I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 21 November 2019

2:00pm

Council Chambers, 50 Centreway Rd, Orewa
50 Centreway Road
Orewa

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Gary Brown

 

Deputy Chairperson

Victoria Short

 

Members

Andy Dunn

 

 

Janet Fitzgerald, JP

 

 

Gary Holmes

 

 

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

 

Alexis Poppelbaum

 

 

Leanne Willis

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Gemma Kaldesic

Democracy Advisor for Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

15 November 2019

 

Contact Telephone: 02 152 7397

Email: gemma.kaldesic@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 November 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Declaration by Local Board Member Gary Holmes                                                   7

12        Local board governance work management for the 2019-2022 triennium             9

13        Local board appointments and delegations for the 2019-2022 electoral term     15

14        Appointment of LB members to external community organisations                    23

15        Process for appointment of Local Government New Zealand National Council representative                                                                                                              29

16        Adoption of a business meeting schedule                                                               35

17        Urgent decision-making process                                                                               39

18        Decisions made under delegation during the 2019 election period                      43  

19        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting held on Wednesday, 30 October 2019, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 November 2019

 

 

Declaration by Local Board Member Gary Holmes

File No.: CP2019/19344

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

 

1.       Local board member elect, Gary Holmes, will make an oral declaration and sign a written declaration in accordance with Schedule 7, Clause 14 of the Local Government Act 2002, which will be attested by Lesley Jenkins, Relationship Manager.

2.       Lesley Jenkins, Relationship Manager, by way of Memorandum from the Chief Executive, is authorised to administer the members’ declarations at this meeting in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 (Schedule 7, clause 14(2)).

3.       Member elect, Gary Holmes was absent by apology at the Inauguration meeting on 30 October 2019 and therefore making his declaration at the business meeting dated 21 November 2019.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gemma Kaldesic - Democracy Advisor for Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 November 2019

 

 

Local board governance work management for the 2019-2022 triennium

File No.: CP2019/19068

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To outline the options for efficiently and effectively managing the governance work of the local board for 2019-2022 triennium.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the end of each triennium the Local Board Services department delivers a review of local board work practices, including the organisational support they require and how well they support the boards in their governance role. The 2016-2019 triennium review gathered feedback from local board members and staff from Local Board Services and other council departments and Council-Controlled Organisations.

3.       In response to the review, this report outlines a recommended approach for local boards to manage their governance workload as follows:

·   maintain a key focus on annual work programmes and their implementation through quarterly reporting and regular workshops with the whole local board, with decisions made at business meetings

·   appoint nominated local board members who will be consulted on landowner consents and events, and who will provide feedback on liquor licences and resource consents

·   appoint nominated local board members to external organisations.

4.       These practices support the local board to undertake their governance role in an efficient and effective way, reflect the priority work of the local board and help the organisation focus its resources. Some of these practices require a decision of the local board, such as specific appointments of local board members, and separate reports cover these recommendations and associated advice.

5.       Local boards are also able to identify topic area leads who would act as a champion with the local board on specific topic areas. Leads would focus on work programme activities/ projects within their topic areas and understanding relevant community needs and preferences enabling other members to focus their time on other parts of the local board’s workload.

6.       The review feedback suggests the following advantages for having a full local board involved in direction-setting discussions on issues, rather than identifying topic area leads:

·   staff are confident that the direction is the view of the whole board rather than one member

·   knowledge and information is retained by the full local board rather than one member

·   discussions with staff are less likely to enter into management or operational level detail

·   it avoids inefficient duplication, when conversations are held between staff and a lead, and then repeated with the full local board.

7.       The feedback from the review highlighted that if a local board does appoint topic area leads, the risks should be mitigated by providing a clear scope for that role and ensuring it does not lead to inefficiency or adversely affect staff receiving clear direction from the full local board..

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      endorse the following approach to effectively and efficiently manage the governance work of the local board for the 2019-2022 triennium:

i)        maintain a key focus on annual work programmes and their implementation through quarterly reporting and regular workshops with the whole local board, with decisions made at business meetings

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The governance role of an elected member is to:

·   set direction and policy

·   set priorities

·   make significant decisions

·   test advice

·   monitor performance and risk

·   connect with and represent the community

·   be accountable to the public.

9.       At the end of each triennium the Local Board Services (LBS) department undertakes a review of the work practices of, and organisational support provided for, local boards and how this supports them in their governance role. Previous reviews have noted the progress the organisation has made in supporting the governance role of local boards over the past nine years. Improved support and delivery from the organisation have enabled local board members’ time to be used in a more effective and efficient manner as the governance model has matured.

10.     During the 2016-2019 triennium review, feedback was gathered from local board members and staff from LBS and other council departments and Council-Controlled Organisations (CCOs) who work with local boards.

11.     Key themes from local board members related to having topic area leads. Both positives and negatives were identified.

12.     Key themes from staff were that clear direction is given from the full local board and local board members operate at the governance level. Staff identified both positive and negatives aspects of having topic area leads.

13.     The findings from the review have informed the content of this report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Work practices supporting the governance role of local boards (recommended approach)

14.     There are established work practices in place which support the governance role of local boards as follows:

·   Local boards adopt an annual work programme each June for implementation by the council organisation in the next financial year (July-June). Local boards maintain a key focus on these annual work programmes and their implementation through quarterly reporting and regular workshops with the whole local board, with decisions made at business meetings.

·   Local boards appoint a nominated local board member who will be consulted on landowner consents and events by staff carrying out their delegations. Local boards can also appoint a nominated local board member to provide feedback and attend hearings on liquor licences and notified resource consents to ensure that local board views are taken into account in these timebound processes. These appointments are made via a separate report.

·   Local boards appoint nominated local board members to external organisations (via separate report) to exercise their role in the external organisation as per the relevant constitution on behalf of the local board.

15.     Together these practices constitute the recommended approach for managing the governance work of the local board for the 2019-2022 triennium, reflect the priority work of the local board and are the focus of the organisation’s staff and resources.

16.     This approach allows all members to have an overview and collective understanding of work programme matters, and for the whole local board to be able to provide direction to staff and track performance and delivery throughout the financial year. It also enables collective discussions that utilise individual member’s skills and knowledge and ensures elected member and staff time are used effectively and efficiently.

17.     Transparency to the public is ensured by local board decisions occurring through the formal business meeting process with associated standing orders.

Optional addition: Topic area leads (not recommended)

18.     An optional addition to the recommended approach is that the local board identifies topic area leads. Leads would:

·   act as a champion for the topic area in full local board conversations

·   focus on work programme activities / projects within their topic area

·   maintain relationships with key stakeholders

·   understand relevant community needs and preferences.

19.     Leads may also:

·   be appointed as the nominated local board member to provide feedback on behalf of the board on relevant matters (e.g. landowner consents) and appointed to related external organisations

·   undertake learning and development opportunities and attend conferences (using their individual development budget provided as part of the Kura Kāwana development programme) relevant to the topic area

·   highlight relevant issues and emerging priorities during local board plan and work programme development

·   act as a key contact for community groups and members of the public on the topic area.

20.     Topic area leads would enable individual local board members to use existing or build new knowledge and expertise in the topic area and enable other members to focus their time on other parts of the governance workload.

21.     Should the local board identify topic area leads, there are the following risks to consider:

·   a member may provide direction or views which do not reflect those of the full local board

·   staff may seek direction from a topic area lead instead of the full local board, or seek direction from a topic area lead prior to the full local board, resulting in duplication of work

·   key knowledge and information on a topic may be retained with the topic area lead and not shared with the whole local board

·   a topic area lead may enter into discussions at the management or operational level if meeting regularly with staff without a clear governance purpose for the discussion.

22.     These risks can be addressed by:

·   using the workshop process as the mechanism for all local board members to receive updates and provide governance direction on approved work programme projects

·   clarifying the limited resources available to any topic area lead.

23.     Staff resourcing is focussed on work programme development and delivery, along with advice to support workshops and business meetings. Topic area leads can be supported by staff to undertake the following responsibilities:

·   when issues arise at a full board workshop, the lead can be directed to meet with staff on that issue and explore solutions; staff would report back to the full board for direction, and the lead can assist with explanation and support during that discussion

·   develop local board feedback on regional policies, plans and strategies relevant to the topic area, for full local board approval

·   respond to constituent enquiries relevant to the topic area

·   report back to the local board at workshops, and publicly via board member reports at business meetings, on the activities undertaken as the topic area lead.

24.     If a local board does want to appoint topic area leads, it may wish to consider identifying alternates. The role of the alternate would be to support the topic area lead in their responsibilities and undertake any roles the lead has been formally appointed by the whole board when the lead is unavailable. Having an alternate means that the information, knowledge, skills and workload can be shared by more than one member, but it could also lead to confusion between the two roles where the alternate acts as a co-lead.

25.     If a local board’s preference is to appoint topic area leads, this will require a local board decision via a resolution to this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     This report is procedural in nature so does not have direct climate impacts. However, a key focus for the council in the current term will be how it responds to the climate emergency and this may be a consideration for how local boards manage their governance work.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     Feedback was gathered from staff from LBS  other departments and CCOs who work with local boards, about practices to manage the local board governance work through the 2016-2019 triennium review.

28.     The practices used by a local board to manage their governance work can impact on the efficiency of staff engagement with members. Some variation in practices is required to reflect local differences, but overall large differences in work practices is challenging and consistency is beneficial.

29.     In light of this, LBS has provided consistent advice and recommendations on work practices to all local boards to consider when making decisions on how they will manage their governance work for the 2019-2022 triennium.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     Feedback was gathered from local board members about practices to manage local board governance work through the 2016-2019 triennium review. This included: a workshop attended by 13 local board members from 10 local boards; and a survey to all members, with responses provided by 29 members, from 13 local boards.  

31.     The practices used by a local board to manage their governance work can impact efficiency and effectiveness of engagement with communities and the opportunities that members have to provide local leadership beyond the formal decision-making process.

32.     The topic of managing the governance work of the local board was discussed at a workshop on 22 October 2019, as part of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board induction programme for the 2019-2022 triennium. At that workshop, members indicated they would like to introduce Community Forums, one per month, which requests for deputations could be referred to and where staff could bring non-confidential items to present to the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     This decision is procedural in nature so does not have immediate impacts on Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     This decision is procedural in nature so does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     The risks and mitigations of having topic area leads are outlined in the ‘Analysis and Advice’ section of this report.

36.     Risks relating to any specific decision required for the work practices that form the recommended approach are outlined in the respective separate reports relating to those decisions.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Staff from the LBS will work with staff from other departments and CCOs to ensure the practices of the local board are implemented.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Reed - Local Board Advisor Albert-Eden

Authorisers

Kerri Foote - Operations and Improvements Manager

Oliver Roberts - Central Teams Manager

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 November 2019

 

 

Local board appointments and delegations for the 2019-2022 electoral term

File No.: CP2019/19070

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To recommend that the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board appoints a local board member to:

·   be the nominated local board member for landowner consents (including affected party approvals)

·   be the nominated local board member for film applications

·   be the nominated local board member for events

·   provide formal reports on liquor licence applications and attendance at hearings

·   provide formal views on whether a resource consent should proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application

·   provide formal views (feedback) on notified resource consents and attend the council hearings.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In order to enable effective and efficient decision-making, the council delegates some responsibilities to staff or individual elected members. This report seeks to appoint nominated local board members who will be consulted on landowner consents and events, and who will provide feedback on liquor licences and resource consents.

3.       If local boards choose not to appoint a nominated local board member for landowner consents staff will consult with the local board chairperson, as outlined in the Local Board Delegation Protocols.

4.       District Licensing Committees consider and grant or renew applications for liquor licences and manager’s certificates. These applications are publicly notified, and local boards can provide views on an application to the District Licensing Committee. A delegation to a nominated local board member is recommended to allow local boards to provide formal views as part of the liquor licensing process.

5.       Local boards can provide feedback on whether resource consent applications should be publicly notified. Local boards can also provide written feedback once the applications are notified and can subsequently speak to their feedback to support local board views at the council hearing. A delegation to a nominated local board member is recommended.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      appoint XXXX and XXXX, as an alternate, as the nominated local board member for landowner consents (excluding landowner consents for filming) and authorise them to:

i)        be the point of consultation for staff on all applications for landowner consent and, at their discretion, refer any application for landowner consent to the local board for a local board decision, and

ii)       to be the point of consultation for staff on proposed asset renewal works and, at their discretion, refer any proposed asset renewal works to the local board for a local board decision

iii)      receive staff notifications of areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk.

b)      appoint XXXXXX and XXXXXX, as an alternate, as the nominated local board member for landowner consents for filming and authorises them to:

i)        to be the point of consultation with staff on all applications for landowner consent for filming and, at their discretion, refer any applications for landowner consent for filming to the local board for a local board decision

ii)       receive notifications from staff of areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk.

c)      appoint XXXXXX and XXXXXX, as an alternate, as the nominated local board member for events and authorises them to receive staff notifications of areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk

d)      delegate to XXXXXX and XXXXX, as an alternate, the authority to prepare and provide local board views and speak to those local board views at any hearings on applications for liquor licences

e)      delegate to XXXXXX and XXXXX, as an alternate, the authority to provide the local board views on whether a resource consent should proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application

f)       delegate to XXXXXX and XXXXX, as an alternate, the authority to prepare and provide local board views and speak those local board views at any hearings on notified resource consents.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

Background

6.       Decision-making within Auckland Council is shared between the Governing Body and local boards. Local boards have made a general delegation to the chief executive of all of their responsibilities, duties and powers subject to the exclusions, restrictions and clarifications set out in the Chief Executive’s Delegations Register. The chief executive has in turn delegated those responsibilities, duties and powers to staff. The exercise of those responsibilities, duties and powers is subject to a set of delegation protocols. These protocols provide a set of expectations and directions to staff and require a number of actions that are relevant to all local activities. These delegations help Auckland Council to operate efficiently and effectively.

7.       In some cases, delegations are given to individual local board members, usually due to short timeframes constrained by operational requirements, customer expectations and deadlines set by statute. Having a delegation in place to one local board member helps to ensure that council can continue to undertake its normal business practices without undue delays.

8.       Local boards have allocated responsibility for decision-making with respect to local parks and have delegated landowner consent decisions to staff subject to a number of delegation protocols. The delegation protocols require that the nominated local board member is consulted on every landowner consent. Landowner consents encompass a broad range of activities, including affected party approvals, filming and events. Local boards are also able to provide their formal views in a report at liquor licence hearings.

9.       Under the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 the Governing Body must consider any views and preferences expressed by a local board, where a Governing Body decision affects or may affect the responsibilities or operation of the local board or the well-being of communities within its local board area. Local boards’ ability to provide local views can be affected because of statutory timeframes or external agency deadlines. Delegating authority for providing local board views to individual members provides local boards the opportunity to give local views within prescribed timeframes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Landowner consents

10.     Under Auckland Council’s Combined Chief Executive Delegations Register, council staff are delegated authority to approve landowner consents on behalf of local boards. This delegation is subject to the Local Board Delegations Protocols. These protocols require that before exercising their delegations, staff must consult with a nominated local board member for landowner consents. If required, by the nominated local board member, the staff member must refer the landowner consent to a local board business meeting for a decision.

11.     It is therefore recommended that the local board appoint a nominated local board member for landowner consents to enable staff to exercise their delegation.

Landowner consents for filming

12.     Screen Auckland (Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development) process requests for filming in the Auckland Region, and seek landowner consent from local boards. Over 600 permits are granted each year, with the largest number of permits being granted in Waitematā, Wāitakere Ranges and Rodney Local Board areas.

13.     Screen Auckland must process the applications within three to five working days, and therefore require feedback from local boards within two working days. These timeframes are short because filming activities often have a fast turnaround for productions from concept to delivery. To keep filming in Auckland, in a competitive international market, film crews often have to work within short timeframes.

14.     Due to the extremely short timeframes for film applications, where local boards have a large number of filming applications, it may be beneficial for this subset of landowner consents to be referred to a different nominated local board member, to manage workloads.

Events

15.     Under the Local Board Delegations Protocols staff must consult with and obtain the views of the nominated local board member on:

·   applications to hold events on council-owned land in the local board area that require regulatory approval and involve one or more of the following matters:

o complete or substantial closure of the public open space

o more than 500 people

o road closure

o liquor

o ticketed event.

·   Any regulatory decision to set fees and charges for holding local events on council-owned local parks and reserve (and refer the matter to the local board to obtain local board views and input where required by the delegated local board member).

·   Staff are also required to notify the nominated local board member of:

o areas relating to the event that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk

o decisions to approve events on council owned land in the local board area.

16.     The appointment of a nominated local board member for events is therefore recommended to enable staff to exercise their delegation.

17.     Under the Local Board Delegations Protocols landowner consent is also required for all event proposals on local parks. To avoid double-handling of applications, it is recommended that the local board member nominated for events is the same as that local board member nominated for landowner consents.

Formal submissions at liquor licence hearings

18.     District Licensing Committees consider, and grant or renew applications for liquor licences and manager’s certificates. When a business applies for an on-licence, off-licence, or club licence, new or renewed, they are publicly notified. On 25 September 2014, the Governing Body (GB/2014/103) agreed to a process where local boards can provide views on an application in a report to the District Licensing Committee. If the District Licensing Committee considers that the local board’s report has raised issues that it needs to hear more about, it can call a hearing and invite the local board to appear and talk to its report and respond to questions as a witness.

19.     Once the public notice has been posted online, the local board has 15 working days to provide their report to council.

20.     This report recommends a delegation to a nominated local board member to allow local boards to provide formal views as part of the liquor licensing process.

Notified resource consents

21.     Local boards can provide feedback, within the statutory timeframes, on whether resource consent applications should be publicly notified. This was resolved by the Governing Body on 28 July 2011 (GB/2011/156). Resource consent planners email the planning lead copies of applications that meet the triggers set by the local boards (last reviewed in 2017). The planning leads have three working days to provide comment on the matter of whether the application should be publicly notified or limited notified to particular persons who may be adversely affected by the proposal. Where comments are provided, these are included verbatim as part of the reporting planner’s notification report to the decision-maker.

22.     Local boards can also provide written feedback once resource consent applications have been notified. Written feedback needs to be provided prior to the submission closing date (usually 20 working days after public notification). Local boards can subsequently speak to their feedback to support their views at any hearing.

23.     This report recommends a planning lead for each local board to provide the local board’s formal views on whether or not resource consents should be notified or limited notified and to provide written feedback on notified applications and speak on the local board’s behalf at the council hearing.

Options considered

24.     Options available for local boards to input into landowner consents, events, planning processes and liquor licences have been summarised in Tables 1 and 2.

25.     It is recommended that local boards select both a nominated local board member and an alternate. The alternate is available to act when the nominated local board member is unable to act (eg leave of absence, illness) and has agreed (via written communication) that the alternate take the role of nominated local board member for a specified time period.

26.     We recommend that local boards appoint one nominated local board member (and alternate). Appointing more than one nominated local board member increases administration for staff and can create unnecessary confusion where local board members provide differing views to staff.

 

Nominated local board members under the Local Board Delegations Protocol

27.     The preferred option is that a nominated local board member is appointed for landowner consents and events (option two in Table 1). This option is preferred because it aligns with council’s existing delegations and local board delegation protocols and allows for council to undertake core business in a timely manner. There is reputational risk to council if it is unable to administer landowner consents in a timely manner.

Table 1: Options for local boards to address requirement for nominated local board members under the Local Board Delegations Protocol for landowner consents and events

Options

Pros

Cons

1.   There is no nominated local board member and staff must consult with the local board chairperson as a primary point of contact

·      The local board chairperson will become the subject matter expert for the local board on landowner approvals and events

·      Local boards can provide their views in a timely way that better meets organisational deadlines

·      The local board chairperson’s work-load will be increased

·      Decisions are not made by the full local board

·      Decisions are not made at a public meeting

2.   Nominated local board member appointed for landowner consents and events (preferred option)

·      The nominated local board member will become subject matter expert for local board on the topic they are nominated for

·      Local boards can provide their views in a timely way that better meets organisational deadlines

·      Decisions are not made by the full local board

·      Decisions made under delegation are not made at a public meeting

Notified applications (resource consents and liquor licences)

28.     Local boards normally provide their formal views at business meetings (option two in Table 2). Because local board reporting timeframes do not usually align with process and statutory timeframes outlined above, in most instances reporting at a business meeting will not be a viable option. Providing a delegation to one local board member and one alternate (option three in Table 2) is considered the most efficient way of providing formal views for the matters discussed in this report.

Table 2: Options for local boards to provide their formal views on notification of resource consents and liquor licences

Options

Pros

Cons

1.   No formal local board views are provided

 

·      Local board views will not be considered by the hearing commissioners

2.   Formal local board views are provided at a business meeting

·      All local board members contribute to the local board view

·      Provides transparent decision making

·      Local board meeting schedules and agenda deadlines are unlikely to align with statutory deadlines imposed by the planning process

3.   Formal local board views are provided by way of delegation to one local board member for all applications (preferred option)

·      Nominated local board member will become subject matter expert for local board on topic they are nominated for

·      Local boards can provide their views in a timely way that meets statutory deadlines

·      Any feedback can be reported back to the local board

·      Local board views are not put forward by the full local board

·      Local board views under delegation are not provided at a public meeting (local board views are however made public once submitted via the planning process)

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     These decisions are procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     This report recommends the appointment of nominated local board members to ensure that council can undertake its operational and statutory duties in a timely manner, while receiving local board input and decision-making in matters that are of local importance.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     This report seeks to appoint nominated local board members to perform particular functions.

32.     Any local board member who is appointed as a nominated board member should ensure that they represent the wider local board views and preferences on each matter before them.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have a positive or negative impact for Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have financial implications on Auckland Council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     If local boards choose not to appoint a nominated board member for landowner consents (including film applications) and events, staff will need to seek feedback from the chairperson. This could potentially lead to a busy workload for the local board chairperson, in addition to their existing duties.

36.     If local boards choose not to delegate to provide views on notified applications, there is a risk that they will not be able to provide formal views prior to submission closing dates and miss the opportunity to have their feedback presented and heard at a hearing.

37.     If local boards choose not to delegate to provide their views on liquor licences, there is a risk that they will not be able to provide formal views prior to closings dates for submissions not coinciding with political meetings.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     Nominated local board members providing feedback on landowner consents and events will engage with staff acting in accordance with the Local Board Delegation Protocols.

39.     Training for local board members will be offered on the Resource Management Act 1991 and the preparation of effective feedback for applications notified as part of a Resource Management Act 1991 process.

40.     Nominated local board members (and alternates) who are delegated to provide reports and speak at District Licensing Committee Hearings should sign-up to receive alcohol notices. This will ensure that they hear about new applications as soon as they are open for comment.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol Stewart - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 November 2019

 

 

Appointment of LB members to external community organisations

File No.: CP2019/19071

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To appoint local board members to external community organisations relevant to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Elected members participate as representatives of the local board on a number of external community and national organisations.

3.       The beginning of the new electoral term generates the need for new appointments. This report provides details of the external organisations relevant to the local board and requests that the local board nominates a lead and alternate member to represent the local board on those external organisations for the 2019-2022 triennium.

4.       In addition, there are a small number of appointments, which due to legislation or the terms in a deed are the responsibility of the Governing Body. In instances where the relationship between the council and the organisation is local, the Governing Body has delegated its responsibility to nominate an elected member from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      appoint the following board members to the external community groups and organisations listed below for the 2019-2022 triennium:

External organisation

 

Lead

Alternate

The Sir Peter Blake Marine Education and Recreation Centre Board

 

 

Victor Eaves Reserve Management Trust

 

 

Destination Orewa Beach BID

 

 

Torbay BID

 

 

Browns Bay BID

 

 

Mairangi Bay BID

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5        A number of external organisations provide for the formal participation of Auckland Council elected members in their affairs. Elected member appointees will have a variety of duties and liabilities depending on the individual organisation.

6.       At the commencement of each triennium, the Governing Body and local boards recommend appointments to external organisations.

7.       As local board representatives, the nominated members represent the local board, not in a personal capacity.  Local board members will provide updates at local board meetings to keep the local board regularly informed of discussions and decisions made of the organisation’s activities unless good reasons exist for confidentiality.  Local board members will be required to formally report to the business meeting that follows each trust/society/board meeting to maintain public transparency.

8.       The reasons for elected member participation in external organisations can be described in a number of ways:

·        a trust deed, that requires Auckland Council to make an appointment to an organisation

·        an organisation of interest to the local board is inviting elected member representation at its meetings

·        associations entered into by the council which provide for elected member representation

·        organisation governance, or project or programme oversight, such as regional or local parks management groups

·        a statutory or regulatory provision (for example a regulation providing for a community liaison committee) or

·        a resource consent requiring the formation of a committee or hearing panel

9.       In making decisions about these appointments, it is suggested that local boards are mindful of;

·        the elected members availability

·        any conflict of interests, including whether the local board provides funding to the entity

·        relevance to the local board

·        historical relationship with the organsation and Auckland Council

10.     Members are delegated in their capacity as elected local board members. Should they no longer be a local board member, their nominations would be automatically repealed.     

11.     Local board members may be part of any organisation in their private capacity and personal interests and are encouraged to disclose memberships to external organisations in the conflict of interest register.

 

 

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The organisations relevant to the local board are detailed below.

 

Sir Peter Blake Marine Education and Recreation Centre Board (MERC)

13.     A condition of the trust deed for the Sit Peter Blake Marine Education and Recreation Centre Board is the appointment of representatives from the previous Auckland Regional and North Shore City councils. 

14.     MERC’s original trust deed was confirmed in October 1979 and is acknowledged for its long-standing commitment to marine sports, marine education and outdoor activities.

15.     It appears that there has not been a recent appointment to the MERC board since the resignation or Councillor Denise Krum from council, who was the last council appointment in 2016.

16.     This is the first time that a member of the local board has been sought and the Governing Body has delegated that decision to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to appoint a local board member for the triennium.

Victor Eaves Reserve Management Trust

17.     A condition of the Assignment of Lease to the Sharks Sports Club Incorporated is that the council and the tenant will jointly maintain a management committee to oversee the management and control of the lease area and facilities.  The committee will comprise one council officer, one member of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board, one member of the Hibiscus Cricket Club and two members of the Sharks Sports Club Incorporated.  The function of the committee is to oversee and control all issues arising from the use of the site and the facilities on it including, but not limited to, supporting the ongoing operations of the facility and activities.

18.     The previous local board representative was Mike Williamson.

19.     The committee meets twice per annum at which the council officer in attendance will lead and minute the meeting. 

20.     The local board is requested to appoint one member (and an alternate) to the Victor Eaves Reserve Management Trust.

 

Destination Orewa Beach, Torbay, Browns Bay, and Mairangi Bay Business Improvement Districts

21.     There are 46 Business Improvement District Partnership Programmes operating within the Auckland region. There are four local business improvement districts (BID) in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

22.     The local board has a day-to-day relationship with the business associations as a joint partner in the BID Partnership Programme. The local board will work with the business associations to align the direction for the BID programme and local priorities expressed in the local board plan. The local board will receive regular reporting on the BID Partnership Programme and review progress against objectives.

23.     The business association may invite the appointed local board member onto the BID governance board or executive committee. The discretion on whether this local board member has voting rights will lie with the business association under the rules of their constitution.

24.     It is recommended that the local board appoints a local board member and an alternate on each business association to represent the local board in all matters relating to the individual business association

 

Vaughan Homestead (Torbay Historical Society)

25.     Historically, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has appointed a local board member to the Vaughan Homestead (Torbay Historical Society).  There is little information available to confirm why an appointment from the local board is required.  It appears that the appointment is a legacy arrangement and upon investigation, the council appoints a staff member (currently the Northern Principal Ranger, Regional Parks) to the current committee. 

26.     As the Vaughan Homestead is located within the Long Bay Regional Park and the local board is not a decision -maker in that area, the continued appointment of a local board member is questioned unless the requirement for the appointment of an elected member can be confirmed.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27        This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28        The Auckland Council has strong relationships with its co-governing partners within the co-governance and co-management entities.  The entities themselves are independent to the council and connect with other parts of the council group as required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29        One of the functions of local boards is to connect with community organisations within their areas.  Local board members often attend meetings of community organisations to facilitate those connections.

30        Where a document, such as a trust deed, provides for the Auckland Council to make an appointment to an organisation, the appointment is the responsibility of the Governing Body unless it is delegated. 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31        A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have specific implications for Māori, and the arrangements proposed in this report do not affect the Māori community differently to the rest of the community.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32        This decision is procedural in nature so does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33        No particular risks have been identified.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34        These appointments need to be made immediately due to upcoming meetings of the respective entities.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol Stewart - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 November 2019

 

 

Process for appointment of Local Government New Zealand National Council representative

File No.: CP2019/19073

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the process for making the local board representative appointment to the Local Government New Zealand National Council and inform elected members of changes to the Local Government New Zealand  rules.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local Government New Zealand amended its rules at its Annual General Meeting on 7 July 2019 and these were confirmed at a meeting of the Local Government New Zealand National Council in September. There are some key changes affecting Auckland.

3.       There are now three dedicated seats on the Local Government New Zealand National Council for Auckland Council representatives. These will be filled by the Mayor of Auckland (or his alternate) and representatives to be appointed by local boards and the Governing Body. The Local Government New Zealand rules require these appointments to be made within eight weeks of the triennial local government elections.

4.       This report outlines a process to appoint the local boards representative. Nominations will be open to all local board members and this can be done in November. Local boards are being asked to delegate authority to select the representative by nominating one of its members, preferably the chairperson, to be part of a local board selection panel. This process will enable the representative to be appointed as quickly as possible.

5.       The Local Government New Zealand rules now excludes Auckland from Local Government New Zealand Zone 1. Although not officially a member of an Local Government New Zealand zone group, the expectation is that Auckland Council schedules regular meetings with the president and chief executive (or their representatives) of Local Government New Zealand and organise itself as if it were a zone group. These meetings could be co-chaired by the councillor and local board member who are appointed to the Local Government New Zealand National Council.

6.       Other arrangements such as the sector-based groups remain unchanged. Auckland Council is eligible to be a member of the Metropolitan and Regional Groups and the Governing Body will be asked to select representatives to these groups.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      note the amended Local Government New Zealand rules.

b)      endorse Option A (selection panel made up of representatives from each local board) as the process for appointing the local board representative to the Local Government New Zealand National Council.

c)      delegate to the Chairperson Gary Brown to be part of the selection panel to appoint the local board representative to the Local Government New Zealand National Council.

d)      agree in principle to two annual meetings of Auckland Council and Local Government New Zealand (or their representatives) with the arrangements to be decided by the three Auckland Council representatives to the Local Government New Zealand National Council and staff.

e)      endorse the proposal that the meetings of the Auckland Council/ Local Government New Zealand meetings be co-chaired by the governing body and local board representatives appointed to the Local Government New Zealand National Council.

 

Horopaki

Context

Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ)

7.       Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) is an incorporated society (New Zealand Local Government Association Inc) which represents the national interests of councils around New Zealand and leads best practice in the local government sector.

8.       The objectives of LGNZ include promoting and advocating matters affecting the national interests of local government. LGNZ holds regular dialogue with government, parliamentarians and government agencies and provides thought leadership and research on matters of interest to local authorities.

9.       LGNZ is governed by a national council made up of members elected to represent geographic zones, representatives of various sector groups, Chair of Te Maruata (LGNZ’s national collective of Māori in local government governance roles), the President and three seats reserved for representatives of Auckland Council.

10.     The establishment of dedicated Auckland seats were made as part of amendments to the LGNZ Rules agreed at its AGM in July 2019 (available online). The amended rules stipulate that the composition of the LGNZ National Council will include the Mayor of Auckland (or an alternate) and two further persons: one to represent the Governing Body and one to represent local boards. The appointments are for three years.

11.     LGNZ members are organized in zones and sectors generally. These zones and sectors make appointments to the LGNZ National Council, provide advice on issues affecting their geographical or sector areas and provide information to their members.

12.     Auckland Council is no longer a member of any zone group. Due to its size and governance structure, it is expected that the council will organise itself as if it were a zone.

13.     The amendments did not change arrangements for sector groups. Auckland Council remains eligible to be a member of the Metro Sector Group and the Regional Sector Groups. The Governing Body usually appoints Auckland Council’s representatives to these groups and will be asked to do so again.

14.     Auckland Council’s benefits from its interactions with LGNZ include keeping abreast of national issues affecting local government, advocating for and influencing local government issues on the national agenda and providing a forum where elected representatives connect and network with their peers from across the country.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Appointment of local board representative to LGNZ National Council

15.     The appointment of a local board representative will need to be decided by local boards. This is outlined in LGNZ Rule E1A “(b) one person appointed by Auckland Council local boards, from elected members of the local boards”.

16.     The restricted timeframes (eight weeks from start of the term) requires an agile selection process. Staff considered several options and recommend Option A as detailed in the following table:

 

 

Process for selection of local board representative to the LGNZ National Council

Option

Process

Details of process

A

Selection panel made up of representatives from each local board

·    Each local board delegates authority to one of their members to be part of a selection panel.

·    The selection panel can be called to meet once all candidates are confirmed and they will agree the voting system to be used.

·    One vote per local board is considered a fair way to select a single representative for all 21 local boards.

·    Members can utilise an existing meeting to get the selection panel together (such as the Chair’s Forum).

·    Process can start in mid-November with a two-week nomination period.

B

Reports to local boards seeking decision/preference (may require urgent decisions)

·    This would involve seeking a vote/preference from each local board through a formal report and resolution.

·    The report can only be produced once nominations have closed and the candidates list is available – this will delay the report to early December.

·    Where there is a tie between candidates based on local board votes, staff will need to be delegated authority to resolve the candidate by lot or go back to local boards for a decision.

·    This process is unlikely to produce an agreed appointment in a timely fashion.

 

17.     Staff also considered the option of a popular vote of all local board members. This would involve setting up an online voting system, where each local board member would have one vote. However, this option may not comply with the LGNZ rules which anticipates a selection by local boards rather than by individual members. 

18.     The recommended Option A will enable a fair process by giving each local board a vote and an opportunity for their representatives to properly consider each nominee. This selection can take place at the planned meeting of the Chairs’ Forum on 9 December 2019 to avoid arranging an additional meeting.

Nominations for the local board representative

19.     The LGNZ anticipates that all local board elected members are eligible to be a candidate for the LGNZ National Council. The nominations process will therefore need to allow self-nominations.

20.     To facilitate this process in the timeframes required, staff will call for nominations on Friday 15 November and will allow a two-week period closing on 29 November 2019.

Auckland Council / LGNZ meetings

21.     The role of a zone includes receiving reports from LGNZ about matters of national interest to local authorities and communicating to LGNZ the issues and concerns. The key item of interest at Zone meetings is the national update from LGNZ.  The president and chief executive of LGNZ (or their representatives) attend to present the update.

22.     Auckland Council could continue to meet with the president and chief executive (or their representatives) of LGNZ on a regular basis. Although not expressly set out in the changes to the LGNZ Rules, there is an understanding that Auckland Council will continue with these meetings in order to ensure an ongoing regional dialogue and continue to identify and advise LGNZ on issues and concerns affecting the Auckland region.

23.     Staff recommend these meetings are co-chaired by the councillor and local board member appointed to the LGNZ national council. A co-chair approach recognises the shared governance role of local boards. Following discussions with LGNZ, staff also recommend that the meetings be open to all elected members.

24.     The proposed meeting dates for the Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings are 13 March 2020 and 11 September 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     These decisions are procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. Staff will look to schedule meetings of the Auckland/LGNZ on days where there are other city-based activities and meetings for elected members in order to minimise travel requirements. Staff will also explore the use of skype and live-streaming so elected members may choose to avoid travel.

26.     Regarding engagement with the LGNZ, Auckland Council has declared a climate emergency, along with other councils around the country, so there will be an opportunity for partnership and joint leadership on this issue.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     Secretariat support for the Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings will be provided by the Governance Division.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The changes to the LGNZ rules and the designated seat on the LGNZ National Council acknowledges the role of local boards and gives it greater recognition in LGNZ.

29.     Local board chairs were briefed on anticipated changes at the May 2019 Chairs’ Forum.

30.     The amended rules were confirmed at a meeting of the LGNZ National Council in September. Due to the elections and end of term timeframes, staff were unable to seek the views of local boards on the process for appointing a representative.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     These decisions are procedural in nature and do not impact on Māori.

32.     At the LGNZ level, the LGNZ has provided for representation on the National Council by the Chair of Te Maruata.

33.     Te Maruata is a LGNZ National Council sub-committee which has the role of promoting increased representation of Māori as elected members of local government, and of enhancing Māori participation in local government processes. They provide support for councils in building relationships with iwi, hapu and Māori groups and provides Māori input on development of future policies or legislation relating to local government. 

34.     Appointments to Te Maruata are not made by councils. In the previous term Councillor Alf Filipaina was invited to be a member of the sub-committee.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     Membership of LGNZ incurs a cost to ratepayers. Auckland Council’s annual subscription to LGNZ in 2019/2020 is $340,148 excluding GST.

36.     The establishment of Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings will incur expense currently unbudgeted for. Staff from the Governance Division will support the first meeting using existing resources. 

37.     As the Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings are expected to bring together all elected members from across the region including the islands, this will impact on governance administration budgets over time.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     The LGNZ rules require persons appointed to the LGNZ National Council to assume office within eight weeks of the triennial local government elections. This creates some difficulties in designing a process for all 21 local boards to agree their single representative. The recommended option (Option A) proposed in this report will enable the process to be completed as quickly as possible, on the first working day after the eight week period. The LGNZ secretariat has indicated this would be acceptable.

39.     If all local boards do not endorse the same process (Option A), this would affect how quickly the appointment is able to be made.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The Governing Body will be making their appointment in November 2019 including appointment of Auckland Council representatives to the sector groups.

41.     Appointments of Auckland Council seats to the LGNZ National Council will be communicated to the LGNZ by 6 December 2019.

42.     Staff will work with the appointed representatives of Auckland Council to make arrangements for the first Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shirley  Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 November 2019

 

 

Adoption of a business meeting schedule

File No.: CP2019/19074

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board meeting schedule for the period November 2019 to December 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules. In particular, clause 19, Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002  on general provisions for meetings requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings. Sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 require that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting, and that local board meetings are open to the public.

3.       Adopting a meeting schedule helps with meeting these requirements. Adopting a business meeting schedule also allows for a planned approach to workloads and ensures that local board members have clarity about their commitments.

4.       A draft meeting schedule for the period November 2019 to December 2020 has been developed and is included below for.adoption by the local board.

5.       Commencing the business meeting during business hours will enable meetings to be productive and ensures best use of resources.

6.       One business meeting per month is sufficient for formal business to be considered. There are some instances for which the local board may need to have meetings in addition to this schedule. The specific times and dates for meetings for matters such as local board plans and local board agreements are yet to be finalised. Local board meeting schedules may need to be updated once these details are confirmed.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      adopt the meeting schedule outlined below for the period November 2019 to December 2020:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DATE

TIME

VENUE

Business Meeting

Thursday, 21 November 2019

2pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road, Orewa

Community Forum

Thursday 5 December 2019

6pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

Business Meeting

Thursday, 12 December 2019

2pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

Community Forum

February TBC

6pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road, Orewa

Business Meeting

Thursday 20 February 2020

2pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road, Orewa

Community Forum

Thursday 5 March 2020

6pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

Business Meeting

Thursday 19 March 2020

2pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

Community Forum

Thursday 2 April 2020

6pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road, Orewa

Business Meeting

Thursday 16 April 2020

2pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road, Orewa

Community Forum

Thursday 7 May 2020

6pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

Business Meeting

Thursday 21 May 2020

2pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

Community Forum

Thursday 4 June 2020

6pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road, Orewa

Business Meeting

Thursday 18 June 2020

2pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road, Orewa

Community Forum

Thursday 2 July 2020

6pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

Business Meeting

Thursday 16 July 2020

2pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

Community Forum

Thursday 6 August 2020

6pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road, Orewa

Business Meeting

Thursday 20 August 2020

2pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road, Orewa

Community Forum

Thursday 3 September 2020

6pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

Business Meeting

Thursday 17 September 2020

2pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

Community Forum

Thursday 1 October 2020

6pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road, Orewa

Business Meeting

Thursday 15 October 2020

2pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road, Orewa

Community Forum

Thursday 5 November 2020

6pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

Business Meeting

Thursday 19 November 2020

2pm

Local Board Office

2 Glen Road

Browns Bay

Community Forum

Thursday 3 December 2020

6pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road, Orewa

Business Meeting

Thursday 10 December 2020

2pm

Council Chamber

Orewa Service Centre

50 Centreway Road, Orewa

 

b)      agree to commence business meetings at 2.00pm to be held at the Council Chambers, Orewa Service Centre and the Local Board Office, Browns Bay, alternating each month between the two local board venues. Public forum will be scheduled at the start of the business meeting, to enable participation by the public and stakeholders in the democratic process.

c)      agree to commence community forum meetings at 6.00pm at the Council Chambers, Orewa Service Centre, and the Local Board Office, Browns Bay, alternating each month betweenthe two local board venues. Community forums are being introduced to provide a dedicated forum for community groups and members of the public to present and update the local board on projects or issues.

d)      note the dates and times for business meetings to make decisions on local board plans and local board agreements are yet to be scheduled.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anna Bray - Policy and Planning Manager - Local Boards

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 November 2019

 

 

Urgent decision-making process

File No.: CP2019/19075

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s agreement to use the urgent decision-making process when appropriate.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The urgent decision-making process enables the local board to make decisions to manage unforeseen and urgent circumstances when it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirements of a quorum. By agreeing to this process, the local board delegates decision-making authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirements of a quorum.

b)      delegate authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board.

c)      agree that the relationship manager, chairperson and deputy chairperson (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off an authorisation memo.

d)      note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary meeting of the local board.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       The urgent decision-making process enables the chairperson and deputy chairperson, or any person acting in these roles, to make decisions to manage unforeseen and urgent circumstances when it is not practical to call the full local board together and meet the requirements of a quorum. Examples include during the Christmas and New Year period or for providing input to the council’s central government submission process in tight timeframes.

4.       By agreeing to this process, the local board delegates decision-making authority to the chairperson and deputy chairperson, or any person acting in these roles during that period.

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 provides for local boards to delegate to committees, members of the local board or Auckland Council staff any of its responsibilities and powers, with some specific exceptions (clause 32, Schedule 7). This legislation enables the urgent decision-making process.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The urgent decision-making process provides an alternative decision-making mechanism to an extraordinary meeting. An extraordinary meeting is called when an urgent decision is required on matters that cannot wait until the next scheduled business meeting of the local board.

7.       Urgent decisions are different from emergency decisions, which are only made if there is a risk to public health and safety.

8.       All requests for an urgent decision will be supported by a memo stating the nature of the issue, reason for urgency and the decisions or resolutions sought.

9.       The local board relationship manager will use the information in this memo, along with the supporting report, to determine whether or not to authorise the urgent decision-making process.

10.     A number of factors will be considered by the relationship manager before approval to use the urgent decision-making process is given, such as:

·   the timing of the next scheduled meeting

·   confirmation that the local board has the delegation to make the decision

·   consideration of the rationale for the urgency

·   the significance of the decision and whether the urgent decision-making process is appropriate.

11.     Once the relationship manager authorises the use of the urgent decision-making process, the chairperson and deputy chairperson (or any person/s acting in these roles) also need to approve the use of the urgent decision-making process by signing the same memo.

12.     Once the authorisation memo has been approved, the chairperson and deputy chairperson will refer to the substantive report for advice and staff recommendations to inform their decision. This report will meet Auckland Council quality advice standards and adhere to the report authorisation processes.

13.     Any decision made using the urgent decision-making process will be reported as an information item to the next ordinary meeting of the local board and the signed approval memo will be attached.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The urgent decision-making process proposed in this report enables the council group to progress urgent decisions efficiently, when it is not practical to call the full local board together.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     This report outlines the local board urgent decision-making process, and seeks the local board’s agreement to adopt this process.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have specific implications for Māori, and the arrangements proposed in this report do not affect the Māori community differently to the rest of the community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     There are no financial implications arising from the procedural decision sought by this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     To mitigate any risk that the urgent decision-making process could be used inappropriately, the relationship manager will assess a number of factors including timing of the next scheduled meeting, the reason for urgency, and significance of the decision. If a matter is of major significance, an extraordinary meeting can be called instead.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     If the local board adopts the use of the urgent decision-making process, the local board relationship manager and delegated members will execute the urgent decision-making process outlined in this report if the need arises.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anna Bray - Policy and Planning Manager - Local Boards

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 November 2019

 

 

Decisions made under delegation during the 2019 election period

File No.: CP2019/19354

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the decisions made under delegation during the 2019 election period.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting on 18 September 2019, the Hibiscus and Bays resolved as follows:

Resolution number HB/2019/1

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      utilise the local board’s existing urgent decision-making process between the final local board business meeting and the commencement of the term of office of new local board members

b)      note that from the commencement of the term of office of new local board members until the inaugural meeting of the incoming local board, urgent decision-making will be undertaken by the Chief Executive under existing delegations

c)      approve that staff, as a temporary measure, can make business as usual decisions under their existing delegated authority without requiring compliance with the requirement in the current delegation protocols to consult with the nominated portfolio holder (or chairperson where there is no portfolio holder in place), from 22 October 2019, noting that staff will consult with the chairperson and deputy chairperson following the inaugural meeting until new arrangements are made at the first business meeting in the new term

d)      note that existing appointments by the local board to external bodies will cease at the election and new appointments will need to be made by the local board in the new term.

3.       This is an information only report which aims to provide greater visibility and outlines the decisions that were made under those delegations.

4.       The following decision was authorised by Members Julia Parfitt and Janet Fitzgerald, who have delegated authority to make, on behalf of the local board, urgent decisions on matters that cannot wait until the next scheduled ordinary meeting of the local board.:

Date

Subject

8/10/19

Delegation to approve a report under urgency on a temporary alcohol ban for Crate Day 2019 on the Hibiscus Coast.

 

5.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Local board members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      note the decision made under delegation by Chairperson Julia Parfitt and Deputy Chairperson Janet Fitzgerald to approve a report under urgency on a temporary alcohol ban for Crate Day 2019 on the Hibiscus Coast during the 2019 election period.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20191007 Memo Crate Day

45

b

20191008 Crate Day Report

49

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gemma Kaldesic – Democracy Advisor Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 November 2019

 

 

 

 

URGENT DECISION OF THE HIBISCUS AND BAYS LOCAL BOARD

 

 

Dated: 8 October 2019

 

 

SUBJECT:             To request the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board consider and approve a report under urgency on a temporary alcohol ban for Crate Day 2019 on the Hibiscus Coast.

 

 

BACKGROUND:

 

1.       The New Zealand Police (Police) have requested a 48-hour temporary alcohol ban (alcohol ban) for Saturday 7 and Sunday 8 December 2019 on the Hibiscus Coast. The request includes beaches and adjoining parks from Waiwera Beach to Arkles Bay, including Victor Eaves Park, Western Park and Centreway Reserve.

2.       The request seeks to prevent alcohol-related crime and disorder associated with Crate Day. Crate Day is unofficially celebrated around New Zealand as the first Saturday of summer in December. The event has been promoted by The Rock radio station since 2009 for people to gather outdoors, listen to music and “share a crate” of alcohol.

3.       The purpose of the report is for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to consider:

·    adopting a 48-hour temporary alcohol ban for Crate Day 2019 on Saturday 7 and Sunday 8 December 2019 on areas of the Hibiscus Coast identified in Attachment A of the report.

·    allocating up to $5000 plus GST for public notification and installation and removal of signage in priority areas for the temporary alcohol ban.

 

 

REASON FOR URGENCY

 

4.       A request to consider the report under urgency is sought for the following reasons:

·          Local Body elections in October 2019 mean that there are no local board meetings during this month.

·          The next meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is scheduled for late November. This would not leave sufficient time to ensure signage installation and 14 days public notification before Crate Day on Saturday 7 December 2019.


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 November 2019

 

 

DECISIONS:

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

 

a)   adopt a 48-hour temporary alcohol ban on Saturday 7 and Sunday 8 December 2019 on areas of the Hibiscus Coast identified in the overview map in Attachment A of the report.

b)   allocate up to $5000 plus GST for public notification and installation and removal of signage in priority areas for the temporary alcohol ban because there is no event organiser to cover these costs.

 

AUTHORISED FOR RELEASE

 


 

 

 

 

Authorisation

 

This decision is authorised by Members Julia Parfitt and Janet Fitzgerald, who have delegated authority to make, on behalf of the local board, urgent decisions on matters that cannot wait until the next scheduled ordinary meeting of the local board. Resolution number HB/2016/195.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Julia Parfitt                                                                  Janet Fitzgerald

Chairperson                                                                Deputy Chairperson

 

 

Date: 8 October 2019                                                  Date: 8 October 2019

 

 

Note: This decision will be reported to the next Hibiscus and Bays Local Board meeting on 21 November 2019.


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 November 2019

 

 

Request for temporary alcohol ban on Hibiscus Coast on 7 and 8 December 2019

File No.: CP2019/19297

 

  

 


Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek a decision on whether to adopt a temporary alcohol ban on the Hibiscus Coast on 7 and 8 December 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To enable a decision on a request for a 48-hour temporary alcohol ban on Saturday 7 and Sunday 8 December 2019 on the Hibiscus Coast, staff assessed the request against legislative criteria and identified three options:

·      Option one: Status quo - existing evening alcohol bans apply.

·      Option two: Priority areas - adopt a 48-hour temporary alcohol ban on 7 and 8 December 2019 on the beach and adjoining parks in Waiwera, Orewa, Red Beach, Stanmore Bay, Manly, Arkles Bay, and on Western Reserve and Victor Eaves Park.

·      Option three: All areas - adopt a 48-hour temporary alcohol ban on 7 and 8 December 2019 on areas of the Hibiscus Coast requested in Attachment A with signage in priority areas.

3.       Staff recommend the local board adopt Option three: All areas. Taking this approach is most likely to prevent crime and disorder associated with Crate Day gatherings on the Hibiscus Coast.

4.       There is a minor reputational risk associated with Option three: All areas. This option could be perceived as a disproportionate response to the issue due to the number of areas covered by the proposed ban. This can be mitigated by public communication that the proposed ban reduces the high risk of displacement of the event around the local area and will most effectively prevent crime and disorder in a reasonable way.

5.       If the local board adopt a temporary alcohol ban staff will notify Police of the decision. The local board will be responsible for funding the public notification and installation and removal of temporary signage. Police will be responsible for enforcement.

 


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      adopt a 48-hour temporary alcohol ban on Saturday 7 and Sunday 8 December 2019 on areas of the Hibiscus Coast identified in the overview map in Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      allocate up to $5,000 plus GST for public notification and installation and removal of signage in priority areas for the temporary alcohol ban, because there is no event organiser to cover these costs.

 

 


Horopaki

Context

Police request a temporary alcohol ban to prevent Crate Day problems on Hibiscus Coast

6.       The New Zealand Police (Police) have requested a 48-hour temporary alcohol ban (alcohol ban) for Saturday 7 and Sunday 8 December 2019 on the Hibiscus Coast (Attachment A). The request includes beaches and adjoining parks from Waiwera Beach to Arkles Bay, including Victor Eaves Park, Western Reserve and Centreway Reserve.

7.       The request seeks to prevent alcohol-related crime and disorder associated with Crate Day. Crate Day is unofficially celebrated around New Zealand as the first Saturday of summer in December. The event has been promoted by The Rock radio station since 2009 for people to gather outdoors, listen to music and “share a crate” of alcohol.

8.       Current alcohol bans on the Hibiscus Coast (Attachment B) apply:

       from 10pm-7am during daylight savings on beach, park and certain surrounding streets alongside Orewa Beach, Victor Eaves Park, Western Park, Red Beach, Stanmore Bay, Manly, and Arkles Bay

       24 hours, 7 days a week in Orewa Town Centre and associated beach and parks.

Alcohol bans prohibiting alcohol, are adopted by local boards and enforced by Police

9.       Alcohol bans prohibit the consumption or possession of alcohol in specified public places during specified times. The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has authority to make alcohol bans under the Auckland Council Alcohol Control Bylaw 2014 (Bylaw) (GB/2014/121).

10.     A local board decision to adopt an alcohol ban must meet criteria in the Local Government Act 2002 and Bylaw (refer Table 1 and Attachment C).

11.     Police enforce alcohol bans using powers of search, seizure, arrest, and $250 infringement fees1. Police also have powers to address incidents of crime or disorder under the Summary Offences Act 1981 and Crimes Act 1961, whether or not alcohol is involved.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Staff have assessed the request against legislative criteria for making alcohol bans

Staff have assessed the information provided in the request against the legislative and bylaw criteria in Attachment C. Table 1 provides a summary of this assessment.

12.     Police provided evidence of a high level of crime and disorder on Crate Day at Manly Beach in 2015 and Stanmore Bay in 2016 caused or made worse by alcohol consumed there. Examples included litter, public urination, glass injuries, vomit in public bathrooms, and arrests including for disorderly behaviour and fighting (refer to summary in Table 1).

13.     A temporary ban would be appropriate, proportionate and a justified limitation on people’s rights and freedoms due to the level of crime and disorder associated with Crate Day, ease of displacement of gatherings, limited ban duration and general community and Police support. In addition, temporary alcohol bans in 2017 and 2018 for similar areas as in the request effectively prevented alcohol-related harm (refer to summary in Table 1).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1 Summary assessment of alcohol ban request against statutory and bylaw criteria

Criteria

Staff assessment

 

Is there evidence of a high level of crime or disorder at the location caused or made worse by alcohol consumed there?

Police provided evidence of a very high level of alcohol-related crime and disorder at Manly Beach and Stanmore Bay on Crate Day in 2015 and 2016. Examples included litter, public urination, glass injuries, vomit in public bathrooms, and arrests including for disorderly behaviour and fighting.

Police and residents saw the crowds drinking excessively and noted that offenders were intoxicated. Police provided photos of alcohol-related litter and broken bottles.

There were at least 10 incidents of physical harm, 10-15 actual threats, and 20 incidents of nuisance.

 

Is the request appropriate in light of the evidence?

Temporary alcohol bans in 2017 and 2018 for similar areas in this request effectively prevented alcohol-related incidents occurring. This is likely to be because incidents at previous Crate Day gatherings were of a type that could be more successfully prevented by an alcohol ban, the premise for Crate Day gatherings is heavy drinking, notification of the alcohol ban prevented promoters organising a large gathering on the Hibiscus Coast, and Police planned to proactively patrol and enforce the ban.

Previous alternative options such as public awareness or relying on Police powers under the Summary Offences Act 1981 were ineffective.

The 2017 and 2018 alcohol bans were effective despite signage only in priority areas, which meant that Police had to first give people an opportunity to leave an area lacking signage with their alcohol. The local board may consider costs to install and remove signage from all areas in the request (an estimated

$10,000) to be disproportionate to the effect of the ban. In 2018, the local board provided approximately $4,330 for 16 priority areas which is proportionate to the cost of cleaning up after previous Crate Day events without temporary bans in place.

 

Is the request proportionate in light of the evidence?

A temporary alcohol ban at Stanmore Bay, Manly Beach and similar locations on the Hibiscus Coast is proportionate. Police provided evidence that Crate Day gatherings can displace to other public places easily. Gatherings moved from Manly Beach (2015) to Stanmore Bay (2016) through social media promotion and similar problems occurred at the new location. The 2018 temporary alcohol ban included Waiwera based on Police intelligence from 2017. Police consider a temporary alcohol ban at just some locations could displace gatherings to other public places.

In addition, the ban duration relates to a specific limited timeframe associated with a high level of alcohol-related crime and disorder.

Someone opposed to the request may argue that the number of areas covered by the temporary ban is excessive and that limiting the ban to the more popular areas in Orewa and the Whangaparaoa Peninsula would be more proportionate.

 

Is the request a justifiable and Is the request a justifiable and reasonable limitation on people’s rights and freedoms?

There is sufficient information to conclude that this limitation of rights or freedoms is justified, given:

There is sufficient information to conclude that this limitation of rights or freedoms is justified, given:

 

·    the very high level of crime and disorder a temporary alcohol ban is likely to prevent as in previous years

·    its limited duration

·    general community and Police support

·    high risk of displacement of Crate Day gatherings.

 

 

Staff have identified three options in response to the assessment

 

14.     Staff have identified the following three options in response to the assessment. Options are compared in Table 2 below.

· Option one: Status quo – decline request, existing evening alcohol bans apply.

·        Option two: Priority areas – adopt a 48 hour temporary alcohol ban on 7 and 8 December 2019 on the beach and adjoining parks in Waiwera, Orewa, Red Beach, Stanmore Bay, Manly, Arkles Bay and on Western Reserve and Victor Eaves Park.

·        Option three: All Areas – adopt a 48 hour temporary alcohol ban on 7 and 8 December 2019 on areas of the Hibiscus Coast requested in Attachment A with signage in priority areas.

Table 2 Comparative assessment of options to alcohol ban request

 

 

Option one: Status quo

Option two: Priority areas

Option three: All areas (recommended)

Pros

No further limitations on people’s rights and freedoms to consume alcohol reasonably in public places on the Hibiscus Coast.

No local board cost to install and remove temporary signage.

Crime and disorder associated with Crate Day likely to be prevented.

Crime and disorder associated with Crate Day likely to be prevented.

Notifying the alcohol ban as “all areas” is easier to communicate and more effective than Option two.

Cons

High likelihood of crime and disorder associated with Crate Day in public places.

Significant council and local board cost to clean up afterwards.

Crate Day gatherings may take place on smaller public places and alcohol- related harm occurs.

Council incurs cost of signage, around $5,000 plus GST.

Disproportionate cost to install and remove signage in all areas (around $10,000) in relation to the effect of the ban, compared to only priority areas (around $5,000).

It is recommended that only priority areas have signage.

Risks

Council and local board perceived to have allowed harm to occur.

Council and the local board perceived to ignore evidence-based recommendations made by Police.

Council and local board perceived to have allowed harm to occur.

Council and the local board perceived to ignore evidence-based recommendations made by Police.

Council and local board perceived to have responded disproportionately due to number of areas.

Police can take less immediate action to prevent harm in areas with no signage.

Mitigation

Public communication that the local board considers an alcohol ban is no longer required.

Public communication that the local board considers this option reasonable and financially justified, based on evidence presented.

Public communication that the local board considers this option best prevents crime or disorder in a way that is reasonable and financially justified.

 

Staff recommend the request for an alcohol ban be adopted on all areas

15.     Staff recommend Option three: All areas due to:

·        the very high level of crime and disorder experienced in the area from Crate Day gatherings in 2015 and 2016 prevented by an alcohol ban in 2017 and 2018

·        ease of displacement of Crate Day gatherings

·        the limited duration of the alcohol ban

·        general community and Police support

·        how the cost of signage is minimised.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     This report is procedural in nature so does not have direct climate impacts. However, a key focus for the council in the current term will be how it responds to the climate emergency and this may be a consideration for how local boards manage their governance work.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on council groups.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board adopted a similar alcohol ban in 2018 (HB/2018/168) and alcohol-related harm or disorder did not occur on coastal reserve land.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Managing alcohol-related harm associated with events increases opportunities for health and well-being, which is consistent with the outcomes of the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau. Iwi and Māori health advocacy organisations support the general use of alcohol bans as a tool to reduce alcohol-related harm.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     Option three: All areas is estimated to cost the local board $5,000 for sign installation and removal in priority areas. In 2018, the local board installed 74 temporary signs in 16 priority beach and park areas at approximately $4,330 to install and remove.

21.     If the local board decides to signpost all areas, the cost is estimated to be $10,000.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     There is a minor reputational risk associated with Option three: All areas. It could be perceived as a disproportionate response to the issue due to the number of areas covered by the proposed ban.

23.     This can be mitigated by public communication that the ban proposed manages the high risk of displacement of the event around the local area and will effectively prevent crime and disorder in a way that is reasonable.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     If the local board adopts the temporary alcohol ban, staff will notify Police of the decision.

25.     Temporary alcohol bans are usually associated with an event organiser, such as Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development. Crate Day gatherings are not associated with formal event organisers. This means that once a decision is made the local board will seek assurances that the relevant council departments will notify the public (for example in local newspapers) and install and remove temporary signage.

26.     Police will be responsible for enforcement.

 


Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Police report

 

b

Attachment B - Map of existing alcohol bans

 

c

Attachment C - Assessment Sheet

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gemma Kaldesic - Democracy Advisor for Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 November 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 November 2019

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 November 2019