places bylaw 2015 and amended through the long term plan and annual plan.

 

26.     This report seeks formal feedback from the board at its August 2019 business meeting on the recommended changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol in response to consultation feedback.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.  This included engagement with Auckland Transport, Panuku Development Auckland, and with Auckland Council community facilities, region‑wide planning, social policy and bylaws, visitor experience and heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Role of local boards in film permitting

28.     Landowner approval is required to film on any public open space in the Auckland region.  Local boards are responsible for landowner approvals for local parks and reserves.  Engagement with local boards that experience a high volume of applications for film permits was undertaken in September and October 2018 to inform the review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  A summary of the key engagement themes is included in Attachment C and was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

29.     A key theme from local board engagement was that the film permit timeframes mean that landowner approval timeframes are very tight, particularly when considering complex or contentious applications.  It was also noted that the current timeframes do not allow sufficient time to consider applications at full board meetings or to consult key stakeholders.  Given this, the following options on film permit timeframes were presented to the Environment and Community Committee at a workshop in May 2019 and at the June 2019 meeting.

Option one: Status Quo.

Option two: amend the permit timeframes

·     Option 2(a) the permit time frame is amended to be “up to five working days”.

·     Option 2(b) the permit time frame is increased to 5‑7 working days.

30.     Following direction from the Committee, that increasing timeframes could act as a disincentive making Auckland internationally uncompetitive, the status quo option was retained in the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     ATEED has an ongoing relationship with several mana whenua and mataawaka groups, across its whole portfolio of activity.  To inform the review of the Protocol the 19 Iwi Authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review.  In relation to film permit applications Māori views and input may be obtained in several ways where there is a potential impact on particular land or sites. This is usually coordinated either by the film facilitator, or through the relevant parks manager.

32.     Specific processes are in place for the tūpuna maunga, with all commercial filming on the maunga requiring the approval of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority).  Screen Auckland facilitates all requests for approval to film on the tūpuna maunga.  Approval to film will be subject to conditions and restrictions set by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.  Meetings were held with staff of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to inform the review and ensure that proposed amendments are consistent with the policy of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     The proposed amendments to the Protocol do not impact on existing levels of service and will not impact on operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     There are no significant risks arising from the board giving feedback on the proposed changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol at this time.

35.     If adoption of the revised Auckland Film Protocol is delayed this would impact on council’s ability to implement the proposed changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     Public feedback and proposed amendments to the Auckland Film Protocol will presented to the Environment and Community Committee for approval.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key submission themes and responses

201

b

Draft 2019 Auckland Film Protocol

211

c

Summary of preconsultation engagement

271

d

Response to Waitākere Ranges Local Board Submission

275

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Marie Jenkins, Screen Facilitation Manager, ATEED

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza, Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 

 

 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Confirmation of Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2019/14127

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present records of workshops held by the Waitākere Ranges Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Briefings provided at the workshop held are as follows:

          6 June 2019:

1.   Quick response Round Three

2.   Arts & culture update: Open Studio

3.   Arts & culture update: Going West 2019 programme

4.   Arts & culture: Shadbolt House

5.   Project Twin Streams - Strategic Review

          13 June 2019:

1.   Piha Cameras

2.   Waitākere Ranges long-tailed bat walks and research

3.   Kauri Karnival debrief

4.   Waitakere Ranges Heritage Gateway project

20 June 2019:

1.   Elected Member Survey

2.   Responding to flood safety in Piha

3.   Animal Management Bylaw Review

4.   Targeted investigation for onsite wastewater (Huia/Bethells)

27 June 2019:

1.   Project Streetscapes – weed control in road corridor within the Waitakere Ranges Local Board area

2.   Update on 3 projects: a) Kay Rd balefill mountain bike feasibility, b) Mettam Drive Park consultation and development, c) Recreation assessment

3.   Project Twin Streams Site Visit

4 July 2019:

1.   Project update: a) Recreation assessment, b) Piha Stream

2.   End of year reporting from Community Waitākere

3.   Annual Smart Procurement Reporting

4.   Annual Smart Procurement Reporting

5.   Replacement Huia Water Treatment Plant and Reservoirs - Consent Application - local board input

6.   Acquisition of land from Watercare - Titirangi & Swanson report

7.   Titirangi South Pest Free

11 July 2019:

1.   Consideration of Chicken Management Options & Rodent Control Activity - Titirangi Village report

2.   Small Park Improvements project - LDI capex funded

3.   Kauri dieback response

18 July 2019:

1.   Seabird and Shorebird survey results

2.   Proposed Piha Surfing Tournament – 2020

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for 6, 13, 20 and 27June 2019 and 4, 11 and 18 July 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop records for 6, 13,20 and 27 June 2019

281

b

Workshop records for 4, 11 and 18 July 2019

289

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor - Waitakere Ranges

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Programme

File No.: CP2019/12499

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waitākere Ranges Local Board with its updated governance forward work programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar is part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work programme calendar for July 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work programme calendar - August 2019

297

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor - Waitakere Ranges

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Waitākere Ranges Local Board for Quarter four 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14265

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Waitākere Ranges Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter four, 1 April – 30 June 2019, and the overall performance for the financial year, against the agreed 2018/2019 local board work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2018/2019 financial year.

3.       Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

4.       Seventy-five activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Thirteen activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred and thirteen projects/activities have not progressed as expected during 2018/2019.

5.       Key activity updates for this quarter include:

·      187: Anzac Services - Waitakere Ranges. Both Dawn and Civic Anzac Day services were delivered at the Waikumete Cemetery. These services were combined with other services in the region due to consolidation of other Anzac services following events in Christchurch. Due to increased security, the services did not include parades. Approximately 5,000 people attended the dawn service and 3,000 attended the 11am service. Waitākere Returned and Services Association (RSA) proceeded with a smaller service and the Piha RSA held their usual service on the beach at Lion Rock.

·      2882: Huia Domain - renew coastal structure. Project stage 1 was completed in December 2018. Stage 2 was the Huia beach western rock revetment extension work.  Works at Huia Domain and the revetment wall were completed in July and the car park is now open to the public. 

·      338:  Community Grants (contestable). Community grants totaling $118,677 made to 78 local community groups for local activities and projects. In Q4 the existing $75,000 budget was topped up to enable this. 

6.          The 2018/2019 financial performance report is attached but under confidential cover. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX) – expected to be made public 30 September 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter and year ending 30 June 2019.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2018/2019 are released to the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX) which are expected to be made public 30 September 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has an approved 2018/2019 work programme for the following operating departments:

·    Community Services (Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; Parks, Sport and Recreation; and Service Strategy and Integration)

·    Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew and Community Leases

·    Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·    Local Economic Development

·    Plans and Places

8.       Management of Youth Connection activities moved from the Arts, Community and Events to The Southern Initiative work programme in quarter two.

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

Overall performance against the Waitākere Ranges Local Board 2018/2019 work programme

10.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected (completed by the end of July 2019) or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

11.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each department’s work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

12.     The table below shows the overall performance of work programme activities (RAG status and activity status by work programme).

Table 1: End of year Local Board Work Programmes Status

RAG Status

Activity Status

ACE

PSR

Libraries

CF

Leases

I&ES

P&P

ATEED

TSI

Green

Completed

34

5

6

16

4

10

-

-

-

In progress

-

1

-

16

-

3

2

-

1

Amber

In progress

1

1

-

6

-

2

-

1

-

Red

In progress

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

On Hold

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

Not delivered

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Grey

Deferred

2

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

Cancelled

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

Key activity updates from quarter three

13.     Key activity updates for this quarter include:

·      187: Anzac Services - Waitakere Ranges. Both Dawn and Civic Anzac Day services were delivered at the Waikumete Cemetery. These services were combined with other services in the region due to consolidation of other Anzac services following events in Christchurch. Due to increased security, the services did not include parades. Approximately 5,000 people attended the dawn service and 3,000 attended the 11am service. Waiākere RSA proceeded with a smaller service and the Piha RSA held their usual service on the beach at Lion Rock.

·      2882: Huia Domain - renew coastal structure. Project stage 1 was completed in December 2018. Stage 2 was the Huia beach western rock revetment extension work.  Works at Huia Domain and the revetment wall were completed in July and the car park is now open to the public. 

·      338:  Community Grants (contestable). Community grants totaling $118,677 made to 78 local community groups for local activities and projects. In Q4 the existing $75,000 budget was topped up to enable this. 

Overview of work programme performance by department

Arts, Community and Events work programme

14.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 34 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), one activity that is in progress but delayed (amber), and two activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey).

15.     Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

Māori Responsiveness

Amber

In progress

The status relates to the final activity for this budget for the year. A youth engagement and Māori landscape design project with Te Kura o Hoani Waititi Marae was expected to take place in Q4 but has been postponed to Q1 2019/2020 at the request of the Kura. The budget will be carried forward to 2019/2020.

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

16.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are six activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), one activity that is in progress but are delayed (amber), one activity that is significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red).

17.     Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

588: Māori naming of reserves and facilities Phase one

Red

In progress

The programme is making progress but has experienced some time delays against original plan.

The plan is progressing as reported in the previous quarter however we can now confirm that as part of sorting through the overlapping naming interest two mana have whenua have indicated naming interest in the local board area, including Te Kawerau
ā Maki and Te Runanga o Ngāti Whatua.  The local board is working through tranche 1.

1518: Parks strategic assessments programme FY19

Amber

In progress

Complete strategic assessments in order of priority for:
1.  Concordia Reserve
2.  Piha Stream
3.  Ministry of Education land at Piha
4.  Penihana
5.  Recreation Assessment
6.  Wait
ākere Quarry
7.  Piha Skatepark  

While the majority of projects have been completed, 6. Waitākere Quarry., is on hold pending a governing body decision on management of the park by Regional Parks.

Community and Social Policy have included in their work programme for the year ended 30 June 2020, a report to the governing body to decide on the status of Waitākere Quarry.

Libraries and Information work programme

18.     In the Libraries and Information work programme, there are six activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green).

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

19.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 32 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), six activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), six activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red).

20.     Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

1741: Armour Bay Reserve - renew park roading and drainage

Red

In progress

Works are unable to be completed in 2019 due to consenting requirements.

The project has been deferred to the 2020/2021 financial year. An engineer is being engaged to compile the detailed design and tender documents and apply for resource consents.

1743: Concordia Reserve - renew pathways

Red

On hold

The project has been placed on hold as the park will remain closed with pathway works postponed as part of the Kauri Dieback investigations and mitigation programme.

1749: Harold Moody Park to Savoy Road Cycleway Bridge - develop connection

Red

On hold

This categorisation is administrative in that it reflects that one department (Community Facilities Investigation and Design) was waiting for a necessary step for a single project to be completed by another.

Progress on this should be read in conjunction with 454: Harold Moody Reserve: Service Assessment, which notes that Glenora Rugby League have formally declined access across their property, therefore a bridge to access Harold Moody Reserve is no longer possible. The next alternative route has been reassessed and identified as Priority Route 8 in draft Greenways Plan. Feasibility on this route has now been undertaken was and workshopped with local board in June.

Waitākere Domain Hall - renew roof on hall

Red

On hold

The project has been placed on hold and works will be delivered in financial year 2022. A condition report has been commissioned to enable prioritisation of the works.

1767: Waitakere Ranges - renew community facility & park signage 2018/2019+

Red

On hold

This project is awaiting confirmation of content of dual language signage. It will proceed with concept design once confirmation is received.

3096: Mahoe Walk - renew walkways and path

Red

On hold

The project is on hold awaiting direction on whether to proceed due to kauri trees being present in the project area. It will remain on hold until 2020/2021 and further notice from kauri dieback programme specialists.

1751: Huia Domain - renew park roading and car park

Amber

In progress

There is a delay through the project requiring access to the shore through the Huia carpark.

 Whilst a design has been prepared, consents for the works required have not been obtained. An offer of service has been requested from a consultant to provide end to end professional services, from fulfilling planning requirements through to oversight of physical works. This offer of service is being assessed and a contract agreement being prepared to engage.
Next steps are to engage a consultant and commence works on consent application package.

1761: Titirangi Town Centre - replace toilet block

Amber

In progress

There are delivery delays continue due to compliance queries and private landowner approvals. The resource Consent process is now at 95 percent, and next steps are to lodge a building consent and engineer planning approval request.

1766: Waitākere Ranges - renew carparks 2018/2019+

Amber

In progress

This project is to renew the carparks at Karekare Reserve and Bethells Beach. It has been deferred to FY20 as works are unable to be completed in FY19 due to consenting requirements.

1770: Waitakere Ranges - renew park fixtures and furniture 2018/2019+

Amber

In progress

The project includes renewing park fixtures and fittings at the following sites:
Parrs Park, Huia Domain, Swanson Oaks, Piha South Road Reserve, Tangiwai Reserve, Titirangi Beach, Alex Jenkins Memorial, Foster Bay Reserve, Seibel Scenic Reserve and Sherrybrooke Esplanade.
Current Status - stage one - investigate, design, scope and plan the works required.
Stage two - deliver physical works.

The contract has been awarded and furniture been ordered. Physical works are forecast to start in September 2019.

1772: Waitakere Ranges - renew park structures 2018/2019+

Amber

In progress

The project includes park structures at the following sites:
Kowhai Reserve, Clarence Reserve, Clayburn Reserve, French Bay Reserve, Alex Jenkins Memorial Park, French Bay Esplanade, Kaurimu Park, Swanson Oaks, Piha South Road Reserve, Piha Domain, Titirangi War Memorial Park, Sandys Parade, Kawaka Reserve, Miha Road Reserve, Oratia Esplanade, Seaview Road Plant Reserve - 1, Bishop Park, Seaview Walkway and Tinopai Reserve.
Current status - stage one - investigate, design, scope and plan the works required.
Stage two - deliver physical works.
Estimated completion date yet to be confirmed.

The project needs to be retendered to review pricing, after. Works are expected to commence in 2019/2020.

3169: Laingholm Scenic Reserve - renew track

Amber

In progress

Land owner approval is needed for tree removal and the scope of the project had to reflect these design changes. The project has now been delivered.

 

Community Leases work programme

21.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are 4 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), and 5 activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

22.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are 13 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), 2 activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), and 1 activity that has been cancelled and deferred

23.     Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

437: Waitākere Weed Action Project (Our Backyard)

Amber

In progress

Unexpected contractor capacity issues meant that engagement was not undertaken in quarter four. This work will be completed in quarter one 2019/2020 and will not impact the delivery of the 2019/2020 programme. This required a $12,000 carry forward of the budget remaining from the 2018/2019 financial year and will be delivered by the end of September 2019.



Weed surveying and control have continued this quarter. Discussions have been held with the contractor about how to deliver the remaining works and it was agreed to extend the contract to 30 September 2019. This will fulfil the engagement planned for quarter four of 2018/2019. The delivery process is being reviewed so that engagement and survey and control can be undertaken at the same time where practicable. This will reallocate some engagement budget and allow a greater amount of surveying in 2019/2020.

731: Manukau Harbour Forum - Waitākere Ranges

Amber

In progress

This work programme was not able to be delivered within 2018/2019 year due to the governance and management review not beginning until June 2019, and the symposium and community forum event being rescheduled from June to August 2019.

This event has now happened.

Local Economic Development work programme

24.     In the Local Economic Development work programme, there is 1 activity that is in progress but delayed (amber). 

25.     Activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered are discussed below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

615: Glen Eden Investment Attraction

Amber

 

It has not been possible to identify a project that the local board, business association and BID team are all in agreement can deliver the outcomes sought.

The funds will be used to purchase Marketview reports to enable the local board to better understand how the centre is performing. As this was not delivered by 30 June the project has been deferred into 2019/2020.

Plans and Places work programme

26.     In the Plans and Places work programme, there are 2 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green).

Deferred activities

27.     As part of the local board funding policy, activities funded through the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operating fund that were not delivered in 2018/2019 will be deferred into 2019/2020 work programmes.

Additional activities

28.     Opportunities to reallocate underspends within and across existing project budget lines were identified by staff throughout Q4. The following additional activities were taken forward. 

·     Funding contribution to the organisation of Ethkick in Parrs Park in 2020 – a multi-ethnic football tournament and cultural celebration in the Glen Eden area, building on the current event, and organised by Community Waitākere. $15,000.

·     Funding contribution to support publication of a book dedicated to the pioneering work of landscape architect Harry Turbott (1930-2016), a Karekare resident and the designer of Arataki Visitor Centre. $3,000.

·     Funding contribution for the ‘Welcome Home' community-led initiative to give new residents in Glen Eden the information they need to find their feet in their new community. This forms part of 1018: Increase diverse participation as part of the Glen Eden Pilot Activation Programme, continuing into 2019/2020. $10,000.

·     Top up of $43,680 to 338: Community Grants, making the total allocated in 2018/2019 $118,680. There were 78 separate grants made in total. All applications were assessed against local outcomes sitting in the application criteria.

·     Top up of $5,250 to 739: Community Weed Bins to increase the amount of the 2018/2019 contract to cover a shortfall in the estimated amount (a result of the kauri dieback disposal fee).

29.  Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     This report informs the Waitākere Ranges Local Board of the performance for quarter ending 30 June 2019 and the performance for the 2018/2019 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     The following projects contain a specific approach to progressing Māori responsiveness.

·     198: Hoani Waititi Marae funding is a three-year term agreement with Hoani Waititi Marae Trust towards operation and maintenance associated costs, enabling the marae to be open and available for public use for 2018/2019. It commenced on 1 July 2018 and will terminate on 30 June 2021.

·     588: ori naming of parks and reserves, will identify opportunities for park and facility naming/renaming and engaging with mana whenua to develop Māori names and enhance Aucklands Māori identity and heritage.

·     1014: Build capacity –Youth Fund, funds youth providers including Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Hoani Waititi Marae, to facilitate placemaking, place activation or environmental projects that are led and delivered by young people. This project will be scoped with the marae and other youth providers in quarters 2 and 3.

·     1018: Increase diverse participation – Waitākere Ranges. This activity contributes funding to community-led place making activities that celebrate local identities that reside in the area. This may include Māori.

·     1019: ori responsiveness, Waitākere Ranges is an activity which supports partnering with mana whenua and mataawaka organisations on collaborative projects that respond to Māori aspirations. It includes funding to support engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka groups and capacity building (supporting leadership development and strategic planning).

In March 2019 the local board adopted The Waitākere ki Tua report which is an action plan intended to influence and drive future business planning, engagement and relationships, decision-making, systems and processes design, capability and capacity building, and general provision of services.

A key part of the plan is the establishment of a three-year local community-based Māori broker to take a lead role in strengthening connections and capacity across west Auckland Māori communities, as well as fostering the relationship between west Auckland Māori communities and individuals and Auckland Council.

·     1196: Libraries celebrate Te ao ori with events and programmes including regionally coordinated and promoted programmes: Te Tiriti o Waitangi, Matariki and ori Language Week. Their actions include engaging with iwi and Māori organisations.  They also work to champion and embed te reo Māori. Both local libraries have created a Kōrero space to enable people to practice their Te Reo Māori. This quarter, Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori included Matariki displays and activities including a bilingual story time and taonga crafts. Titirangi library hosted the Titirangi Kapa Haka group and Huia Hamon with over 140 people attending the events.

·     The local board formally agreed on 28 September 2017 to pursue a relationship agreement with Te Kawerau ā Maki in 2018, as a commitment to an open and positive relationship.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     This report is provided to enable the Waitākere Ranges Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2018/2019 work programmes and to report this to the public. This report is for information only and therefore there are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

34.     Auckland Council currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX expect to be made public on 30 September.

35.     Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

37.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitākere Ranges Quarter 4 (1 April-30 June 2019) Work Programme Update

311

b

Waitākere Ranges Financial Performance Report 30 June 2019 (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Raewyn Curran - Senior Local Board Advisor - Waitakere Rnge

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 



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22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14813

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2018/2019 Annual Report for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 26 September 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2018/2019 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      adopt the 2018/2019 Waitākere Ranges Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A.

b)      note that any proposed changes will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019.

c)      note that the draft 2018/2019 Waitākere Ranges Local Board Annual Report (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report) will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2018/2019 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities, and the overall Financial Impact Statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

6.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the NZX Debt Market (quoted bonds) maintained by NZX Limited. As a result, the council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules (listing rules) and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA). Under these obligations, local boards may not release annual financial results in any form, including publishing their agenda/minutes containing their results, until council group results are released to the NZX on 27 September 2019.  Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi relates to the local board area.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area, summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved.

Funding information

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English, and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2018/2019 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2019

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 26 September 2019

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 27 September 2018

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019 (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

David Gurney - Manager Corporate Performance & Reporting

Authorisers

Kevin Ramsey – General Manger Corporate Finance and Property

Victoria Villaraza – Acting General Manger Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

     

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

22 August 2019

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board

a)      note the confidential status of Attachment B – Waitākere Ranges Financial Performance Report 30 June 2019 to Item 20: Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report and Attachment A – Draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019 to Item 21: Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019.

 

20        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Waitākere Ranges Local Board for Quarter four 2018/2019 - Attachment b - Waitākere Ranges Financial Performance Report 30 June 2019

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2019 that require final Audit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

21        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019 - Attachment a - Draft Waitākere Ranges Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2019 that require final Audit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

   



[1] This activity is subject to local boards prioritising local economic development, and subsequently allocating funding to local economic development through their local board agreements.

[2] FY 2018/19 result for ATEED’s SOI KPI2