I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitematā Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 20 August 2019

2:00pm

Waitematā Local Board Office
Ground Floor
52 Swanson Street
Auckland

 

Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chair

Pippa Coom

 

Deputy Chair

Shale Chambers

 

Members

Adriana Avendaño Christie

 

 

Richard Northey, ONZM

 

 

Denise Roche

 

 

Vernon Tava

 

 

Rob Thomas

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Liz Clemm

Democracy Advisor – Waitematā Local Board

 

15 August 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 353 9654

Email: liz.clemm@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

7.1     Petition from Western Springs College re Meola Road crossing                   5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    6

8.1     Judges Bay Beach – Sand Top-up and other maintenance matters              6

8.2     Proposal for an additional targeted rate for Newmarket                                 6

8.3     An update on progress with the City Fringe Identity Web App project         6

8.4     To discuss opportunities to support the K'Road Chronicle, a not-for-profit organisation                                                                                                          7

8.5     Management of feral geese at Western Springs Te Wai Ōrea Lakeside Park 7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

9.1     Gael Baldock regarding Park Management                                                      7

9.2     Boopsie Maran regarding the process for street closures                             8

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

11        Councillor's report                                                                                                         9

12        Proposal to start the Waitematā Local Board meeting to be held on 17 September 2019 at the earlier time of 1.00pm                                                                              11

13        Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Development Plan                                   13

14        Auckland Transport August 2019 Update                                                                 21

15        Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes     37

16        Options to investigate improving west Waitematā community facilities            121

17        New community lease to Basement Theatre Trust at 313 Queen Street             157

18        Temporary Alcohol Ban Request for Western Springs Stadium                         169

19        ATEED six-monthly report to the Waitematā Local Board                                   187

20        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019                                                                             195

21        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019                                                                    239

22        Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback on Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing draft report                      243

23        Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback on Ministry of Transport's proposal to introduce a Clean Car Standard and Clean Car Discount               259

24        Waitematā Local Board feedback on the proposed Auckland Council Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2019 and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015.                                                                       267

25        Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback to Auckland Council's submission on the Kāinga Ora-Homes and Communities Bill                             275

26        Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback to Auckland Council's submission on proposed Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill                                                                                                                                     285

27        Chair's Report                                                                                                            293

28        Board member reports                                                                                              319

29        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      333

30        Waitematā Local Board Workshop Records                                                          337

31        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

32        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               347

20        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

b.      Waitematā Financial Performance Report                                                    347

21        Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

a.      Draft 2018/2019 Waitematā Local Board Annual Report                             347

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 16 July 2019, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

7.1       Petition from Western Springs College re Meola Road crossing

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present a petition requesting a pedestrian crossing on Meola Road by the MOTAT bus stop (Stop 1051) to ensure students can be safe when crossing the busy road.

2.       The petition can be accessed online at this link https://www.toko.org.nz/petitions/make-meola-road-safe-new-zebra-crossing.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Harrison Cooke of Western Springs School Travel-wise for the presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

 


 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Judges Bay Beach – Sand Top-up and other maintenance matters

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To propose re-sanding of Judges Bay.

2.   To present additional items that require maintenance.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Luke Niue and Mike Blackburn of Parnell Community Committee Inc., for the presentation and attendance at the business meeting.

 

Attachments

a          Presentation to Judges Bay Beach - Sand Top-up...................................... 353

 

 

8.2       Proposal for an additional targeted rate for Newmarket

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   The Newmarket Business Association Board have approved in principle the further exploration of Newmarket implementing an additional targeted rate with the primary purpose of the completion of the Waitematā Local Board’s Newmarket Laneways Plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Mark Knoff-Thomas of Newmarket Business Association for the presentation and attendance at the business meeting.

 

 

 

8.3       An update on progress with the City Fringe Identity Web App project

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To provide an update on progress of the City Fringe Identity Web App project.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Cheryl Adamson of Parnell Business Association and Mark Knoff-Thomas of Newmarket Business Association, for the presentation and attendance at the business meeting.

 

 

8.4       To discuss opportunities to support the K'Road Chronicle, a not-for-profit organisation

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To introduce the K’Road Chronical publication and the K' Rd Chronicles series.

2.   To discuss opportunities for the local board to support this organisation.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Six for the presentation and attendance at the business meeting.

 

 

 

8.5       Management of feral geese at Western Springs Te Wai Ōrea Lakeside Park

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To present a recommendation that Auckland Council ban the feeding of birds at Western Springs, both on the grass and in the water.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Ian McLean of Birds New Zealand (Auckland Regional Representative) for the presentation and attendance at the business meeting.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Gael Baldock regarding Park Management

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To discuss park management.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Gael Baldock for the presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

 


 

 

9.2       Boopsie Maran regarding the process for street closures

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on discussions with New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA), Auckland Transport (AT), and Auckland Council (AC) regarding the process for street closures for community events.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Boopsie Maran for the presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Councillor's report

 

File No.: CP2018/18673

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor Mike Lee with an opportunity to update the Waitematā Local Board on regional issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal update from the Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Mike Lee.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Mike Lee - Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Proposal to start the Waitematā Local Board meeting to be held on 17 September 2019 at the earlier time of 1.00pm

File No.: CP2019/14516

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to start the 17 September 2019 Waitematā Local Board meeting at the earlier time of 1.00pm instead of the usual business meeting start time of 2.00pm.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting on 22 November 2016 the Waitematā Local Board adopted the Waitematā Local Board Meeting Schedule for the 2016-2019 Triennium (WTM/2016/180 a)) and agreed to commence business meetings at 2.00pm (WTM/2016/180 b)).

16

Adoption of the Waitematā Local Board Meeting Schedule for the 2016-2019 Triennium

 

Resolution number WTM/2016/180

MOVED by Chairperson P Coom, seconded by Member R Northey:  

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         adopt its meeting schedule for the period December 2016 – September 2019 as follows:

Year

Date

Location

2016

13 December

Waitematā Local Board office, 52 Swanson Street, Auckland Central.

2017

21 February

Waitematā Local Board office, 52 Swanson Street, Auckland Central.

21 March

11 April

16 May

20 June

18 July

15 August

19 September

17 October

21 November

12 December

2018

20 February

Waitematā Local Board office, 52 Swanson Street, Auckland Central.

20 March

17 April

15 May

19 June

17 July

21 August

18 September

16 October

20 November

11 December

2019

19 February

Waitematā Local Board office, 52 Swanson Street, Auckland Central.

19 March

16 April

21 May

18 June

16 July

20 August

17 September

 

b)      agree to commence business meetings at 2.00pm. Public forum and deputations will be scheduled in the early part of the business meeting, to enable the democratic process.

c)      note that dates and times for meetings, public engagement and any hearings and deliberations for local board plans and local board agreements are yet to be finalised.

 

d)      agree that the start time of 2.00pm for the business meeting is on a trial basis and subject to review by mid-2017.

 

CARRIED

 

3.       The 17 September 2019 meeting will be the final meeting of the 2016-2019 triennium for the local board.

4.       Starting the meeting one hour earlier would ensure adequate time is available to meet the anticipated increase in public forum attendance and provide an opportunity for local board members to provide valedictory speeches.

5.       A public notice will be published confirming the date and time of the September business meeting and the Auckland Council website will be updated to reflect any change to the start time.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the start time of 1.00pm for the Waitematā Local Board meeting to be held on 17 September 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Liz Clemm - Democracy Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Development Plan

File No.: CP2019/00526

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek adoption of the draft Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai ōrea Park Development Plan (August 2019).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waitematā Local Board requested staff to prepare a development plan for Western Springs Lakeside in the financial year 2017-2018 work programme.

3.       The direction for the plan was to provide a clear design framework to guide how Western Springs Lakeside and its interface with surrounding reserves and facilities should be improved over the short, medium and long term.

4.       The development of the draft plan involved consultation with the Waitematā Local Board, mana whenua, stakeholders and council staff to set key themes and desired outcomes for the park. These outcomes have shaped the key objectives in the draft development plan which focuses on improving the existing values of the reserve rather than seeking significant change.    

5.       Public consultation was carried out in July and August 2018 and there was generally a high level of satisfaction with the way the plan aims to improve key service outcomes. These outcomes include water quality, connectivity, celebration of the site’s history, creating a ‘refuge away from the city’ and provision for events. Ecological and water quality improvements were identified as the highest priority outcomes desired by users. 

6.       The results from the survey and the final approved plan will help the local board align renewals, transport capital funds and local board budgets with outcomes that are needed and supported by the users of the park.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai ōrea Development Plan August 2019 (Attachment A to the agenda report)

b)      utilise future renewals and LDI discretionary budgets to deliver outcomes identified in the Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai ōrea Development Plan August 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Western Springs Lakeside is a popular 26 hectare destination park that is enjoyed by visitors from across the Auckland Region and beyond. It is highly valued as a site that provides for walking, refuge from the city, children’s activities, events and a place where people can connect with nature.

8.       The intent of the plan is to provide a clear design framework that will guide how Western Springs Lakeside and its interface with surrounding reserves and facilities will be improved over the short, medium and long-term.

Consultation

9.       The draft plan was consulted on in two phases.

10.     The first phase of pre-design consultation was undertaken with project partners to identify what was valued about the park and needed to be retained and what were the key issues and ambitions that would guide improvements to Western Springs Lakeside.

11.     This has resulted in the plan focusing on the following vision objectives that look to improve existing values at the site without major change to the park’s current layout:

·     water quality

·     refuge

·     connectivity

·     events

·     interpretation of the site’s history.

12.     The draft plan was reviewed by the Waitematā Local Board, mana whenua, stakeholders and council staff to ensure that improvements appropriately addressed key concerns and ambitions for Western Springs Lakeside. Feedback from this process included:

·   support for the plan, with only minor amendments suggested

·   enthusiasm for the water quality improvements.

13.     In February 2018 the Waitematā Local Board approved the draft Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Development Plan for public consultation (resolution WTM/2018/12) which marked the second phase of consultation with the wider public and users of the park.

14.     The consultation period ran from 30 July to 27 August 2018 and involved making the plan, plus questionnaire, available on line. The process was widely advertised by:

·      presenting information on the local board’s website and Auckland Council’s ‘have your say’ page

·      notifying all relevant stakeholders

·      distributing 1300 flyers to local residents located beside the site

·      erecting signs on site

·      holding one ‘drop in day’ on site (18 August 2018).

15.     People’s views were sought by means of a questionnaire, with 198 questionnaire responses received. Seven submissions were also submitted including those from Auckland Zoo, the Museum of Transport and Technology (MOTAT), the Friends of Mangawhau, St Lukes Environmental Protection Society (STEPS) and New Zealand Heritage.

16.     The questionnaire asked people to rate the effectiveness of the design solutions identified in the plan with the following question and feedback given as an example.

 

How would you rate the development plan’s proposals for providing and upgrading the facilities listed (bench seats, picnic tables, picnic toilets, pathways and walkways, signage, rubbish bins, bbq)?

 

 

17.     The final question in the survey asked respondents to select the three most important high-level objectives identified in the plan. Responses were weighted, with the highest priority outcomes given an increased score. Total scores were then combined to provide the following priority rating:

Ecology                            64

Water quality                    57

Connectivity                     20

Other park facilities          15

Play                                  12

Signage                            10

Events                              7

 

18.     Additional community feedback on the draft plan was presented at public forum during the March 2019 local board’s business meeting.  In response the local board resolved the following (WTM/2019/26).

a)      thank Wendy Gray for the presentation about the Western Springs Lakeside Development Plan and attendance at the meeting

b)      refer the presentation to Parks, Sports and Recreation for consideration in finalising the Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Development Plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     Feedback to the survey indicated that ecological and water quality improvements were regarded as high priority areas that future investment should focus on.

20.     Improving connectivity, park assets (toilets and drinking fountains), the playground and interpretive signage were viewed as medium priorities.

21.     Provision for events was considered the lowest priority.

22.     There was a high level of satisfaction with how the plan aims to improve service outcomes such as water quality, connectivity, celebration of the site’s history and provision for events.

23.     Comments via submissions were made by Auckland Zoo, Motat, the Friends of Maungawhau, STEPS and New Zealand Heritage. These included references to:

·   a lack of focus on the volcanically formed lava rock forest and wetland area (STEPS / Friends of Maungawhau / Zoo)

·   concern around intent to lower water levels which could negatively impact on the wetland ecology and impact on the Zoo’s ability to divert water at current consented levels

·   a considered approach is required to providing bird and eel feeding areas, particularly in the context that this action could have further significant detrimental impact on water quality (Zoo)

·   need for a wildlife management plan and restoration plan (Zoo)

·   need for wayfinding / design features on footpath connecting Zoo with bus stop on Great North and Motions Road to promote Zoo activities (Zoo).

 

24.     These comments along with additional consultation feedback and submissions made at the local board’s March 2019 business meeting have resulted in the following changes / modifications being made to the plan:

 

·   Greater recognition of, and protection for, the lava rock forest plus wetland area and additional references to a restoration plan focusing on emergent planting around the lake edge and the wetland. 

·   A greater focus on the site’s ecological importance both in a local and regional context.

·   Recognition that planting undertaken in and around the lake edge, wetland, rock lava forest and pine stand (defined as ‘natural’ areas within the plan) will all be with native species. The majority of planting undertaken in the parkland and quarry areas will also be with native species but noting that in some instances, exotics will be used (e.g. beside the playground and Fukuoka Garden).

·  Minor amendment to greenways route around the playground and extending playground footpath to Zoo kiosk.

·   Reduction in extent of cherry tree stand beside the Fukuoka Gardens.

·   Removal of the bird feeding platforms and design features that would accommodate and promote the feeding of eels from the ‘eel themed’ bridge.

25.     The decision to remove the bird feeding platforms has been carefully considered. Bird feeding has historically been a popular activity enjoyed by many and the feeding platforms were a design feature that would have allowed visitors to feed birds out of the water and thereby limit negative impacts on water quality. However, feeding artificially raises the park’s bird population and results in the following outcomes that significantly impact on park amenity, recreation and ecological values:

·    An unhealthy bird population - despite education and signage there remains a risk that the wrong kind of foods, including bread, are given to birds. A poor diet reduces body condition and makes the birds more vulnerable to parasites and diseases.

·    Changing natural behaviour - feeding the birds changes their natural behaviours and makes them aggressive to both people and other birds.

·    Water and landscape pollution - the unnaturally high level of bird droppings foul the footpath and grass areas and negatively impact water quality. 

·    Reduction of native bird numbers - at Western Springs Lakeside the birds that benefit from feeding are generally those that are already abundant and largely exotic (i.e. feral geese, mallard ducks, feral pigeon, Black Backed Gulls) at the expense of native species.  

26.     These negative impacts are considered to outweigh the amenity benefits associated with bird feeding and for this reason the feeding platforms have been removed from the plan.


 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     The plan has been compiled with input from the following key departments/units:

·   Parks, Sports and Recreation

·   Community Facilities

·   Environmental Services

·   Healthy Waters.

28.     The draft plan has also been shared with Auckland Transport, Regional Facilities Auckland and Watercare and it is considered that the plan generally aligns with aspirations and outcomes sought by the range of council departments working in, or close to, the Western Springs precinct area. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     Local board workshops, at which the development plan was discussed, were held in October 2018, February and August 2019. The following local board feedback was given on the draft plan:

·   develop a project implementation plan

·   align budgets with the Timeframes and Priorities table (page 87 of draft plan)

·   commit to planting native species 

·   support an eco-themed playground

·        ensure popular play experiences provided at the current playground are carried over to the new playground (i.e. spinning rides that cater for a number of children at any one time)

·   reduce content of the plan

·   remove photos that don’t have relevance to site

·   remove the bird feeding platforms.

 

30.     The draft plan has been amended accordingly and aligns with outcome 2 in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017, which aims to deliver ‘attractive and versatile public places that meet our communities’ needs’. The development plan provides a clear strategic framework to guide future development at Western Springs Te Wai Ōrea in order to successfully deliver on this local board objective.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     The plan was developed with input from mana whenua to address impacts on Māori and engagement was undertaken at key points throughout the plan’s preparation to enable mana whenua to shape and influence the content of the plan.

·    30 August 2017: staff undertook pre-design engagement with mana whenua.  Feedback included:

o the water quality of the park needs to be looked at as the priority for the plan

o mana whenua would like to provide input to the design of the playground when it is renewed - natural play options are preferred

o given the declining condition of the pine trees north of the lake, consideration needs to be given to indigenous revegetation of the area

·    25 October 2017: staff workshopped the water quality issues with mana whenua.

32.     After each workshop, appropriate changes were made to the plan’s scope and drafting process to take account of impacts on Māori.

33.     Waitematā Local Board representatives also met with Te Ākitai Waiohua (Adrian Lee Pettit) and Ngaati Whanaunga (Martin Te Moni) in July 2019 to review the draft plan. Mana whenua endorsed the water quality, plus other plan objectives and requested that:

·   events at the park are ‘zero waste’ based

·   council continues to work towards wider water catchment improvements 

·   references to Māori history are consolidated on page 30 of the plan 

·   a series of cultural indicators be allowed for within the delivery of some of the plan outcomes, particularly those related to water quality.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     To date budget has only been allocated to the renewal of the playground and a draft lakeside and wetland restoration plan.

35.     All other projects are currently unfunded but will be delivered through a combination of renewals, discretionary LDI capex/opex and with partners such as MOTAT.

36.     Community Facilities and Community Services have worked on the programming of all projects by splitting them into short (1-3yrs), medium (4-6yrs) and long term (7-10yrs) priorities as set out on page 87 of the draft plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     The main risks that apply to the plan and associated projects are that:

·   the content of the draft plan does not align with wider public desires

·   the proposed lowering of the lake water levels to allow for emergent lakeside planting has a negative impact on the quality of the wetland area

·   that there are insufficient funds to deliver all aspects of the plan.

38.     Given the level of public consultation undertaken, the likelihood of the draft plan failing to align with wider public desires is considered low.

39.     Thorough investigation work regarding suitable lake water levels will ensure the quality of the wetland is not threatened by any future works. While the optimal lake level for establishing vigorous emergent planting, and at the same time protecting wetland ecology, has yet to be quantified, the level changes will be minor rather than major. 

40.     Because of the aspirational nature of the plan, it’s possible that sufficient funds are not available to deliver all the identified outcomes in the ten-year time-frame anticipated. However, it is considered preferable to extend the delivery period rather than trim some aspects of the plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     Once the development plan is adopted by the Waitematā Local Board, it is intended that funding will be allocated to projects as per the Timeframes and Priorities table (p 87 of the plan) over a ten-year time frame.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Park development plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

David Barker - Parks & Places Team Leader

Hayley Dauben - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport August 2019 Update

File No.: CP2019/14422

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Waitematā Local Board on transport related matters in their area including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and to seek direction on projects which could be funded by the local board’s Community Safety Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report covers:

·    A summary of Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area.

·    A summary of the board’s Transport Capital Fund and Community Safety Fund.

·    A summary of general information items sent to the board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport August 2019 report.

b)      approve the allocation of $615,000 from the Community Safety Fund for the delivery of the project “Safe Schools Toolbox - Newton Central School.”

c)      approve the allocation of $300,000 from the Community Safety Fund for the delivery of a pedestrian Crossings on West End Road / Fife Street by the bus stops next to the Westend tennis club.

d)      subject to confirmation by the Domain Committee, approve the allocation of $75,000 from the Community Safety Fund for formalising the pedestrian crossings on Lower Domain Drive at Lovers Lane and at Domain Drive.

e)      approve the allocation of $260,000 from the Community Safety Fund for the delivery of a pedestrian crossing outside ACG Campus on Davis Cres to Olympic Reserve.

f)       approve the allocation of $200,000 from the Community Safety Fund for the delivery of improvements on Hopetoun Street.

g)      agree that any funds underspent on the Community Safety Fund be allocated as additional funds to the project “Safe Schools Toolbox - Newton Central School.”

h)      approve the allocation of $100,000 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund as a contribution to the MOTAT 2 project (connection between Motions Road and Meola Road) for additional improvements such as planting or lighting.

i)        approve the allocation of $200,000 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund as additional funding to fully fund the Motion Road cycleway connection to a total of $690,000, which will complete the greenway connection from Meola Road to Great North Road as per the local boards Greenways Plan

j)        approve the allocation of $50,000 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund towards the Newmarket Wayfinding and Signage Enhancements

k)      approve the allocation of $80,000 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund towards a Wayfinding Signage Project that identifies and delivers wayfinding improvements across the Waitematā Local Board area.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       AT is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. As set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan, we report on a monthly basis to local boards. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

4.       This report updates the Waitematā Local Board on Auckland Transport (AT) projects and operations in the local board area, it updates the local board on their advocacy and consultations and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund and Community Safety Fund.

5.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme.

The Community Safety Fund is a capital budget established by Auckland Transport for use by local boards to fund local road safety initiatives. The purpose of this fund is to allow elected members to address long-standing local road safety issues that are not regional priorities and are therefore not being addressed by the Auckland Transport programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area

6.       The table below has a general summary of projects and activities of interest to the board with their current status. Please note that all timings are indicative and are subject to change:

Item

Update

Great North Rd (Previously route 4 of Waitematā Safe Routes)

The business case and design process are being developed. The Connected Communities Team intend to re-engage with the Local Board in February 2020.

Cook Street & Union Street

The Project team is unable to secure any funding for this project at this stage. This project cannot be prioritised for delivery under AT’s Road Safety Community programme, which is focused on high risk locations.   This project will be on hold until funding is identified.

Parnell cycleway – proposed cycleway through Parnell

AT will soon be organising a fourth community liaison group meeting to provide a project update to stakeholders.

Wellesley Street Bus Improvement Project (formerly Midtown bus route) – Improving how city centre buses operate

The project team has been asked to do further work on the emerging preferred design for the Wellesley Street bus improvements project. This work is still in progress. The outcome will be brought back to the Waitematā Local Board ahead of public consultation with an update of the timeline for delivery.

Westhaven to City Cycleway - The purpose of the project is to deliver a commuter cycling facility linking Westhaven Drive with Quay Street.

The project budget has been approved for delivering the cycleway with some streetscape enhancements.

 

Concept design commenced in June 2019.

 

Public consultation is planned in Sept/ Oct 2019. We are developing two new design options on Market Pl and Customer St West:

·    Base cycleway design with some streetscape enhancement (updated from the scheme design been consulted in 2017)

·    Integrated cycleway and streetscape design (uni – directional cycleway).

Pt Chev to Westmere cycleway - A dedicated cycle route along Pt Chevalier Road and Meola Road ending near the Westmere Shops 

The project is moving into detailed design and once the engagement with the CLG and Local Board’s is complete, the design will go out for consultation. It is hoped that the consultation will take place in 2019.

 

The project team is scheduled to present to the local board in September.

Waitematā Safe Routes project, the two routes open for feedback are Route 1: Surrey Crescent to Garnet Road and Route 2: Richmond Road.

The public feedback report has been published.

 

Regarding remedial works in West Lynn village, AT is collating the feedback on concept drawings to address the drainage and pedestrian crossing gradient issues.

Herne Bay cycling and walking improvements – proposed changes to encourage slower driving speeds and improve routes for people walking and cycling.

No update this month, previous update:

 

The detailed design is progressing well. The team expect to present to the local board with an update on the design upon receiving the Road Safety Audit.

Victoria Street East-West cycleway - dedicated cycle route along Victoria Street West, from the Beaumont Street intersection to the Hobson Street intersection.

No update this month, previous update:

 

The detailed design is progressing. The team presented to the local board at workshop on 2 July with an update on the design.

Federal Street Walking and Cycling Improvements

(proposed for Federal Street linking Fanshawe Street to Victoria Street until the full Federal Street Upgrade occurs.)

No update this month, previous update:

 

The report on public feedback into the project has been published on the AT website.

Tamaki Drive cycle route (Quay Street to Ngapipi Bridge)

The project team, along with AT’s senior managers, are working with the Port in the hope that the project can proceed while we continue to work toward a resolution on Solent Street.

Grafton Road – clearway

No update this month, previous update:

In scheme design phase.

St Georges Bay Rd - pedestrian crossing facility.

Delivery of the project has been moved to 2019/2020 financial year. We have also identified an opportunity to coordinate with maintenance renewal work.

Newmarket & Remuera Residential Parking Zone - proposed permit scheme for residents and businesses

AT has surveyed some residential streets in these areas and is now commencing discussions with the relevant stakeholders, including the local boards, to come up with a final proposal to be consulted with residents.

Grey Lynn & Arch Hills parking scheme - proposed permit scheme for residents and businesses

The Residential Parking zones were implemented in December 2018. Feedback so far has been positive.

In line with a resolution passed by the local board, we are re-assessing the parking situation in the remaining streets now the parking patterns have normalised.

Occupancy surveys are expected to take place in August. A proposal will be developed for public engagement should the surveys show high occupancy levels.

Parnell East Residential Parking Zone – project to install a residential parking zone and safety improvements on St Stephens Ave, Lichfield and Crescent Road.

Public consultation underway.

Wellesley St & Sale Street – new intersection signals

No update this month, previous update:

 

Auckland Design Office’s (ADO) Tactile Urbanism notification (phase I) was decoupled from AT’s consultation of intersection traffic signals.

ADO are leading on the notification and subsequent community engagement. The intersection traffic signals are still planned for 2019/20 delivery.

Grafton Road – midblock pedestrian signal outside of University of Auckland.

Consultation is likely to start late August 2019. We are aiming to build the project before University of Auckland semester one 2020 begins.

Princes St & Eden Cr Intersection - upgrade including raised zebra crossings

No update this month, previous update:

 

We are expecting to start construction by late August or early September.

 

Karangahape Road Enhancements Project – streetscape upgrade

Construction has begun, on the first section from Symonds Street past the cemetery to Upper Queen Street.  The works include closing the left turn from Symonds on to Karangahape Road. 

The next section from Ponsonby Road to Howe Street will begin soon. 

Wynyard Quarter street and park upgrades – central construction package

Work on Daldy Street continues, footpath and carriageway works are well advanced. Boardwalk and paving around pump station nearing completion.  Tree planting will start during August.

 

Work has commenced on Gaunt Street. Gaunt Street will be reduced to a single lane and one way traffic movement from east to west towards the end of August. The project team has been working with businesses on Gaunt Street.

 

A memo will be provided to the board mid-August. The memo will include more detailed information about the detours and traffic movement, and an overview of communications activity being undertaken to keep people informed.

Great North Road Shared path – shared path, new paired crossings at slip lanes and Western Springs Rd, shared path crossing with cycle lights, raised tables and kerb realignments.

Construction is expected to be complete in August.

 

Parnell Station – Installing ticket gates

Complete.

 

Downtown Infrastructure Improvement Programme

7.       This includes:

·   Quay Street Strengthening 

·   Quay Street Enhancement

·   Britomart East

·   Lower Albert

·   Downtown Ferry

·   Waterfront Park

·   Mooring dolphin

 

8.       As part of the Quay Street enhancements programme construction sites were established through early July on the Southern side of the footpath (lower Hobson to Lower Albert, Lower Albert to Lower Queen and lower Queen to Customs Street). The streetscape works on the southern side are expected to be complete early 2020 and will progress towards the northern side, targeting completion late 2020.


 

9.       To accommodate these works, traffic lanes have shifted to the northern edge of Quay Street between Lower Hobson Street and Commerce Street. The shift has progressed smoothly with little impact on traffic flows. We will continue to monitor and manage traffic on an on-going basis.

10.     As part of this, the Quay Street bus stop 1346 was relocated temporarily 150m west to outside MSocial Hotel. Access to the bus stop is from the eastern side only. This affects services 95B, 95C, 95G, 97B, 97R, 97V. There is substantial use of wayfinding, ambassadors and traffic controllers to ensure commuters can locate the new bus stop with ease.

11.     Preparatory works for the Seawall Strengthening on the northern side of Quay Street between Queens Wharf and Marsden Wharf were completed in early July.

12.     The large piling rig has been installed on site and constructing a new Palisade Wall to strengthen the existing seawall between Queens Wharf and Marsden Wharf. The Palisade Wall piling began on 1 August with the first pile located just outside Captain Cook Wharf.  Piling will progress east towards Marsden Wharf then move back to Captain Cook Wharf and progress west towards Queens Wharf. Different methodologies will be used at other locations along Quay Street (i.e. Jet Group piling at very eastern end of Quay Street), based on location, ground conditions and design.

13.     Construction of the new raingardens as part of the Quay Street Enhancements is well underway. There will be sixteen rain gardens in total along the southern side of Quay Street, each will be approximately 8.5m long by 3m wide and 2m deep. The Gardens will be temporarily capped to allow for upcoming traffic shifts during ongoing streetscape works. New trees and the vacationing Pohutakawa will move into their new homes next year.

14.     Work is also underway for the Ferry Basin Redevelopment on the western side of Queens Wharf. Two cranes have been installed on site and will install 253 new piles as part of the construction of the new breakwater wall and canopies. Piling began late July and will continue for approximately six months.

15.     Maintenance underneath Pier 2 is on-going and will continue to late August.

16.     Consent updates:

Project Consent

Consent Status

Next steps

Ferry Basin Redevelopment - Stage 1

Approved

Commence construction

Queens Wharf Mooring Dolphin

Approved –

appealed through the Environment Court

Mediation 6 Aug 2019, Hearing date still TBC

Downtown Public Space – Stage 1

Lodged, notified

Submission period closed, Council hearing late Sep/early Oct 2019, decision expected early Nov 2019

Quay St Enhancement

Approved

Commence construction

Quay St Strengthening - Princes Wharf

Approved

Commence construction

Quay St Strengthening - Ferry Basin

Approved

Commence construction

Quay St Strengthening - Ferry Building

Lodged, notified

Currently in notification period, Council hearing Oct 2019, decision expected late Nov 2019

Quay St Strengthening - Queens to Marsden

Approved

Commence construction

Galway St Enhancement – central block

Lodged, non-notified

Non-notified resource consent– decision expected late-Aug 2019

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

17.     Please see Attachment A which outlines decisions made in the Waitematā Local Board area in June and July 2019. Auckland Transport's resolution and approval process ensures the most appropriate controls and restrictions are put in place and can be legally enforced.

Community Transport quarterly report

18.     Please see Attachment B which outlines activities undertaken by the Community Transport team in schools in Waitematā Local Board area.

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

19.     The allocation to the board is $3,073,725 in total for this electoral period. From this sum the board has approved:

Project Name

Allocation

Status

Additional funds for the Ponsonby Road pedestrian improvement project

$221,000

Complete.

Streetscape enhancement incorporating tree planting on St Marys Road.

$5,000

Being delivered by Auckland Council arborists.

Greenway connection through Cox’s Bay Reserve to Wharf Road via Bayfield Park

$825,000

Being delivered by Community Facilities.

Upgrading the footpath along the western side of Bourke Street, Newmarket

$18,500

Complete.

Install two sets of bollards in St Patricks Square

$41,000

In delivery phase.

Western Springs Greenway Projects, Motions Road: Option 2 with the understanding that Waitematā Local Board will approach the Albert-Eden Local Board for the remaining $200,000 for the section in their Local Board area.

$490,000

Seeking full funding from Waitematā Local Board.

Auckland Domain - connection from the Titoki Street carpark to Football Road footpath.

$198,275

Being delivered by Community Facilities.

Auckland Domain - connection from the corner of the Winter Garden through to The Crescent.

$160,485

Being delivered by Community Facilities.

Auckland Domain - connection from Centennial Path to Grafton Mews.

$88,484

Being delivered by Community Facilities.

Auckland Domain - connection from Parnell Station to Lovers Lane.

$518,215

Being delivered by Community Facilities.

Lighting the Victoria Park Greenway project

$76,800

Being delivered by Community Facilities.

20.     The local board currently has $430,966 uncommitted.

21.     At a workshop with the Local Board on the 7 of August the following options for the allocation of the remaining funds was discussed:

  Project name

Rough order of cost

Support for MOTAT 2

$100,000

Additional funding to fully fund Motion Road to $690,000

$200,000

Newmarket Wayfinding and Signage Enhancements

$50,000

Wayfinding Signage Project

$80,000

Total

$430,000

22.     This is on the basis that:

·    The local board recognises that MOTAT is funded to build the connection between Motions Road and Meola Road however, the local board may wish to allocate $100,000 for additional improvement, such as additional planting or lighting.

·    That the Albert-Eden Local Board was not able to contribute funding to the Motions Road greenway connection. If the local board wished to deliver this greenway the Waitematā Local Board will need to commit a further $200,000 to fully fund the connection to a total of $690,000. This will complete the greenway connection from Meola Road to Great North Road as per the local boards Greenways plan. Auckland Transport’s Parking Design team have advised that any parking removal required as part of the Motions Road project would be manageable within the proposed Precinct Parking Plan being developed by Regional Facilities and Auckland Transport.

·    The commitment to the Newmarket Wayfinding and Signage Enhancements would potentially leverage significant funding from other parties.

·    Auckland Transport has confirmed that there is a significant quantity of wayfinding improvements that could be made in the Waitematā Local Board area.  Allocation of funding towards a general Wayfinding Signage Improvement project would include setting up a project which identifies and delivers these improvements.

·    The Great North Road pedestrian crossing project would be best funded by the Albert-Eden Local Board.

23.     Resolutions to this effect can be found in the recommendations of this report.

 

Community Safety Fund

24.     Waitematā Local Board’s allocation is $1,450,216.

25.     This list was presented for discussion at a workshop on the 4 June and confirmed with resolution number WTM/2019/115

26.     Auckland Transport has developed the following rough order of cost:

Project

Rough order of cost

Safe Schools Toolbox - Newton Central School

$615,000

Pedestrian Crossings - on West End Road / Fife St by the bus stops next to the Westend tennis club

$300,000

Pedestrian crossings formalised on Lower Domain Drive at Lovers Lane and at Domain Drive

$75,000

Pedestrian crossing at the entrance to the Domain across Park Road to give access to the Domain from Grafton and pedestrian prioritisation on the raised table on Domain Drive

Did not qualify for the fund this time due to other AT projects in this area.

Pedestrian crossing outside ACG Campus on Davis Cres to Olympic Reserve

$260,000

Cook Street Project - Area 5: Shared Path/Cycleway

Not meeting AT’s prioritisation for a joint project.

Hopetoun Street Improvements

$200,000

 

27.     The total rough cost for qualifying projects is $1,450,000.

28.     Given that the local board’s agreed prioritised projects meet the value of the fund It is recommended that the local board approve these projects for delivery.

29.     Auckland Transport recommends that if any of the projects are delivered underbudget then the remaining funds could be reallocated to the Newton Central School project. This project can be easily expanded to accommodate any additional funding.

30.     Resolutions to this effect can be found in the recommendations of this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     The impact of the information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group. Any engagement with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no local, sub-regional or regional impacts.

Local Board Workshops

33.     Auckland Transport attended workshops on 6 August 2019 with information on the proposed Newmarket and Remuera residential parking zones, Newmarket Westfield development and a discussion of the local boards transport funds.

General information items sent to the board:

34.     Please see below for a summary of items sent to the board for their information or feedback:

Item

Date sent to Board

Outcome: Ronayne Street, Parnell - P5 Loading Zone

08/07

Update: Nelson St

08/07

FYI: Parnell East Residential Parking Zone and safety improvements consultation

09/07

Update: Marmion Street- Footpath

10/07

FYI: Downtown Programme Video - Caring for our pohutukawa

16/07

FYI: Waitematā Safe Routes - public feedback report

16/07

Update: Karangahape Road Enhancements project starting Monday

25/07

Consultation: Churton Street - Road Marking Changes

30/07

FYI: Quay Street Changes - Campaign Informer

30/07

FYI: Parnell - ticket gates opening

31/07

Feedback: Beaumont Road bus stop relocation

02/08

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     The proposed decision of receiving this report has financial implications as outlined in the resolutions, analysis and advice.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board next month.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Traffic Control Committee resolutions June/July 2019

31

b

Activities undertaken by the Community Transport team in schools in Waitematā Local Board area

35

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ben Halliwell - Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon - Team Leader Elected Member Relationship Managers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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PDF Creator


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Film Protocol consultation feedback and recommended changes

File No.: CP2019/14435

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, and to provide feedback on the recommended changes to the document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is currently reviewing the Auckland Film Protocol.  The Auckland Film Protocol sets out:

·        the commitment of the council group to support filming in Auckland;

·        expectations and rules that filmmakers must abide by when filming in Auckland; and

·        provides guidance for filmmakers on the process for approval to film in Auckland.

3.       The purpose of the review was to ensure that the Auckland Film Protocol is up-to-date and identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities that should be addressed.  Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Auckland Film Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol. 

4.       A revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in June 2019 for consideration and was approved for public consultation (resolution number ENV/2019/73). 

5.       The following is a summary of the key changes made to the Auckland Film Protocol before public consultation was undertaken:

·        Native species: new content added stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: new content added providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: new content added stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: new content added stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: new content added to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Content of the Auckland Film Protocol was updated to reflect current policy, plans and bylaws of Auckland Council.  Some structural and editorial amendments were also made to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

6.       Public consultation was undertaken over a three week period between 21 June and 12 July 2019.

7.       A total of 74 submissions were received during the public consultation period.  Waitematā Local Board residents provided a total of eight submissions on the draft Auckland Film Protocol, representing 10.8 percent of all submissions.  The views of Waitematā Local Board submitters were similar to regional views.  Staff are proposing some changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address submitter concerns; the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film protocol are shown in track changes in Attachment B.

8.       This report provides a summary of public feedback and of proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol to address feedback.  The following is a high‑level summary of the key changes proposed to the Auckland Film Protocol in response to public consultation:

·        Natural environment: include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Native species: include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

·        Kauri dieback: amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

·        Impact on access to public open space: include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

·        Compliance and enforcement: include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with the Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

9.       Submission themes and proposed changes are summarised in Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive a summary of consultation feedback on the draft Auckland Film Protocol

b)      provide feedback on the recommended changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol

c)      note that local board feedback will be included in a report to the Environment and Community Committee in September 2019, seeking approval for the proposed changes to the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The first version of the Auckland Film Protocol (the protocol) was adopted by the Regional Development and Operations Committee (resolution number RDO/2013/27) on 14 March 2013.  A review of fees for filming in the Auckland Region was undertaken in 2014 and a new set of region‑wide charges was recommended; providing a simplified and harmonised range of charges.  The Governing Body adopted a region‑wide schedule of film fees and revised Auckland Film Protocol on 28 May 2015 (resolution number GB/2015/36).

11.     Since the Protocol was adopted in 2015 there have been a number of changes to legislation and to Auckland Council’s policy and planning framework. The purpose of the review of the Protocol was to:

·        ensure that the Protocol is up-to-date; and

·        identify emerging trends, issues or opportunities to be addressed in the Protocol.

12.     Content of the Protocol was reviewed against legislation referenced in the document and against policies and plans of the Auckland Council group to identify areas where the Protocol should be updated.  Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.

13.     Workshops were held in September and October 2018 to engage with local boards that experience a high volume of filming.

14.     Engagement to inform the preparation of the revised draft Protocol was also undertaken with:

·        mana whenua: mana whenua interests are represented by 19 iwi (tribal) authorities in Tāmaki Makaurau, Auckland.  The 19 iwi authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review of the Protocol.

·        staff of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to inform the review.

·        screen sector: the screen sector was invited to participate in a survey in April 2019 to inform the review.  The survey asked a series of general questions about the Protocol and experiences of filming in public open space in Auckland. 

·        public: the People’s Panel in September 2018; a total of 4,762 responses were received.  The survey asked a series of questions on views on and experiences of filming in Auckland. 

A high-level summary of feedback (including local board feedback) is provided in Attachment C.

15.     The review recommended that a range of changes be made to the Auckland Film Protocol, the following is a summary of the key changes proposed to the Environment and Community Committee:

·        Native species: include new content stating that Auckland Council may place additional conditions on film permits to protect native species

·        Kauri dieback: include new content providing information about kauri dieback and stating that filmmakers will be required to clean equipment to council specifications when filming in areas where kauri are present.

·        Drones: include new content stating that a film permit is required for commercial filming and requiring filmmakers to comply with Civil Aviation rules, Auckland Council bylaws and conditions.

·        Historic heritage: include new content stating that filming in proximity to historic (including cultural) heritage will be subject to conditions to protect these sites.

·        Health and safety: include new content to reflect the new Health and Safety at work Act 2015 and requirements to prepare a site specific health and safety plan.

·        Filming on Tūpuna Maunga: update content to reflect that applications to film on Tūpuna Maunga are assessed by the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority.

·        Updates to content: update content to reflect current policy (e.g. smokefree policy), plans (Auckland Unitary Plan) and bylaws of Auckland Council.

·        Structural and editorial: amend some parts of the document to improve the logic, flow and readability of the document.

16.     The revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol was approved by the Envrionment and Community Committee for public consultation in June 2019 (resolution number ENV/2019/73).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     Consultation on the revised draft of the Auckland Film Protocol took place from 21 June to 12 July 2019.  A total of 74 submissions were received; this represents a substantial increase on the 21 submissions which were received in response to the 2015 review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  Of the submissions received, 72 were submitted using the online form and 2 non‑form hardcopy submissions were received. 

18.     Submitters were asked to identify if they worked in the screen sector or not, with:

·        29 submissions (39%) received from individuals or organisations that identified themselves as working in the screen sector

·        45 submissions (61%) received from individuals or organisations that do not work in the screen sector.

The questions included in the online form varied depending on whether the submitter identified themselves as working in the screen industry or not.

19.     A breakdown of all submissions received by local board area is shown in Table 1 below.  The small number of responses from individual local board areas means that a analysis of views by local board area was not possible for all local board areas.

 

Table 1: Breakdown of submissions made by local board area.

Local Board Area

Number of respondents

Percentage of respondents

Waitākere Ranges

17

23.0%

Albert-Eden

9

12.2%

Waitematā

8

10.8%

Rodney

6

8.1%

Upper Harbour

5

6.8%

Ōrākei

5

6.8%

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

4

5.4%

Devonport-Takapuna

4

5.4%

Henderson-Massey

3

4.1%

Kaipātiki

3

4.1%

Howick

2

2.7%

Whau

2

2.7%

Māngere-Ōtahuhu

1

1.4%

Puketapapa

1

1.4%

Hibiscus and Bays

1

1.4%

Papakura

1

1.4%

Franklin

0

0%

Great Barrier

0

0%

Ōtara‑Papatoetoe

0

0%

Manurewa

0

0%

Waiheke

0

0%

Don't Know

1

1.4%

Outside Auckland

1

1.4%

Total

74

 

 

20.     A series of closed questions were asked of non‑screen sector individuals and organisations; a summary of the responses to these questions is shown in Table 2 below.  Table 2 shows that:

·        most respondents are supportive of Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach and that;

·        most respondents think that the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on residents and businesses, on public open space and historic and cultural heritage.

Table 2: Feedback on the Auckland Film Protocols management of the impacts of filming

Question

Response

Percentage of regional submissions

(number of respondents is shown in brackets)

Do you support Auckland Council's film‑friendly approach?

Yes

75% (33)

Partially

20% (9)

No

5% (2)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on residents and businesses?

Yes

56% (18)

Partially

19% (6)

No

25% (8)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact that filming has on our public open space and environment?

Yes

53% (23)

Partially

33% (14)

No

14% (6)

Do you think the Auckland Film Protocol does enough to manage the impact of filming on our historic and cultural heritage?

Yes

62% (26)

Partially

29% (12)

No

10% (4)

 

21.     The main reasons given by those who supported Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach are shown in Table 3.

Table 3: Summary of key reasons for supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Economic

·      generates employment and economic growth;

·      benefits communities and local businesses;

·      benefits a broad range of trades and industries;

·      attracts investment and businesses to Auckland.

Cultural and creative

·      has cultural benefits allowing and supporting the telling of stories visually;

·      supports the creative economy and enables people to find a future in the creative industries;

·      It’s fun and exciting to see Auckland on the screen.

Promotion and tourism

·      promotes and showcases Auckland to the world;

·      creates a positive image of Auckland.

 

22.     Table 4 shows the key reasons that respondents gave for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Table 4: Summary of key reasons given for partially supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach.

Theme

Summary of key submission points

Access

·      the impacts on resident, including parking restrictions, road closures and ability to use public open space while filming is taking place need to be considered and managed;

·      need to ensure that film‑makers are respectful of other users of public open space.

Notification

·      there needs to be sufficient notification to ensure that residents and businesses are aware of open space being used for filming and are not inconvenienced.

Balance

·      need to consider and manage the impact that filming has on the environment and impacted residents;

·      need to balance the cumulative impacts of filming.

Equity

·      need to ensure that fees for commercial use of public places are fair.

 

23.     The key reasons given for not supporting Auckland Council’s film‑friendly approach were:

·        the cost to ratepayers of enabling filming;

·        that there is not enough protection for individuals, businesses and residents affected by filming being carried out on private property.

24.     A series of open‑ended questions were also included to elicit further information about responses to these questions and about a range of other topics.  Staff have worked through submissions to determine any changes to be recommended for the final revised Auckland Film Protocol.  Attachment A identifies key themes and submission points along with proposed staff responses.  

A summary of the most common submission themes and the proposed staff responses are shown in table 5.

Table 5: Summary of key submission themes and proposed staff responses.

Key themes

Summary of proposed responses

Use of drones for filming

Include additional guidance on the use of drones around native birds and in proximity to other users of public open space and adjoining private properties.

Impact on natural environment

Include stronger messaging about the importance of respecting Auckland’s natural environment, that film permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Kauri dieback

Amend to ensure that conditions may be placed on film permits in any public open space (controlled by Auckland Council) where kauri are present.

Impact on native species

Include stronger messages around the potential impact of filming on native species, such as birds and that filming permits may be subject to conditions to manage impacts and/or that filming may be subject to restrictions where these impacts cannot be appropriately managed.

Impact on access to public open space

Include stronger messages around the need for filmmakers to be respectful of other users of public open space and state that film permits give limited permission to occupy public open space.

Compliance and enforcement

Include stronger messages around the requirement for filmmakers to comply with Auckland Council policies, plans, bylaws and the terms and conditions of their film permit.

Health and safety

Amend to enable production companies to arrange alternative timeframes for the submission of a site specific health and safety plan by agreement with Screen Auckland.

Notification

Screen Auckland to consider operational approaches to achieving wider public notification.

Impact on business

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  The protocol is intended to provide a framework that enables decisions to be made on a case‑by‑case basis.

Equity

No change to the Auckland Film Protocol.  Fees for commercial use of public open space are set under the Auckland Council Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 and amended through the long term plan and annual plan.

 

25.     This report seeks formal feedback from the board at its August 2019 business meeting on the recommended changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol in response to consultation feedback.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Engagement with staff involved in the process of assessing and approving film permit applications, from across the Council group, was undertaken to inform the review and proposed amendments to the Protocol.  This included engagement with Auckland Transport, Panuku Development Auckland, and with Auckland Council community facilities, region‑wide planning, social policy and bylaws, visitor experience and heritage

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Role of local boards in film permitting

27.     Landowner approval is required to film on any public open space in the Auckland region.  Local boards are responsible for landowner approvals for local parks and reserves.  Engagement with local boards that experience a high volume of applications for film permits was undertaken in September and October 2018 to inform the review of the Auckland Film Protocol.  A summary of the key engagement themes is included in Attachment C and was reported to the Environment and Community Committee in July 2019.

28.     A key theme from local board engagement was that the film permit timeframes mean that landowner approval timeframes are very tight, particularly when considering complex or contentious applications.  It was also noted that the current timeframes do not allow sufficient time to consider applications at full board meetings or to consult key stakeholders.  Given this, the following options on film permit timeframes were presented to the Environment and Community Committee at a workshop in May 2019 and at the June 2019 meeting.

Option one: Status Quo

Option two: amend the permit timeframes

·        Option 2(a) the permit time frame is amended to be “up to five working days”.

·        Option 2(b) the permit time frame is increased to 5‑7 working days.

29.     Following direction from the Committee, that increasing timeframes could act as a disincentive making Auckland internationally uncompetitive, the status quo option was retained in the draft Auckland Film Protocol.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     ATEED has an ongoing relationship with several mana whenua and mataawaka groups, across its whole portfolio of activity.  To inform the review of the Protocol the 19 Iwi Authorities were invited, in writing, to inform the review.  In relation to film permit applications Māori views and input may be obtained in several ways where there is a potential impact on particular land or sites. This is usually coordinated either by the film facilitator, or through the relevant parks manager.

31.     Specific processes are in place for the tūpuna maunga, with all commercial filming on the maunga requiring the approval of the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority).  Screen Auckland facilitates all requests for approval to film on the tūpuna maunga.  Approval to film will be subject to conditions and restrictions set by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.  Meetings were held with staff of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to inform the review and ensure that proposed amendments are consistent with the policy of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The proposed amendments to the Protocol do not impact on existing levels of service and will not impact on operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     There are no significant risks arising from the board giving feedback on the proposed changes to the revised draft Auckland Film Protocol at this time.

34.     If adoption of the revised Auckland Film Protocol is delayed this would impact on council’s ability to implement the proposed changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Public feedback and proposed amendments to the Auckland Film Protocol will be presented to the Environment and Community Committee for approval.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Key submission themes and responses

47

b

Draft 2019 Auckland Film Protocol

57

c

Summary of preconsultation engagement

117

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Marie Jenkins - Screen Facilitation Manager, ATEED

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Options to investigate improving west Waitematā community facilities

File No.: CP2019/11509

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the findings from the West Waitematā Current State Analysis of Community Services.

2.       To seek approval for the development of indicative business cases for the three recommended options to improve community facilities in west Waitematā.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       To help understand library, community centre, and venue for hire services and facilities within west Waitematā (the area west of State Highway One), an assessment of community services was undertaken. 

4.       As part of the assessment, consideration was given to facility condition and suitability, and whether provision meets the current and future needs of the community and wider network.

5.       The investigation concentrated on library, community centre, and venue for hire services at:

·    Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium (in Ponsonby)

·    Grey Lynn Library and Hall

·    Grey Lynn Community Centre.

6.       The investigation found that the services provided from the three facilities situated in Ponsonby and Grey Lynn are needed and that more community centre and library services will be required in the future as the population grows.

7.       The assessment showed that utilisation rates are generally above the Auckland average, and customers attending programmes are being turned away from Grey Lynn Community Centre and Grey Lynn Library due to capacity constraints.

8.       Issues with the buildings themselves were also identified. These included:

·    the small size of both libraries (particularly Grey Lynn),

·    Leys Institute and Grey Lynn Library buildings are earthquake prone

·    Leys Institute and Grey Lynn Library and Hall are listed heritage structures

·    Auckland Council is required to ensure library services are provided, at Leys Institute Library, in perpetuity.

9.       These identified issues constrain any significant modification to both library buildings in the future and prevents any repurposing of Leys Institute.

10.     Building renewals will assist with keeping the facilities operating for another 10 to 15 years but will not address seismic risk, capacity levels, and long-term building and service requirements.

11.     Staff have identified and evaluated options as outlined in Attachment B.

 

12.     It is recommended that a more detailed investigation of the following options is undertaken, and indicative business cases are developed. 

Area

Intervention

Anticipated completion of indicative business case

Ponsonby

Restore Leys Library and Gymnasium, including seismic work (option 2)

Within 5 years

Grey Lynn

Restore Grey Lynn Library and Hall, including seismic work and extending the library service into the hall (option 5)

Within 5 years

Develop a multi-purpose facility incorporating the community centre and library (option 9)

Within 15 years

 

13.     The indicative business cases of the three options will inform investment decisions to solve the foreseeable, long-term, provision gaps. Consideration of options for optimisation as part of the indicative business cases could also provide potential budget sources.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the West Waitematā Current State Analysis of Community Services findings report (Attachment A)

b)      approve the development of indicative business cases to understand service and facility investment options for:

i)        option 2: restoration of Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium, including seismic upgrade, and extension of library services into underutilised space

ii)       option 5: restoration of Grey Lynn Library and Hall, including seismic upgrade, and extension of library services into the hall

iii)      option 9: development of a multi-purpose facility, in Grey Lynn, incorporating the community centre and library.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

14.     The investigation of Ponsonby and Grey Lynn library facilities, giving consideration to facility condition and suitability, is in the 2018/2019 and 2019/2020 local board work programmes (WTM/2018/77 and WTM/2019/126).

15.     The project also responds to action 107 from the Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) action plan (Ponsonby / Grey Lynn - investigate provision of library facilities in this area giving consideration to facility condition and suitability).

16.     The facilities in scope for the assessment were Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium, Grey Lynn Library and Hall, and Grey Lynn Community Centre.

17.     Seismic assessments for Leys Institute and Grey Lynn Library and Hall identified the buildings are below 34 per cent of new building standard (NBS). This means the buildings are considered earthquake-prone and must be strengthened or removed within 35 years.

18.     Grey Lynn Community Centre has some weather-tightness issues which are currently being addressed.

19.     The building condition, cost of addressing seismic risk, and expected population growth were triggers to consider if the facilities are fit for purpose and well placed to provide for future generations. This has prompted the development of options for the continued provision of community services in west Waitematā.

20.     As outlined in the Community Facilities Network Plan, council is committed to providing community facilities that benefit all Aucklanders. We have an obligation, under the Local Government Act, “to meet current and future needs of communities for good quality local infrastructure in a way that is most cost effective”[1].

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     We have carried out research to understand more about the facilities in scope within the broader context of community service requirements in west Waitematā (Attachment A).

22.     All the facilities have issues that must be addressed to continue the delivery of community services.

·    Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium and Grey Lynn Library and Hall are heritage buildings and earthquake prone

·    Leys Institute Library and Grey Lynn Library staff-spaces do not meet accessibility standards

·    Grey Lynn Community Centre has water-tightness issues to address and work is currently underway that will extend the life of the building for another 10 to 15 years.

23.     The population of west Waitematā is expected to increase by approximately 45 per cent over the next 30 years from 35,746 to 51,916.

24.     Current levels of library service provision are below the Community Facility Network Plan guidelines, and Grey Lynn Library management report having to turn customers away, wishing to attend programmes and events, due to size constraints.

25.     Several factors have implications for how council can create) this library capacity. These include:

·    the requirement that Leys Institute Library continue to offer a library service in perpetuity (as set out in the terms of the 1904 deed of trust)

·    the heritage status of Leys Institute and Grey Lynn Library and Hall

·    low utilisation of Grey Lynn Hall

·    underutilised space in both the basement and upper floor of Leys Institute Library.

26.     Grey Lynn Community Centre is very well utilised, and customers are sometimes turned away due to the demand placed on its large meeting space. According to Community Facilities Network Plan guidelines, additional community centre provision will need to be considered in the next 30 years.

27.     Leys Institute Gymnasium and Grey Lynn Hall both operate as venues for hire. Utilisation for Leys Institute Gymnasium is average for its size; Grey Lynn Hall utilisation is low. From a provision perspective and considering both council and non-council providers, west Waitematā is well served for venue for hire space now and into the future.

Options Assessment

28.     The following high-level options were developed to respond to the findings. When assessed against each facility, nine options were defined (Attachment B). The nine options were presented to the local board for feedback at a workshop on 7 June 2019.

29.     Options were evaluated for:

·    opportunity for service enhancement

·    strategic alignment

·    ability to address investigation findings.

30.     A summary of the option evaluation can be found in Attachment B.

Auckland Council’s three-stage process for new investment

31.     Cases for new or changed investment in community services and facilities follow Auckland Council’s three stage process, based on the better business case model developed by the Treasury. The process applies to the recommendations for Ponsonby and Grey Lynn. 

Process stage

Description

Ponsonby

Grey Lynn

Needs assessment

Analysis of growth, demographics, network provision and gaps

Completed through the current state findings report (Attachment A)

Completed through the current state findings report (Attachment A)

Indicative business case

Considers the merits of proposed investment, strategic alignment and economic case that looks at costs and benefits to help ensure a robust case for change

As per recommendation b) i) option 2

As per recommendation b) ii) option 5

As per recommendation b) iii) option 9

Detailed business case

Builds on the previous stages and identifies preferred options(s) that will deliver community benefit and value for money

To be determined by the indicative business case

To be determined by the indicative business case

 

32.     The three options recommended for further investigation through development of an indicative business case are:

·    option 2: restoration of Leys Library and Gymnasium including seismic upgrade and extension of library services into underutilised space

·    option 5: restoration of Grey Lynn Library & Hall including seismic work and extension of library service into the hall

·    option 9: develop new multi-purpose facility in Grey Lyn, incorporating community centre & library.

33.     The following diagram describes what each option investigation would include.


Ponsonby

 

Grey Lynn

 

34.     The investigation option recommended for Ponsonby offers long-term solutions to the issues caused by facility condition and population growth.

35.     The two-phase investigation options recommended for Grey Lynn are interdependent. The work at Grey Lynn Library and Hall and the approved renewal work at Grey Lynn Community Centre are medium-term solutions that provide us with 10 to 15 years to identify funding required for a new multi-purpose facility.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     The findings and options included in this report have been developed with input from a multi-disciplinary team. The project team included members from Libraries and Information, Community Places, Heritage, Service Strategy and Integration, Commercial and Finance, and Community Facilities.

37.     Indicative business case development will include the same multi-disciplinary team with support from Panuku and Land Advisory Services.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     Grey Lynn Community Centre Board have been informed of the recommendations in this report for staff to investigate the development of a new multi-purpose facility to house both community centre and library services.

39.     Investigation findings were presented to the local board at a workshop on 30 April 2019.

40.     Options were presented to the local board at a workshop on 7 May 2019. The workshop included information on optimisation and how this offers the opportunity to offset new build costs. The local board requested that a variety of housing options, for delivery with a multi-purpose facility, should be investigated. Staff will work with Panuku, mana whenua, and mataawaka to investigate optimisation options and potential sites as part of the next phase of research. 

41.     Recommendations in this report would be subject to future decision-making by Governing Body given capital investment would potentially be sought through indicative business cases.

42.     Local impacts will be considered through all phases of investigation and business case development. Local board direction will be sought to inform further phases of the project and decision-making around location and services.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     Leys Institute stands on Te Rimutahi ridgeline – a traditional transport route from Maungawhau to Te Too, a headland pā site at St Mary’s Bay. Grey Lynn Library and Hall stands on the Karangahape track, now Great North Road, connecting Waitematā moana to Manukau moana. Both routes are acknowledged as significant to mana whenua and to this mahi.

44.     Engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka will be included in the next stages of this investigation and be reflected in future recommendations.

45.     The Community Facilities Network Plan (2015) emphasises council’s responsibility to deliver outcomes for Māori. The network plan details six actions that will ensure council meets this commitment including active engagement with Māori to factor needs and expectations into decision-making for the planning and operations of facilities and incorporating concerns about wahi tapu.

46.     The CFNP states that development of new facilities will involve investigating Māori demographic participation and usage trends, identifying opportunities to increase the attendance and use of facilities by Māori.

47.     The recommendations offer the opportunity to engage with mana whenua and mataawaka from facility and service design conception, therefore delivering on the key directions of The Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau 2017. The plan, published by the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB), provides a framework to Auckland Council for implementing desired cultural, economic, environmental and social outcomes for Māori.

48.     The following table outlines key directions, of particular cultural relevance, to this mahi.

Key directions of The Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau 2017

49.     New facilities also offer the potential to deliver on Auckland Plan Direction four: ‘Showcase Auckland’s Māori identity and vibrant Māori culture through design and te reo Māori.

50.     Mana whenua will be engaged with and provide input for details of the service provision and outcomes required for communities through the design phases of the new facility projects that are progressed following a detailed business case for investment.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

51.     Resource to complete indicative business cases is available through existing operational budgets.

52.     Council is operating in a constrained financial environment and the business case process supports consideration of priorities and trade-offs when new funding is required. Funding requirements identified through the indicative business case will be reported to the local board for feedback in preparation for consideration through the relevant Long-term Plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Local board priority changes following the October 2019 local government elections

Present key findings and direction to the new board late 2019 or early 2020. Receive any additional direction

Community perception that services will change without consultation.

Community consultation will be undertaken regarding any significant service changes.

 

53.     Seismic risk is mitigated through council’s compliance with legislation and the development of a seismic policy, currently underway. Water tightness issues with Grey Lynn Community Centre are being remediated by physical works currently underway.

54.     A comprehensive risk analysis will be included in future phases of this work.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     Following local board resolution staff will confirm the delivery programme for the indicative business cases.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

West Waitematā Current State Analysis of Community Services Findings Report

129

b

Options analysis table

155

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Hannah Alleyne - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

New community lease to Basement Theatre Trust at 313 Queen Street

File No.: CP2019/13956

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to Basement Theatre Trust at 313 Queen Street.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The “basement one” community space at 313 Queen Street, Auckland is currently vacant. The space was previously occupied by Silo Theatre Trust on an informal basis from 2013 up until July 2018 and prior to the commencement of the renewal works.

3.       A renewal project to upgrade the condition of basement one within the building was approved by the local board in 2018 (Resolution WTM/2018/93). The purpose of the renewal works was to enable continued and ongoing use of the space. The renewal works involved renovating the kitchen (which previously only contained a sink), new windows and new bathroom facilities. The ventilation system was also upgraded. Renewal works on the space were completed in February 2019.

4.       As recommended under the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, an expression of interest should be undertaken where council seeks to grant a lease for vacant space within council-owned buildings.  At its workshop of 25 September 2018, the local board requested staff undertake an expression of interest (EOI) process for eligible groups interested in leasing the premises.

5.       Council staff initiated the process in November 2018 which concluded on 20 December 2018. Three applications were received and an assessment identified Basement Theatre Trust as the most suitable candidate.

6.       During the assessment process, council staff involving the Community Lease Specialist, Arts Advisor and the Senior Local Board Advisor, assessed the applications.  Key considerations included how the space was intended to be used, willingness and opportunities to share the space and collaborate with community groups and opportunities to leverage funding towards improving the facility.

7.       Under the Local Government Act 2002 and prior to the granting of a new community lease, council must publicly notify its intention to grant a new community lease where it is for a term in excess of six months. The proposed term is in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 for council owned buildings being five years with one five year right of renewal.

8.       The public have an opportunity to make submissions on the proposal. If any of the submitters wish to be heard in relating to their submission, the board should establish a hearings panel to hear these. The panel can either be the whole board or it can be delegated to members. It is useful when appointing the panel to delegate authority to hear, consider and decide on the submissions.

9.       Iwi consultation is also required that can be undertaken concurrently with the public notification.

10.     This report recommends that the Waitematā Local Board approve the public notification of the intent to grant a new community lease to the Basement Theatre Trust. Provided the public submissions if any, can be satisfied and that the iwi consultation is successful, it is also recommended that the local board grant to Basement Theatre Trust a new community lease for a term of five years with one five year right of renewal. The recommendations align with the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes of a high-quality built environment that embraces our heritage and inclusive communities that are vibrant, healthy and connected.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approves the public notification and iwi consultation on Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community lease to Basement Theatre Trust

b)      nominate a hearings panel to hear, consider and decide on any submissions received following the public notification process

c)      grants, subject to any submissions being resolved, a new community lease to Basement Theatre Trust for that part of the council-owned building comprising approximately 168m², situated at 313 Queen Street, Auckland City, on land legally described as Allotment 4 and 5 Section 29 City of Auckland. The lease area is delineated in red and marked A on Attachment A appended to this report and will be subject to the following terms:

i.    term – five (5) years commencing on the next working day after the expiration of the public notification period or should any objections be received during the public notification period, the next working day after those objections have been appropriately resolved, with one five (5) year right of renewal

ii.    rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii.   maintenance fee- $500 plus GST per annum

iv.  all other terms and conditions will be in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

d)      delegate to the Waitematā Local Board Chairperson, in consultation with local board members, the authority to approve the Basement Theatre Trust’s Community Outcomes Plan, which will be appended to the lease document.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     This report considers the expression of interest applications and a proposed new community lease for part of the council-owned building located at 313 Queen Street.

12.     The Waitematā Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Land, buildings and community lease

13.     The land on which the council-owned building is located at 313 Queen Street, Auckland Central is legally described as Allotment 4 and 5 Section 29 City of Auckland. The land is held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002.

14.     The building comprises four levels; two basement levels, basement one being the subject premises and basement two being occupied by Q Theatre and the ground and first floor are used for commercial retail and commercial operations managed by Panuku Development Auckland.

15.     A renewal project to upgrade the condition of the building was approved by the local board in 2018 (Resolution WTM/2018/93). The purpose of the renewal works was to enable continued and ongoing use of the leasable space. The renewal works involved renovating the kitchen, which previously only contained a sink, new windows and bathroom facilities. The ventilation system was also upgraded. Renewal works were completed in February 2019.

Expressions of interest

 

16.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements.

17.     The proposed lease is for ‘basement one’ and the only community lease space within the building. In accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 the recommended term for a community lease for a council-owned building is five years with one five year right of renewal. The occupant will be charged a subsidised maintenance fee of $500 plus GST per annum in accordance with the guidelines. Additionally, the cost of electricity for the space is provided by a dedicated meter and the occupant will be responsible for this as part of its obligations under the proposed lease. Water usage will be prorated and on-charged to the occupant.

18.     Under the guidelines, the procedure for granting a new community lease of vacant spaces within council-owned buildings is to call for expressions of interest from community groups. This process ensures that the proposals received seek to achieve the best community outcomes.

19.     During November and December 2018, expressions of interests were called for and applications from the following three community groups were received:

·    Silo Theatre Trust

·    Basement Theatre Trust

·    Pacific Islands Dance Fono.

20.     The above applications were assessed by the Community Lease Specialist, the Senior Local Board Advisor and the Art Advisor, having regard to:

·    any existing and proposed uses of the premises

·    financial stability and sustainability of the groups

·    suitability of the building, considering its size, location and configuration

·    willingness and opportunities to share the space and collaborate with other community groups

·    alignment with the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes

Basement Theatre Trust

21.     The Basement Theatre Trust is a charitable trust and its objects are to foster, develop and encourage all forms of creative and performing art.

22.     The Basement Theatre Trust was assessed as the most suitable occupant as it is prepared to share the space with other similar user groups. Although the Basement Theatre Trust works solely with their partnership groups, these groups in turn activate the space by sharing it with other creative and performing arts user groups.

23.     The Basement Theatre Trust wishes to create an art and performance hub and is prepared to invest its own funds into the community facility to create a fit-for-purpose performing arts space. The Basement Theatre Trust is well managed and financially sustainable

24.     The activities align with the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes of a high-quality built environment that embraces our heritage and inclusive communities that are vibrant, healthy and connected.

 

Silo Theatre Trust

25.     Silo Theatre Trust previously occupied the basement one space at 313 Queen Street on an informal basis between 2013 and July 2018. Silo Theatre Trust vacated the building prior to the commencement of the renewal works.

26.     The trusts application clearly indicated:

a)   its willingness to share the space with a wide range of user groups

b)   its purpose to utilise the space for performing arts, aligning with the local board plan. The trust intends making the space available for artists, performance rehearsals and partners with a range of arts and performing arts group

c)   its financial stability and sustainability

d)   Its alignment with the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017 outcome of inclusive communities that are vibrant, healthy and connected

27.     One of the key determinants during the assessment is that Silo Theatre Trust proposed to seek council funding to pay towards fit out for the space as opposed to Basement Theatre Trust which is prepared to invest its own funds to improve the functionality of the space.

Pacific Islands Dance Fono

28.     Pacific Islands Dance Fono scored considerably lower than the Basement Theatre and Silo Theatre. This was due in part to the group’s inability to share and collaborate as well as its limited scope for use as a dance space.

Public notification and engagement with iwi

29.     The land on which the council-owned building is located at 313 Queen Street, Auckland Central is subject to the requirements of the Local Government Act 2002.

30.     In accordance with section 138 of the Local Government Act 2002 any lease term in excess of six months must be publicly notified. This applies to the proposed new community lease to Basement Theatre Trust. Similarly, engagement with mana whenua is required under section 81 of the Act.

31.     Staff will place an advertisement about the proposed new community lease in relevant local newspapers and on Auckland Council’s website. Submitters and or objectors will be given one calendar month in which to lodge their submissions or objections and advise whether they wish to be heard in person. Should there be any objections and the objectors wish to be heard, this will require a formal hearings process.

32.     If any of the submitters wish to be heard in relation to their submission, the board should establish a hearings panel to hear these. The panel can either be the whole board or it can be delegated to members. It is useful when appointing the panel to delegate authority to hear, consider and decide on the submissions.   

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     During the assessment process, community leasing staff worked with and sought feedback from the Arts Advisor and the Senior Local Board Advisor with respect to the applications and proposed lease. 

34.     Community Leasing staff will work collaboratively with the Art Advisor from Arts, Culture and Events, to develop a targeted community outcomes plan to achieve specific local board outcomes and deliver community benefit.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.   This is an approved item on the Community Facilities Work Programme for 2018/2019, line item 3287. This item was workshopped with the local board on 25 September 2018, 26 February 2019, 30 April 2019 and 25 June 2019.

36.   At its workshop of 30 April 2019 and 25 June 2019, the local board provided direction to staff on the board’s priorities for the space. The local board indicated their preference for the space to be used as rehearsal space, and sought to ensure the use is maximised through the willingness of the tenant to share the space and collaborate with other community groups and opportunities to seek additional funding to further improve the premises.

37.   During the applications assessment process, council staff identified that Basement Theatre Trust already has a community lease with council for the council-owned premises located at 321 Queen Street. This provides opportunities for co-ordination of activities and day to day management oversight.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.   Before granting a lease with a term of greater than six months, it is best practice to consult with iwi on the intent to grant a lease. Mana whenua consultation is a two-step engagement process which involves:

a.   A presentation at the Mana Whenua Forum to inform iwi of the proposed lease.

b.   written communication with mana whenua seeking feedback on the proposed lease and inviting iwi to a hui or a kaitiaki site visit.

39.  A presentation this proposal was made at the Central and South Mana Whenua Forum held on 26 June 2019. Iwi representatives in attendance did not raise any objections pertaining the proposed lease.

40.  Mana whenua requested that the local board install cigarette filters to the drains in the surrounding carpark accessed via Greys Avenue to stop any pollutants entering the waterways.

41.  Subject to the local board approving the recommendations of this report, formal mana whenua engagement will be undertaken on the proposal by way of an email to key representatives of iwi identified as having an interest in land in the Waitematā Local Board geographical area. The email will contain detailed information on the land classification, the group and lease details. Iwi representatives will be asked to comment on any spiritual, cultural or environmental impact with respect to the proposal.

42.  There are no changes to the use or operational activities being conducted on the land.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

43.     The cost of the public notification is approximately $800.00. This cost will be borne by the Community Facilities Department.

44.     Should there be a formal hearing required, this cost of the hearing will be borne by Local Board Services.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

45.     Basement Theatre Trust already has a community lease with council for the council-owned premises located at 321 Queen Street. It is suggested that the local board encourages Basement Theatre Trust to actively engage with independent artists and performers to use the space. In addition, the trust should be encouraged to maximise the amount of time the space is used as a rehearsal space rather than office space. This can be achieved by including specific measures in the community outcomes plan that is to be developed and attached to the proposed lease.

46.     As there is no significant change in the current land use or change in activities, there are no identified risks in granting the lease subject to the successful outcome of public notification.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

47.     Subject to the local board approving the recommendations of this report, council staff will place an advertisement in relevant newspapers to publicly notify the proposal. Subject to any submissions being satisfied following the public notification period and the successful outcome of iwi consultation, staff will work with the successful group to formalise the lease agreement.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan

163

b

Local Government Act sections

167

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tsz Ning Chung - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 



Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Temporary Alcohol Ban Request for Western Springs Stadium

File No.: CP2019/14654

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek a decision on whether to adopt a temporary alcohol ban for specified events at Western Springs Stadium for the 2019-2020 summer concert season.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To enable a decision on whether to adopt a temporary alcohol ban, staff have assessed the request against legislative criteria, and identified and assessed two options:

·    Option one (status quo) – rely on existing permanent alcohol bans, including bans at Grey Lynn town centre (24/7), Western Springs Lakeside park (10pm-7am), the Zoo carpark (10pm-7am), Pt Chevalier town centre (24/7), Western Springs Gardens (10pm-7am), Old Mill reserve (10pm-7am) and Pasadena reserve (10pm-7am) shown in Attachment B.

·     Option two (temporary alcohol ban) – apply a temporary alcohol ban for specified events at Western Springs Stadium during the 2019-2020 summer season for the areas shown in Attachment A, from 6am (concert day) to 6am (day after concert).

3.       Staff recommend the local board adopt Option two. Taking this approach is most likely to reduce disorder associated with specified events at Western Springs Stadium.

4.       Staff recommend Option two: temporary alcohol ban because:

·     there would likely be a high level of disorder associated with events in the absence of an alcohol ban

·     the disorder is of a type likely to be reduced by an alcohol ban

·     the duration and area are limited to the concert and nearby places to and from the concerts

·     the cost of implementation is justified by the effect.

5.       There is a risk that the Local Board could be perceived to have adopted an alcohol ban based on insufficient evidence. The risk of legal challenge is low and defendable.

6.       If a temporary alcohol ban is adopted, Auckland Tourism and Economic Events Development (ATEED) will be responsible for informing the public and organising signage. The New Zealand Police will be responsible for enforcement.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         adopt a temporary alcohol ban for events at Western Springs Stadium in the areas shown in Attachment A:

i)     on 17 and 28 November 2019, 11 and 18 January 2020 and 6 and 22 February 2020 (or any postponement dates)

ii)     from 6am on the day of the events to 6am on the day after the events

 

Horopaki

Context

Police have requested a temporary alcohol ban for events at Western Springs Stadium

7.       The New Zealand Police (Police) have requested a temporary alcohol ban (alcohol ban) at Western Springs Stadium (Attachment A). The area includes Western Springs Stadium, Western Springs Lakeside Park, Western Springs Outer Fields and surrounding streets. The alcohol ban requested would apply from 6am on the day of the concert, to 6am on the day after each concert.

8.       There are six concert events booked at Western Springs Stadium between November 2019 and February 2020:

·   Sunday 17 November 2019 (Friday Jams)

·   Thursday 28 November 2019

·   Saturday 11 January 2020

·   Saturday 18 January 2020

·   Thursday 6 February 2020

·   Saturday 22 February 2020 (Six60 concert).

9.       The streets surrounding the event perimeter at Western Springs Stadium are residential, with some shops, restaurants and cafés. The request seeks to prevent alcohol-related crime and disorder caused by concert attendees that could impact residents and other attendees as they travel to and from Western Springs Stadium. This is of particular concern during the walk between Western Springs Stadium and bus stops at Grey Lynn town centre.

10.     There are existing permanent alcohol bans over Grey Lynn town centre (24/7), Western Springs Lakeside park (10pm-7am), the Zoo carpark (10pm-7am), Pt Chevalier town centre (24/7), Old Mill reserve (10pm-7am), Western Springs Gardens (10pm-7am) and Pasadena reserve (10pm-7am). These existing areas are shown in Attachment B.

Alcohol bans prohibit alcohol, are adopted by local boards and enforced by the police

11.     Alcohol bans prohibit the consumption or possession of alcohol in specified public places during specified times. Alcohol bans do not apply to areas covered by a Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 Special Licence.

12.     The Waitematā Local Board has authority to make alcohol bans under the Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 (GB/2014/121).

13.     A Local Board decision to adopt an alcohol ban must meet criteria in the Local Government Act 2002 and Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 (refer Table 1 and Attachment C).

14.     Police enforce alcohol bans using powers of search, seizure, arrest and $250 infringement fees. Police also have powers to address incidents of crime or disorder under the Summary Offences Act 1981 and Crimes Act 1961, whether or not alcohol is involved.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Staff have assessed the request against assessment criteria

15.     Staff have assessed the information provided in the request against the legislative and bylaw criteria in Attachment C. Table 1 provides a summary of this assessment.

 

Table 1: Summary assessment of alcohol ban request against statutory and bylaw criteria

Criteria

Staff assessment

 

Is there evidence of a high-level of crime or disorder caused or made worse by alcohol consumed there?

Evidence shows that in the absence of a temporary alcohol ban the level of disorder in areas surrounding concerts at Western Springs Stadium can be high.

Someone opposed to the request may argue that there is insufficient evidence of a high-level of harm and it is unreasonable to assume this in the absence of an alcohol ban.

_

Is the request appropriate in light of the evidence?

An alcohol ban is likely to prevent the type of incidents associated with alcohol consumption before and after concerts at Western Springs Stadium. Police enforcement is also likely to be effective. The cost of signage is proportionate to its effect.

ü

Is the request proportionate in light of the evidence?

The requested area and duration of the temporary alcohol ban are limited to areas and times where people are likely to be drinking and disorder could occur.

ü

Is the request a justifiable and reasonable limitation on people’s rights and freedoms?

The request prevents responsible alcohol consumption in areas surrounding Western Springs Stadium before and after concerts, including at Western Springs Lakeside park. There is sufficient information to conclude that this limitation of rights or freedoms is justified, given:

·    the high level of disorder associated with concerts that a temporary alcohol ban is likely to prevent

·    its limited area and duration

·    general community and Police support

·    ability for event organisers to obtain special licences to sell alcohol at the event.

Someone opposed to the request may argue that there is insufficient evidence of a high-level of harm to justify limiting rights or freedoms.

_

Staff have identified two options in response to the assessment

16.     Staff have identified the following two options in response to the assessment. The options are compared in Table 2 below.

·   Option one (status quo) – rely on existing permanent alcohol bans, including bans at Grey Lynn town centre (24/7), Western Springs Lakeside park (10pm-7am), the Zoo carpark (10pm-7am), Pt Chevalier town centre (24/7), Western Springs Gardens (10pm-7am), Old Mill reserve (10pm-7am) and Pasadena reserve (10pm-7am) shown in Attachment B.

·   Option two (temporary alcohol ban) – temporary alcohol ban for specified events at Western Springs Stadium during the 2019-2020 summer season for the areas shown in Attachment A, from 6am (concert day) to 6am (day after concert).

Table 2: Comparative assessment of options to alcohol ban request

 

Option one: Status quo

Option two: temporary alcohol ban

Pros

No further limitations on people’s rights and freedoms to consume alcohol responsibly in public places surrounding the concert venue.

No implementation costs for public notification or signage.

Disorder associated with events likely to be prevented or reduced.

Better public perception of event safety and council.

Cons

High likelihood of disorder caused or made worse by people drinking alcohol on their way to and from the concert venue.

Implementation costs of public notification or signage to Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development.

Reduced freedom for those who wish to consume alcohol responsibly in public places surrounding the concert venue, including Western Springs Lakeside park.

Risks / Mitigation

Risk that Council is perceived to have allowed harm to occur.

 

Mitigation

Public communication that the local board considered an alcohol ban was not required.

Local Board perceived to have adopted an alcohol ban based on insufficient evidence.

 

Mitigation

Risk of legal challenge is low and defendable.

Staff recommend that the Waitematā Local Board adopt temporary alcohol ban

17.     Staff recommend Option two: temporary alcohol ban because:

·     there would likely be a high level of disorder associated with events in the absence of an alcohol ban

·     the disorder is of a type likely to be reduced by an alcohol ban

·     the duration and area are limited to the events and nearby places to and from the events

·     the cost of implementation is justified by the effect.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     Decisions related to the temporary alcohol ban impact the operations of Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development, and Auckland Stadiums, who are responsible for promoting the alcohol ban and associated signage. Council units are aware of these impacts and their implementation role.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The Waitematā Local Board adopted a temporary alcohol ban for previous events at Western Springs Stadium, including for Fat Freddies Drop, Six60 and Friday Night Jams in the 2018-2019 summer concert season (WTM/2018/156).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     Managing alcohol-related harm associated with events helps to promote health and wellbeing, which is consistent with the outcomes of the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau. Staff have consulted Iwi and Māori health advocacy organisations previously and they support the general use of alcohol bans as a tool to reduce alcohol-related harm.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     Auckland Stadiums are responsible for meeting implementation costs (public notification and signage). Police are responsible for compliance and enforcement costs.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     There is a risk with Option two (temporary alcohol ban) that the Local Board could be perceived to have adopted an alcohol ban based on insufficient evidence. The risk of legal challenge is however low and defendable.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

23.     Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development and Auckland Stadiums will be responsible for implementing the temporary alcohol ban for events.

24.     Auckland Stadiums will provide:

·     signage and a public notice to inform the public of the area, dates and times

·     notification letters informing all local businesses and residents of the alcohol ban.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Police request and proposed temporary alcohol ban area

175

b

Current permanent alcohol bans

177

c

Western Springs temporary alcohol ban assessment sheet

179

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Julia Harker - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Deborah Edwards - Senior Policy Manager

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

ATEED six-monthly report to the Waitematā Local Board

File No.: CP2019/15284

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides the Waitematā Local Board with highlights of ATEED’s activities in the Waitematā Local Board area as well as ATEED’s regional activities for the six months between 1 January to 30 June 2019.

 

2.       This report should be read in conjunction with ATEED’s Quarter 3 report to Auckland Council (available at www.aucklandnz.com) and the forthcoming Quarter 4 report to the Auckland Council CCO Finance and Performance Committee (available 17 September). Although these reports focus primarily on the breadth of ATEED’s work at a regional level, much of the work highlighted has significant local impact. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report provides the Waitematā Local Board with relevant information on the following ATEED activities:

·     Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI): Young Enterprise Scheme, Implementation of the City Fringe Local Economic Development Action Plan, Support for the Grey Lynn Business Association

·     supporting local business growth

·     filming activity

·     youth employment pathways

·     youth connections

·     offshore talent attraction

·     local and regional destination management and marketing

·     delivered, funded and facilitated events

 

4.       Further detail on these activities is listed under Analysis and Advice.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive ATEED’s update to the Waitematā Local Board – August 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       ATEED has two areas of focus:

Economic Development – including business support, business attraction and investment, local economic development, trade and industry development, skills employment and talent and innovation and entrepreneurship.

 

Destination - supporting sustainable growth of the visitor economy with a focus on destination marketing and management, major events, business events (meetings and conventions) and international student attraction and retention.

6.       These two portfolios also share a common platform relating to the promotion of the city globally to ensure that Auckland competes effectively with other mid-tier high quality of life cities.

7.       ATEED works with local boards, Governing Body and CCOs to support decision-making on local economic growth and facilitates or co-ordinates the delivery of local economic development activity. ATEED ensures that the regional activities that ATEED leads or delivers are fully leveraged to support local economic growth and employment.

8.       In addition, ATEED’s dedicated Local Economic Development (LED) team works with local boards who allocate locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget to economic development activities. The LED team delivers a range of services[2] such as the development of proposals, including feasibility studies that enable local boards to directly fund or otherwise advocate for the implementation of local initiatives.

9.       ATEED delivers its services at the local level through business hubs based in the north, west and south of the region, as well as its central office at 167B Victoria Street West.

10.     Additional information about ATEED’s role and activities can be found at www.aucklandnz.com/ateed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     As at 30 June[3], 3303 businesses had been through an ATEED intervention or programme. Of these, 1145 businesses were in the Waitematā Local Board area – 411 businesses went through Destination-related programmes and 734 businesses went through Economic Development-related programmes.

Economic Development

Locally Driven Initiatives:

12.     Young Enterprise Scheme: The Auckland Chamber of Commerce has delivered the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) since January 2018. ATEED maintains a strategic role. Payment was made to the Chamber during Q3. During the period, there were 58 schools participating in the Auckland YES programme, representing 1376 students completing the programme. ACG Parnell College, Auckland Girls’ Grammar School, St Mary’s College Ponsonby and Western Springs College are the four schools from the Waitematā Local Board area participating in the YES programme.

13.     Implementation of the City Fringe Local Economic Development Action Plan: During Q4, the Local Board approved funding for the development of a WebApp following the receipt of a proposal from the Business Associations. A funding agreement was entered into, with the Newmarket Business Association as the lead for the project. The grant funding was paid and received by the Business Association during Q4.

14.     Support for the Grey Lynn Business Association: The grant was paid in Q1 and reporting then became the responsibility of the Grey Lynn Business Association.

Supporting Local Business Growth

15.     This area is serviced by the Business and Enterprise team in ATEED’s central office, located at 167B Victoria Street West. The team comprises of two Business and Innovation Advisors and administration support. The role of this team is to support the growth of Auckland’s key internationally competitive sectors and to support to provide quality jobs.

16.     A key programme in achieving this is central government’s Regional Business Partnership Network (RBPN). This is delivered by ATEED’s nine Business and Innovation Advisors (BIA), whose role is to connect local businesses to resources, experts and services in innovation, R&D, business growth and management. 

17.     ATEED’s BIAs engage 1:1 with businesses through a discovery meeting to understand their challenges, gather key data, and provide connections / recommendations via an action plan.

18.     Where businesses qualify (meet the programme criteria and/or align to ATEED’s purpose as defined in the SOI) the advisors facilitate government support to qualifying businesses, in the form of:

·   Callaghan Innovation R&D grants (including Getting Started, project and student grants (https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/grants)

·   Callaghan Innovation subsidised innovation programmes

(https://www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz/innovation-skills)

·   RBPN business capability vouchers (NZTE), where the business owner may be issued co-funding up to $5,000 per annum for business training via registered service providers. Voucher co-funding is prioritised to businesses accessing this service for the first time, in order to encourage more businesses to engage with experts to assist their management and growth.

·   NZTE services such as Export Essentials (https://workshop.exportessentials.nz/register/)

·   Referrals to NZ Business Mentors via The Chamber of Commerce.

 

19.     During the reporting period, ATEED Business and Innovation Advisors met with 148 businesses in the Waitematā Local Board area, 26 for innovation advice and services and 125 for business growth and capability advice and services (23 were returning clients). From these engagements:

·   One hundred and ten RBPN vouchers were issued to assist with business capability training

·   Eighty-five connections were made to Callaghan Innovation services and programmes

·   Thirty-six referrals were made to Business Mentors New Zealand

·   Seventy-three connections were made to ATEED staff and programmes

·   More than 600 connections were made to other businesses or programmes.

 

Other support for new businesses

20.     During the period, ATEED also ran workshops and events aimed at establishing or growing a new business and building capability. Twenty-five people from the Waitematā Local Board area attended an event below:

·   Starting off Right workshop - 4

·   Business clinic – 16

·   Innovation clinic - 5.

 


 

 

Filming activity within the Waitematā Local Board area

21.     ATEED’s Screen Auckland team provides film facilitation services as part of ATEED’s support for the screen and digital sector of Auckland’s economy. Screen Auckland facilitates, processes and issues film permits for filming activity in public open space. This activity supports local businesses and employment, as well as providing a revenue stream to local boards for the use of local parks.

22.     Between 1 January and 30 June 2019, 305 film permits were issued in the Auckland region across 379 locations and 404 days of filming. Of these, 68 permits were issued in the Waitematā Local Board area – the highest in the Auckland region. The Waitematā Local Board area’s share of film permit revenue was $7,623.19 for the period (total for all boards combined was $51,191.30).

23.     On average, 37 crew work on each shoot day. This does not reflect filming that also takes place in studios, private property or low impact activity that wouldn’t have required a permit. During the period, 81 permits were issued for TV commercials (TVC), making up 27 per cent of permits issued. A quarter of the TVC permits were destined for an international market.

24.     Some of the key film productions that were issued permits to film in the Waitematā Local Board area were:

·    Ablaze (TV feature)

·    Baby, Done (feature film)

·    Falling Inn Love (feature film)

·    Jonah, The Untold Story (TV feature)

·    Only Cloud Knows (feature film)

·    Power Rangers

·    Take Home Pay (feature Film)

 

25.     Auckland is becoming a popular destination for international television networks to pilot an episode of a new TV series to allow them to gauge if a series will be successful. Permits were issued for locations across the Auckland region earlier this year for two new US pilots.

 

Youth employment pathways

26.     The Go with Tourism campaign was successfully launched on 5 April, attracting 170 employers and more than 700 youth by year-end. The campaign is designed to shift perceptions many young people have about careers in tourism and address the skills gap in the industry.

27.     ATEED delivered the Future Ready Summit on 26 June at the Vodafone Events Centre in Manukau. Approximately 250 employers, 40 young people and 20 speakers (eight under the age of 24). The Youth Employer Pledge partners were the primary audience. The Future Ready Auckland: Driving economic development through technology and transformation insights paper was also released, attracting strong media attention - including a lead story on Radio NZ Nine to Noon.  The research insights aims to better understand Auckland’s future skill needs, including future growth sectors. ATEED is currently working with pledge partners to harness the network, with a focus on south and west Auckland now that Youth Connections has transferred to The Southern Initiative.

 

Local Jobs and Skills Hubs

28.     ATEED is the regional partner for the network of Auckland Jobs and Skills Hubs. These multi-agency hubs support employers at developments where there is a high and sustained demand for local labour and skills development. The Auckland network includes Ara (Auckland Airport development), City Centre and Tāmaki hubs. As at 30 June, 377 people had been placed into employment via the ATEED-facilitated City Centre hub, 1,914 training outcomes were delivered, and 11 apprenticeships were facilitated. About 36 per cent of those employed are Māori, against a target of 40 per cent. ATEED has developed a school engagement pilot programme with interested employers and schools aimed at engaging students with career opportunities in the construction and infrastructure sector. ATEED also provided funding to a Progressive Employment Programme for at-risk youth, supporting cadet training and developing youth-ready capability within businesses working on the City Rail Link. The City Centre hub is a training partner for this programme.

 

Offshore talent attraction

29.     The Auckland. We’re Hiring campaign ran from January to March 2019. The campaign is designed to attract high-skilled offshore construction and technology talent to Auckland. The campaign resulted in 2295 job applications.

 

Destination

Local destination management and marketing activity

30.     International Consumer and Trade Marketing - Australian consumer and trade marketing programme (winter, shoulder focus), Travelport Campaign - see Trade Story Telling Word doc for further details

31.     Explored the feasibility of establishing and operating a Māori/Polynesian cultural centre for Auckland, to recognise and celebrate mana whenua relationships with the Waitematā and the wider Pacific.

32.     ATEED’s Destination Innovation team developed tourism cluster initiatives across the region. The goal is to support the clusters to grow capability in order to ensure that programmes are developed in preparation for Auckland’s mega year of events in 2021.

 

Regional destination management and marketing activity

33.     The Elemental AKL winter festival website went live on 29 April. The festival ran from 1-31 July and is developed to promote sustainable tourism growth by encouraging visitation more evenly throughout the year, and dispersing visitors across the region. The programme included more than 60 free and ticketed events across the themes of light, food, entertainment, and culture. Elemental Feast went live on 4 June, with 120 restaurants participating in plating up unique festival dishes using ingredients sourced from the Auckland region and inspired by the elements. Forty-seven of these events were held in the central city.

34.     ATEED also provided funding towards the delivery of the NUKU live event as part of the Elemental AKL programme. Nuku Live is a wahine empowerment wananga, focused on empowering indigenous women through storytelling and workshops that express the creativity of indigenous women in Tāmaki Makaurau.

35.     The Short Break campaign, aimed at leisure travellers on Australia’s eastern seaboard, ran during Q3 and Q4. There were three bursts of the campaign, focused on themes of nature, food and wine, and ultimate things to do in Auckland featuring different parts of the region. As part of the campaign, ATEED hosted news.com.au and lifestyle.com.au in Auckland, showcasing the city’s unique offering that is promoted in the campaign. News.com.au has a reach of six million and will produce a dedicated feature on Auckland as well as share one article on Facebook with their 1.1m followers. Lifestyle.com.au has a reach of 1.2m unique viewers and will produce two dedicated online features.

 

Delivered, funded and facilitated events

36.     During the period, ATEED delivered the 2019 Auckland Lantern Festival at the Auckland Domain. Customer satisfaction was 89 per cent, an increase of nine per cent compared to the previous year. Some key findings from the customer survey found that respondents were very positive about what the event meant for the city, with 96 per cent of respondents agreeing that Auckland Council should continue to support events like the Lantern Festival and 94 per cent saying that the event brought people from different ethnic and cultural groups together (compared to 95 per cent and 91 per cent respectively in the previous year). The Auckland Lantern Festival’s sustainability objectives through the Cultural Festivals Strategy resulted in 62 per cent of waste being diverted from landfill. This has nearly doubled in two years, with the diversion being 34 per cent in 2017.

37.     Given the need to prioritise police resourcing following the events in Christchurch on 15 March, the 2019 Pasifika festival, which was due to run on 23 and 24 March, was cancelled. Although the festival would have been an opportunity to bring Auckland’s communities together at a time of national mourning, given the unprecedented nature of what happened and after discussions with the New Zealand Police, it was agreed that Police must prioritise resourcing to ensure the safety of communities across the city.

38.     During the period, residents of the Waitematā Local Board area were also able to enjoy events funded or facilitated by ATEED across the Auckland region, including the ASB Classic, Splore Music and Arts Festival, Sculpture on the Gulf, the New Zealand Comedy Festival, the Auckland Writers Festival, the Auckland Art Fair, Warhorse, and Auckland Wine Week.

39.     A full schedule of major events is available on ATEED’s website, aucklandnz.com.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     ATEED assesses and manages our initiatives on a case-by-case basis and engages with the Council group where required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     Local Board views are not sought for the purposes of this report. Local Board views were sought for some of the initiatives described in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds to any impact that our initiatives may have on Māori on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

43.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with our initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     ATEED will provide the next six-monthly report to the Local Board in February 2020 and will cover the period 1 July to 31 December 2019.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Samantha-Jane Miranda - Operational Strategy Advisor (ATEED)

Authorisers

Quanita Khan - Manager Operational Strategy and Planning (ATEED)

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for quarter four 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/15154

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Waitematā Quarter Four Work Programme update (1 April to 30 June 2019) as set out in Attachment A, and overall performance against the agreed 2018/2019 work programme for the financial year ending 30 June 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Waitematā Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2018/2019 financial year.

3.       Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

4.       126 activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Seven activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred and 30 activities have not progressed as expected during 2018/2019.

5.       Key activities from the 2018/2019 work programme include:

Activity

WP Ref

Update

Q1 RAG

Q2 RAG

Q3 RAG

Q4 RAG

254 Ponsonby Road, Ponsonby Park develop civic park space (One Local Initiative)

2867

This activity is in progress and on track for delivery FY21

 

 

 

 

Myers Park Caretakers Cottage and shed - renew and restore

2042

This activity has been deferred for further investigation and scope.

 

 

 

 

Parnell Baths - comprehensive renewal

2043

This activity has been completed

 

 

 

 

Pt Erin Pool - comprehensive renewal

2046

This activity is in progress (multi-year)

 

 

 

 

Salisbury Park - improve entranceway

2060

This activity has been completed

 

 

 

 

Grey Lynn Park - develop new changing rooms

2065

This activity is in progress and on track for delivery FY20

 

 

 

 

Elam Street - renew walkway

3136

This activity is in progress and on track for delivery FY20

 

 

 

 

Waitematā - Urban Forest Restoration

2788

This activity is in progress and on track for delivery FY20

 

 

 

 

Waitematā - Western Springs native bush restoration plan

3308

This activity is on hold until the outcome of the quasi-judicial process is determined.

 

 

 

 

Western Springs Bush Restoration - develop pathways

2789

This activity is on hold until the outcome of the quasi-judicial process is determined.

 

 

 

 

Additional hours to network standard: Central Library - Waitematā

2108

This activity has been completed

 

 

 

 

City play network assessment

366

This activity is in progress and will be completed Q1 FY20

 

 

 

 

The Parnell Plan

1436

This activity has been completed

 

 

 

 

 

6.       The 2018/2019 financial performance report is attached, but under confidential cover. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – expected to be made public 30 September 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter four (1 April to 30 June 2019) and overall performance against the agreed 2018/2019 local board work programme for the financial year ending 30 June 2019.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2018/2019 are released to the NZX which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Waitematā Local Board has an approved 2018/2019 work programme for the following operating departments:

·          Community Services: Arts, Community and Events, Parks, Sport and Recreation, Libraries and Information and Service, Strategy and Integration

·          Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew; and Community Leases

·          Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·          Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development: Local Economic Development

·          Plans and Places.

 

8.       Work programmes are produced annually, to meet the outcomes identified in the three-year Waitematā Local Board Plan. The 2017 local board plan outcomes are:

·          Outcome 1: Inclusive communities that are vibrant, healthy and connected

·          Outcome 2: Attractive and versatile public places that meet our communities’ needs

·          Outcome 3: The natural environment is valued, protected and enhanced

·          Outcome 4: A high-quality built environment that embraces our heritage

·          Outcome 5: An accessible, connected and safe transport network with well-designed streets

·          Outcome 6: An innovative, productive and resilient local economy.

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet the local board plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board and project funded by the Transport Capital Fund, are not captured in this graph.

 

Graph 1: work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Overall performance against the Waitematā Local Board 2018/2019 work programme

10.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity.

11.     It shows the percentage of work programme activities by RAG status as follows:

·    Green: activities that have been delivered as expected or will be completed by the end of July 2019 or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned

·    Amber: activities which are in progress but will be completed by the end of quarter one FY20, or with issues that are being managed or are part of multi-year activity which has not progressed as expected for FY19

·    Red: activities in progress but will not be completed by the end of quarter one FY20, activities put on hold or activities not delivered

·    Grey: activities that have been cancelled, deferred or merged.

 

 

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

 

12.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each department’s work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

 

13.     The table below shows the overall performance of work programme activities (RAG status and activity status by work programme).

Table 1: End of year Local Board Work Programmes Status

RAG Status

Activity Status

ACE

PSR

Libraries

SS&I

CF

Leases

I&ES

P&P

ATEED

Green

Completed

24

7

8

-

24

9

8

1

3

In progress

1

1

-

2

36

-

1

-

-

Amber

In progress

5

2

-

-

9

-

-

-

-

Red

In progress

1

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

On Hold

-

-

-

-

10

1

-

-

-

Not delivered

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Grey

Deferred

-

-

-

-

1

6

-

-

-

Cancelled

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

 

Key activity achievements from the 2018/2019 work programme

14.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2018/2019 include:

·    Ponsonby Park - develop civic park space (ID 2867)

This is the local board’s One Local Initiative (OLI), which was approved as part of the 10-year Budget process.  The project is on track and a resolution from Environment and Community Committee on 4 December 2018 has confirmed the whole land parcel at 254 Ponsonby Road can be developed as civic space.  The project is now proceeding to a Detailed Business Case and design. 

·    Parnell Baths - comprehensive renewal (ID 2043)

The physical works, including new plant and concourse, were completed and the facility re-opened on 1 December 2018. The works had no impact on operating performance. The Baths hosted a series of successful events, including inflatable days, water polo training sessions, freediving and school triathlon training

·    Salisbury Reserve - improve entranceway (ID 2060) and Masonic Lodge Hall - demolish and remove (ID 3100)

This project was successfully completed in June 2019. 

·    Grey Lynn Park - develop new changing rooms (ID 2065)

The design of the new facility was approved by the local board in May 2019 and the relevant consents have been granted.  The physical works are planned to start following completion of Richmond Rover Rugby League winter season (September/October 2019).

·    Elam Street - renew walkway (ID 3136)

The foundations have been laid on site and the staircases are being installed. Physical works will be completed August 2019.

·    Albert Park - renew cottage (ID 2886) and Albert Park - renew band rotunda (ID 3012)

The successful renewal of these two important heritage places was completed in November 2018.

·    The Parnell Plan (ID 1436)

The Parnell Plan has been published and a well-attended launch party was held on 26 June 2019. On-going plan implementation monitoring is under way and progress will be reported annually to the local board.

·    City play network assessment (ID 366)

A draft plan with high-level recommendations was presented to the local board and some amendments were requested. A final version of the plan will be presented for adoption by the local board in September 2019.

15.     Key projects which have not progressed as expected include:

·    Western Springs native bush restoration plan (ID 3308)

The resource consent granted by independent commissioners has been appealed to the Environment Court.  Subject to the outcome of the Environment Court mediation/ hearing the pine tree removal works is currently scheduled to occur in February or March 2020 with the removal of the pine trees and the seedling planting expected to take approximately six weeks


 

·    Western Springs Bush Restoration - develop pathways (ID 2789)

This project is currently on hold as it is contingent on the outcome of the Environment Court decision regarding the bush restoration project above.  A public consultation process will also be undertaken.

·    Myers Park Caretakers Cottage and shed - renew and restore (ID 2042)

Heritage and seismic assessments for the cottage have been completed. Costings for the building renewal are being prepared by an external consultant. This information will be discussed with the leasing team to investigate a potential end usage for the facility and brought to the local board for direction.

Overview of work programme performance by department

Arts, Community and Events work programme

16.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 25 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), five activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber) and one activity that is in progress but significantly delayed (red). Activities that are delayed are set out in the table below.

 

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

863 Community-led placemaking: Waitematā community empowerment initiatives

Amber

In progress

The budget was not fully allocated during the financial year. Unspent budget will be carried forward to 2019/2020 to deliver community projects such as the Te Maata Community Garden partnership funding of coordinator role. This will come back to the local board for a decision. 

866 Increase diverse community participation: children and youth voice

Amber

In progress

The budget was not fully allocated in the financial year.  A provider has been engaged to deliver a series of events for youth across Waitematā which should commence Q1 FY 20.

1226 Community Disaster Resilience Building

Amber

In progress

A series of workshops were scheduled to be delivered in Q4 FY19 but will now be delivered in Q1 FY20 due to community centre availability.

1540 Build capacity: responsiveness to emerging needs and issues of Waitematā’s homeless community

Amber

In progress

The budget was fully allocated for the financial year, however the $8000 allocation to the Heart of the City Guardians programme was subsequently funded by central government.  Alternative homelessness projects are being explored with recommendations to come to the local board in Q1 2019/2020, and the budget will be carried forward to 2019/2020 for this purpose.

The volunteer training was delayed until Q1 2020.

 

2452 Future governance and management options for Ellen Melville Centre

Amber

In progress

This initiative has been delayed. It is proposed to advance it in Q4 with a focus on reviewing the progress of the facility through the first two years of operation, to seek customer and stakeholder feedback on the current operation, as a guide to future governance and operational options.

867 Local Māori Responsiveness Action Plan

Red

In progress

Due to delays in sourcing a suitable contractor this programme will be completed in 2019/2020. Staff worked with the contractor to finalise a required report and the scope of work which will include a stocktake of Māori organisations and an overview of mana whenua and mataawaka activities in the local board area. The report will identify gaps and provide recommendations.

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

17.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 60 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), nine activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), 12 activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and one activity that has been deferred in quarter four (grey).  Activities that are delayed or deferred are set out in the table below.

 

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

2042 Myers Park Caretakers Cottage and shed - renew and restore

Grey

Deferred

The project has been deferred until the costs for the building renewal is known – currently being prepared by an external consultant.

2048 Waitematā - renew paving, courts and car park FY17

Amber

In progress

Physical works at Victoria Park were completed in June 2019.  The local board to agree on the design of the shared space signage and required signs will then be installed.

2062 Waitematā - LDI Minor Capex Fund 2018/19

Amber

In progress

14 per cent of the LDI minor capex fund was spent FY19, towards the cost of the Ponsonby Community Centre shade sail. The balance of the fund will be carried forward to FY20. Recommendations for new minor assets in the local board area will be discussed at a workshop for the local board to consider and prioritise.

2769 Newmarket Park - install park signage

Amber

In progress

A preliminary design is being developed and will be provided to the local board for review.

2973

Waitematā - Parks Improvement Projects - LDI

Amber

In progress

Several new projects were approved by the local board in December 2017 and the scheduled delivery for each of these projects will be confirmed in early FY20.

3008 Highwic House - renew roads and car parks

Amber

In progress

This project was delayed due to consent and a Heritage New Zealand requirement to carry out archaeological investigation.

3056 Studio One - Artstation - refurbish roof to fix leak

Amber

In progress

Work to address and rectify water ingress and repair affected wall and ceiling is currently underway.

3080 Heritage Foreshore - interpretation panels

Amber

In progress

The content to be displayed online will be confirmed with the local board and once confirmed the content will be delivered.

3231 Central Library - renew boiler

Amber

In progress

Works are expected to be completed by September 2020.

2028 Basque Park - renew and upgrade park assets

Red

In progress

The proposed investigation into options for renewing and upgrading park assets was on hold to awaiting the finding of a concept plan being funded in FY20

2047 St Stephens Cemetery - renew walkway

Red

On hold

This project is on hold pending a decision on stormwater disposal options and Heritage New Zealand consent.

2066 Olympic Pool - improve acoustics in main pool

Red

On hold

Recent condition assessment conducted revealed that there were more urgent works to be undertaken e.g. Boiler, Domestic Hot Water Cylinder and Pool Hoist then to improve acoustics. The items mentioned are critical to operations.  The proposed change in scope to be workshopped with the local board to seek further direction prior to physical works being undertaken

2067 Olympic Pool - replace main pool sparge line

Red

On Hold

Due to urgent repairs required for the spa and other facilities which were critical to the operations of the pool, funds have been redirected to attend to these projects.

2789 Western Springs Bush Restoration - develop pathways

Red

On hold

Investigation and design phase for the path development is awaiting removal of the pine trees. Tree removal is currently scheduled to occur in February to March 2020. (refer 3308)

2905 Waitematā - renew utilities and furniture FY17

Red

On hold

The renewal of the water fountains at Western Springs will wait until the design review of the park is complete (once the development plan has been adopted by the local board) as was suggested for the sign renewal within the park.

2993 Albert Park - development - stage 4

Red

On hold

The project scope has changed and is on hold due to the need for resource consent and direction from the local board.

3017 Coxs Bay - reinstate pathway - stage 3 - Parawai Crescent section

Red

In progress

The design has been reviewed to avoid the need for an extensive retaining wall and associated costs. An agreement with the adjoining property owner is required.

3047 Albert Park - reinstate Zig Zag track FY17

Red

In progress

All necessary consents are in place including engineering and resource consent, Heritage New Zealand Authority to Modify and Iwi approval. The budget allocation is being used to complete the central desire line path consented in conjunction with the Zig Zag track project.

3115 Pt Erin Pool - replace playground

Red

On hold

This project is on hold to ensure it is undertaken as part of a wider comprehensive renewals programme.

3308 Waitematā - Western Springs native bush restoration plan

Red

On hold

The resource consent has been appealed to the Environment Court.  Subject to the outcome of that process the earliest time tree removal can occur is February to March 2020.

3358 Western Springs - Develop Seddon Fields Greenway

Red

On hold

The project is currently on hold until a decision is made about the location of the greenway in Q1 FY20.

 

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

18.     Both activities in the Service Strategy and Integration work programme were completed by the end of the year (green).

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

19.     All nine activities in the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019.

Libraries and Information work programme

20.     All eight activities in the Libraries and Information work programme, were completed by the end of the year (green).

Local Economic Development work programme

21.     The three activities in the Local Economic Development work programme were completed by the end of the year.


 

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

22.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR) work programme, there are eight activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green) and two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber). Activities that are delayed are set out in the table below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

366 WTM: City play network assessment

Amber

In progress

The draft plan has been workshopped with the local board and changes will be made ahead of the proposed adoption in September 2019.

491 WTM: Local Implementation Plan of the Ngahere (Urban Forest) Strategy

Amber

In progress

The draft Ngahere local assessment report has been completed for review by the local board at a workshop in July. Based on the feedback a final report will be prepared for adoption at the September 2019 business meeting.

 

Plans and Places work programme

23.     In the Plans and Places work programme, the Parnell Plan was successfully delivered.

Community Leases work programme

24.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are nine leases that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2019 (green), one lease is on hold (red) and seven leases have been cancelled or deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities that are on hold, cancelled or deferred are set out in the table below.

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

1325

Sea Scout Den, 55 West End Road, Herne Bay: Lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand - Hawke Sea Scouts

Grey

Deferred

Leasing staff are seeking advice regarding the Esplanade Reserve classification to progress the lease.

2658 Auckland Domain 100 Stanley St Parnell: Lease to Auckland Bowling Club Incorporated

Grey

Deferred

Leases staff need to undertake a site visit prior to progressing the lease.

2662

124 Wellington Street: New lease Auckland Playcentres Association Inc - Franklin Road

Grey

Deferred

Staff to assess application received for new lease and will workshop this with the local board

2663 Heard Park; 192 Parnell Rd, Parnell: Lease to Royal New Zealand Plunket Society Incorporated

Grey

Deferred

This item cannot be progressed until the building renovation and alteration works are completed.  The local board has allocated a renewal budget as part of the FY20 work programme.

2667 Grey Lynn Park; 55-61 Elgin Street, Grey Lynn: Lease Renewal Richmond Rovers Rugby League Club Inc

Grey

Deferred

Lease is subject to building works under the lease terms. Staff to follow up with club regarding progress on the urgent building works

2670

Albert Park; 33-43 Princes Street, Auckland: No current lease – “Albert Park Caretakers Cottage”

Grey

Cancelled

This item is no longer a community leasing item due to the implications of the Auckland Improvement Trust Act.

3287 313 Queen Street, Auckland: No current lease

Grey

Deferred

Staff have workshopped this lease with the local board and a business meeting report will go to the local board's August 2019 business meeting.

2665 Bayfield Park; 10 West End Road, Herne Bay: Renewal and variaton Herne Bay Ponsonby Racquets Club Inc

Red

On hold

This item is placed on hold pending discussions between Parks Sports and Recreation and the club regarding loan expiry date. This may result in requiring a variation to the lease expiry date.

Deferred activities

25.     As part of the local board funding policy, activities funded through the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operating fund that were not delivered in 2018/2019 will be deferred into 2019/2020 work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     This report informs the Waitematā Local Board of the performance for quarter ending 30 June 2019 and the performance for the 2018/2019 financial year.

28.  Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     A number of the key projects set out in this report have involved direct engagement with iwi and the projects themselves have been refined as a result of this engagement.  For example the Western Springs Te Wai Ōrea Development Plan which first featured in the 2017/2018 work programme involved consultation with iwi for direction, the Parnell Plan has been refined through iwi involvement and the Te Ha o Hine Place signage content was developed in partnership with Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei.

30.     The Waitematā Local Board will continue to ensure mana whenua have input into local board projects and that projects are refined in response to this valued input.

31.     The Waitematā Local Board supports the use of traditional iwi names and dual names for public spaces as a standard approach to Māori responsiveness and to reflect the history of the local board area.

32.     Mana whenua customary practices continue to be embedded into the events for the local board’s projects such as the Good Citizen’s Awards event and the launch of the Parnell Plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     This report is provided to enable the Waitematā Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2018/2019 work programmes and to report this to the public. This report is for information only and therefore there are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

34.     Auckland Council currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H.

35.     These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX which is expected to be made public on 30 September.

36.     Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to this quarterly report is under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

38.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Deferral of budgets of unfinished activities will be added into 2019/2020 work programmes by quarter one reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Quarter 4 FY19 Work Programme Update

209

b

Waitematā Financial Performance Report (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Simon Tattersfield - Senior Local Board Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 



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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2018/2019

File No.: CP2019/14288

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2018/2019 Annual Report for the Waitematā Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 26 September 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2018/2019 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      adopt the 2018/2019 Waitematā Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A.

b)      note that any proposed changes will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body by 26 September 2019.

c)      note that the draft 2018/2019 Waitematā Local Board Annual Report (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report) will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2018/2019 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 30 September 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities, and the overall Financial Impact Statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

6.       Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the NZX Debt Market (quoted bonds) maintained by NZX Limited. As a result, the council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules (listing rules) and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA). Under these obligations, local boards may not release annual financial results in any form, including publishing their agenda/minutes containing their results, until council group results are released to the NZX on 27 September 2019.  Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi relates to the local board area.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area, summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved.

Funding information

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

8.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

10.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

11.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English, and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2018/2019 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2019

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 26 September 2019

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 27 September 2018

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2019.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2018/2019 Waitematā Local Board Annual Report (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

David Gurney - Manager Corporate Performance & Reporting

Authorisers

Kevin Ramsay - General Manager Corporate Finance and Property

Victoria Villaraza - Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback on Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing draft report

 

File No.: CP2019/14353

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the local board to receive the decision made under urgency to provide feedback on the Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing draft report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Central Government has asked the Commission to undertake an inquiry into local government funding and financing and, where shortcomings in the current system are identified, to examine options and approaches for improving the system.

3.       The Commission’s issues paper was released on 6 November 2018. The Waitematā Local Board provided informal feedback on the issues paper (Attachment C).

4.       On 4 July 2019, the Commission released its draft report relating to the inquiry into local government funding and financing.

5.       Local boards were invited to provide views and feedback on the draft report by 29 July 2019, which will be taken into consideration into draft council’s submission.

6.       The Finance and Performance Committee will consider the Auckland Council submission at its 20 August 2019 meeting.

7.       As the Waitematā Local Board’s next scheduled business meeting was not until the 20 August 2019, the local board could not resolve on their feedback by the deadline. Therefore, the agreed urgent decision process was followed (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the urgent decision dated 29 July 2019

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback on the Productivity Commision inquiry into local government funding and financing

247

b

Waitematā Local Board feedback on Productivity Commission inquiry into local government funding and financing draft report

251

c

Waitematā Local Board informal feedback on Productivity Commision Issues Paper

255

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Simon Tattersfield - Senior Local Board Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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20 August 2019

 

 

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20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback on Ministry of Transport's proposal to introduce a Clean Car Standard and Clean Car Discount

 

File No.: CP2019/14898

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the local board to receive the decision made under urgency to provide feedback on The Ministry of Transport’s proposal to introduce a Clean Car Standard and Clean Car Discount 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Central Government is looking to take action to protect our climate by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and aim to prioritise transport emissions reductions, which are the fastest growing source of emissions in New Zealand, accounting for nearly 20% of all CO2 greenhouse gases produced.

 

3.       This includes significantly improving the fuel efficiency, and thereby reducing the emissions, of light vehicles as they account for nearly 70% of all transport emissions. Central Government seeks meaningful change to reduce vehicle emissions by introducing a Clean Car Standard and Clean Car Discount, which would apply to all new and used light vehicles first registered in New Zealand after 2021.

 

4.       The Ministry of Transport produced a discussion document designed to seek feedback on these two proposals to reduce emissions in the light vehicle fleet (cars, SUVs, utes, vans, light trucks). 

 

5.       Auckland Council provided a draft submission on the two proposals for local boards to provide feedback on by 8 August 2019.

 

6.       The Auckland Council draft submission will be considered by the Environment and Community Committee on 13 August 2019. The final deadline for submissions to Central Government is 20 August 2019.

 

7.       As the Waitematā Local Board’s next scheduled business meeting was not until the 20 August 2019, the local board could not resolve on their feedback by the deadline. Therefore, the agreed urgent decision process was followed.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the urgent decision dated 8 August 2019 as set out in Attachment A of this report.

 

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Board feedback on The Ministry of Transport's proposal to introduce a Clean Car Standard and Clean Car Discount

263

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Heather Skinner - Local Board Advisor Waitematā Local Board

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Waitematā Local Board feedback on the proposed Auckland Council Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2019 and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015.

File No.: CP2019/14365

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Waitematā Local Board’s feedback on the proposed Auckland Council Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2019 and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015.

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Act 2002 requires council to review its bylaws to determine whether they are effective, efficient and still needed.

3.       The Regulatory Committee completed a review of The Te Ture ā Rohe Para Māro 2012, Auckland Council Solid Waste Bylaw 2012 in March 2019 and gave directions to prepare a new bylaw about waste.

4.       The purpose of the bylaw is to set rules to manage and minimise waste, protect public health and safety and manage litter and nuisance. The bylaw also provides operational controls for the separation, placement and collection of waste and disposal of waste to cleanfills and managed fills.

5.       A Statement of Proposal containing a new Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2019 was adopted for public consultation. Amendments to the Auckland Council Trading and Events in Public Spaces Bylaw 2015 were also proposed to better align with the requirements of the proposed new bylaw.

6.       At the 21 May 2019 business meeting, the Waitematā Local Board received the Waste Bylaw Statement of Proposal and delegated authority to the Environment and Infrastructure Portfolio lead and co-portfolio holder to provide feedback on behalf of the local board (resolution number WTM/2019/93).

7.       The Hearings Panel received local board input at a session held on 26 July 2019. Waitematā Local Board’s feedback was presented to the panel by Member Richard Northey and Chair Pippa Coom.

8.       The Hearing Panel will now deliberate and make recommendations to the Governing Body.   A final decision on any new bylaw and amendments will be made on 22 August 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)   receive the Waitematā Local Board feedback on the proposed Auckland Council Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2019 and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Board feedback on the proposed Auckland Council Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2019 and amendments to the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015.

271

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Heather Skinner - Local Board Advisor Waitematā Local Board

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback to Auckland Council's submission on the Kāinga Ora-Homes and Communities Bill

 

File No.: CP2019/13018

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the local board to receive the decision made under urgency to provide feedback on Auckland Council’s submission to the government’s proposed Kāinga Ora-Homes and Communities Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill (the Bill) was introduced to Parliament on 31 May 2019. The Bill establishes Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities as a new Crown entity bringing together Housing New Zealand Corporation (HNZC), HLC (Homes. Land. Community.) and the KiwiBuild Unit of the Ministry for Housing and Urban Development.

3.       The Bill is the first of two pieces of legislation applying to the new entity. A further Bill is expected in the third quarter of this year which will set out the powers that Kāinga Ora-Homes and Communities can assume to enable it to undertake urban development in specified development areas.

4.       At its 2 July 2019 meeting, the Planning Committee approved a draft submission to the Bill “subject to receiving input from local boards which will be appended to the submission”.

5.       The final deadline to receive local board feedback to be appended to the Auckland Council submission was 9 July 2019.

6.       As the Waitematā Local Board’s next scheduled business meeting was not until the 16 July 2019, the local board could not resolve on their feedback by the deadline therefore, the agreed urgent decision process was followed.

7.       Due to timing constraints with the closing of the agenda for the 16 July 2019 business meeting, this urgent decision report was scheduled to be received at the 20 August 2019 business meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the urgent decision dated 8 July 2019

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Board's feedback to council's submission on Kainga Ora-Homes and Communities Bill

279

 


 

 

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Corina Claps - Senior Local Board Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback to Auckland Council's submission on proposed Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill

 

File No.: CP2019/13032

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the local board to receive the decision made under urgency to provide feedback on Auckland Council’s submission to the government’s proposed Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The proposed Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill was developed in January 2018 as part of a global effort under the Paris Agreement to limit the global average temperature increase to 1.5° Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

3.       Originally the Zero Carbon Bill was to be a separate piece of legislation, however it now will be introduced as an amendment to the current Climate Change Response Act 2002. The amendment is to ensure all key climate legislation is encompassed within one Act.

4.      A draft submission from Auckland Council and CCOs was prepared with input across council departments, CCOs and discussions with mana whenua.

5.       Local boards were invited to provide feedback by 10 July 2019, for it to be appended to the council’s submission.

6.       The Environment and Community Committee endorsed the draft Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill at its meeting on 10 July 2019.

7.       As the Waitematā Local Board’s next scheduled business meeting was not until the 16 July 2019, the local board could not resolve on their feedback by the deadline therefore, the agreed urgent decision process was followed.

8.       Due to timing constraints with the closing of the agenda for the 16 July 2019 business meeting, this urgent decision report was scheduled to be received at the 20 August 2019 business meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the urgent decision dated 8 July 2019

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Board's feedback on council's submission to the proposed Climate Change Response Amendment Bill

289

 

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Corina Claps - Senior Local Board Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Chair's Report

 

File No.: CP2018/18687

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

2.       To provide a report back from the LGNZ Conference 2019.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Chair’s report for the period August 2019, including the report back from the LGNZ Conference 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

P. Coom - Waitematā Local Board Chair's Report August 2019

297

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Pippa Coom - Chair, Waitematā Local Board

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Board member reports

 

File No.: CP2018/18698

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for board members to update the board on projects/issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written report from member R Northey and the tabled and verbal board member reports for August 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Member R Northey report for August 2019

323

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Richard Northey (ONZM) - Waitematā Local Board Member,

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2018/18724

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       Attached is a copy of the governance forward work calendar for the Waitematā Local Board which is a schedule of items that will come before the board at business meetings.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work calendar August 2019 attached to the agenda.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar at August 2019

337

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Liz Clemm - Democracy Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

20 August 2019

 

 

Waitematā Local Board Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2018/18713

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to present the Waitematā Local Board workshop records to the board.  Attached are copies of the proceeding records taken from the workshops held on:

·        23 July 2019

·        30 July 2019

·        6 August 2019

·        13 August 2019

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

·        receive the workshop proceeding records for the meetings held on 23 July 2019, 30 July 2019, 6 August 2019 and 13 August 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20190723 Waitematā Local Board Workshop Record

341

b

20190730 Waitematā Local Board Workshop Record