I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Environment and Climate Change Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 28 November 2019

9.30am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te Taiao / Environment and Climate Change Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Richard Hills

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Pippa Coom

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

IMSB Member Glenn Wilcox

 

Cr Hon Christine Fletcher, QSO

IMSB Member Karen Wilson

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Cr Paul Young

 

Cr Shane Henderson

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

Suad Allie

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua /

Senior Governance Advisor

 

22 November 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 977 6953

Email: suad.allie@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 


 


 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with environmental and climate change activities.   The committee will establish an annual work programme outlining key focus areas in line with its key responsibilities, which include:

 

·         climate change mitigation and adaptation policy, and implementation (with other committee chairs where cross over of responsibilities exists)

·         coastal renewals, slips and remediation

·         Auckland’s Climate Action Framework

·         natural heritage (including ecology, biodiversity and biosecurity matters, such as kauri dieback)

·         protection and restoration of Auckland’s ecological health

·         water, including Auckland’s Water Strategy

·         waste minimisation

·         acquisition of property relating to the committee’s responsibilities and in accordance with the LTP

·         grants for regional environmental outcomes.

 

Powers

 

(i)      All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities, including:

(a)     approval of a submission to an external body

(b)     establishment of working parties or steering groups.

(ii)      The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iii)     If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Environment and Climate Change Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Planning Committee and/or the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, then the Environment and Climate Change Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committee(s). For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of these committees for decisions.

(iii)     The committee does not have:

(a)     the power to establish subcommittees

(b)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2).

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·           Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·           Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·           Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·           In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·           The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·           However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·           All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·           Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·           Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·           All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·           Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·           Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·           Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

28 November 2019

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          7

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

8          2019/2020 Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant Programme allocation                                                                                                                                          9

9          Update on Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund September 2019/2020 funding round                                                                                                                             63  

10        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

11        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                                 85

C1       CONFIDENTIAL: Update on Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund September 2019/2020 funding round                                                                                            85  

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

There will be no confirmation of minutes.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

28 November 2019

 

2019/2020 Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant Programme allocation

File No.: CP2019/19437

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve grant allocations for the 2019/2020 Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme funding round.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant is a contestable grants programme designed to support the protection, restoration and enhancement of Auckland’s regionally significant natural heritage areas. It also funds projects that encourage and support Aucklanders to adopt environmentally sustainable lifestyles.

3.       The programme focuses on supporting strategic regional initiatives that deliver on any of four outcome categories: Sustainable living, conservation, healthy waters and kaitiakitanga (see Attachment A for the grant framework).

4.       The total budget available for the 2019/2020 Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme funding round is $836,443. This includes $440,000 allocated from the 2019/2020 natural environment targeted rate budget, which is ringfenced to support projects that contribute towards conservation outcomes.

5.       The programme received 69 applications for the 2019/2020 funding round which requested a total of $2,299,755. These included 14 multi-year applications requesting funding for up to three years. One application was withdrawn during the assessment process.

6.       The applications were assessed against key criteria such as the expected impact of the project on regional outcomes, applicant capacity and contribution to Māori outcomes.

7.       Based on this assessment, staff recommend that 49 applications are supported with a total of $922,443 in grants (see rationale for funding specific projects in Attachment B). This total includes $836,443 from the 2019/2020 grants budget. Six multi-year projects are also recommended for funding, with $49,000 allocated in 2020/2021 and $37,000 in 2021/2022.

8.       Of the 49 applications recommended for funding, 38 (76 per cent) will deliver on conservation outcomes, with the remainder of projects delivering on sustainable living, healthy water and kaitiakitanga outcomes. The high proportion of conservation projects is due to the additional funding from the natural environment targeted rate.

9.       Recommended grants range from $2,000 to $40,000, with an average value of $17,070.

10.     Staff recommend that 19 applications be declined. This is for a variety of reasons, in most instances due to their lower contribution towards regionally significant outcomes. Due to budget limitations, a number of high-quality applications are also recommended to be partially funded (see funding rationale in Attachment B).

11.     A total of 42 applications recommended for funding were identified as making some contribution towards achieving Māori outcomes.

12.     Once approved, applicants will be notified of funding decisions as soon as practicable. Successful grant recipients will have one year to three years to complete their projects, depending on the grant term.

13.     At the end of the grant term recipients will be required to complete an accountability report detailing what has been achieved with this funding and through their projects.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      approve the grant allocations for the 2019/2020 Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme funding round, as listed below and detailed in Attachment B of the agenda report:

Applicant

Project Title

Amount recommended

Regional Environment and Natural Heritage funded projects (general rates)

For the Love of Bees Charitable Trust

Urban Farmers Alliance Tāmaki Makaurau Teaching Programme

$31,000

Kaitiaki and Friends of Te Aroha Group

Kaitiaki and Friends of Te Aroha

$10,000

Tread Lightly Charitable Trust

Tread Lightly Caravan and Tread Lightly Drain Game 2020

$29,000

Specpro Media Limited

How to Save the World Podcast – Season One

$10,000

The Painga Project

Kohukohunui – A Wairoa River student education and science collaboration.

$15,000

The Forest Bridge Trust

Fencing Hoteo Forest Remnants, Riparian Margins and Wetlands

$30,000

Earth Action Trust

Live Lightly!! Newcomers

$8,000

Jan McIntosh

Organic Edible Garden

$17,000

Kaipātiki Project Incorporated

Eco Fest North 2020

$7,500

Wainui School

Garden to Table

$3,243

Roseline Klein

Maungawhau Ecological Restoration – Weeding and Planting Below Clive Road

$6,000

Including: (2019/2020: $2,000; 2020/2021: $2,000; 2021/2022: $2,000)

Te Matuku Bay Landcare Group

Environmental Weed Control – Te Matuku Scenic Reserve

$10,000

Karekare Landcare under the umbrella of Karekare Ratepayers and Residents Trust

Karekare Landcare Equipment 2019/2020

$8,000

Kiwi Harvest Limited

KiwiHarvest Mobile Community Kitchen Educator

$7,000

Jenny Christianson

Trial of Methodology of Non-chemical Ecological Restoration Year Two

$2,000

Natural environment targeted rate funded projects

The Forest Bridge Trust

CatchIT Schools

$17,000

Applicant

Project Title

Amount recommended

Matuku Reserve Trust Board

Wetland Accessibility Trail and Wetland Education Design Plan

$10,000

Friends of Wairaki Stream under the umbrella of Friends of Oakley (Te Auaunga) Creek Incorporated

Formation of Safe Pest Animal Control Access

$10,000

Meier and Wilson Limited

Trilateral Pilot Project for Environmental Protection and Restoration

$15,000

SCOW Incorporated

Project Weta

$10,000

The Whau River Catchment Trust

Rosebank Peninsula Coastal Restoration Project

$10,000

Motuihe Trust

Continued Restoration of Native Habitat on Motuihe Island

$5,500

Friends of Oakley Creek Te Auaunga Incorporated

Oakley Creek –Te Auaunga Restoration Project

$15,000

Urban Ark – Manawa Taiao under the umbrella of Auckland Foundation

Urban Landscape Integration of Volunteer Pest Eradication and Biodiversity Groups

$7,000

Community Waitakere Charitable Trust

Harbourview – Orangihina Robust Predators and Weeds Monitoring – Biodiversity Recovery Project

$5,000

Gecko New Zealand Trust

South Rodney Joined Up Action Project

$5,000

Pest Free Kaukapakapa under the umbrella of Kaukapakapa Residents and Ratepayers Association

Pest Free Kaukapakapa

$5,000

Community Cat Coalition Incorporated

The Community Cat De-Sexing Project

$10,000

Projects funded by both Regional Environment and Natural Heritage grant (general rates) and Natural Environment Targeted Rate

Waiheke Collective under the umbrella of The Waiheke Resources Trust

Coordinator Role for the Waiheke Collective

$70,000

Including: (2019/2020: $40,000; 2020/2021: $15,000; 2021/2022: $15,000)

Makaurau Marae Maori Trust

Whakahaere Kīrearea o Oruarangi Awa

$40,000

Applicant

Project Title

Amount recommended

Pest Free Kaipātiki Restoration Society Incorporated

Pest Free Kaipātiki Restoration Assistant

$50,000

Including: (2019/2020: $30,000; 2020/2021: $10,000; 2021/2022: $10,000)

Motuora Restoration Society Incorporated

Restoration of Motuora

$10,000

EcoTrack and EcoEngage under the umbrella of Pest Free Kaipātiki Restoration Society Incorporated

Consolidation of the EcoTrack Database and Application

$35,000

Kaipātiki Project Incorporated

Pest Control and Bird Monitoring Capability in the Upper Waitematā

$30,000

Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society New Zealand Incorporated

Pest Free Hibiscus Coast

$45,000

Including: (2019/2020: $25,000; 2020/2021: $10,000; 2021/2022: $10,000)

Conservation Volunteers New Zealand

Ecological Enhancement of the Awaawaroa Wetland Reserve

$24,900

Beyond the Fence under the umbrella of Le Roys Bush and Little Shoal Bay Reserves Charitable Trust

Beyond the Fence Weed and Pest Control Halo

$15,000

Sir Peter Blake Trust

Blake Virtual Reality in Schools Programme

$30,000

Protect Piha Heritage Society Incorporated

Pest free Piha by 2025

$30,000

Friends of Okura Bush Incorporated

Remnant Restoration

$30,000

Southern Seabird Solutions Trust

Seabird Campaign Targeting Recreational Fishers

$15,000

Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society of New Zealand Incorporated

South-East Wildlink

$24,900

Biosense Limited

An Interactive, Virtual Reality Experience within a Kauri Dieback-Affected Forest

$35,000

CUE Haven Community Trust

CUE Haven Native Forest Reserve Restoration

$25,000

Applicant

Project Title

Amount recommended

Chirag Jindal under the umbrella of New Zealand Speleological Society

Terrestrial LiDAR Mapping of Auckland Lava Caves

$30,000

East Coast Bays Community Project Incorporated

Hibiscus and Bays Pest Free Small Projects

$30,000

Including: (2019/2020: $20,000; 2020/2021: $10,000)

Awhitu Peninsula Landcare Incorporated

Pest Free Kauritutahi Creek

$20,000

New Zealand Native Forests Restoration Trust

Drone Vegetation Mapping

$7,000

Windy Hill Rosalie Bay Catchment Trust

Double Tap – Field Trial in Windy Hill Sanctuary

$7,400

Including: (2019/2020: $5,400; 2020/2021: $2,000)

Total

$922,443

(including $440,000 from targeted rates budget)

 

2019/2020: $836,443 (including $440,000 from targeted rates budget)

 

2020/2021: $49,000

2021/2022: $37,000

 

Horopaki

Context

Grant programme purpose and outcomes

14.     The Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme supports the implementation of the Auckland Plan, Auckland Council’s Indigenous Biodiversity Strategy, the Regional Pest Management Plan, and the Low Carbon Auckland Action Plan. Outcomes from these plans supported by this grant programme are:

·        the mauri of the natural environment is in optimum health

·        our natural heritage is valued by all Aucklanders

·        our natural resources are sustainably managed

·        our waterways, coastline, harbours, islands and marine areas are treasured

·        a high number and diverse range of Auckland’s indigenous species and ecosystems are conserved; there are no regional extinctions of indigenous species and a reduction in the number of threatened or ‘at risk’ species

·        mana whenua are empowered, enabled, respected and recognised in their customary kaitiaki role, and participate in the co-management of natural resources

 

 

·        Aucklanders adopt sustainable lifestyles, including reducing use of non-renewable resources and minimising waste

·        Auckland communities are involved in the stewardship of our biodiversity and other natural resources

·        Aucklanders help to address climate change through carbon sequestration, adaptive land management and better soil management.

Outcome areas and grant programme criteria for 2019/2020

15.     Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant projects need to meet at least one of the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant Programme Framework outcomes. These are grouped under four categories:

·        sustainable living

·        conservation

·        healthy waters

·        kaitiakitanga.

16.     The grant programme framework and the specifics of the fund criteria are attached to this report as Attachment A.

Funding available for the 2019/2020 financial year

17.     Auckland Council invests an annual budget of $506,958 into the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grants programme. The budget available for allocation in the 2019/2020 funding round is $396,443. This is because a portion of this budget ($110,515) has already been committed to multi-year applications through the 2017/2018 and 2018/2019 funding rounds.

18.     Additional funding of $440,000 was allocated from the natural environment targeted rate budget to provide supplementary funding for conservation projects in 2019/2020. The additional funding is targeted towards conservation projects which aim to achieve biodiversity outcomes across the Auckland region.

Timing and promotion of the grant programme

19.     The Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme has one annual funding round. In 2019/2020, the fund opened on 15 July 2019 and closed on 30 August 2019. Applications were assessed by subject matter experts during September and October 2019.

20.     The grant was promoted through several existing processes and networks including Auckland Council’s website and social media sites, Tō Tātou Tāmaki Makaurau, local media publications, hui, pest liaison and biodiversity groups, local board networks and emails to environmental stakeholders and partners.

21.     Six workshop presentations were held across Auckland where applicants could be supported through the application process and request advice from council staff. Ecological restoration advisors were also available to help applicants to develop restoration plans for their conservation project sites if needed.


 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

How the grant applications were assessed

22.     Applications were assessed through a three-stage process as follows:

i.          Applications were assessed against grant programme eligibility criteria and allocated for merit assessment according to the outcomes of the fund, as shown below in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Categorisation of applications across Regional Environment and Natural Heritage grant outcomes *

* All applications deliver on more than one outcome category but were classified above according to their primary outcome area.

 

ii.          Subject matter experts for each of the categories were allocated applications for assessment against the criteria shown below in Table 1. Māori outcomes for all applications were assessed by an internal subject matter expert in Te Ao Māori. The assessment evaluated to what extent the project empowered mana whenua as kaitiaki and the integration of Te Ao Māori within the project methodology and goals.

Table 1: Regional Environment and Natural Heritage grant assessment criteria

Criteria

Weighting

Project impact

40

Project connectivity

20

Applicant capacity

20

Contribution towards Māori outcomes

10

Value for money

10

Total

100

 

 

iii.         A panel of subject matter experts considered all applications against the outcome areas and recommended grant allocations based on application assessment and alignment with grant programme outcomes. Applications which are more closely aligned with programme outcomes were more likely to be funded, although other key criteria were also considered such as geographical distribution, replicability of the project and ability for it to be scaled up across the region.

23.     The panel developed funding recommendations for the Committee’s consideration as described in Attachment B and summarised in the report recommendations.

Recommendations for allocating funding

24.     It is recommended that 49 applications are supported with grants from the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme budget. These recommendations include six multi-year projects.

25.     If approved, the grant allocation will be:

·        $836,443 from the 2019/2020 grant budget (including $440,000 from the natural environment targeted rate budget)

·        $49,000 from the 2020/2021 grant budget

·        $37,000 from the 2021/2022 grant budget.

26.     Table 2 shows the number and total value of applications received, declined and recommended for funding since 2017/2018.

Table 2: Summary of funding available and committed from 2017/2018 to 2019/2020

 

2017/2018

2018/2019

2019/2020

Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant Budget

$399,710

$358,855

$396,443

Natural environment targeted rate budget

-

$200,000

$440,000

Number of applications received

54

70

69

Total value of grants requested

(including multi-year requests)

$1,610,708

$2,786,199

$2,299,755

Number of applications recommended for funding

24 applications recommended for funding, 4 of them multi-year

28 declined

2 ineligible

47 applications recommended for funding, 8 of them multi-year

22 declined

1 withdrawn

49 applications recommended for funding, 6 of them multi-year

19 declined

1 withdrawn

Value of grant allocation

Range: $3,000 to $40,000

Average grant: $16,654

Range: $1,850 to $30,000

Average grant: $11,890

Range: $2,000 to $40,000

Average grant: $17,070

Rationale for funding decisions

27.     While the grant framework provides for grants between $5,000 and $40,000 per annum, there is provision to award smaller grants for projects that meet the criteria for regional significance, but only require moderate support.

28.     Most of the successful applications were recommended for partial funding, taking into account value for money, project budgets, ability to scale projects and access to other resources. 

29.     Two grants of less than $5,000 are recommended, due to either a moderate funding request by the applicant or moderate investment from the council required to maximise a project’s potential environmental outcomes. Recommended grants range in value from $2,000 to $40,000, with an average grant value of $17,070.

30.     It is also recommended that a further 19 applications be declined. Projects are recommended to be declined for a variety of reasons, in most instances due to their relatively lower contribution towards regionally significant outcomes (see further details in Attachment B).

31.     A high proportion of the projects recommended for funding are focused on achieving conservation outcomes. This reflects the focus of applications received in the funding round, as 70 per cent of applications received contribute directly towards conservation outcomes.

32.     The additional ring-fenced natural environment targeted rate fund dedicated for projects with conservation outcomes has contributed positively to both the number and average grant value of recommended conservation projects. The number of conservation projects recommended for funding has increased from 25 to 38 projects and the average grant value per project has increased from $8,748 to $16,939.

33.     Table 3 below outlines the Regional and Natural Heritage Grant allocations by outcome area.

Table 3: Summary of Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant allocations by outcome area

Outcome area

Number of applications recommended for support

Amount recommended from Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant budget 2019/2020

Amount allocated from the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) budget 2019/2020 *

Total 2019/2020

Sustainable living

8

$112,743

-

$112,743

Conservation**

38

$218,700

$420,000

$638,700

Healthy waters

2

$45,000

-

$45,000

Kaitiakitanga ***

1

$20,000

$20,000

$40,000

Total

49

$396,443

$440,000

$836,443

* Only conservation and kaitiakitanga projects are funded from NETR budget.

** Five conservation projects funded from the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant budget, 20 projects funded from both the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant and NETR budgets, 13 projects funded from NETR budget only.

*** One kaitiakitanga project received additional funding from NETR budget as it also contributes directly towards conservation outcomes.

34.     Six applications are recommended for multi-year funding. These recommendations are based on high project ranking, representing a strong alignment with the grant objectives, high applicant capacity and best practice project design. These are listed in Table 4 below.

Table 4: Recommendation for multi-year funding allocation

Applicant

Project Title

2019/2020

2020/2021

2021/2022

Waiheke Collective under the umbrella of The Waiheke Resources Trust

Coordinator role for the Waiheke Collective

$40,000

$15,000

$15,000

Pest Free Kaipātiki Restoration Society Incorporated

Pest Free Kaipātiki Restoration Assistant

$30,000

$10,000

$10,000

Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society New Zealand Incorporated

Pest Free Hibiscus Coast

$25,000

$10,000

$10,000

East Coast Bays Community Project Incorporated

Hibiscus and Bays Pest Free Small Projects

$20,000

$10,000

-

Roseline Klein

Maungawhau Ecological Restoration – Weeding and Planting Below Clive Road

$2,000

$2,000

$2,000

Windy Hill Rosalie Bay Catchment Trust

Double Tap – Field Trial in Windy Hill Sanctuary

$5,400

$2,000

-

$122,400

$49,000

$37,000

Applicants’ contribution to projects is far higher than council investment

35.     A 50 per cent applicant contribution is encouraged for the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant to ensure that the council grants continue to leverage private investment and funding from other providers.

36.     The applicant contribution can be volunteer time, in-kind contributions or financial. The total applicant contribution across all applications is $7,264,936. Figure 2 shows the funding requested and the applicant contribution towards the projects per grant outcome area.

Figure 2: Funding requested and applicant contribution across Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme outcomes

37.     Following the assessment of project budgets and potential environmental outcomes, funding for applications recommended this year does not exceed more than 50 per cent of total project costs for any project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     The Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant provides grants (to individuals and groups for projects) that support community climate change action to reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts.

39.     Eight projects under the sustainable living outcome that enable community climate action to reduce emissions are recommended for funding in the current round. These projects adopt different approaches, including sustainable food production, enhancing community energy efficiency through education and behaviour change, and building community climate resilience.

40.     Approximately 40 projects were recommended for funding under the conservation and healthy waters outcomes. These projects support climate change adaptation through measures such as community planting days, landscape restoration and reforestation. In addition, many will protect native flora and fauna species that are vulnerable to climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views on applications were not sought.

42.     Input on applications was sought from experts from the relevant departments across the council, for example, Healthy Waters or Sustainable Living.

43.     Applications were also reviewed by an historic heritage subject matter expert and an archaeological assessment completed where necessary.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Local impact

44.     Equitable geographical distribution of grant allocations across different local board areas was considered among other factors by the moderation panel.

Local board views

45.     The Community Grants Policy provides for local boards to operate their own local grants programmes. Local boards may choose to fund local environmental projects and activities, some of which may complement the grants provided at regional level, or vice versa.

46.     Information on funding allocation and successful applicants will be provided to all relevant local boards, following the approval of grant recommendations by the Environment and Climate Change Committee.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.     All grant programmes aim to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Māori. Input from the Independent Māori Statutory Board has been sought into the development of the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage grants programme.

 

Applications under the kaitiakitanga category

48.     The Kaitiakitanga category of this grant programme supports projects or activities that align with, enable and empower mana whenua or mataawaka in the exercise of kaitiakitanga in Tāmaki Makaurau. Two applications were received in this category.

49.     Of the applications recommended for support, the greatest contribution towards Māori outcomes was identified from the Whakahaere kīrearea o Oruarangi Awa project by Makaurau Marae Maori Trust. This project aims to restore mauri of the Oruarangi Awa and its surrounds. The project supports an iwi-led ecological management initiative to exercise rangatiratanga and kaitiakitanga through monitoring and eradicating predators within the Oruarangi Awa catchment, their ancestral waterbody, and Papakāinga.           

Assessment of Māori outcomes

50.     Māori outcomes for all applications were assessed by an internal subject matter expert in Te Ao Māori. The assessment evaluated the extent to which the project empowered mana whenua as kaitiaki and the integration of Te Ao Māori within the project.

51.     A total of 42 applications recommended for funding were identified during the assessment process as contributing positively towards Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

52.     The budget allocation for this grant was confirmed through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028. The annual budget for this grant is $506,958. The funding recommendations presented in this report recommend full allocation of the 2019/2020 fund. Multi-year funding recommendations partially commit budget from 2020/2021 and 2021/2022.

53.     In May 2018, the Governing Body approved a natural environment targeted rate to support environmental initiatives. The rate will raise $311 million over the duration of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 (resolution GB/2018/91).

54.     For the 2019/2020 financial year $440,000 from the natural environment targeted rate budget will be used to provide supplementary funding for conservation projects applied for through the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme.

55.     Attachment B details the amounts recommended for funding from both the grant programme budget and the additional targeted rate funding.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

56.     A risk assessment has only identified two low risks associated with the grant allocation process. These are listed below along with the mitigations:

·    Low reputational risk – Applicants may query the grant allocation process and feel it has been inconsistent or unfair. This risk is mitigated through the thorough and transparent evaluation and assessment process, carried out in accordance with the grant framework.

·    Low financial risk – Grant applicants do not use grant funds appropriately to fulfil the conditions of their grant or deliver the outcomes desired by the council. This risk is mitigated through the initial assessment, which included evaluation of the capacity of applicants and their track record, and requirements for detailed reporting on outcomes of all applications. Grant recipients are required to account for use of allocated funds and Council can request the return of any funds not used in line with the approved grant purpose.

57.     Staff will maintain regular contact with grant recipients during project implementation to follow up on progress and make sure any risks of individual projects are properly addressed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

58.     Once approved, applicants will be notified of funding decisions as soon as practicable. Successful applicants will have one to three years to complete the proposed project work.

59.     At the end of the grant term recipients will be required to complete an accountability report on what has been achieved through their projects. Accountability reports provide detailed information about different aspects of the project, including receipts to show expenditure, photos and videos and are reviewed by subject matter experts against prespecified metrics.

60.     Unsuccessful applicants will be issued with a decline letter as soon as practicable. These applicants will also be offered the opportunity to work with council staff on applications for future funding rounds or other opportunities for funding.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grants Programme Framework 2019-2020

23

b

Funding recommendations for Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Fund 2019/2020 round

29

      

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Adam Abdeldayem - Senior Grants Advisor

Frances Hayton - Practice lead, Grants and Incentives

Authorisers

Sophie Heighway - Sustainability Initiatives Manager

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

28 November 2019

 

Update on Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund September 2019/2020 funding round

File No.: CP2019/19493

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update regarding grant recommendations for the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund, September 2019 funding round.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund is a contestable grants scheme established as a key initiative of Auckland Council’s Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018.

3.       The fund supports initiatives that will help achieve the vision, targets and strategic objectives of the waste plan, including waste minimisation and the diversion of waste from landfill in Auckland.

4.       The fund focuses on seed-funding new waste minimisation activities. Funding is allocated across four key outcome areas:

·    resource recovery initiatives and facilities

·    commercial waste

·    organic waste

·    community action and behaviour change.

5.       In the September 2019 funding round:

·    $30,219 is available to distribute to small grants ($5,000 and under), with decision-making delegated to the General Manager Waste Solutions

·    $453,908 is available to distribute to medium and large grants (over $5,000), with decision-making delegated to the Environment and Climate Change Committee.

6.       The grant programme received 84 applications, requesting over $2.3 million in total. Approximately 23 applications were for small grants, and 61 applications requested medium and large grants (of which six were multi-year applications). Three applications were withdrawn due to misalignment with the fund criteria and objectives.

7.       All applications were checked for eligibility, before being assessed and scored by a panel of council staff with expertise in waste minimisation. Assessments were undertaken in line with the funding criteria, including strategic alignment, potential for waste minimisation, community participation, value for money, and quality of the proposal (see fund guidelines in Attachment A).

8.       Staff recommend that 20 of the medium and large grant applications are supported with $449,951 of funds from the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund budget. More detail regarding the allocation of funding for specific projects will be provided in the confidential section of the 28 November 2019 Environment and Climate Change Committee meeting.


 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)         note the information contained in this report on allocation of grant applications for the 2019/2020 Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund, September 2019 funding round enables transparency on the topic due for discussion in the public excluded part of the meeting.

b)         note that the confidential report contains information that could prejudice the commercial position of some grant applicants.

 

Horopaki

Context

Grant programme purpose and outcomes

9.         The Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund was established to support waste minimisation initiatives using a portion of the funds allocated to Auckland Council from the national waste levy. The fund is primarily intended to provide seed-funding to encourage and enable creative reuse and recovery as well as generate economic opportunities.

10.       Half of the total revenue generated from the national waste levy (currently set at $10 per tonne) is allocated to territorial authorities on a population basis. This money must be spent on promoting or achieving waste minimisation as set out in local authorities’ waste management and minimisation plans.

11.       The Auckland Council Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 sets out the purpose of the fund, which is summarised as follows:

·    promote or achieve waste management and minimisation

·    reduce waste to landfill in accordance with the objectives of the plan

·    foster new ideas and encourage community participation in reducing waste to landfill.

12.       The fund aims to target priority waste streams, reduce harm to the environment and improve efficiency of resource use by supporting new initiatives which complement and enhance existing programmes or address gaps. Funding is allocated through four outcome areas as shown in Table 1 below:

Table 1: Outcome areas targeted through the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund

Outcome area

Background

Resource recovery initiatives and facilities

         Development of a regional resource recovery network is a priority for Auckland’s long-term aim to achieve zero waste by 2040. The network will provide an infrastructure that supports maximum resource recovery, as well as providing local business and employment opportunities. A specific focus is the development of community and business operated resource recovery facilities.

Commercial waste

Supporting business waste minimisation is a key initiative of the Auckland Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018. The long-term target of the waste plan is to reduce total waste to landfill by 30 per cent by 2027. As commercial waste (waste not controlled by the council) makes up 83 per cent of all waste sent to landfill in Auckland, supporting business waste minimisation is a priority.

The council is seeking ways to encourage development of innovative solutions for commercial waste, particularly construction and demolition waste (such as concrete, timber, plasterboard, and insulation materials).

Organic waste

Organic waste (food waste and green waste) makes up about 50 per cent (by weight) of domestic waste sent to landfill. As such, reducing organic waste is a priority for achieving Auckland’s zero waste goal. Auckland Council will introduce a kerbside collection of food scraps for households in urban areas from 2021. Initiatives that complement this service or enable local composting are eligible for funding. Projects could look at reducing domestic and commercial green waste to landfill like community gardens, through composting or mulching, or innovative ways to process organic waste.

Community action and behaviour change

Fostering new ideas and encouraging community participation in reducing waste to landfill is a key direction of the waste plan and a priority in the lead up to introducing user pays charging for refuse across the region once the food scraps collection has been introduced. Building community capacity for waste minimisation will be important in ensuring all Aucklanders have access to the information, education and support they need to reduce the amount of waste they send to landfill. The aim is to create enduring change in community behaviour and attitudes towards waste.

 

Grant programme budget and funding available for 2019/2020

13.       The fund has an annual budget of $500,000, with $450,000 allocated to medium and large projects in a single funding round, and $50,000 allocated to small grants across two funding rounds. This is summarised in Table 2 below.

Table 2: Sub-categories for allocating grant funding

Category

Grant range

Application period each financial year

Small projects

From $250 - $5,000

April and September

Medium projects

From $5001 - $25,000

September

Large and multi-year projects

$25,001 and over

September

 

14.         The total amount of funding available for distribution for the 2019/2020 funding round is $30,219 for small grants and $453,908 for medium and large grants.

15.         The fund has a minimum threshold of $250, and a maximum threshold of $50,000. Multi-year projects are for a maximum of three years with a minimum threshold of $25,001 and a maximum threshold of $50,000. Applications requesting funding of more than $50,000 in a single year period are considered on merit at the discretion of subject matter experts and council staff.

16.         Decision-making for recommendations of up to $5,000 is delegated to the General Manager Waste Solutions, with decision making for recommendations of over $5,000 delegated to the Environment and Climate Change Committee.

 

Applicants are required to match 50 per cent of the funding

17.       A minimum 50 per cent contribution towards projects is required from applicants. This can be achieved through additional funding from their own or other resources, or time-in-kind.

18.       Private investment and funding from other providers are encouraged and considered favourably by the assessment team.

Timing and promotion of the grant programme

19.       The September 2019 funding round was promoted via several avenues, including:

·    local boards

·    internal council networks including the Waste Solutions, Sustainability Initiatives, Community Empowerment Unit and Grants teams

·    Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund contact database

·    media releases to newspapers and radio stations, including articles in Our Auckland

·    Facebook ads

·    digital screens in Auckland Council service centres, libraries and buildings.

20.       In addition to the standard promotion listed above, in August 2019 six workshop presentations were held across Auckland where applicants could be supported through the application process and request advice from council staff.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

How the grant applications were assessed

21.     Applications were assessed through a three-stage process as follows:

i.          All funding applications were assessed for eligibility against the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund Guidelines, as outlined in Attachment A. 

ii.          Feedback was requested from subject matter experts and council staff on all eligible funding applications, as outlined below in Table 3.

Table 3: An overview of feedback requested on Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund applications

Feedback requested from

Feedback requested on

Intention

Subject matter experts

·    Any applications that require subject matter input regarding the waste being targeted, processes being used, or organisation applying

·    To receive technical and expert input on subject matter, including the applicant, targeted waste streams, community, processes and legislative requirements

Resource Consents Department

·    All applications

·    To identify whether any resource consents may be triggered by the proposed project

Sustainable Schools Team

·    Any applications relating to educational institutions or child-based learning

·    To identify whether the applicant has been liaising with the Sustainable Schools Advisor allocated to their area

·    To help determine whether the project is using best practice methods, and those appropriate for the size, capacity and type of organisation

iii.      Applications were then assessed by a panel comprised of council subject matter experts, who scored each application against the assessment criteria, focusing on the:

·      project’s strategic alignment with the waste plan

·      potential for waste minimisation

·      community participation and/or benefit

·      value for investment

·      quality of proposal.

22.         The initial scores were moderated by panel members before the panel agreed upon final funding

recommendations for the Committee’s consideration.

Summary of applications received

23.       The grant programme received 84 applications requesting over $2.3 million in total. Approximately 23 were for small grants, and 61 for medium and large grants (of which six were multi-year applications). Three small applications were withdrawn from the grant round.

24.       Applications were received from a range of organisation types with the majority received from charitable organisations, schools or educational institutions, social enterprises, business associations and businesses as shown in Figure1 below. 

Figure 1. Applications received by organisation type

 

25.     Applications were spread across all four priority outcome areas (resource recovery initiatives and facilities, commercial waste, organic waste, and community action and behaviour change). Refer to Figure 2 below for applications received by outcome areas.

26.     There was a strong focus on projects that reduced commercial, organic, or construction and demolition waste.


 

 

Figure 2. Applications received by outcome areas

 

 

27.     Grant requests ranged from $250 to $150,000 in value, with an average of $27,942 being requested.

Recommendations and rationale for allocating funding

28.     The funding recommendations included in this report have been developed in line with the fund guidelines, priorities and agreed funding principles.

29.     Staff recommend that 20 applications from the September 2019 funding round, totalling $449,951, are supported from the fund’s medium to large grants category budget.

30.     Applications which are recommended for funding scored highly against the assessment criteria, as well as showing:

·    capability of the applicant to deliver the project outcomes

·    budget feasibility, including applicant investment and funding requested

·    demonstration of financial and operational project sustainability

·    ability to scale or replicate the project

·    use of best practice methods

·    project continuance and benefit should partial funding be granted.

31.     Of all medium, large or multi-year applications received, 41 applications are recommended to be declined for reasons such as:

·    low contribution towards funding outcomes

·    not significantly meeting funding criteria

·    budget limitations.

32.     If the funding recommendations are approved, $3,957 will be carried forward from the medium to large grants category budget to the next financial year and be available for allocation in 2020/2021.

33.     A total of 13 applications for the small grant category requesting up to $5,000 were recommended for funding for a total of $26,089. The decision-making on these is delegated to the General Manager Waste Solutions.

34.     Seven applications for the small grant category were recommended to be declined and three applicants withdrew from the funding round. The unallocated funding of $4,129 will be carried forward from the small grant category budget to the April 2020 funding round.

35.     Table 4 below shows the number and total value of applications received, declined and recommended for funding since 2017/2018.

Table 4: Summary of funding available and allocations from 2017/2018 to 2019/2020

 

2017/2018

2018/2019

2019/2020

Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund Budget

$680,122

$545,214

$484,127

Number of applications received

102

93

84

Total value of grants requested (including multi-year requests)

$2,488,912

$2,622,859

$2,347,382

 

Number of medium/large applications recommended for funding

30 applications recommended for funding, no multi-year

31 declined

2 ineligible

18 applications recommended for funding, no multi-year

50 declined

2 withdrawn

20 applications recommended for funding, no multi-year

41 declined

 

Total amount allocated for medium/large applications

$615,794

$517,044

$449,951

Value of grant allocation for medium/large applications

Range: $3,400 to $50,000

Average grant: $20,526.45

Range: $9,600 to $50,000

Average grant: $28,724.67

Range: $5,190 to $50,000

Average grant:

$22,498

Number of small applications recommended for funding

23 applications recommended for funding

14 declined
2 ineligible

9 applications recommended for funding

14 declined

13 applications recommended for funding

7 declined

3 withdrawn

Total amount allocated for small applications

$32,518

$25,539

$26,089

Total amount allocated for all grants

$648,312

$542,583

$476,040

 

36.     Table 4 suggests that the total value of money committed to the fund has decreased since 2017/2018. However, the council budgets approximately the same amount of new funding for the grant scheme every year - $450,000.

37.     The apparent decrease in funding available is because in the first few years after the fund was established in 2015/2016, the council did not receive enough high-quality applications to allocate the full amount available. The money was therefore carried forward, resulting in a particularly high budget available in 2017/2018 and a slightly higher budget in 2018/2019.

38.     The number of grant applications has also decreased slightly since 2017/2018.  However, the quality of applications received has improved, as applicants’ understanding of what types of project will be supported through the fund has increased over time.

39.     Because of this in 2019/2020 staff recommend that almost all the available funding of $484,127 be allocated, with only $8,087 carried forward to future grant rounds.

40.     More detail on the allocation of grant funding will be discussed in the confidential section of the 28 November 2019 Environment and Climate Change Committee meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.     According to the data provided in the Auckland Greenhouse Gas Inventory 2016, the contribution of waste to overall greenhouse gas emissions is approximately 3.1%. The largest source of greenhouse gas emissions under the waste sector in Aotearoa New Zealand is solid waste disposal. This category includes disposal of household waste, construction and demolition waste, industrial sites, cleanfill and farm fills.

42.     One of the key criteria for allocation of funding under the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund is the potential for a project to divert waste from landfill. The diversion of waste from landfill contributes to a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions through reducing the largest source category for the waste sector – solid waste disposal.

43.     It is difficult to quantify the exact emissions reductions that will be achieved through this grant round, as funding is allocated to several different organisations from across community and industry sectors that may not subscribe to one emissions reporting methodology.

44.     However, eight projects that divert food scraps from landfill are recommended for funding in this grant round. Food scraps and organic materials release methane when they degrade in the anaerobic environment of a landfill. The diversion of these specific materials will further reduce methane emissions. 

45.     Funding recommendations also include 10 projects which contribute to a circular economy by encouraging re-use and restoration of products and materials. By reusing materials, these projects will reduce emissions from waste in landfill and preserve embedded carbon by extending the lifecycle of such materials.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.     All applications have had input, according to the project outcome areas and scoring guidelines, from a subject matter expert from the relevant department. All applications were also reviewed by a resource consent expert and recommendations were provided to ensure the proposed projects don’t require any consents.

47.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views on applications were not sought.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

48.     Feedback from local boards was not included as part of the assessment due to the grant timeline conflicting with the local government elections schedule.

49.     Local boards will be informed of the results of the funding round and successful applications from their areas, following approval of funding recommendations by the Environment and Climate Change Committee.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

50.     A guiding principle of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund is to support waste minimisation projects which enable Māori, in their role as kaitiaki. This includes enabling Māori to participate in co-management of resources and support sustainable development of Māori outcomes, leadership, community and partnerships.

51.     In the 2019/2020 financial year, facilitation of project scoping meetings at Kawa Marae and Ōrākei Marae were undertaken to increase the uptake of the fund by Māori.

52.     The council received one application from an organisation who identified as mana whenua, and three organisations that identified as working with mana whenua (or with Māori more broadly). Funding is recommended for three (of the four) applications under the medium and large grant category, including the application from Kawa Marae. One application has been declined.

53.     Further work is needed to increase awareness and uptake of the fund by Māori. This will be an ongoing focus of the fund. Further work will be undertaken on how best to do this in 2020/2021 consultation with council staff with knowledge in Te Ao Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

54.     The grant allocation of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund can be managed through existing budgets provided by the national waste levy. The 2019/2020 budget for medium to large grants is $453,908.

55.     Staff recommend $449,951 of this budget be allocated in the September 2019 funding round, and $3,957 be carried forward to the 2020/2021 financial year.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

56.     To reduce risks, allocation of grants follows the guidelines and criteria of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund and Community Grants Policy. A thorough assessment process, including fair and transparent decision making, ensures fair allocation of grants.

57.     The Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund further mitigates potential risk by using a reimbursement process when awarding large amounts of funding. Recipients receive funding once project works have been undertaken and invoices or receipts have been provided to council.

58.     Upfront funding can be provided, however, an official and detailed request must be made by the grant recipient and is assessed on a case-by-case basis. There is also the requirement for applicants to provide a project accountability report at the end of their term.

59.     Staff will maintain regular contact with applicants during the project implementation phase to follow up on progress and make sure any risks are properly addressed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

60.     Once recommendations are approved, applicants will be notified of funding decisions in December 2019.

61.     Successful applicants will be notified in writing. At the end of the grant term, recipients will be required to meet project accountability requirements, detailing how funding has been used and what their project has achieved.

62.     Unsuccessful applicants will be informed of the decision in writing. These applicants will also be offered a written evaluation on request, and the opportunity to work with council staff for advice on applications for future funding rounds.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund Guidelines 2019-2020

73

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Samantha Arumugam - Waste Planning Advisor

Authorisers

Parul Sood - General Manager Waste Planning

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

28 November 2019

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

     

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

28 November 2019

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       CONFIDENTIAL: Update on Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund September 2019/2020 funding round

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains sensitive information about some commercial applications that should not be released to competitors.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.