I hereby give notice that the inaugural meeting of the Governing Body after the triennial local body elections will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Friday, 1 November 2019

6.00pm

Great Hall
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Tira Kāwana / Governing Body

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Mayor

Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

 

Councillors

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Shane Henderson

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Richard Hills

 

Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Pippa Coom

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Hon Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr Paul Young

 

 

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Sarndra O'Toole

Team Leader Governance Advisors

 

29 October 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 8152

Email: sarndra.otoole@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 



 

Terms of Reference

 

Those powers which cannot legally be delegated:

 

(a)        the power to make a rate

(b)        the power to make a bylaw

(c)        the power to borrow money, or purchase or dispose of assets, other than in accordance with the long term plan

(d)        the power to adopt a long term plan, annual plan, or annual report

(e)        the power to appoint a chief executive

(f)        the power to adopt policies required to be adopted and consulted on under the Local Government Act 2002 in association with the long-term plan or developed for the purpose of the local governance statement

(g)        the power to adopt a remuneration and employment policy.

 

Additional responsibilities retained by the Governing Body:

 

(a)        approval of long-term plan or annual plan consultation documents, supporting information and consultation process prior to consultation

(b)        approval of a draft bylaw prior to consultation

(c)        resolutions required to be made by a local authority under the Local Electoral Act 2001, including the appointment of electoral officer

(d)        adoption of, and amendment to, the Committee Terms of Reference, Standing Orders and Code of Conduct

(e)        relationships with the Independent Māori Statutory Board, including the funding agreement and appointments to committees

(f)        approval of the Unitary Plan

(g)        overview of the implementation and refresh of the Auckland Plan through setting direction on key strategic projects (e.g. the City Rail Link and the alternative funding mechanisms for transport) and receiving regular reporting on the overall achievement of Auckland Plan priorities and performance measures.

 


Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·         Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·         Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·         Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·         In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·         The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·         However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·         All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·         Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·         Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·         All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·         Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·         Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·         Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 

 


Governing Body

01 November 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

A mihi whakatau will proceed the formal meeting.

The meeting will be chaired by the Chief Executive until the Mayor has made his statutory declaration.

Apologies

Statutory Declaration – Mayor

A waiata will be performed by the Auckland Council Waiata Group at this time.

Statutory Declarations - Councillors

The meeting will adjourn once all Councillors have made their statutory declarations
and will reconvene on Tuesday 5 November 2019, at 9.30am in the Reception Lounge,
Auckland Town Hall.

 

1          Affirmation                                                                                                                      7

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

5          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

6          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

7          Local Board Input                                                                                                          7

8          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

9          Statutory Declaration - Mayor                                                                                      8

This item will be part of the ceremonial section of the meeting held on Friday 1 November 2019 at 6.00pm in the Great Hall, Auckland Town Hall.

10        Statutory Declarations - Councillors                                                                           8

This item will be part of the ceremonial section of the meeting held on Friday 1 November 2019 at 6.00pm in the Great Hall, Auckland Town Hall.

11        Maiden Speeches                                                                                                           8

12        Explanation of laws affecting elected members                                                        9

13        Auckland City Centre Advisory Board End of Term Report                                   19

14        Set up of the Advisory Panels for the 2019-2022 term                                            45

15        Governing Body decision-making during the 2019/2020, 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 Christmas recess periods                                                                                         187

16        Governing Body meetings in November 2019                                                       191

17        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Affirmation

 

His Worship the Mayor will read the affirmation.

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

There will be not confirmation of minutes.

 

 

5          Petitions

 

There will be no petitions section.

 

 

6          Public Input

 

There will be no public input section.

 

 

7          Local Board Input

 

There will be no local board input section.

 

 

8          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”


 

 

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 

9          Statutory Declaration - Mayor

 

His Worship the Mayor will make an oral declaration and sign a written declaration which will be attested by the Chief Executive.

 

The Mayor will address the meeting, outlining his vision for Auckland.  He will acknowledge local boards and the appointment of the Deputy Mayor.

 

This item will be part of the ceremonial section of the meeting held on Friday 1 November 2019 at 6.00pm in the Great Hall, Auckland Town Hall.

 

 

10        Statutory Declaration - Councillors

 

Each councillor will make an oral declaration and sign a written declaration, which will be attested by His Worship the Mayor.

 

This item will be part of the ceremonial section of the meeting held on Friday 1 November 2019 at 6.00pm in the Great Hall, Auckland Town Hall.

 

 

11        Maiden Speeches

 

New councilors will have the opportunity to address the meeting.

 

The order of speaking will be as follows:

 

Councillor Pippa Coom

Councillor Angela Dalton

Councillor Shane Henderson

Councillor Tracy Mulholland

 

 


Governing Body

01 November 2019

 

 

Explanation of laws affecting elected members

File No.: CP2019/18681

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a general explanation of the laws affecting elected members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the first meeting after the three-yearly local election, elected members are required to receive a general explanation of the laws that affect them as elected members.[1] This report provides that explanation.

3.       There are a number of laws affecting members and other core legal requirements that elected members should be aware of when making decisions.  The legislation that applies both to individual elected member’s actions and collective decision making includes:

a)      Local Authorities (Members’ Interests) Act 1968

b)      Crimes Act 1961

c)      Secret Commissions Act 1910

d)      Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013

e)      NZSX Listing Rules

f)       Health and Safety at Work Act 2015

g)      Personal liability of elected members

h)      Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

i)        Local Government Act 2002

j)        Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009

k)      Other statutory decision-making requirements

4.       This report and attachment provide an explanation of these core legal requirements. 

5.       In addition to these core legal requirements, there are many other statutes relevant to certain council decisions (for example the Resource Management Act 1991 and the Reserves Act 1977). 

6.       Elected members will receive advice from staff on a case-by-case basis to ensure that they understand their legal obligations when making decisions

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      note the general explanation of the laws affecting elected members.

 

 

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Laws affecting elected members:  core legal requirements

11

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Meredith Webb – Manager Public Law

Authorisers

Dani Gardiner - General Counsel

Stephen Town - Chief Executive

 


Governing Body

01 November 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Governing Body

01 November 2019

 

 

Auckland City Centre Advisory Board End of Term Report

File No.: CP2019/15651

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview of the advice provided by the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board over the 2016-2019 term.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board advises Auckland Council on the alignment of the city centre targeted rate portfolio to the needs of the city centre.

3.       The city centre targeted rate portfolio of works is the portfolio of investment that are funded by the city centre targeted rate that formed part of the long-term plan. They are endorsed by the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board and approved by the Finance and Performance Committee. The city centre targeted rate investment portfolio is attached to this report as Attachment A.

4.       The board also provides advice on council’s strategies, policies, plans, bylaws and programmes in relation to city centre development.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      note the advice provided by the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board over the 2016-2019 term.

b)      note the report on the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board for the 2016-2019 term.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 S(9) specifies that one of the roles of the Mayor of Auckland is to ensure there is effective engagement between the Auckland Council and the people of Auckland. The Mayor has the power to establish processes and mechanisms for the council to engage with the people of Auckland, whether generally or particularly (for example, the people of a cultural, ethnic, geographic, or other community of interest).

6.       The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board (ACCAB) was one of the council’s sector panels that gave effect to this legislation by:

·        advising on council strategies and plans that impact on Auckland city centre

·        advising on the priorities of the City Centre Targeted Rate investment portfolio

·        recommending any proposed changes to the Auckland City Centre Targeted Rate policy

·        advising on issues and opportunities to support city centre outcomes and its success.

 

 

 

7.       The city centre targeted rate was established by Auckland City Council in the 2004/2005 financial year to help fund the development and revitalisation of the city centre. The rate is applied to business and residential land in the city centre and is estimated to yield approximately $22.5 million per annum.

8.       The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board was formed to advise the council on expenditure of the city centre targeted rate.

9.       From April 2018, staff have worked alongside members of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board to undertake a review of the city centre targeted rate portfolio, to reflect the alignment with the Long-term Plan 2018 - 2028, latest challenges and opportunities and to ensure the portfolio is congruent with Auckland Council’s most current policies, plans and strategies.

10.     The review of the targeted rate portfolio used the board’s endorsed assessment criteria and the council’s Investment Delivery Framework to assess projects in the city centre portfolio.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The completion of the strategic assessment process and the incorporation of the advice and feedback from the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board allows council to formulate a refreshed city centre targeted rate budget for 2019/2020. The Finance and Performance Committee agreed to the city centre budget 2019/2020 at its August meeting, resolution FIN/2019/94.

12.     During the 2016-2019 term, the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board provided key advice on the Auckland Plan 2050, the Long-term Plan 2018-2028, the City Centre Master Plan and Waterfront Plan (update), The City Centre Public Arts Plan and Homelessness city centre targeted rate support for the James Liston Hostel refurbishment and assertive outreach.

13.     Staff will provide advice in relation to the review of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board as part of the res-establishment of the sector advisory panels in a separate report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     This report is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The report is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will be considered in future advisory board recommendations.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The Auckland City Advisory Board provides advice on city centre workstream of projects provided by the Council Group.

16.     Auckland Transport and other council departments have provided feedback in relation to the development of the City Centre Targeted Rate Investment Portfolio.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Auckland’s city centre falls within the Waitematā Local Board boundaries. The local board is consulted during the development of relevant city centre projects, some of which receive funding through the city centre targeted rate.

18.     A Waitematā Local Board representative is part of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board membership.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     A Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei representative is part of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board membership.

20.     The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board supports the city centre targeted rate to fund development projects that contribute to Māori outcomes by enabling manaakitanga (hospitality), kaitiakitanga (environmental guardianship), and highlighting our unique cultural heritage by incorporating Māori design elements.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board advises on the priorities of the City Centre Targeted Rate Investment Portfolio which is worth a value of $22.8 million per annum.

22.     The Finance and Performance Committee agreed to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board’s endorsement to the portfolio budget within the existing city centre targeted rate portfolio budget to 2025.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

23.     Staff will continue to administer the city centre targeted rate budget endorsed by the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board with the agreement of the Finance and Performance Committee.

24.     Further advice on the re-establishment of the sector advisory panels is provided in a separate report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland City Centre Advisory Board report to Governing Body

23

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Carol Hayward - Principal Advisor Panels

John Dunshea – General Manager Development Programme Office

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - General Manager Democracy Services

Stephen Town - Chief Executive

 


Governing Body

01 November 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Governing Body

01 November 2019

 

 

Set up of the Advisory Panels for the 2019-2022 term

File No.: CP2019/18671

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   To endorse the mayor’s proposal to establish six demographic and three sector advisory panels for the 2019-2022 term, with new terms of reference.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council’s demographic and sector advisory panels enable the council to ensure that the views and needs of a wide range of communities of interest are incorporated in council’s decision-making.

3.       An evaluation carried out earlier this year by the council’s Research and Evaluation Unit (RIMU) confirmed that in the 2016-19 term, the demographic advisory panels provided valuable input into key plans and policies while giving the council unique opportunities to increase understanding of people from diverse communities and take these perspectives into account in its decision-making processes.

4.       An informal evaluation was also carried out through an online survey with sector panel members.

5.       The Mayor proposes that the council continues to have the same six demographic advisory panels and three sector advisory panels for the 2019-2022 term, to ensure that the council continues to access the voice of diverse communities of interest and respond to existing and emerging issues, building on the successful approach of the previous term.

6.       In response to the evaluation, this report provides the Mayor’s proposals on several aspects that would enhance the panels, such as the number of panel members, the appointment of chairs and an increase in Māori representation. It proposes a maximum number of terms and an increase in diversity across the demographic advisory panels. Additional protocols and processes of the panels are attached in the terms of reference in Attachments C-F.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      endorse the Mayor’s proposal to establish the following six demographic advisory panels during the 2019-2022 term:

i)        Disability Advisory Panel

ii)       Ethnic Peoples Advisory Panel

iii)      Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

iv)      Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel

v)      Seniors Advisory Panel

vi)      Youth Advisory Panel

 

 

 

b)      endorse the Mayor’s proposal to establish the following three sector advisory panels during the 2019-2022 term:

i) Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

ii)            Heritage Advisory Panel

iii)           Rural Advisory Panel

c)      endorse the updated terms of reference for the demographic and sector advisory panels.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 S(9) specifies that one of the roles of the Mayor of Auckland is to ensure there is effective engagement between the Auckland Council and the people of Auckland, including those too young to vote. The Mayor has the power to establish processes and mechanisms for the Auckland Council to engage with the people of Auckland, whether generally or particularly (for example, the people of a cultural, ethnic, geographic, or other community of interest).

8.       Auckland Council’s advisory panels are one of the mechanisms that give effect to these legislative terms.

9.       During the 2016-2019 term, the mayor established six demographic advisory panels:

·    Disability Advisory Panel

·    Ethnic Peoples Advisory Panel

·    Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

·    Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel

·    Seniors Advisory Panel

·    Youth Advisory Panel.

10.     Three sector panels were also established during this period:

·    Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

·    Heritage Advisory Panel

·    Rural Advisory Panel

11.     The advisory panels enable the council to ensure that the views and needs of a wide range of communities of interest were incorporated in the council’s decision-making, by:

·    reviewing and commenting on the content of the council’s strategies, policies, plans, bylaws and projects

·    advising the council on ways to communicate and engage effectively with their communities of interest

·    bringing to the attention of the council any matters that they consider to be of particular importance for or concern to their community of interest.


 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Earlier this year, Democracy Services commissioned the council’s Research and Evaluation Unit (RIMU) to carry out an evaluation of the 2016-19 term demographic advisory panels, to identify improvements that would be recommended to the Mayor following the 2019 local elections. The full report is attached at Attachment A. Key findings were:

·    advisory panels provided valuable input into key strategic planning and policy documents such as the Auckland Plan and Inclusive Auckland Framework

·    the panels provided the council with unique opportunities to build relationships with people from diverse communities, to increase understanding of their viewpoints and take these perspectives into account

·    panel members were provided with more opportunities to build relationships with councillors and senior staff and these were positively valued

·    panels are well supported by liaison councillors, lead officers, deputy lead officers and governance advisors, but more work is needed to clarify roles and build whakawhanaungatanga (team ties) at the start of the term

·    the role of the advisory panels in relation to facilitating communications and engagement is not well understood and clearer guidance and staff support is needed

·    continuity between terms should be enabled by reappointing up to half of a panel, but a term limit should also be introduced to allow new ideas and energy on to the panels

·    the remit and purpose of the Ethnic Peoples Advisory Panel should be revisited to address the challenges faced by the previous panel in representing Auckland’s superdiversity, and the diversity of other panels increased

·    the size of the Youth Advisory Panel should be reduced and remuneration should be brought in line with that of other advisory panel members.

13.     An informal evaluation was also carried out through an online survey of sector panel members. This was circulated in the agenda papers of the Governing Body on 26 September 2019. Key findings were as follows:

·    panel members thought that the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board (ACCAB) and the Rural Advisory Panel were generally working well

·    ACCAB members thought that their focus is helping to drive positive change within the city centre, however, board members felt that the council could work more closely across different departments and the council family to ensure that discussions are joined up at an early stage and that improvements are implemented quicker

·    Heritage Advisory Panel members did not feel that the panel was working well. They voiced frustration that the panel had no direct conduit to council committees. They felt that the council had little interest in heritage matters and that the panel’s views or recommendations were not being heard or considered during decision-making processes

·    Heritage and Rural Advisory Panel members felt that workshops with wider communities of interest would be beneficial from time to time to consider topics of mutual interest

·    panel members generally felt well supported by staff but some operational improvements were identified for each panel.

 

 

Proposed approach for the 2019-2022 term

14.     The Mayor proposes that the council continues to have the same six demographic advisory panels and three sector advisory panels for the 2019-2022 term, to ensure that the council continues to access the voice of diverse communities of interest and respond to existing and emerging issues. In response to the evaluation, the council proposes the following changes to the advisory panel model for a more effective engagement mechanism.

Demographic Advisory Panel proposed approach

15.     The full list of recommendations and responses to those recommendations is in Attachment B. Many of these changes are operational in nature and will readily be implemented by staff.

16.     Proposed strategic changes are as follows:

·    Update the criteria for recruitment to the Ethnic Peoples Advisory Panel to focus on the skills required within the panel, for example to support the development of guidelines on how to engage with minority ethnic communities.

·    Increase diversity within each panel and introduce a new minimum size of eight people to allow for that greater diversity.  The previous terms of reference state that the minimum size of a panel was six but feedback from the panels is that they struggled with workload and this was particularly challenging for the panels who lost members.

·    Introduce clearer processes to retire panel members who drop out without formally resigning and make it easier to recruit replacements during the term.

·    Introduce a maximum number of two full terms for panel members to encourage new thoughts and perspectives on the panels but support up to half of panel members to remain from one term to the next to provide continuity.

·    Maintain a small budget for communications and engagement activities but provide more clarity about the panels’ role in their delivery.

·    Provide an opportunity for panels to choose, shape and support a project that they feel passionate about as part of their work programme during the term.

·    Reduce the size of the Youth Advisory Panel (YAP) and remove the geographical connection. Facilitate connections with local board youth voice panels and other youth leadership groups to ensure a diversity of views is heard, to create strong youth networks across Auckland and a recruitment channel for the YAP.

·    One of the recommendations from the review was to increase the remuneration of the YAP members. The current Auckland Council fees framework, which is based on the government’s fees framework, measures the demographic advisory panels on the following criteria:

Skills, knowledge and experience

Function, level and scope

Complexity of issues

Public interest and profile

In the current framework, the Youth Advisory Panel have been scored lower than other demographic advisory panels on all four categories. However, the Youth Advisory Panel members provide a similar level of strategic advice to the council as the other panels.  To ensure that YAP members are able to participate at this strategic level, panel members will be recruited through existing Auckland Council youth voice groups, youth councils at schools and in community organisations where they have gained appropriate leadership experience.

On this basis, staff recommend that the remuneration of the YAP be increased to that of other panels as per the application of the fees framework.

 

17.     The demographic advisory panels could maintain an ongoing connection with the Auckland Plan’s Belonging and Participation outcome, help with the development of engagement guidelines for minority cultural and demographic communities and advise on the council’s ongoing climate change and environment focus. These topics should be referred to during the recruitment process to ensure that appointees have the skills and interests to participate in these discussions.

18.     The terms of reference for the demographic advisory panels have been updated to reflect these proposed changes and are attached as Attachment C.

Sector Advisory Panel proposed approach

19.     Key changes proposed for sector advisory panels are outlined below.

20.     Sector panels need stronger connection with committees so their advice can feed into the council’s decision-making process. An appropriate council committee should approve panels’ work programmes to give effect to panels’ advisory function. Each panel should have direct and formal connections with a relevant council committee to formally present its advice to the governing body.

21.     Staff recommend that the Auckland City Centre and Rural Advisory Panels continue in the same format and that the Heritage Advisory Panel be repurposed.

22.     The Rural Advisory Panel has contributed to improved outcomes for rural communities by offering a wide range of rural sector views, and providing strategic advice on the current and emerging needs of rural communities in Auckland. We recommend the panel continue to meet every two months and that they be given the opportunity to hold one to two stakeholder forums a year on topics of wider rural or environmental interest.

23.     Staff recommend that the Mayor appoint a councillor as Chair of the Rural Advisory Panel for a term of three years.

24.     The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board (ACCAB) advised on the work programme for the targeted rate and continue to be engaged in the development of the city centre projects. We recommend the board continue its advice on the development of the city centre with support from the council’s Development Programme Office. We recommend the board meet every month alternating between workshops and scheduled meetings. 

25.     In the last term, the ACCAB chair was elected by the board for a 12-month period every year. This was to ensure political neutrality of decisions related to targeted rate spending. For this term, we recommend that the Mayor appoint a chair for the three-year term who is independent from the stakeholder groups represented on the board.

26.     The Heritage Advisory Panel originally focused its advice on the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan, but during the last term, the panel mainly focused on updates from Auckland Council Heritage team during its bimonthly meetings.

27.     Due to this lighter workload, staff think that meeting two to four times a year would be more appropriate. In addition, members of the panel should be refreshed, retaining specialist skills but providing an opportunity for greater diversity and new voices into the group.

28.     A councillor has chaired the Heritage Advisory Panel since its establishment. Staff recommend that the Mayor appoint one of the members with heritage expertise and community standing as the chair of the Heritage Advisory Panel. Staff also recommend that there be a liaison councillor ensuring the link between the panel and the governing body.

29.     The terms of reference for the sector advisory panels have been updated to reflect these proposed changes and are attached as Attachments D-F.


 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.     Many of the advisory panels provided advice on climate change during the 2016-2019 term and identified this as a priority within their work programmes. There will be further opportunities for the panels to provide input over the coming term. This is anticipated to be one of the topics that will be highlighted during recruitment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     The advisory panels have connected with the Council Controlled Organisations during the previous term and it is anticipated that work will continue to strengthen this relationship during the 2019-2022 term. For example, Auckland Transport engaged with the demographic advisory panels at an integrated panel meeting as affordable, safe and accessible transport had been identified as a priority for many of these panels.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     While the panels offer strategic advice on regional issues primarily to the governing body and staff, panel members have previously welcomed the opportunity to engage with local boards through community forums and events.

33.     Local board members may directly engage with the panels to seek strategic advice on specific matters of interest to these communities of interest. Local board staff may seek guidance on how to engage with Auckland’s diverse communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     One of the council’s strategic priorities for Māori outcomes is to increase participation in decision-making. We are looking to achieve this by increasing the minimum number of representatives with lived experience in Te Ao Māori and knowledge of contemporary issues facing Māori from one to two people in all panels apart from the Ethnic and Pacific Peoples Advisory Panels. As part of the recruitment process, we will reach out through appropriate Māori networks.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     The Long-term Plan 2018-2022 set an annual budget of $401,740 for the operations of the panels. This should cover the costs of staff supporting the panels. The new panel model will be able to operate with the existing budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     The risk of not establishing the advisory panels could lead to the plans and services provided by the council not reflecting the needs of the communities we serve and widespread dissatisfaction by the communities of interest represented by the advisory panel model. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Once the governing body endorses the proposed panel model for this term, staff will implement a selection process for the appointment of panel members.

38.     For sector advisory panels, this will include a review of the current panel members and identification of any gaps in the current stakeholder representation. It will also include reaching out through appropriate Māori networks to increase representation of members with lived experience of Te Ao Māori as well as a significant refresh of the Heritage Advisory Panel membership.

39.     For the demographic advisory panels this will be a new selection process for all panels with a shortened process for up to half existing panel members who wish to reapply.

40.     Staff will present a report on the appointment of panel members for mayoral approval and endorsement from the governing body by April 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Review of the Demographic Advisory Panels

53

b

Summary of recommendations for the demographic advisory panels

129

c

Terms of Reference for the Demographic Advisory Panels

135

d

Auckland City Centre Advisory Board Terms of Reference

149

e

Heritage Advisory Panel Terms of Reference

163

f

Rural Advisory Panel Terms of Reference

175

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol Hayward - Principal Advisor Panels

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - General Manager Democracy Services

Phil Wilson - Governance Director

Stephen Town - Chief Executive

 


Governing Body

01 November 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Governing Body

01 November 2019

 

 

Response to RIMU recommendations for improvement

                       i.Recommendation

                     ii.Comment / progress

    iii. 

   iv.RECOMMENDATION 1: Strengthen the relationship with the Governing Body

     v. 

i.   Establish a panels’ forum with the Mayor: a six-monthly meeting with panel representatives to provide an update to the Mayor, raise major issues, and participate in a Q&A. Consider holding a nomination process within the panels to choose a representative for each forum meeting.

vi.Yes, to be arranged in partnership with the Mayor’s office

ii.  Provide orientation to liaison councillors about the expectations for the role (role at meetings, attendance, being an advocate).

vii.Yes, to be delivered in partnership with the Chief Liaison Councillor

iii.  Clarify the mechanisms that other councillors have to engage with the panels (e.g. that they can be invited to or ask to attend panel meetings).

viii.Yes, additional guidance will be provided to councillors

iv. Schedule at least three joint Panels/Governing Body/ELT meetings each term.

ix.Yes, these meetings were valued by the panels and will continue to be scheduled

v.  Continue to identify other opportunities for councillors to engage with the panels.

x.Yes, staff will continue to identify ways of involving councillors with the panels

    xi. 

  xii.RECOMMENDATION 2: Alter the expectations about the community forums

 xiii. 

i.   Retain the community engagement budget.

xiv.Yes

ii.  Remove the expectation that the panels would deliver community engagement.

xv.Yes, during recruitment and orientation, the panels’ role in community engagement will be made clear.

iii.  Provide staff support dedicated to organising community engagement activities, with panels having a less operational role.

xvi.The community engagement budget will be used, where required, to provide support. In addition, synergies will be sought as below.

iv. Find synergies with engagement that the council is doing themselves, but ensure that panel members are able to take a lead role in confirming what engagement they get involved with.

xvii.Yes, the terms of reference have been updated to recommend synergies with other council activities

xviii. 

 xix.RECOMMENDATION 3: Provide good practice guidance and more support for online engagement with communities

  xx. 

i.   Work with the panels to identify the most appropriate and sustainable ways of communicating and engaging with their community online.

xxi.Yes, the council has access to a range of tools that can be utilised by the panels for digital communication and engagement with their communities

ii.  Provide operational support to implement and maintain digital engagement channels. This could be done by existing or additional panel support staff.

xxii. 

xxiii. 

xxiv.Ways of delivering this support will be explored in the coming months.

xxv. 

xxvi.RECOMMENDATION 4: Clarify the panels’ role in connecting the council with communities

xxvii. 

i.   Clarify the role the panels play in connecting the council to their communities.

xxviii.Yes, expectations will be set during the recruitment process that the panels will assist the council in improving its engagement guidelines to reach Auckland’s diverse communities, not act as an ongoing conduit.

ii.  Communicate these expectations to the panels and council staff.

xxix.Yes, staff will ensure that guidance is provided to staff to manage expectations.

xxx. 

xxxi.RECOMMENDATION 5: Strengthen the mechanisms for closing the loop

xxxii. 

i.   Require council staff who receive advice from the panels to send a document outlining key messages back to the panel.

xxxiii.Options for the best way to manage this will be explored.

ii.  Adopt an action tracker template for all panels, incorporate feedback detail provided by council staff.

xxxiv.Yes – this was adopted by many of the panels in the 2016-2019 term so will be rolled out to all panels.

iii.  Strengthen ongoing communications between consulting staff and the panels around projects.

xxxv.Yes – clearer expectations will be set with staff who wish to consult with the panels

iv. Strengthen the report template guidance regarding the panels’ input and include an optional ‘demographic advisory panels’ heading where appropriate.

xxxvi.To be considered in partnership with the Quality Advice Programme.

v.  Encourage staff to invite panel chairs to present alongside them at committee meetings.

xxxvii.Guidance will be provided to staff where appropriate, bearing in mind panel members’ availability.

xxxviii. 

xxxix.RECOMMENDATION 6: Consolidate panel-related resources on Kotahi (the council intranet)

   xl. 

i.   Consolidate all the information about the panels onto a single page on Kotahi to make it easy for staff to access information about the panels and make it easy for the support staff to signpost interested people to the right place.

xli.Yes, most information is already available in a guidebook but new Kotahi pages are in progress

  xlii. 

xliii.RECOMMENDATION 7: Set clear expectations about workload (support staff)

xliv. 

i.   Revise the expectation of time commitment for lead and deputy lead officers from one day per month to at least two days per month.

xlv.The role description for staff is currently being updated based on feedback received.

ii.  Set up a formal arrangement where managers agree the amount of time that staff are released from their other roles to support their work with the panels.

xlvi.Staff will seek to ensure that support staff are well supported in their role.

iii.  Clarify the respective responsibilities between support staff.

xlvii.Yes. This will be covered during staff orientation

xlviii. 

xlix.RECOMMENDATION 8: Provide orientation and support (support staff)

      l. 

i.   Hold an induction workshop for lead and deputy lead officers.

li.Yes

ii.  Consider arranging peer-support mechanisms for the support staff.

lii.Yes

   liii. 

  liv.RECOMMENDATION 9: Provide training and orientation (panel members)

   lv. 

i.   Provide a training program for panel members, including topics such as governance, policy making, and conflicts of interest, and a separate training module for chairs.

lvi.Yes, discussions are underway with the Kura Kawana programme to access some of the same training modules for panel members which could be provided throughout the year

ii.  Provide time for active whakawhanaungatanga and team-building with fellow panel members and with support staff.

lvii.Yes, time will be set aside at the start of the term and annually

iii.  Allow panel members to get familiar with each other before selecting a chair. The council can appoint an interim chair and deputy chair for the initial time period or offer an option for the liaison councillor to facilitation the discussions in the interim.

lviii.The recommended approach is that the Mayor appoint the Chair and Deputy Chair within the first three months of the term.

iv. Provide opportunities for upskilling. Have regular check-in conversations with panel members about the way panel membership is going for them.

lix.Training will be provided as appropriate to their advisory role. Check-in conversations will also be initiated.

    lx. 

  lxi.RECOMMENDATION 10: Set clear expectations about workload (panel members)

 lxii. 

i.   Clarify the expectations about the amount of time and the type of remunerated and unremunerated work that panel members would be expected to commit to the role.

lxiii.An hourly rate is proposed for panel members to support any pre-approved activity additional to attending panel meetings.

ii.  Make sure that the scope of work required of panel members is in line with the expectations set out before they accept the role.

lxiv.Yes – recruitment material will be reviewed and updated as appropriate

iii.  Introduce an hourly rate to allow recognition of additional work by panel members.

lxv.Yes – this has been included within the updated terms of reference

 lxvi. 

lxvii.RECOMMENDATION 11: Make changes to the appointment process (panel members)

lxviii. 

i.   Enable the re-appointment of up to half of existing members to enhance continuity. Whether or not a panel member is re-appointed should depend in part on their good attendance and participation in the previous term.

lxix.Yes – however, in general there have been less than half panel members who wish to continue

ii.  Create a lessons-learned guide each term that passes on the knowledge between the panels.

lxx.Some information was gathered at the end of the term but this will be progressed for the 2019-2022 term.

iii.  Set a two-term or three-term limit for panel members.

lxxi.Yes – staff recommend two terms

iv. Strengthen the language used in the terms of reference about non-attendance to state that any member who misses three consecutive meetings without an apology would be deemed to have abandoned their position and replaced.

lxxii.Yes – terms of reference have been updated to strengthen this

v.  Simplify the process of replacing panel members, by creating a pipeline of approved candidates and/or delegating the responsibility for mid-term panel appointments.

lxxiii.Yes – the terms of reference have been updated to clarify this

lxxiv. 

lxxv.RECOMMENDATION 12: Enhance diversity and representation within the panels

lxxvi. 

i.   Actively apply a diversity lens during recruitment in order to promote diversity within the panels. Involve the Diversity and Inclusion Team during the recruitment of the panel members.

lxxvii.Yes. Efforts will be made to reach into a wide range of diverse communities to attract candidates who can help us to meet this goal.

ii.  Raise the minimum number of members on the panel from six to eight to enable greater diversity among members.

lxxviii.Yes. Terms of reference have been updated to reflect this.

iii.  Offer intersectional candidates, who fit the demographic profile of two or more panels, a choice as to which panel to serve on.

lxxix.Yes – this will be managed in way that will help to enable greater diversity within each panel

iv. Encourage and support panel members to move between panels in different terms to enhance diversity and cross-over.

lxxx.Yes – within the proposed two term limit for panel members.

v.  Demonstrate the importance of Te Ao Māori and the Treaty of Waitangi by providing more emphasis on the Treaty throughout the term as well as support and guidance during orientation.

lxxxi.Yes – the terms of reference for the panels will be increased to two members with Te Ao Māori experience and guidance about the Treaty will be provided as part of the orientation process.

lxxxii. 

lxxxiii.RECOMMENDATION 13: Clarify the role of advocacy and support the panels to advocate on behalf of their communities

lxxxiv. 

i.   Clarify the role of advocacy in panel functioning

lxxxv.The panels are established to provide advice to the Mayor and Governing Body. Enabling an advocacy role creates tensions between the panel being able to deliver on their core function.

ii.  Consider offering panel members means to choose, shape and support a project they feel passionate about in collaboration with the relevant council department.

lxxxvi.To be considered in partnership with the panels and the liaison councillors

iii.  Consider time and resource implications of this change: panel members should be remunerated for their time working on the project.

lxxxvii.Yes, as appropriate.

lxxxviii. 

lxxxix.RECOMMENDATION 14: Encourage inter-panel interactions and collaborations

  xc. 

i.   Look for more opportunities to bring panel members together, both in formal and informal capacities.

          xci. 

xcii.Yes – opportunities will be identified where appropriate

ii.  Consider establishing cross-panel working groups on specific issues but be mindful of purpose, workload, and appropriate remuneration.

        xciii. 

       xciv. 

        xcv. 

xcvi.Yes – opportunities will be identified where appropriate

xcvii. 

xcviii. 

xcix.RECOMMENDATION 15: Provide technology solutions to enhance communication

     c. 

i.   Provide technology solutions to enhance communications between the council and panel members and to reduce paper usage. 

ci.Yes – the council’s new technology platform Nexus will fulfil this

   cii. 

 ciii.RECOMMENDATION 16: Revisit the set-up of the Ethnic Peoples Advisory Panel

 civ. 

i.   Revisit the remit and purpose of the Ethnic Peoples Advisory Panel before the new panel is set up and recruited. For example, the recruitment onto the panel could be skills-based (e.g. experience-based ability to consider the views of newcomers and migrants)

cv.Work is underway to develop skills criteria for the recruitment process

ii.  Reflect the growing diversity of Auckland in the ethnic compositions of all demographic advisory panels. 

cvi.Yes – will be considered during the recruitment process

 cvii. 

cviii.RECOMMENDATION 17: Consider changes to the set-up of the Youth Advisory Panel

 cix. 

i.   Reduce the number of panel members from 21 (local-board based) to 13 (ward based). This would maintain the historic geographic spread of the panel and help the panel maintain continuity during the term in spite of relatively high turnover.

cx.Partly – this is proposed to be the same set up as other panels with 8-12 members and no geographic connection. There is an opportunity to formally arrange youth hui with local youth groups once or twice a year (18 local boards have youth groups).

ii.  Clarify and emphasise the fact that the panellists are not ward representatives.

cxi.Yes – reducing the size of the panel and the geographical connection will remove any confusion.

iii.  Increase remuneration levels to that of other panels. 

cxii.Yes - the criteria set within the fees framework have been reviewed and can be adapted so that YAP members are on the same remuneration level as other panel members.

 


Governing Body

01 November 2019

 

 

Terms of Reference

Auckland Council Demographic Advisory Panels

2019-2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DISABILITY ADVISORY PANEL

ETHNIC PEOPLES ADVISORY PANEL

PACIFIC PEOPLES ADVISORY PANEL

RAINBOW COMMUNITIES ADVISORY PANEL

SENIORS ADVISORY PANEL

YOUTH ADVISORY PANEL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Contents

Terms of Reference. 5

Demographic advisory panels. 5

Purpose. 5

Outcomes. 5

Strategic agenda and work programme. 5

Chief liaison councillor and liaison councillors. 6

Selection process. 6

Membership. 6

Meetings and workshops. 7

Quorum.. 7

Meeting protocols. 7

Submissions. 8

Communications and engagement. 8

Media. 8

Panel resourcing. 8

Staff support. 9

Governance Director. 9

Principal Advisor Panels. 9

Lead Officer Support. 9

Deputy Lead Officer Support. 9

Communications Advisor / Specialist. 10

Advisor Governance Support. 10

Review.. 10

Appendix A: Code of Conduct for members appointed to Advisory Panels. 11

1 Purpose. 11

2 Principles. 11

2.1 Honesty and integrity. 11

2.2 Impartiality and accountability. 11

2.3 Openness. 11

2.4 Respect. 11

2.5 Duty to uphold the law.. 11

2.6 Stewardship. 11

2.7 Leadership. 12

3 Relationships. 12

3.1 Chair. 12

3.2 All members. 12

3.3 Employees of Auckland Council. 12

4 Media. 12

4.1 Spokesperson. 12

4.2 Response to media enquiries. 12

4.3 Personal views. 13

5 Confidential information. 13

6 Ethics. 13

7 Members’ interests. 13

7.1 Acting in the interests of the advisory panel and the public. 13

8 Complaints. 14

Appendix B: Qualifications of Members. 15

 


 

    AMENDMENTS

Version

Amendment

Committee

Resolution #

V1.0

Mayoral Proposal

Governing Body

 

 

·     

 

 


 

Terms of Reference   

 

The terms of reference set out the purpose, role and protocols of all Auckland Council demographic advisory panels. Panel members abide by the Code of Conduct for members of Auckland Council advisory panels (Appendix A).

Demographic advisory panels

The demographic advisory panels of Auckland Council in the 2019-2022 term are the:

·    Disability Advisory Panel

·    Ethnic Peoples Advisory Panel

·    Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel

·    Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel

·    Seniors Advisory Panel

·    Youth Advisory Panel.

Purpose

As one of council’s engagement mechanisms with diverse communities, the demographic advisory panels provide advice to the governing body and council staff within the remit of the Auckland Plan on the following areas:

 

·    Auckland Council’s regional policies, plans and strategies

·    regional and strategic matters including those that Council-Controlled Organisations deal with

·    any matter of particular interest or concern to diverse communities.

Outcomes

The panels’ advice will contribute to improving the outcomes of diverse communities and social cohesion as set out in the Auckland Plan. The panels will advise through their agreed strategic agenda and detailed work programme.

Strategic agenda and work programme

The panels must develop a work programme and set a strategic agenda for the term. The agendas should be focused and integrated across the panels for collaborative input into shared agendas, particularly in relation to the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan and regional policies.

 

The panels should advise on council’s operational and organisational strategies relevant to diverse communities, for example, the diversity leadership strategy as part of the Engage and Enable Communities approach.

 

The panels may also consider whether they wish to choose, shape and support a project they feel passionate about as part of their work programme.

 

The governing body and council staff should work with the panels for the development of their strategic agendas and work programme. An appropriate committee will approve the panels’ work programme and any subsequent major changes to it.

Chief liaison councillor and liaison councillors

The Mayor appoints a chief liaison councillor and one liaison councillor for each of the six advisory panels.

The role of a chief liaison councillor is to:

 

·    support a more integrated panel approach

·    provide connections between the governing body and the panels

·    advise the mayor on panel issues.

 

The role of a liaison councillor is to:

 

·    ensure that the governing body is aware of panels’ feedback on council issues and their advice on diverse communities.

·    help align the panels’ strategic agendas with governing body priorities

·    actively engage in panel meetings and workshops

·    engage with the panel chair and the lead officer for meeting agendas

 

The panels will mainly engage with the governing body through the environment and community committee meetings or workshops. The panels may also engage with other committees considering regional plans and strategies on which the panels have provided advice.

Selection process

The selection process of panel members is open for applications. The members of the panels are selected on the basis of their:

 

·    individual competencies

·    lived experience with relevant diverse communities

·    ability to offer policy and strategic advice

·    understanding of diverse communities of Auckland

·    understanding of Te Tiriti O Waitangi.

 

Qualification of members is set out in Appendix B. 

 

The mayor appoints panel members with the endorsement of the governing body to give effect to the membership of the panels. If members need to be replaced during the term, the mayor can make the appointment in consultation with the Chief Liaison Councillor and the panel liaison councillor.

Membership

Each panel has between eight and twelve members.

 

Members of the Youth Advisory Panel should be aged between 14 and 24 at the time they are appointed. The members of the Youth Advisory Panel are exempt from clause (2)(a) of Appendix B.

 

Panels should have at least two members with lived experience in Te Ao Māori and knowledge of the contemporary issues facing Māori communities. The representation of Māori members may not be applicable to the Ethnic Peoples Advisory Panel or the Pacific Peoples Advisory Panel.

 

When a panel has less than eight members, the council must appoint additional members to meet the minimum number of members. The council may consider appointing previous unsuccessful applicants.

 

The council will appoint the next highly ranked candidates in the selection process should any appointed members decline the appointment offer or decide to leave the panel.

 

Auckland Council family staff including CCOs are not eligible to be panel members.

 

Any vacant panel positions are not to be replaced when the panel’s term has less than 12 months until the next local government elections take place.

 

The panels’ term ends one month prior to the next local government elections in 2022.

 

The membership of a panel member will lapse if one or more of the disqualifying matters set out in Appendix B applies to the panel member.

 

If a member fails to attend a significant number of meetings, breaches the Code of Conduct or otherwise underperforms in his/her duty as a member, the chair or officers must first raise the issues directly with the member and try and resolve them by mutual agreement. If under-performance continues the chair can recommend to the Mayor that the member be removed from the panel.

 

Meetings and workshops

Each panel will have a maximum of three formal meetings and up to seven workshops per year at a time deemed convenient to the majority of members.

 

Scheduled meetings are open to the public and any elected members of Auckland Council.

 

Workshops are used for discussion between panel members, governing body members and relevant council staff.

 

Two to four times a year, workshops will also be held to bring together all demographic advisory panels on shared council agendas, for example, the council’s diversity leadership strategy.

 

Additional workshops or meetings will be organised in agreement with General Manager Democracy Services to advance the panels’ strategic agenda and work programme depending on the availability of budget.

 

Quorum

The quorum required for resolutions at a scheduled meeting of the panels will be half the members if the number of members is even, and a majority if the number of members is odd. The quorum includes the chief liaison councillor and liaison councillors.

Meeting protocols

The mayor will appoint the chair and deputy chair or co-chairs for each of the advisory panels within three months of the establishment of the panels. The chair or co-chairs are responsible for chairing all panel meetings and workshops.

 

The panels may invite presentations from external organisations and individuals in scheduled meetings if the topics are relevant to the panels’ strategic agendas. The chair approves such external presentations in consultation with the liaison councillor and the lead support officer.

 

The resolutions in each meeting should clearly be shown in meeting minutes. Minutes will be kept for workshops but will not be published.

 

Submissions

The panel cannot make formal submissions to Auckland Council on council strategies, policies and plans, for example, the annual plan. However, the panel may be asked for informal feedback during a consultative process.

 

In its advisory role to the council, the panels may have input to submissions made by the council to external organisations but do not make independent submissions, except as agreed with the council.

 

This does not prevent individual members being party to submissions outside their role as panel members.

 

Communications and engagement

The panels are provided with a small budget to facilitate communication and engagement activities, for example community forums. This can be used to better inform the council of community perspectives and to facilitate discussion between the council and diverse communities on council issues. Where possible, the panels should work with council staff to complement council’s other communication and engagement mechanisms. 

 

Media

The panels may issue media releases through the council’s communications advisor on council matters or issues of importance to their respective communities. Any media release by a panel requires the approval of the mayoral office.

 

The panels should refer to the Code of Conduct in the event that a panel member receives a request for panel comment directly from a journalist or media outlet.

Panel resourcing

The council sets an annual budget for the panels.

 

All panel members are entitled to meeting fees as determined by the council on the basis of the Auckland Council Fees Framework and Expenses Policy for Appointed Members. An hourly rate may also be applied where work other than preparation for and attendance of meetings is required. This must be pre-approved and minuted before the work is undertaken.

 

The council will reimburse personal expenditure incurred in conducting panel business, in line with the Expenses Policy.

Staff support

The panels are supported by the following council staff.

Governance Director

The Governance Director

·    is the executive leadership team member responsible for advisory panels

·    through the General Manager Democracy Services, works with the mayor’s office to create strong links between the panels, the governing body and the organisation

·    drives and promotes the council’s engagement with panels through the executive team

·    brings panel views on council’s organisational strategy for the consideration of the executive team where appropriate.

Principal Advisor Panels

The Principal Advisor Panels:

·    ensures appropriate processes and policies are in place for the panels

·    supports the Chief Liaison Councillor for panels’ connection with the governing body

·    facilitates working across panels

·    negotiates and brokers strategic agendas between the panels and the council

·    ensures strategic agenda and work programme are signed off by the governing body

·    co-ordinates monitoring and reporting of progress on the panels’ strategic agendas

·    establishes and oversees processes for communication between the panels and communities

·    arranges recruitment and induction of members

·    provides a final report on the panels’ achievements at the end of the council term.

Lead Officer Support

The Lead Officer Support:

·    advises the chair on the strategic agendas

·    co-ordinates development of the panels’ strategic agenda and work programme

·    follows up on meeting actions and resolutions

·    acts as a conduit with relevant parts of organisation for the panels

·    supports the liaison councillor

·    attends pre-meeting briefings with the chair and liaison councillor

·    highlights potential issues and risks

·    sits next to the chair in meetings to provide advice as appropriate

·    ensures guidance and advice from the panels is clearly captured 

·    provides subject matter expertise.

Deputy Lead Officer Support

The Deputy Lead Officer Support:

·    supports the lead officer to develop the panels’ strategic agendas

·    updates the panels’ agendas and write necessary reports for panel meetings and workshops

·    performs delegated tasks from the Lead Officer Support.

Communications Advisor / Specialist

The Communications Advisor / Specialist:

·    is the panels’ initial point of contact for all media activity undertaken by or in collaboration with the panels

·    can assist with communicating matters of relevance to the panels and/or related to the panels’ strategic agenda and work programme

·    provides advice and works with the panel chair and/or delegated panel spokesperson and relevant support staff in response to media inquiries and other communications. This may include reviewing and providing feedback on draft media releases and other communications.

Governance Advisor

The Advisor Governance Support:

·    prepares for meeting agendas and schedule

·    arranges panel meetings and workshops

·    takes meeting minutes and publishes them online on time

·    acts as a first point of contact for panel issues, and refers inquiries or information to relevant council staff.

 

Review

 

The form and functioning of the panels may be reviewed prior to or after, the end of the panels’ term in September 2022.


 

Appendix A: Code of Conduct for members appointed to Advisory Panels

 

1 Purpose

The Code of Conduct sets out expectations for the general conduct of members of Auckland Council advisory panels.

2 Principles

The principles underlying the expected conduct of members include:

2.1 Honesty and integrity

Members have a duty to act honestly and with integrity at all times.

2.2 Impartiality and accountability

Members should consider issues on their merits, taking into account the views of others. This means co-operating fully and honestly to ensure the best advice is provided to the council.

2.3 Openness

Members should be as open as possible about their actions and advice. This includes having an open mind and a willingness to listen to differing points of view. This means giving reasons for advice given; communicating clearly; not being close-minded and taking personal ownership of comments made publicly.

2.4 Respect

Members should treat others, including staff, with respect at all times. This means not using derogatory terms towards others, or about others, including in public-facing media; not misrepresenting the statements or actions of others (whether they be other individual members, the governing body, local boards, committees or staff); observing the rights of other people; treating people with courtesy, and recognising the different roles others play in local government decision-making.

2.5 Duty to uphold the law

Members should uphold the law and, on all occasions, act in accordance with the trust the public places in them.

2.6 Stewardship

Members should ensure that they and the council use resources prudently and for lawful purposes.

2.7 Leadership

Members should promote and support these principles by example.

 

3 Relationships

3.1 Chair

The chair (co-chairs in the case of the Rainbow Communities Advisory Panel) is the presiding member at the meetings and is the spokesperson(s) for the panel.

3.2 All members

Members will conduct their dealings with each other in ways that:

·    maintain public confidence in the office to which they have been appointed

·    are open and honest

·    focus on issues rather than personalities.

3.3 Employees of Auckland Council

Members will:

·    not do anything which compromises, or could be seen as compromising, the impartiality of an employee

·    avoid publicly criticising any employee in any way

·    raise concerns about an employee only through the employee’s employer.

 

4 Media

4.1 Spokesperson

The chair is the first point of contact for the official view of the panels on any issue. Where the chair is absent, any matters will be referred to the deputy chair when applicable.

 

No other member may comment on behalf of the panels without having first obtained the approval of the chair.

4.2 Response to media enquiries

In the event that a panel member receives a request for panel comment directly from a journalist or media outlet, the member is required to forward the request immediately to the panels’ assigned communications advisor as well as the panel chairs. Panel members must not respond directly to media without prior agreement.

 

Where a journalist or media outlet seeks an individual panel member’s views, the panel member will:

·    make clear that the views presented represent the personal views of the individual member

·    ensure that information presented is consistent with information provided to the panel

·    maintain the integrity of the panels and Auckland Council at all times.

4.3 Personal views

Members are free to express a personal view in public or in the media, at any time. When doing so, they should observe the following:

 

·    comments must make clear that they represent a personal view and must not state or imply that they represent the views of the panels

·    where a member is making a statement that is contrary to a panel policy, the member must not state or imply that his or her statements represent a majority view

·    comments to the media must observe the other expectations of general conduct, e.g. not disclose confidential information, or compromise the impartiality or integrity of staff.

 

 

5 Confidential information

 

If members receive information that is confidential they must ensure it remains confidential. Confidential information is normally deemed to be such because its public release will cause some harm, either to the council or to other parties.

 

 

6 Ethics

 

Members will:

·    claim only for legitimate expenses

·    not influence, or attempt to influence, any officer or employee to take actions that may benefit the member, or the member’s family or business interests

·    not use the resources of the panels for personal business

·    not solicit, demand, or request any gift, reward or benefit by virtue of the member’s position.

 

7 Members’ interests

7.1 Acting in the interests of the advisory panel and the public

Members act in the interests of the panels and not in their own interests.

 

A financial conflict of interest arises when a member stands to benefit financially, either directly or indirectly, from advice given by the panels.

 

A non-financial conflict may arise from a personal relationship or association with another organisation or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination. In these situations a member may be influenced by interests that conflict with the duty to act in the best interests of the panels.

 

Members must declare any private interests or personal benefits relating to their public duties and take steps to resolve any conflicts of interest in such a way that protects the public interest. This means fully disclosing actual or potential conflicts of interest; avoiding any financial or other obligation to any individual or organisation that might reasonably be thought to influence them in the performance of their duties.

 

 

8 Complaints

 

A complaint about a member’s conduct will be made to the chair of the panels in the first instance, who will counsel the member concerned. Alternatively, concerns about the conduct of any member or chairperson may be raised with the General Manager Democracy Services, who will give advice on options available to resolve the concerns.


 

Appendix B: Qualifications of Members

 

1.   To be a member of the board, a person must

 

a.      be a natural person, and

b.      consent to being appointed to the board, and

c.      not be disqualified under sub clause (2).

 

 

2.   The following persons are disqualified from being members:

 

a.   a person who is under 18 years of age (except for the Youth Advisory Panel)

b.   a person who is an undischarged bankrupt

c.   a person who is prohibited from being a director or promoter of, or being concerned or taking part in the management of, an incorporated or unincorporated body under the Companies Act 1993, or the Securities Act 1978, or the Securities Markets Act 1988, or the Takeovers Act 1993

d.   a person who is subject to a property order under the Protection of Personal and Property Rights Act 1988

e.   a person in respect of whom a personal order has been made under that Act that reflects adversely on the person’s

i.    competence to manage his or her own affairs in relation to his or her property; or

ii.    capacity to make or to communicate decisions relating to any particular aspect or aspects of his or her personal care and welfare

f.    a person who has been convicted of an offence punishable by imprisonment for a term of two years or more, or who has been sentenced to imprisonment for any other offence

g.   a current member of Parliament

h.   a current Auckland councillor or current local board member

i.    a current Independent Māori Statutory Board member

j.    a person who is disqualified under another Act.


Governing Body

01 November 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Terms of Reference

Auckland Council

Auckland City Centre Advisory Board 2019 - 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contents

Terms of Reference. 3

Purpose. 3

Outcome. 3

Role of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board. 3

Membership. 3

Selection process. 5

Resignation. 5

Chair and Deputy Chair 5

Meetings. 5

Quorum.. 6

Submissions. 6

Engagement with Auckland Council 6

Agendas. 6

Staff support 7

Lead Officer Support 7

Deputy Lead Officer Support (if required) 7

Principal Advisor Panels. 7

Governance Advisor 7

Additional support 8

Resourcing. 8

Review.. 8

Appendix A: Code of Conduct for members appointed to Auckland City Centre Advisory Board. 9

1 Purpose. 9

2 Principles. 9

2.1 Honesty and integrity. 9

2.2 Impartiality and accountability. 9

2.3 Openness. 9

2.4 Respect 9

2.5 Duty to uphold the law.. 9

2.6 Stewardship. 9

2.7 Leadership. 9

3 Relationships. 10

3.1 Chair 10

3.2 All members. 10

3.3 Employees of Auckland Council 10

4 Media. 10

4.1 Spokesperson. 10

4.2 Response to media enquiries. 10

4.3 Personal views. 11

5 Confidential information. 11

6 Ethics. 11

7 Members’ interests. 11

8 Complaints. 11

Appendix B: Qualifications of Members. 12

 


Terms of Reference

 

The terms of reference sets out the purpose, role and protocols of the Auckland Council Auckland City Centre Advisory Board for the 2019-2022 term of the council. Board members must abide by the Code of Conduct for members of Auckland Council advisory boards (Appendix A).

Purpose

 

The board advises Auckland Council on the alignment of the city centre targeted rate investment portfolio to the needs of the city centre, provides advice on council’s strategies, policies, plans, bylaws and programmes in relation to city centre development, as well as key issues and opportunities to support city centre outcomes.

 

Auckland Council includes:

 

·    the governing body and its relevant committees

·    Waitematā Local Board

·    the wider council group.

Outcome

 

The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board will contribute to growing and consolidating the city centre’s international reputation as:

 

·    one of the largest generators of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in New Zealand

·    a high quality living urban environment

·    one of the most popular destinations for Aucklanders and visitors to the region

·    a world class centre for education, research, innovation and development.

Role of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

 

The role of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board is to:

 

·    advise on council strategies and plans that impact on Auckland city centre

·    advise on the priorities of the City Centre Targeted Rate investment portfolio

·    recommend any proposed changes to the Auckland City Centre Targeted Rate policy.

·    advise on issues and opportunities to support city centre outcomes and its success

·    as appropriate, members may participate on behalf of the board, as part of stakeholder reference groups to provide feedback to city centre projects and initiatives

·    work with the council group staff to achieve shared outcomes for the city centre. 

 

 

Membership

 

The board will include the following sectors:

City Stakeholders

Representatives

Corporate sector including financial and other professional services

3

Design (NZ Institute of Architects)

1

Tourism and travel sector

1

Business associations (Heart of the City and Karangahape Road Business Association)

2

Retail sector

1

Tertiary education (one from each of the University of Auckland and Auckland University of Technology)

2

Ngati Whatua representative

1

Additional Māori representative

1

Residents association/organisation

2

Property Council New Zealand

1

Arts and culture nominated by the Advisory Panel for Art in Public Places

1

Transport sector

1

His Worship Mayor Phil Goff (and Chair of an appropriate committee as an alternate)

1

Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor

1

Waitematā Local Board Member

1

Total number

20

 

The board will have between 15 and 21 members at all time including three elected members.

 

The board must have at least two members with lived experience in Te Ao Māori and knowledge of the contemporary issues facing the Auckland city centre.

 

The board will have one member from the City Centre Resident Group and one member from another residents’ association in the Auckland city centre.  

 

The Waitematā Local Board will select its representative to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board.

 

The board’s term ends one month prior to the next local government elections in 2022. The council will review the membership of the board before or after the end of the current term.

 

The membership of a board member will lapse if one or more of the disqualifying matters set out in Appendix B applies to the board member.

 

If a member fails to attend a significant number of meetings, breaches the code of conduct or otherwise underperforms in his/her duty as a member, the chair must raise the issue of expectations about performance with the member and, if necessary, with the lead officer. If under-performance continues, the chair can recommend to the Mayor that the member be removed from the board.

 

Selection process

 

The Mayor invites members of the city centre community to participate on the board having considered their:

 

·    association with an Auckland city centre group or organisation

·    ability to provide expert advice on Auckland city centre issues

·    understanding of Auckland city centre issues

·    commitment to the board.

 

All board members are representatives of sector groups or organisations and have a city centre focus. Board members may send a proxy if they are unavailable to attend a meeting.

 

Qualification of members is set out in Appendix B. 

Resignation

 

When a member wishes to resign from the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board, the member is asked to:

 

·    offer the chair written resignation by way of letter or email

·    offer one month’s notice so that a suitable replacement may be appointed.

 

The lead officer will then commence a process to assist the Mayor to select a replacement member in accordance with the criteria set out in these Terms of Reference.

Chair and Deputy Chair 

 

The chair and deputy chair will be appointed by the Mayor.

 

The three elected members on the board are ineligible to be appointed as chair and deputy chair.

Meetings

 

The board will meet monthly, alternating between meetings and workshops, at a time deemed convenient to the majority of members.

 

Scheduled meetings are open to the public and any elected members of Auckland Council. Workshops are used for discussion between board members, governing body members and relevant council group staff.

Meetings will generally be of two hours duration unless an alternative duration is agreed beforehand.

 

Sub-groups may be formed to further advise on city centre issues, with board members taking responsibility for advising on particular projects or outcomes.

           

The resolutions in each meeting should clearly be shown in meeting minutes.

Quorum

 

The quorum required for the board meeting will be half the members if the number of members is even, and a majority if the number of members is odd.

Submissions

·                      

·                     The board will advise on council strategies, policies and plans prior to any submission process, and will not make formal submissions to Auckland Council.

 

These terms of reference provide for the board to have its views incorporated into the development of Auckland Council proposals affecting the city centre. For this reason, the board is expected not to submit through parallel public consultation processes.

 

This does not prevent individual members being party to submissions outside their role as board members.

Engagement with Auckland Council

 

The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board may make recommendations to:

·    governing body and its committees

·    Waitematā Local Board

·    Council Controlled Organisations including Auckland Transport, Panuku Development Auckland, the Regional Facilities Auckland and Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development

 

depending on which of these bodies has decision making authority over the matter(s) being reported on.

 

Where the board believes a direct communication needs to be provided to the council, its committees, or the chief executive, the chair should do so in writing and provide a copy of that communication for inclusion on the next agenda of the board.

Agendas

 

Board meeting agendas will be distributed three working days prior to the meeting date.

Meeting agendas will be set by the chair and/or the deputy chair in consultation with the lead officer.

A proposed agenda item may be submitted by a board member to the Governance Advisor 15 days prior to a board meeting. If the item is not accepted by the chair and/or deputy chair, the member will be advised of the reason prior to the agenda being circulated.

Minutes of the board meetings will be distributed to members and public no later than five working days after the board meeting.

 

Staff support

 

The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board is supported by the following council staff.

Lead Officer Support

 

The Lead Officer Support is the Auckland Council Development Programme Office General Manager who:

 

·    facilitates development of the board’s work programme

·    follows up on meeting actions and resolutions

·    acts as a conduit with relevant parts of the organisation for the board

·    attends pre-meeting briefings with the chair if scheduled

·    highlights potential issues and risks

·    sits next to the chair in meetings to provide advice as appropriate

·    ensures guidance and advice from the board is clearly captured 

·    provides subject matter expertise.

 

Deputy Lead Officer Support (if required)

 

The Deputy Lead Officer Support:

 

·    supports the lead officer to develop the board’s work programme

·    updates board agendas and writes reports as necessary for board meetings

·    performs delegated tasks from the Lead Officer Support.

 

Principal Advisor Panels

 

The Principal Advisor Panels:

 

·    ensures appropriate processes and policies are in place for the board

·    arranges the appointment process and induction of members.

 

Governance Advisor

 

The Governance Advisor:

 

·    prepares for meeting agendas and schedule

·    arranges board meetings

·    takes meeting minutes and publishes them online

·    acts as a first point of contact for board issues and refers inquiries or information to relevant council staff.

 

Additional support

 

To effectively deliver on the board’s role of providing advice on Auckland city centre matters, representatives from the Auckland Council group are expected to attend whenever an item relevant to their operations is on the Board agenda for that meeting.

Resourcing

 

Auckland Council Democracy Services will support catering and administrative support for board meetings through the Governance Advisor.

 

Members will not be paid meeting fees as representatives of their respective organisations. However, the council will reimburse personal expenditure incurred in conducting board business, in line with the Auckland Council Expenses Policy.

Review

 

The form and functioning of the board may be reviewed prior to or after, the end of the year 2022.

 


 

Appendix A: Code of Conduct for members appointed to Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

1 Purpose

·                     The Code of Conduct sets out expectations for the general conduct of members of Auckland City Centre Advisory Board of Auckland Council.

2 Principles

·                     The principles underlying the expected conduct of members include:

2.1 Honesty and integrity

·                     Members have a duty to act honestly and with integrity at all times.

2.2 Impartiality and accountability

·                     Members should consider issues on their merits, taking into account the views of others. This means co-operating fully and honestly to ensure the best advice is provided to the council.

2.3 Openness

·                     Members should be as open as possible about their actions and advice. This includes having an open mind and a willingness to listen to differing points of view. This means giving reasons for advice given; communicating clearly; not being close-minded and taking personal ownership of comments made publicly.

2.4 Respect

·                     Members should treat others, including staff, with respect at all times. This means not using derogatory terms towards others, or about others, including in public-facing media; not misrepresenting the statements or actions of others (whether they be other individual members, the governing body, local boards, committees or staff); observing the rights of other people; treating people with courtesy, and recognising the different roles others play in local government decision-making.

2.5 Duty to uphold the law

·                     Members should uphold the law and, on all occasions, act in accordance with the trust the public places in them.

2.6 Stewardship

·                     Members should ensure that they and the council use resources prudently and for lawful purposes.

2.7 Leadership

·                     Members should promote and support these principles by example.

3 Relationships

3.1 Chair

The chair is the presiding member at the meetings and is the spokesperson for the board.

3.2 All members

·                     Members will conduct their dealings with each other in ways that:

·    maintain public confidence in the board to which they have been appointed

·    are open and honest

·    focus on issues rather than personalities.

3.3 Employees of Auckland Council

·                     Members will:

·    recognise that employees of Auckland Council or any other organisation providing advice or services to the panels

·    not do anything which compromises, or could be seen as compromising, the impartiality of an employee

·    avoid publicly criticising any employee in any way

·    raise concerns about an employee only through the employee’s employer.

·                      

4 Media

4.1 Spokesperson

·                     The chair is the first point of contact for the official view of the board on any issue. Where the chair is absent, any matters will be referred to the deputy chair when applicable.

·                      

·                     No other member may comment on behalf of the board without having first obtained the approval of the chair.

4.2 Response to media enquiries

In the event that a board member receives a request for board comment directly from a journalist or media outlet, the member will forward the request immediately to the board chair. Board members must not respond directly to media without prior agreement.

 

Where a journalist or media outlet seeks an individual board member’s views, the board member will:

·    make clear that the views presented represent the personal views of the individual member

·    ensure that information presented is consistent with information provided to the board

·    maintain the integrity of the board and Auckland Council at all times.

4.3 Personal views

·                     Members are free to express a personal view in public or in the media, at any time. When doing so, they should observe the following:

·                      

·    comments must make clear that they represent a personal view and must not state or imply that they represent the views of the board

·    where a member is making a statement that is contrary to a board policy, the member must not state or imply that his or her statements represent a majority view

·    comments to the media must observe the other expectations of general conduct, e.g. not disclose confidential information, or compromise the impartiality or integrity of staff.

5 Confidential information

·                     If members receive information that is confidential they must ensure it remains confidential. Confidential information is normally deemed to be such because its public release will cause some harm, either to the council or to other parties.

6 Ethics

·                     Members will:

·    claim only for legitimate expenses

·    not influence, or attempt to influence, any officer or employee to take actions that may benefit the member, or the member’s family or business interests

·    not use the resources of the board for personal business

·    not solicit, demand, or request any gift, reward or benefit by virtue of the member’s position.

7 Members’ interests

·                     Members act in the interests of the board and not in their own interests.

·                      

·                     Members must declare any private interests or personal benefits relating to their public duties and take steps to resolve any conflicts of interest in such a way that protects the public interest. This means fully disclosing actual or potential conflicts of interest; avoiding any financial or other obligation to any individual or organisation that might reasonably be thought to influence them in the performance of their duties.

8 Complaints

A complaint about a member’s conduct will be made to the chair of the board in the first instance, who will counsel the member concerned. Alternatively, concerns about the conduct of any member or chairperson may be raised with the Lead Officer Support, who will give advice on options available to resolve the concerns.

 

 


 

Appendix B: Qualifications of Members

 

To be a member of the Board, a person must

a.      be a natural person, and

b.      consent to being appointed to the board, and

c.      not be disqualified under sub clause (2).

 

The following persons are disqualified from being members:

a.   a person who is an undischarged bankrupt

b.   a person who is prohibited from being a director or promoter of, or being concerned or taking part in the management of, an incorporated or unincorporated body under the Companies Act 1993, or the Securities Act 1978, or the Securities Markets Act 1988, or the Takeovers Act 1993

c.   a person who is subject to a property order under the Protection of Personal and Property Rights Act 1988

d.   a person in respect of whom a personal order has been made under that Act that reflects adversely on the person’s

i.    competence to manage his or her own affairs in relation to his or her property; or

ii.    capacity to make or to communicate decisions relating to any particular aspect or aspects of his or her personal care and welfare

e.   a person who has been convicted of an offence punishable by imprisonment for a term of two years or more, or who has been sentenced to imprisonment for any other offence

f.    a current member of Parliament

g.   a person who is disqualified under another Act.

 

 


Governing Body

01 November 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heritage Advisory Panel

Terms of Reference

2019-2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contents

 

1.      Introduction.. 3

2.      Background. 3

3.      Purpose. 3

4.      Outcomes. 3

5.      Work programme. 4

6.      Councillor involvement 4

7.      Selection process. 4

8.      Membership. 4

9.      Meetings. 5

10.       Quorum.. 5

11.       Meeting protocols. 5

12.       Submissions. 6

13.       Engagement with the Governing Body. 6

14.       Panel resourcing. 6

15.       Staff support 6

16.       Review.. 7

Appendix A: Code of Conduct for members appointed to Advisory Panels. 8

1.      Purpose. 8

2.      Principles. 8

3.      Relationships. 9

4.      Media. 9

5.      Confidential information. 9

6.      Ethics. 9

7.      Members’ interests. 9

8.      Complaints. 10

Appendix B: Qualifications of Members. 11

 


 

1.  Introduction

The terms of reference set out the purpose, role and protocols of the Auckland Council Heritage Advisory Panel during the 2019-2022 term of the council. Panel members abide by the Code of Conduct for members of Auckland Council advisory panels (Appendix A).

2.  Background

Auckland Council recognises that historic heritage contributes significantly to Auckland’s quality of life. The protection and management of the region’s historic heritage is a matter that Auckland’s communities are passionate about.

 

The re-establishment of the Heritage Advisory Panel in the 2019-2022 term with a membership of community representatives and leading professionals is expected to raise the profile of historic heritage both within the council and among the public. This panel will advise the council to build a shared understanding of how the historic heritage of Auckland should be identified, managed, protected, conserved, appreciated and celebrated.

 

The focus of the Heritage Advisory Panel is on historic heritage which includes cultural heritage, historic sites, structures, places, objects and areas and their surrounds, and archaeological sites.

3.  Purpose

As one of council’s engagement mechanisms with the heritage sector in Auckland, the Heritage Advisory Panel provides advice to the governing body and council staff within the remit of historic heritage issues on the following areas:

 

·    council policies, plans, processes and strategies

·    regional and strategic matters

·    any matter of particular interest or concern to heritage communities.

 

Note: specific resource consents applications are not within the scope of the panels advice

4.  Outcomes

The panel’s advice will contribute to the promotion and management of historic heritage of Auckland. The panel will advise through their agreed work programme on heritage matters that may be brought before the panel.

5.  Work programme

The panel must develop a work programme for the term. The agendas should be focused and aligned with the council’s work programme.

6.  Councillor involvement

The mayor will appoint a liaison councillor for the Heritage Advisory Panel. The role of a liaison councillor is to:

·    ensure that the governing body is aware of the panels’ feedback on council issues and their advice on diverse communities.

·    help align the panels’ strategic agendas with governing body priorities

·    actively engage in panel meetings and workshops

·    engage with the panel chair and the lead officer for meeting agendas

 

The panels will mainly engage with the governing body through an appropriate committee meetings or workshops. The panels may also engage with other committees considering regional plans and strategies on which the panels have provided advice.

7.  Selection process

·                     Panel members are appointed through an open selection process. The members of the panel are selected on the basis of their:

 

·    association with a heritage sector group or organisation or

·    ability to provide expert advice on built and cultural heritage issues, and

·    understanding of the heritage sector of Auckland.

 

Qualification of members is set out in Appendix B. 

 

The mayor appoints panel members with the endorsement of the governing body to give effect to the membership of the panels.

8.  Membership

The panel will have between 10 and 16 members. The members must reside in Auckland.

 

The panel must have at least two members with lived experience in Te Ao Māori and knowledge of the contemporary issues facing Māori communities in Auckland.

 

When a panel has less than 10 members, the council must appoint additional members to meet the minimum number of members.

 

The panel’s term ends one month prior to the next local government elections in 2022.

 

The membership of a panel member will cease if one or more of the disqualifying matters set out in Appendix B applies to the panel member.

 

If a member attends less than half of the panel meetings, breaches the Code of Conduct or otherwise under-performs in his/her duty as a member, officers or the chair must first raise the issues directly with the member and try and resolve them by mutual agreement. If under-performance continues the chair can recommend to the Mayor that the member be removed from the panel.

9.  Meetings

The panel will meet at least two times a year and no more than four times.

 

Scheduled meetings are open to the public and any elected members of Auckland Council.

10.   Quorum

The quorum required for a panel meeting will be half the members if the number of members is even, and a majority if the number of members is odd.

11.    Meeting protocols

The role of the panel is to advise the governing body and council staff on historic heritage matters. 

 

The Mayor appoints an interim chair. The panels must then confirm or elect a chair and a deputy chair within three months of the establishment of the panels. The chair is responsible for chairing all panel meetings and workshops. The chair is also the spokesperson for the panel when external organisations, including central government or the media, seek the views of the panel on specific matters.

The panels may invite presentations from external organisations and individuals in scheduled meetings if the topics are relevant to the panels’ purpose. The chair approves such external presentations in consultation with the liaison councillor and the lead support officer.

Members of the panel will respect the majority decision on the panel’s advice to the council. The resolutions in each meeting should clearly be shown in meeting minutes.

 

 

 

12.    Submissions

The panel cannot make formal submissions to Auckland Council on council strategies, policies and plans, for example, the annual plan. However, the panel may be asked for informal feedback during a consultative process.

 

In its advisory role to the council, the panel may have input to submissions made by the council to external organisations but will not make independent submissions, except as agreed with the council.

 

This does not prevent individual members being party to submissions outside their role as panel members.

13.    Engagement with the Governing Body

The panel may forward issues of concern relevant to historic heritage to an appropriate committee.

14.    Panel resourcing

The council sets an annual budget for the panel.

 

Panel members are entitled to meeting fees determined by the council on the basis of the Auckland Council Fees Framework and Expenses Policy for Appointed Members, unless:

 

·    they are on the panel as a representative of an organisation or interest group which already pays them; and/or

 

·    they are an elected member of Auckland Council or a member of the Independent Māori Statutory Board or an ex-officio member.

 

The council will reimburse all members for travel costs to attend scheduled panel meetings, in line with the Expenses Policy.

15.    Staff support

The panel is supported by the following council staff.

 

Lead Officer Support

·    facilitates development of the panel’s work programme

·    follows up on meeting actions and resolutions

·    acts as a conduit with relevant parts of organisation for the panel

·    attends pre-meeting briefings with the chair if scheduled

·    highlights potential issues and risks

·    sits next to the chair in meetings to provide advice as appropriate

·    ensures guidance and advice from the panel is clearly captured 

·    provides subject matter expertise.

 

 

Principal Advisor Panels

·    ensures appropriate processes and policies are in place for the panel

·    co-ordinates monitoring and reporting of progress on the panel’s work programme

·    arranges the induction of members

 

Communications Advisor / Specialist

·    is the panels’ initial point of contact for all media activity undertaken by or in collaboration with the panels

·    can assist with communicating matters of relevance to the panels and/or related to the panels’ strategic agenda and work programme

·    provides advice and works with the panel chair and/or delegated panel spokesperson and relevant support staff in response to media inquiries and other communications. This may include reviewing and providing feedback on draft media releases and other communications.

 

Governance Advisor

·    prepares for meeting agendas and schedule

·    arranges panel meetings and workshops

·    takes meeting minutes and publishes them online on time

·    acts as a first point of contact for panel issues and refers inquiries or information to relevant council staff.

 

16. Review

The form and functioning of the panel may be reviewed prior to or after, the end of the panel’s term in 2022.

 

 

 

 


 

Appendix A: Code of Conduct for members appointed to Advisory Panels

1.  Purpose

·                     The Code of Conduct sets out expectations for the general conduct of members of Auckland Council advisory panels.

2.  Principles

·                     The principles underlying the expected conduct of members include:

2.1 Honesty and integrity

·                     Members have a duty to act honestly and with integrity at all times.

2.2 Impartiality and accountability

·                     Members should consider issues on their merits, taking into account the views of others. This means co-operating fully and honestly to ensure the best advice is provided to the council.

2.3 Openness

·                     Members should be as open as possible about their actions and advice. This includes having an open mind and a willingness to listen to differing points of view. This means giving reasons for advice given; communicating clearly; not being close-minded and taking personal ownership of comments made publicly.

2.4 Respect

·                     Members should treat others, including staff, with respect at all times. This means not using derogatory terms towards others, or about others, including in public-facing new media; not misrepresenting the statements or actions of others (whether they be other individual members, the governing body, local boards, committees or staff); observing the rights of other people; treating people with courtesy, and recognising the different roles others play in local government decision-making.

2.5 Duty to uphold the law

·                     Members should uphold the law and, on all occasions, act in accordance with the trust the public places in them.

2.6 Stewardship

·                     Members should ensure that they and the council use resources prudently and for lawful purposes.

2.7 Leadership

·                     Members should promote and support these principles by example.

3.  Relationships

3.1 Chair

The chair is the presiding member at the meetings and is the spokesperson for the panel. The role of the deputy chair is to support the chair to run panel meetings and perform any delegated tasks from the chair.

 All members

·                     Members will conduct their dealings with each other in ways that maintain public confidence in the office to which they have been appointed.

4.  Media

4.1 Spokesperson

·                     The chair is the first point of contact for the official view of the panel on any issue. Where the chair is absent, any matters will be referred to the deputy chair when applicable.

·                      

·                     No other member may comment on behalf of the panel without having first obtained the approval of the chair.

4.2 Personal views

·                     Members are free to express a personal view in public or in the media, at any time. When doing so, they should observe the following:

·                      

·    comments must make clear that they represent a personal view and must not state or imply that they represent the views of the panel

·    where a member is making a statement that is contrary to a panel policy, the member must not state or imply that his or her statements represent a majority view

·    comments to the media must observe the other expectations of general conduct, e.g. not disclose confidential information, or compromise the impartiality or integrity of staff.

5.  Confidential information

·                     If members receive information that is confidential they must ensure it remains confidential. Confidential information is normally deemed to be such because its public release will cause some harm, either to the council or to other parties.

6.  Ethics

·                     Members will behave ethnically at all times.

7.  Members’ interests

·                     Members act in the interests of the panel and not in their own interests.

·                      

·                     A financial conflict of interest arises when a member stands to benefit financially, either directly or indirectly, from advice given by the panel.

·                      

·                     A non-financial conflict may arise from a personal relationship or association with another organisation or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination. In these situations a member may be influenced by interests that conflict with the duty to act in the best interests of the panel.

·                      

·                     Members must declare any private interests or personal benefits relating to their public duties and take steps to resolve any conflicts of interest in such a way that protects the public interest. This means fully disclosing actual or potential conflicts of interest; avoiding any financial or other obligation to any individual or organisation that might reasonably be thought to influence them in the performance of their duties.

8.  Complaints

A complaint about a member’s conduct will be made to the chair of the panel in the first instance, who will counsel the member concerned. Alternatively, concerns about the conduct of any member or chairperson may be raised with the General Manager Democracy Services, who will give advice on options available to resolve the concerns.

 


 

Appendix B: Qualifications of Members

 

1.  To be a member of the Panel, a person must

a.      be a natural person, and

b.      consent to being appointed to the board, and

c.      not be disqualified under sub clause (2).

2.  The following persons are disqualified from being members:

a.   a person who is under 18 years of age

b.   a person who is an undischarged bankrupt

c.   a person who is prohibited from being a director or promoter of, or being concerned or taking part in the management of, an incorporated or unincorporated body under the Companies Act 1993, or the Securities Act 1978, or the Securities Markets Act 1988, or the Takeovers Act 1993

d.   a person who is subject to a property order under the Protection of Personal and Property Rights Act 1988

e.   a person in respect of whom a personal order has been made under that Act that reflects adversely on the person’s

i.    competence to manage his or her own affairs in relation to his or her property; or

ii.   capacity to make or to communicate decisions relating to any particular aspect or aspects of his or her personal care and welfare

f.    a person who has been convicted of an offence punishable by imprisonment for a term of two years or more, or who has been sentenced to imprisonment for any other offence

g.   a current member of Parliament

h.   a person who is disqualified under another Act.

 

 


Governing Body

01 November 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rural Advisory Panel

Terms of Reference

2019-2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contents

1.      Introduction.. 3

2.      Purpose. 3

3.      Outcomes. 3

4.      Work programme. 3

5.      Selection process. 3

6.      Membership. 3

7.      Meetings. 4

8.      Quorum.. 4

9.      Meeting protocols. 4

11.       Submissions. 5

12.       Engagement with the Governing Body. 5

13.       Panel resourcing. 5

14.       Staff support 6

15.       Review.. 6

Appendix A: Code of Conduct for Members Appointed to Advisory Panels. 7

1.      Purpose. 7

2.      Principles. 7

3.      Relationships. 8

4.      Media. 8

5.      Confidential information. 9

6.      Ethics. 9

7.      Members’ interests. 9

8.      Complaints. 9

Appendix B: Qualifications of Members. 10

 

 


 

1.  Introduction

The terms of reference for the Rural Advisory Panel set out the purpose, role and protocols of the Auckland Council Rural Advisory Panel for the 2019-2022 term of the council. Panel members must abide by the Code of Conduct for Members of Auckland Council Advisory Panels (Appendix A).

2.  Purpose

As one of council’s engagement mechanisms with the rural sector in Auckland, the Rural Advisory Panel provides advice to the council within the remit of the Auckland Plan on the following areas:

 

·    council policies, plans and strategies relevant to rural issues

·    regional and strategic matters relevant to rural issues

·    any matter of particular interest or concern to rural communities.

3.  Outcomes

The panel’s advice will contribute to improving the outcomes of the rural sector as set out in the Auckland Plan. The panel will provide advice through its agreed work programme.

4.  Work programme

The panel must develop a work programme for the term. The agendas should be focused and aligned with the Auckland Plan and the long-term plan.

5.  Selection process

The Mayor appoints panel members in consultation with the chair of the panel and council staff.

·                      

·                     Panel members are selected on the basis of their:

                                                                                

·    association with a rural sector group or organisation

·    ability to provide expert advice on rural issues

·    understanding of the rural sector of Auckland

·    understanding of Te Tiriti O Waitangi.

 

Qualification of members is set out in Appendix B. 

6.  Membership

The panel will have between 15 and 21 members.

 

The panel may have up to five elected members to act as conduits to the governing body, local boards and the council’s relevant committees.

 

The panel must have at least two members with lived experience in Te Ao Māori and knowledge of the contemporary issues facing Māori communities.

 

If the panel has less than 15 members, the council must appoint additional members to meet the minimum number of members.

 

The panel’s term ends one month prior to the next local government elections in 2022.

 

The membership of a panel member will cease if one or more of the disqualifying matters set out in Appendix B applies to the panel member.

 

If a member attends less than half of the panel meetings, breaches the Code of Conduct or otherwise under-performs in his/her duty as a member, the chair must first raise the issues directly with the member and try and resolve them by mutual agreement. If under-performance continues the chair can recommend to the Mayor that the member be removed from the panel.

7.  Meetings

The panel will meet two monthly and have a maximum of six scheduled meetings per year, at a time deemed convenient by the majority of members.

 

Scheduled meetings are open to the public and any elected members of Auckland Council.

8.  Quorum

The quorum required for a panel meeting will be half the members if the number of members is even, and a majority if the number of members is odd.

9.  Meeting protocols

The panel does not have any decision-making power. Its role is to advise the governing body and council staff on regional and strategic matters. 

 

The Mayor appoints the chair, who is a councillor. The role of the chair is to lead the panel meetings. The chair is also the spokesperson for the panel when external organisations, including central government or the media, seek the views of the panel on specific matters. The chair can select a deputy chair who supports the chair to run regular meetings.

 

The panel may invite presentations from external organisations and individuals at their meetings if the topics are relevant to the panel’s work programme. The chair must approve such external presentations in consultation with the lead support officer.

 

The resolutions in each meeting should clearly be shown in meeting minutes.

 

10.    Stakeholder forums

Stakeholder forums may also be held within an approved budget one to two times a year on topics of wider rural or environmental interest. These would be agreed through the work programme and would aim to better inform the council of broad stakeholder views on topics of key concern to rural communities. 

 

11.    Submissions

The panel cannot make formal submissions to Auckland Council on council strategies, policies and plans, for example, the annual plan. However, the panel may be asked for informal feedback during a consultative process.

 

In its advisory role to the council, the panel may have input into submissions made by the council to external organisations but does not make independent submissions, except as agreed with the council.

 

This does not prevent individual members being party to submissions outside their role as panel members.

 

12.    Engagement with the Governing Body

The panel will forward any issues important to rural communities to appropriate council committees.

13.    Panel resourcing

The council sets an annual budget for the panel.

 

Panel members are entitled to meeting fees determined by the council on the basis of the Auckland Council Fees Framework and Expenses Policy for Appointed Members, unless:

 

·    they are on the panel as a representative of an organisation or interest group which already pays them and/or

·    they are an elected member of Auckland Council or members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

 

The council will reimburse all members for travel costs to attend panel meetings, in line with the Expenses Policy.

14.    Staff support

The panel is supported by the following council staff:

 

Lead Officer Support

·    co-ordinates development of the panel’s work programme

·    negotiates and brokers work programme between the panels and the council

·    follows up on meeting actions and resolutions

·    acts as a conduit with relevant parts of organisation for the panel

·    attends pre-meeting briefings with the chair

·    highlights potential issues and risks

·    sits next to the chair in meetings to provide advice as appropriate

·    ensures guidance and advice from the panel is clearly captured 

·    provides subject matter expertise.

 

Deputy Lead Officer Support (if required)

·    updates the panel’s agendas and write necessary reports for panel meetings

·    performs delegated tasks from the Lead Officer Support.

 

Principal Advisor Panels

·    ensures appropriate processes and policies are in place for the panel

·    co-ordinates progress reports on the panel’s work programme with relevant council committees

·    arranges the induction of members

 

Governance Advisor

·    prepares meeting agendas and schedule of meetings

·    arranges panel meetings and workshops

·    takes meeting minutes and publishes them online in a timely manner

·    acts as a first point of contact for panel issues and refers inquiries or information to relevant council staff.

15.    Review

The form and functioning of the panel may be reviewed prior to or after, the end of the year 2022.


 

Appendix A: Code of Conduct for Members Appointed to Advisory Panels

1.  Purpose

·                     The Code of Conduct sets out expectations for the general conduct of members of Auckland Council advisory panels.

2.  Principles

·                     The principles underlying the expected conduct of members include:

2.1 Honesty and integrity

·                     Members have a duty to act honestly and with integrity at all times.

2.2 Impartiality and accountability

·                     Members should consider issues on their merits, taking into account the views of others. This means co-operating fully and honestly to ensure the best advice is provided to the council.

2.3 Openness

·                     Members should be as open as possible about their actions and advice. This includes having an open mind and a willingness to listen to differing points of view. This means giving reasons for advice given; communicating clearly; not being close-minded and taking personal ownership of comments made publicly.

2.4 Respect

·                     Members should treat others, including staff, with respect at all times. This means not using derogatory terms towards others, or about others, including in public-facing new media; not misrepresenting the statements or actions of others (whether they be other individual members, the governing body, local boards, committees or staff); observing the rights of other people; treating people with courtesy, and recognising the different roles others play in local government decision-making.

2.5 Duty to uphold the law

·                     Members should uphold the law and, on all occasions, act in accordance with the trust the public places in them.

2.6 Stewardship

·                     Members should ensure that they and the council use resources prudently and for lawful purposes.

2.7 Leadership

·                     Members should promote and support these principles by example.

3.  Relationships

3.1 Chair

The chair  is the presiding member at the meetings and is the spokesperson for the panel. The role of the deputy chair is to support the chair to run panel meetings and perform any delegated tasks from the chair.

3.2 All members

·                     Members will conduct their dealings with each other in ways that:

·    maintain public confidence in the office to which they have been appointed

·    are open and honest

·    focus on issues rather than personalities.

4.  Media

4.1 Spokesperson

·                     The chair is the first point of contact for the official view of the panel on any issue. Where the chair is absent, any matters will be referred to the deputy chair when applicable.

·                      

·                     No other member may comment on behalf of the panel without having first obtained the approval of the chair.

4.2 Response to media enquiries

In the event that a panel member receives a request for panel comment directly from a journalist or media outlet, the member is required to forward the request immediately to the panel’s assigned communications advisor as well as the panel chairs. Panel members must not respond directly to media without prior agreement.

 

Where a journalist or media outlet seeks an individual panel member’s views, the panel member will:

·    make clear that the views presented represent the personal views of the individual member

·    ensure that information presented is consistent with information provided to the panel

·    maintain the integrity of the panels and Auckland Council at all times.

4.3 Personal views

·                     Members are free to express a personal view in public or in the media, at any time. When doing so, they should observe the following:

·                      

·    comments must make clear that they represent a personal view and must not state or imply that they represent the views of the panels

·    where a member is making a statement that is contrary to a panel policy, the member must not state or imply that his or her statements represent a majority view

·    comments to the media must observe the other expectations of general conduct, e.g. not disclose confidential information, or compromise the impartiality or integrity of staff.

5.  Confidential information

·                     If members receive information that is confidential they must ensure it remains confidential. Confidential information is normally deemed to be such because its public release will cause some harm, either to the council or to other parties.

6.  Ethics

·                     Members will:

·    claim only for legitimate expenses

·    not influence, or attempt to influence, any officer or employee to take actions that may benefit the member, or the member’s family or business interests

·    not use the resources of the panels for personal business

·    not solicit, demand, or request any gift, reward or benefit by virtue of the member’s position.

7.  Members’ interests

·                     Members act in the interests of the panels and not in their own interests.

·                      

·                     A financial conflict of interest arises when a member stands to benefit financially, either directly or indirectly, from advice given by the panels.

·                      

·                     A non-financial conflict may arise from a personal relationship or association with another organisation or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination. In these situations a member may be influenced by interests that conflict with the duty to act in the best interests of the panels.

·                      

·                     Members must declare any private interests or personal benefits relating to their public duties and take steps to resolve any conflicts of interest in such a way that protects the public interest. This means fully disclosing actual or potential conflicts of interest; avoiding any financial or other obligation to any individual or organisation that might reasonably be thought to influence them in the performance of their duties.

·                      

8.  Complaints

A complaint about a member’s conduct will be made to the chair of the panels in the first instance, who will counsel the member concerned. Alternatively, concerns about the conduct of any member or chairperson may be raised with the General Manager Democracy Services, who will give advice on options available to resolve the concerns.

 

 


 

Appendix B: Qualifications of Members

 

To be a member of the Panel, a person must

a.      be a natural person, and

b.      consent to being appointed to the board, and

c.      not be disqualified under sub clause (2).

 

The following persons are disqualified from being members:

a.   a person who is under 18 years of age

b.   a person who is an undischarged bankrupt

c.   a person who is prohibited from being a director or promoter of, or being concerned or taking part in the management of, an incorporated or unincorporated body under the Companies Act 1993, or the Securities Act 1978, or the Securities Markets Act 1988, or the Takeovers Act 1993

d.   a person who is subject to a property order under the Protection of Personal and Property Rights Act 1988

e.   a person in respect of whom a personal order has been made under that Act that reflects adversely on the person’s

i.    competence to manage his or her own affairs in relation to his or her property; or

ii.    capacity to make or to communicate decisions relating to any particular aspect or aspects of his or her personal care and welfare

f.    a person who has been convicted of an offence punishable by imprisonment for a term of two years or more, or who has been sentenced to imprisonment for any other offence

g.   a current member of Parliament

h.   a person who is disqualified under another Act.

 

 


Governing Body

01 November 2019

 

 

Governing Body decision-making during the 2019/2020, 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 Christmas recess periods

File No.: CP2019/18660

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm the process for urgent political decision-making over the 2019/2020, 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 Christmas recess periods.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Christmas recess period starts from the last Governing Body meeting in December and ends when the first scheduled meeting of the Governing Body or its committees resumes in the following new year.

3.       The Governing Body needs to be prepared to manage unforeseen circumstances and respond to any statutory requirements over the Christmas recess period.

4.       The first committee meetings in the 2020, 2021 and 2022 new years will be scheduled for early February of that year. 

5.       This report recommends the same delegation system as previous years for making urgent decisions over these periods.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      delegate to any two of either the Mayor or Deputy Mayor, and a chairperson of a committee of the whole, the power to make urgent decisions on behalf of the Governing Body or its committees, between:

i)        the last scheduled Governing Body meeting in December 2019 and the first meeting of the Governing Body or other relevant committee in 2020

ii)       the last scheduled Governing Body meeting in December 2020 and the first meeting of the Governing Body or other relevant committee in 2021

iii)      the last scheduled Governing Body meeting in December 2021 and the first meeting of the Governing Body or other relevant committee in 2022

b)      agree that if a matter of major significance arises during any of the Christmas recess periods listed in clause a), an extraordinary meeting of the Governing Body will be called.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Part 6 of the Local Government Act 202 sets out the obligations of local authorities in relation to decision-making.  The council needs to be able to make urgent decisions during the Christmas recess period when required. This is simply a procedural decision to enable efficient decision-making to occur.  Existing delegations will remain in place for all non-urgent decisions.

7.       Any matters to be decided under this delegation will be advised to decision-makers via the chief executive or his delegate, who will supply the necessary background and reasons for urgency.  The decision will also be reported to the next ordinary meeting of the Governing Body or relevant committee.

8.       If the matter is considered to be major, an extraordinary meeting of the Governing Body will be called.

9.       The Governing Body has made this delegation for all previous years of Auckland Council.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The council has a responsibility to ensure there is a process available to make urgent or significant decisions during the Christmas recess period.

11.     The process outlined will allow the council to achieve this should the need arise.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     This decision is procedural in nature and will have no impacts on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     This decision is procedural in nature, will have no impact on local boards and consultation is not required.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     This decision is procedural in nature, will have no impact on Māori and consultation is not required.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     If a matter of significance arises and requires an extraordinary meeting, there will be no additional cost as there is already budget provided to cover political meetings.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     There are no risks identified provided there is a process in place to deal with any urgent or significant decisions that may need to be made during this period.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     The Democracy Services department will administer this process if required.  Any urgent decisions will be reported to the first governing body meeting after the Christmas recess period.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarndra O'Toole - Team Leader Governance Advisors

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - General Manager Democracy Services

Phil Wilson - Governance Director

Stephen Town - Chief Executive

 


Governing Body

01 November 2019

 

 

Governing Body meetings in November 2019

File No.: CP2019/18677

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm two extraordinary Governing Body meetings in November 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governing Body needs to adopt a meeting schedule and give advance notice to members of when it will meet.  Governing body meetings are planned for Tuesday 12 November 2019 and Tuesday 19 November 2019 at 9:30 am.  These will be called as extraordinary meetings.

3.       The requirements to give notice of meetings to members are contained in the Local Government Act 2002.  Notice must not be less than 14 days prior to the meeting, or if a schedule is adopted, not less than 14 days prior to the first meeting on the schedule.  Where this notice cannot be given, meetings are called under the provisions for extraordinary meetings.

4.       Staff recommend that the Governing Body meet on Tuesday 12 November 2019 and Tuesday 19 November 2019 by way of an extraordinary meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Governing Body:

a)      hold extraordinary meetings on Tuesday 12 November 2019 and Tuesday 19 November 2019 commencing at 9.30am in the Reception Lounge, Auckland Town Hall.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarndra O'Toole - Team Leader Governance Advisors

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - General Manager Democracy Services

Phil Wilson - Governance Director

Stephen Town - Chief Executive

     

    



[1] Clause 21(5)(c) Schedule 7 Local Government Act 2002.