I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 5 December 2019

3:00pm

St Chads Church and Community Centre
38 St Johns Road
Meadowbank

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Scott Milne

 

Deputy Chairperson

Sarah Powrie

 

Members

Troy Churton

 

 

Colin Davis, JP

 

 

Troy Elliott

 

 

Margaret Voyce

 

 

David Wong, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Kim  Lawgun

Democracy Advisor

 

3 December 2019

 

Contact Telephone: 021 302 163

Email: Kim.lawgun@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Carmel Claridge - Waiatarua Dog Walkers                                 5

8.2     Deputation - Craig Ewington - Nehu Reserve                                                   6

8.3     Deputation - John Blair and Kelvin Hunter - Friends of Madills Farm           6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Public Forum - Meadowbank and St Johns Residents Association - Waiatarua Reserve and Gowing Drive pedestrian crossing                                              7

9.2     Public Forum - Matt Cole - Bike Tāmaki Drive                                                  7

9.3     Public Forum - Craig Presland - Parnell Cricket Club                                     7

9.4     Public Forum - Tom Street - Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club   8

9.5     Public Forum - Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association -  Future use of the ex-Mission Bay Bowling Club land proposal                                         8

9.6     Public Forum - Bridget Rothbart - Waiatarua Protection Society                  9

9.7     Public Forum - John La Roche - Kepa Bush Pathway                                     9

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                9

11        Declaration by Local Board Member Troy Elliott                                                     11

12        Adopt the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan                                                   13

13        Approval of an agreement to lease and landlord consent to Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust for land and works at Shore Road Reserve, Remuera                                                                                                                                       65

14        Auckland Hockey Facilities Trust Incorporated - Grant of an Agreement to Lease at Colin Maiden Park, 71-73 Merton Road St Johns                                                    93

15        Ellerslie War Memorial Town Hall hire fee options                                                137

16        Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection Round One 2019/2020 grant allocations                                                                                                                                     143

17        Approval of the Ōrākei Local Board Engagement Strategy 2019-2022               201

18        Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation                                                                  215

19        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter one 2019/2020                                                                                                             223

20        Auckland Transport December 2019 report to the Ōrākei Local Board              265

21        Local board governance work management for the 2019-2022 triennium         271

22        Local board appointments and delegations for the 2019-2022 electoral term   277

23        Appointment of local board members to external community organisations   285

24        Adoption of a business meeting schedule                                                             291

25        Process for appointment of Local Government New Zealand National Council representative                                                                                                            293

26        Elected Members Expense Policy 2019                                                                  299

27        Urgent decision-making process                                                                             327

28        Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Proceedings                                                          331

29        Resolutions Pending Action                                                                                     355  

30        Consideration of Extraordinary Items  

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of its inaugural meeting, held on Monday, 4 November 2019, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōrākei Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Carmel Claridge - Waiatarua Dog Walkers

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Carmel Claridge from the Waiatarua Dog Walkers group will be in attendance to address the Board on the dog on-leash areas at Waiatarua Reserve.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Carmel Claridge for her attendance.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Craig Ewington - Nehu Reserve

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Craig Ewington, will be in attendance to address the Board on the setting aside of Nehu Reserve until (according to certain signage) December 2021 for the exclusive use of contractors, CB Civil, for the purpose of layup and works base for its contract with Auckland Council for stormwater separation in Ōrākei.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Craig Ewington for his attendance.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation - John Blair and Kelvin Hunter - Friends of Madills Farm

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       John Blair and Kelvin Hunter from the Friends of Madills Farm will be in attendance to introduce the group to the Board, and to explain what the group does and its concerns regarding Madills Farm.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank John Blair and Kelvin Hunter for their attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Meadowbank and St Johns Residents Association - Waiatarua Reserve and Gowing Drive pedestrian crossing

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Gerald Martin, Anna Jackson, Charmaine Vaughan and Barry Stewart from the Meadowbank and St Johns Residents Association will be in attendance to brief the Board on the Association’s view in relation to the proposed Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan and on the Association’s request to Auckland Transport to include a pedestrian crossing on Gowing Drive, Meadowbank as part of Auckland Transport’s traffic safety plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Gerald Martin, Anna Jackson, Charmaine Vaughan and Barry Stewart for their attendance.

 

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Matt Cole - Bike Tāmaki Drive

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Matt Cole will be in attendance to provide an update brief to the Board regarding Bike Tāmaki Drive.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Matt Cole for his attendance.

 

Attachments

a          20191205 - Public Forum - Matt Cole - Bike Tāmaki Drive, presentation... 357

 

 

9.3       Public Forum - Craig Presland - Parnell Cricket Club

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Craig Presland, Parnell Cricket Club will be in attendance to address the Board regarding the Parnell Cricket Club’s plans to upgrade Bloodworth Park including the Club’s plans to build a new cricket pavilion.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Craig Presland for his attendance.

 

 

 

9.4       Public Forum - Tom Street - Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Tom Street, Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club will be in attendance to update the Board on the Club’s development plans.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Tom Street for his attendance.

 

 

 

9.5       Public Forum - Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association -  Future use of the ex-Mission Bay Bowling Club land proposal

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Don Stock, Chair of the Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association will be in attendance to discuss the Association’s proposal regarding future use of the ex-Mission Bay Bowling Club land.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Don Stock for his attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Public Forum - Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association -  Future use of the ex-Mission Bay Bowling Club land, correspondence...... 357

 

 

9.6       Public Forum - Bridget Rothbart - Waiatarua Protection Society

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Bridget Rothbart, Waiatarua Protection Society will be in attendance to brief the Board on the Society’s view around the proposed changes for Waiatarua Reserve.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Bridget Rothbart for her attendance.

 

 

 

9.7       Public Forum - John La Roche - Kepa Bush Pathway

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       John La Roche will be in attendance to address the Board regarding the Kepa Bush pathway.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank John La Roche for his attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Kepa Bush Pathway..................................................................................... 385

 


 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Declaration by Local Board Member Troy Elliott

File No.: CP2019/20114

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Due to being an apology at the Ōrākei Local Board’s inaugural meeting held on Monday, 4 November 2019, Troy Elliott will make an oral declaration and sign a written declaration in accordance with Schedule 7, Clause 14 of the Local Government Act 2002, which will be attested by the Relationship Manager.

2.       In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 (Schedule 7, clause 14(2)) the Relationship Manager is authorised to administer the member’s declaration at this meeting.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Adopt the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan

File No.: CP2019/18940

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek adoption of the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan has been developed in partnership with six iwi groups and in consultation with key stakeholders, park users and local private property owners. Key stakeholders include the Waiatarua Reserve Protection Society volunteer group, the Men’s Shed community group, Meadowbank Residents’ Association and the adjacent Remuera Golf Course.

3.       The feedback from 205 submissions during public consultation has helped shape the plan.  The plan investigates the history, stormwater functions, water quality, ecology and recreational values of the reserve and identifies actions for minimal asset development and maximum ecological enhancement.

4.       Collaboration between the Healthy Waters, Community Facilities and Parks, Sports and Recreation departments of Auckland Council is key to the successful implementation of this plan.

5.       At a business meeting on 19 September 2019, following two public submissions, the Ōrākei Local Board requested further work on a minimum sediment removal programme and an additional on-leash dog area (resolution number OR/2019/184). The plan has been updated with these requests and is resubmitted for adoption.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      adopt the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Waiatarua Reserve Management Plan was written in 1984 when the reserve was used for grazing.  In many respects it is out of date and in need of review. The Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan describes current guiding principles for the development of the reserve.

7.       The Parks, Sports and Recreation work programme for 2018/2019 contained a project called “Waiatarua Reserve: prepare an integrated plan.” The activity description was “Develop an integrated stormwater and park maintenance and development plan to ensure Waiatarua is well managed and sustainably developed.” The activity benefits were “Waiatarua is well maintained and the board have a plan which will guide changes to the park when developing future work programs.” The budget was $20,000.

8.       A pre-plan questionnaire was sent to key stakeholders. Fourteen responses were received.  These responses were used to form the draft plan. Earlier requests from the community included suggestions for a frisbee golf course, a dog agility course, a waterwheel and a future environmental education centre. These were also incorporated into the draft plan for consultation.

9.       On 26 September 2018 the Parks, Sports and Recreation South/Central Mana Whenua Forum was approached to identify iwi who would be interested in participating in the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan. The forum recommended contacting all iwi within the forum group. Six iwi responded and a mana whenua working group was formed (see paragraph 29).

10.     A pre-plan presentation was made to the Meadowbank Residents’ Association on 29 May 2019.

11.     Public consultation on the draft Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan took place between 22 July and 12 August 2019. An online questionnaire was available on the Auckland Council ‘Have Your Say’ internet page. This was publicised via posters at all entrances to the reserve, by fliers delivered to all adjacent properties, through communication with all residents’ associations, business associations and stakeholder groups and was listed on the Ōrākei Local Board Facebook page. A two-hour, drop-in event took place at the Men’s Shed on 3 August 2019. 205 responses were received.

12.     A report seeking adoption of the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan was first presented to the Ōrākei Local Board on 19 September 2019. Two public submissions were made about the plan during the business meeting.

13.     The outcome of the business meeting was “that Ōrākei Local Board defer the decision to adopt the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan pending further consideration of a specifying minimum sediment removal programme and exploring an additional designated on-leash dog area”.  This is resolution number OR/2019/184.

14.     Further changes have been made to the plan and this has been resubmitted for adoption.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The plan includes:

·   site history and context

·   stormwater function

·   structural, water level and water quality analysis

·   flora ecology, vegetation monitoring, pest plant control and biosecurity

·   fauna ecology, bird monitoring and pest control

·   existing park assets and footpath connections

·   consultation summary

·   key development principles

·   actions for further investigation and analysis

·   actions to develop recreational outcomes

·   actions for collaboration with iwi, stakeholders, other council departments and members of the public.

16.     Public consultation generated 205 responses, of which 77 per cent of respondents agreed that the level of development was about right.  A summary of the consultation responses is included on pages 25-26 of the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan. Based on the comments that were received during public consultation the following changes were made:

·   Add two additional key design principles:

1)  “Value naturalness”. Keep the open space free from assets and developments. Contribute to the physical and mental health and wellbeing of park users through connection with the natural environment.  This was a key theme that was mentioned in comments from respondents. 

2) “Shared use for recreation”. Allow varied recreational activities providing they respect other users and do not compromise the natural values.  There were a diverse range of user groups who all had an interest in continued and increased use of the reserve.

·   Keep the frisbee golf course, dog agility course and nature trail. These three elements are positioned outside of the four main development areas. They should be sensitively designed to be rustic and blend into the natural landscape and rustic character of the park. The footprint should be reduced to avoid cluttering the reserve. They should be positioned away from the main perimeter path to reduce user conflicts. 60 per cent of respondents supported the frisbee golf course.  63 per cent of respondents supported the dog agility course. The nature trail was the third most popular asset development in the park.

·   Keep location 13b (between the Abbotts Way car park and the dog pond) as the location for the dog agility course. The preference during public consultation was for the dog agility course to be positioned in area 13a (45 per cent of respondents), near the Grand Drive car park. This result was highly debated. Finally, 13b (preferred by 22 per cent of respondents) was chosen because it was more in keeping with the development principles to leave wide open spaces unobstructed and was closer to a high infrastructure intensity zone.

·   Keep the actions to relocate bins to the entry and exit points of the reserve only and add an additional pathway connection to the café at the Remuera Golf Course. This was supported by 57 per percent of respondents.

·   Consider two ways to incorporate additional toilet facilities in the reserve, either by extending the existing toilet when it is due for replacement or by incorporating it into the proposed environmental centre. Additional toilet facilities were supported by 58 per cent of respondents.

·   Identify the small shed in the Abbotts Way car park for use by community groups. This use was supported by 47 per cent of respondents.

·   Identify two all-weather circuits: the full perimeter path and a shorter circuit. This suggestion was received during the consultation.

·   Remove northern proposed playground. Nature play will be incorporated into the nature trail instead.  This was better aligned with the desire for less infrastructure and more open space.

17.     In response to the two public submissions and a local board resolution on 19 September 2019 the following additional changes were made:

·   To explore an additional on-leash area, an area has been identified in the northern end of the park. This is an indicative area only and cannot be enforced by this plan.  A bylaw review is the legally enforceable method of changing the park specific rules in the Dog Management Bylaw 2012. Advocate for a review of the dog rules in the park has been added to the action plan as a high priority. This process can take 18 months to complete and will include public consultation.

·   Additionally, an action to support dog training and obedience initiatives, increased education and enforcement of the Dog Management Bylaw 2012 has been added to address the conflict between dog owners and non-dog owners.

·   The fenced area in the western end of the park close to the playground is already an on-leash area. The standard dog rules apply around the playground: dogs are prohibited on any playground at all times and under control on a leash in the vicinity of any playground when in use. Extending the nature play into the bush and resigning the amenity area will allow the on-leash area to be used to its full potential.

·   To specify a minimum sediment removal programme additional content has been added around the Healthy Waters’ ponds programme. Healthy Waters manages over 650 stormwater ponds and wetlands.  60 to 80 ponds are inspected every year.  Sediment volumes are calculated during the inspection. Ponds with a loss of storage of more than 20 per cent are added to the pond renewal programme for prioritisation.

·   The wetland at Waiatarua Reserve is not a typical design. The wetland was designed so that the peat base of the wetland would sink at the same rate that sediment enters. Therefore, large-scale de-silting of the main body of the wetland would not be necessary. Monitoring should check for delta formations and short circuiting in the main body of the wetland. This can advise targeted areas of sediment removal. 

18.     The actions in the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan are prioritised into high medium and low on page 32 of the plan.  The two key priorities are to:

·    gain a good understanding of the way the wetland is currently functioning through water quality, structural and sediment monitoring

·    increase the level of pest control for rabbits, mustelids and possums.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Most of Waiatarua Reserve is a wetland.  Water levels are expected to rise and fall to accommodate peak rain events. Trend analysis of data from April 2015 to May 2019 has shown that both the median water level and median discharge rate have increased by about 15 per cent per year. 

·   The median water level has increased by 8.6mm per year from the median water level of 58mm. 

·   The median discharge rate has increased by 0.022 cubic metres per second per year from the median discharge rate of 0.143 cubic metres per second.

There is enough land area for this to occur. However, there may be conflict with users and a perception of a loss of amenity space or deteriorating ground conditions in the surrounding reserve. Any assets should be designed with increased water levels in mind.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The Healthy Waters department of Auckland Council is responsible for maintaining the wetland at Waiatarua Reserve. The wetland was constructed in 2005 to improve catchment stormwater quality, increase sediment removal, maximise habitat values and maximise public recreation. This plan has assessed progress against these objectives and identified actions which will further build on these outcomes. 

21.     Representatives from the Healthy Waters department of Auckland Council have been involved in developing the content about the stormwater wetland. Healthy Waters and Parks, Sports and Recreation representatives attended a joint workshop with the Ōrākei Local Board on 4 July 2019. The business report and draft plan has been reviewed by Healthy Waters who are supportive of the outcomes in the action plan.

22.     Community Facilities is responsible for many of the maintenance outcomes on the reserve and specifically those relating to pest plant and pest animal control. This plan identifies the opportunities and interest in integrated pest control between several council contractors, volunteers, the neighbouring Remuera Golf Club and adjacent private properties to achieve better ecological outcomes. Community Facilities is supportive of the outcomes in the action plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     The Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan will ensure that developments in the reserve protect the rural character of the reserve while improving the quality of open space facilities.  This will contribute to an open space that is valued and enjoyed by residents and visitors. 

24.     Enhancing the wetland will contribute environmental benefits and ecological benefits to the wider stormwater network and biodiversity corridors. 

25.     These outcomes support the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2017.

26.     The scope of the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan was agreed with the Ōrākei Local Board in a workshop on 2 July 2018.  The draft plan was reviewed by the Ōrākei Local Board on 2 May 2019. A further workshop, supported by Healthy Waters’ staff, took place on 4 July 2019, prior to public consultation. A workshop to review the changes made to the plan, following public consultation, took place on 5 September 2019.

27.     A report to adopt the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan was presented to the Ōrākei Local Board at a business meeting on 19 September 2019. The report was not adopted so further work could be done in response to submissions from local members of the public.

28.     A further meeting, requested by newly-elected local board members, to understand the current discussions on the plan, took place on 12 November 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Mana whenua have been an active partner in the development of this plan.  Representatives from Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki Tribal Trust, Te Ākitai Waiohua Waka Taua, Te Patukirikiri Iwi Incorporated and Ngāti Maru formed a mana whenua working group to contribute to the plan. Representatives from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei contributed independently. 

30.     The outcomes of the plan embody the protection, restoration and enhancement of the natural environment and environmental health.

31.     These are key Te Aranga design principles of Mana, Taiao and Mauri Tu founded on intrinsic Māori cultural values and designed to provide practical guidance for enhancing outcomes for the built environment. The principles have arisen from a widely held desire to enhance mana whenua presence, visibility and participation in the design of the physical realm.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The Ōrākei Local Board work programme for 2019/2020 contains two projects for Waiatarua Reserve that will contribute to implementing this plan. 

33.     “Waiatarua Reserve - phase three (ecological restoration and pest management)” is managed by the Biosecurity team and implemented by Community Facilities. It is anticipated that this park will receive increased funding through the Natural Environment Targeted Rate. The level of funding is still being negotiated.

34.     The “Ecological Volunteers and Environmental Programme” is an on-going annual programme which supports community and volunteer ecological and environmental initiatives across the local board area. In Waiatarua Reserve this programme supports the annual winter planting led by the Waiatarua Reserve Protection Society. The budget is $60,000 to be shared across the whole of the Ōrākei Local Board area.

35.     No other actions in the plan are currently funded.

36.     The following items are new assets or services. They will require funding from the Ōrākei Local Board through future Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) capex and opex budgets:

·   Any wetland structural, sediment and water quality monitoring which is beyond routine maintenance and consent requirements

·   A wetland planting and restoration plan to complement the terrestrial planting and restoration plan

·   The frisbee golf course

·   The dog agility area

·   New footpath connections

·   The nature trail

·   The development of the Environmental Centre and water wheel

·   Waiatarua Reserve - phase three ecological restoration and pest management (if Natural Environment Targeted Rate funding cannot be secured).

 

37.     When the following assets are due for renewal, LDI capex top-up funding is recommended to improve the level of service:

·   upgrade the existing lookout platforms

·   redesign and upgrade the playground area, skate half pipe and basketball court

·   relocate and improve bins, seats and picnic tables.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     Waiatarua Reserve is jointly maintained by the Community Facilities and Healthy Waters departments of Auckland Council. The outcomes of this plan require a higher and different level of services than that which is included in the current baseline maintenance contracts and consent requirements. The risk is that contracts are not agile enough or sufficiently well-funded to respond to these outcomes.

39.     A coordinated approach between departments, contractors and interested parties to combined maintenance outcomes will be critical. This will ensure that efforts are complementary and targeted most efficiently. Local board advocacy to prioritising implementation of the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan amid many competing demands will help this plan succeed.

40.     There is a risk that the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan is interpreted as being an avenue to change the dog rules in the Dog Management Bylaw 2012. The plan does not have the ability to do this. Actions to initiate the bylaw review process have been included as mitigation. 

41.     Changing the dog rules without public consultation is a risk to the reputation of Auckland Council. There was no public consultation on changing the dog rules while the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan was being prepared. The bylaw review process includes public consultation and would be a thorough and fair process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     Identify funding to implement the actions in the Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan in the 2020/2021 and future annual work programmes.

43.     Advocate for a bylaw review for the off-leash dog exercise areas in the Dog Management Bylaw 2012 which relate to Waiatarua Reserve.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

191126 Waiatarua Reserve Enhancement Plan

21

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Hayley Dauben - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 



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Approval of an agreement to lease and landlord consent to Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust for land and works at Shore Road Reserve, Remuera

File No.: CP2019/19271

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant an agreement to lease (with a draft lease for additional premises attached) to Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust for 90 square metres of land at Shore Road Reserve, Remuera on which to construct a viewing deck.

2.       To grant landlord consent to Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust to undertake works to its existing clubrooms.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust has a current community lease with council for land at Shore Road Reserve for its premises comprising clubrooms (joining the council-owned changing rooms) and its indoor cricket facility known as the Terry Jarvis Centre.

4.       The Trust intends to construct a viewing deck to the north end of its clubrooms and reconfigure and upgrade its clubrooms to improve the layout of the facility. The Trust will meet all costs incidental to its project.

5.       An agreement to lease is required to enable the Trust to obtain funding, consents and construct its proposed new deck. A draft lease for additional premises (terms and conditions to align with the Trust’s current community lease agreement) will be attached to the agreement to lease. In March 2019, the Ōrākei Local Board granted landowner approval for the proposed new deck.

6.       The Trust has formally applied to council for an agreement to lease (with a draft lease for additional premises attached) for 90 square metres of land at Shore Road Reserve on which to construct its proposed new deck. The term of the agreement to lease will be for a maximum of three years. The lease for additional premises will commence either on the expiry of the agreement to lease or date of issue of code compliance certificate for/practical completion of the deck, whichever date is earliest.

7.       Pursuant to clause 14 of the Trust’s current community lease agreement, landlord consent is required to enable the Trust to undertake works to reconfigure and upgrade its clubrooms to provide an improved layout of the facilities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      grant Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust an agreement to lease (with a draft lease for additional premises attached) for 90 square metres (more or less) of land joining its existing clubrooms at Shore Road Reserve legally described as Lot 1 DP 194869 (Attachment A to the agenda report) to be issued under the Local Government Act 2002 and subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – three years commencing 6 December 2019

ii)       rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      the Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust securing all necessary funding for its project prior to the commencement of the works

iv)      the Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust obtaining all necessary regulatory consents for its project prior to the commencement of the works

v)      the Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust adhering to the conditions detailed in the landowner approval for the works (Attachment B to the agenda report).

b)      grant Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust a lease for additional premises for 90 square metres (more or less) of land joining its existing clubrooms at Shore Road Reserve legally described as Lot 1 DP 194869 (Attachment A to the agenda report) to be issued under the Local Government Act 2002 and subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term - commencing on date of issue of code compliance certificate or practical completion of the deck, to run concurrently with its current community lease

ii)       rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      the agreement will record that the lease for additional premises is subject to the same terms, conditions and covenants as its current lease agreement.

c)      grant Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust landlord consent pursuant to clause 14 of its current community lease agreement for its works to reconfigure and upgrade its clubrooms, subject to terms and conditions (Attachment C to the agenda report).

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       This report considers community leasing matters with respect to Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust’s occupation of land at Shore Road Reserve.

9.       The Ōrākei Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Land, buildings and current community lease

10.     Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust occupies land at Shore Road Reserve, which is located at 32 Shore Road, Remuera. The land is legally described as Lot 1 DP 194869. The land is currently held in fee simple by the Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002 and is not subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

11.     The Trust has a current community lease with council for land on which it has constructed improvements comprising clubrooms (joining the council-owned changing rooms) and its indoor cricket facility known as the Terry Jarvis Centre (Attachment D). The community lease commenced on 13 September 2012 for an initial term of five years and provides for two rights of renewal for five years each, with final expiry on 12 September 2027.

New agreement to lease with lease for additional premises attached

12.     Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust has formally applied to council for an agreement to lease with a draft lease for additional premises attached.

13.     An agreement to lease is required to enable the Trust adequate time and potentially leverage to obtain funding, consents and construct its proposed new deck.

14.     A lease variation that increases the area of premises constitutes a surrender and re-grant of the original lease. Council staff recommend that the local board grant the Trust an agreement to lease with a draft lease for additional premises attached. Similarly, the agreement will record that the lease for additional premises is subject to the same terms, conditions and covenants as the current lease.

15.     The lease for additional premises will take effect at the expiration of the three-year term of the agreement to lease or issue of code compliance certificate or practical completion of the deck, whichever date is the earliest.

Landlord consent

16.     Pursuant to clause 14 of the Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust’s community lease agreement it must not erect any improvements on the premises or make any additions or alterations to the building without the prior written consent of council as landlord.

17.     The landlord consent sets out conditions contained in the community lease agreement (detailed in Attachment C) that must be met in relation to the works.

Public notification

18.     As the underlying land at Shore Road Reserve is subject to the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002, public notification is usually required pursuant to section 138 of the Act. Section 138(1) provides that council must consult with the public on any proposal to dispose of a park or part of a park.

19.     In terms of a lease, section 138(2) defines disposal as the grant of a lease on a park for a term in excess of six months providing that the lease has the effect of excluding or substantially interfering with the public’s access to the park.

20.     In this instance, the proposed new viewing deck on the additional 90 square metres (more or less) would enhance the public’s use and experience of the area. As such, public notification of the agreement to lease (with the draft lease for additional premises attached) was neither legally required, nor undertaken.

Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust structure and activities

21.     The Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust was established in 2003, its purpose to promote and advance generally, the games of rugby and cricket. The Trust is responsible for administering and maintaining its sports clubrooms at Shore Road Reserve.

22.     In 2012 the Trust developed and built its indoor training facility adjacent to its clubrooms and is known as the Terry Jarvis Centre.

23.     In carrying out its purpose, the Trust represents Grammar Juniors rugby and Parnell cricket which has 1,150 members. Membership is detailed in the table below:

Active members

Numbers

Adults

260

Youths (ages 14 to 18)

50

Juniors (ages 5 to 13)

620

Pre-schoolers

220

 

24.     The above table quantifies playing members which excludes members and others (including guests and spectators) who support their children, friends and relatives while playing sports.

25.     On Saturdays during the winter rugby season, the Trust hosts up to 30 teams including their 450 players across games of ‘Rippa’ rugby, half-field ‘learn-to-tackle’ rugby and full-field rugby.

26.     During the summer cricket season, the Trust hosts up to 60 four and five-year-old children on Friday nights. On Saturdays at least 15 matches are held for junior and senior grades at Shore Road Reserve. With the increase in popularity of T20 cricket, these games are also played mid-week on Tuesday and Thursday evenings.

Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust’s proposed works (new deck and reconfiguring and upgrading of clubrooms)

27.     The clubrooms were built in the 1980’s at which time they were fit-for-purpose. The clubrooms are now dated and in need of upgrading to appropriately service the Trust’s 1,150 members and the local community. The gender mix of members has changed over time with a significant number of girls and women playing cricket. Girls are also playing rugby with the club offering girls Rippa rugby grades.

28.     The key features, benefits and considerations of the Trust’s proposed works are detailed in the table below:

Area of upgrade

Description

Benefits

Considerations

Deck addition and bi-fold doors in the clubrooms (there is currently minimal viewing from the clubrooms out to the playing fields which restricts use by members on game days).

Construction of new deck to the north end of the clubrooms and installation of bi-fold doors in the clubrooms.

Viewing access across playing fields.

In March 2019, the Ōrākei Local Board granted the Trust Landowner approval for works to construct the deck.

Agreement to lease (with lease for additional premises attached) required for deck.

Landlord consent is required for interior works.

Kitchen and servery (the existing kitchen is outdated and no longer fit-for-purpose).

Upgrade/modernisation of the kitchen including the installation of new appliances. Upgrading drinks (alcoholic and non-alcoholic) storage and servery area. Upgrading of the food servery area.

Provision of efficient and appropriate catering for members and their guests (after-match socialising, meetings and functions).

Landlord consent required for works.

Clubroom furniture (the existing furniture requires renewal and upgrading).

Replace existing couches, tables and chairs with new.

Clubroom furniture in keeping with the upgraded/modernised clubrooms effecting comfortable and appealing surrounds thereby improving the experience for members and their guests.

N/A.

Toilets (current (all-hours) access is down the exterior alleyway between the council-owned changing rooms and the Terry Jarvis Centre).

The construction of two toilets within the clubrooms.

Safety and convenience of access to toilets within the clubrooms for the increasing numbers of female members and guests (mainly cricket).

Landlord consent required for works.

 

29.     The Trust estimates that the cost of its proposed works to its premises to be approximately $320,000.00 and it is working diligently to fundraise for its project. The Trust will meet all costs incidental to its project. Intended funding sources and amounts are detailed in the table below:

Funding sources

Amounts

Club internal funds

$30,000.00

Members and community

$100,000.00

Grant funders and council

$190,000.00

 

30.     The Trust has forecasted an approximate timeline relating to its project which is detailed in the table below:

Item

Date

Consent drawings filed at council

10 October 2019

Detailed costing received from tender process

20 November 2019

Initial community fundraising discussions commence

15 November 2019

Grant funding applications filed

30 November 2019

Council building consent approval received

15 December 2019

Preferred contractor appointed (subject to funding)

16 December 2019

Grant and community funding confirmed

28 February 2020

Project made unconditional with preferred contractor

March 2020

Project commences

Between April and June 2020

 

Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust’s future plans

31.     Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust has also applied to council for a new community lease for a portion of the council-owned changing rooms joining its existing premises. The Trust would use the portion of the changing rooms for primary purpose of storage.

32.     Subject to any new community lease, the Trust would like the opportunity to re-configure the area to improve the layout to accommodate its assets. The Trust estimates that the costs of works to re-configure a portion of the council-owned changing rooms will be in the amount of $15,000.00 and this figure is included in the Trust’s overall works estimates.

33.     The progress on the Trust’s application for a lease for a portion of the council-owned changing rooms is in its very early stages. At the time of writing this report, council staff are in the process of setting meetings with relevant council teams as follows:

·   Community and Social Policy (recreation)

·   Parks, Sports and Recreation

·   Service, Strategy and Integration

·   Community Facilities - Operational Management and Maintenance.

34.     Subject to feedback from the above-named council teams on the proposal, council staff will workshop the proposal with the Ōrākei Local Board at its first available workshop in early 2020. Similarly, council staff have encouraged key members of the Trust to request a deputation slot with the Ōrākei Local Board, timing to align as close as is possible to the workshop on the matter.

35.     Prior to the grant of any new community lease to the Trust for a portion of the council-owned changing rooms, engagement with iwi and public notification will need to be undertaken. Council staff will prepare a report to the Ōrākei Local Board recommending approval of council staff to undertake these statutory processes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     The designated impact level of the recommended decision on greenhouse gas emissions falls within the “no impact” category because the proposal continues an existing activity and does not introduce new sources of emissions.

37.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the term proposed because the site does not sit directly within a flooding zone of a 1-in-100 years rainstorm event by river or surface flooding (Attachment E).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     Staff from various council teams were canvassed on the Trust’s proposal to construct a new deck. Cognisant of the requirement for a subsequent lease, feedback from relevant staff is detailed in the table below:

Team

Feedback

Community Facilities Operational Management and Maintenance

No objections, confirming five metre set back from playing field

Parks Sports and Recreation, sport and recreation lead

Requested five metre set back from playing field

Parks Sports and Recreation, parks and places team leader

No issue if set back is met

Closed Landfill, management specialist

Requested Asset Owner Approval which was forwarded to key representatives for the Trust to complete

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     In March 2019, the Ōrākei Local Board granted Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust Landowner Approval for the works relating to the deck.

40.     The Trust’s proposal supports the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes as follows:

·   Our local parks and open spaces are valued and enjoyed

·   Our residents are proud of their community facilities and public spaces.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     In March 2019 a Trustee for the Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust contacted the deputy chair of Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Settlement Protection Trust about the proposal. During this contact, no significant issues were raised relating to the Trust’s proposal.

42.     By way of email, council staff have recently sought feedback from mana whenua identified as having an interest in land in the Ōrākei Local Board geographical area with regard to the proposed agreement to lease for the 90 square metres of land.

43.     At the time of writing this report, council staff are in receipt of feedback from Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara (the development arm for Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara) deferring to Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei for comments. Council staff will provide the Ōrākei Local Board with a verbal update on the matter while presenting this report at its business meeting of 5 December 2019.

44.     With regard to the Trust’s future plans with respect to its request for a community lease for the council-owned changing rooms (subject to feedback from the local board (in 2020) on the matter), council staff will engage with mana whenua about the proposal.

45.     Engagement with mana whenua will include:

·   a presentation at a mana whenua forum in 2020

·   email contact containing detailed information and inviting iwi representatives to hui and or for a Kaitiaki site visit to comment on any spiritual, cultural or environmental impact with respect to the proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     There is no direct cost to council associated with the proposed agreement to lease with community lease agreement attached. The Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust has independently approached council for any funding opportunities that may be available.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     Should the Ōrākei Local Board resolve not to grant a new agreement to lease (to Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust), this decision may be viewed as a lack of good faith as the local board has already granted landowner approval for the works to construct the deck.

48.     Similarly, should the local board resolve not to grant landlord consent to Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust for its works to re-configure and improve its existing clubrooms, pursuant to clause 14 of the Trust’s lease agreement this will preclude it from undertaking the works. Council as landlord, must act in good faith and not unreasonably withhold consent as described in the current lease.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

49.     Subject to the Ōrākei Local Board granting an agreement to lease and landlord consent, council staff will prepare the necessary documentation, arrange for signing and sealing by the Trust and execution by council.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

GIS aerial view of a portion of Shore Road Reserve showing the area of the proposed agreement to lease to Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust outlined in blue

73

b

Excerpt from the Landowner Approval to Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust

75

c

Plans showing proposed addition and alterations to Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust existing clubrooms

79

d

Landlord Consent conditions to Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust

87

e

GIS aerial view of a portion of Shore Road Reserve showing current lease area to Remuera Parnell Sports Community Charitable Trust outlined in red

89

f

GIS aerial view from Auckland Council's Hazard Viewer

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Karen Walby - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

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Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

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Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 



Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Auckland Hockey Facilities Trust Incorporated - Grant of an Agreement to Lease at Colin Maiden Park, 71-73 Merton Road St Johns

File No.: CP2019/19685

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve an agreement to lease to the Auckland Hockey Facilities Trust Incorporated for an area of Colin Maiden Park at 71-73 Merton Road, St Johns.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Hockey Facilities Trust Incorporated (the trust) wishes to establish a new artificial hockey turf facility at Colin Maiden Park and has been discussing this with the Local Board and Auckland Council for a number of years.

3.       The site identified for the facility at Colin Maiden Park has been part of the Auckland Regional Hockey Facility Report since 2013.  A hockey facility at this location meets a demonstrated need in this area and in the wider Auckland region for hockey. 

4.       Funding for this project is still to be undertaken and sourced.  An agreement to lease provides certainty to the trust and potential funders that a lease will be granted provided that the performance criteria in the agreement are met. It enables the trust to begin the process for fundraising.

5.       This report provides a brief overview of the history of the proposal, the process that has been undertaken and recommends that the local board approve an agreement to lease to the trust subject to conditions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve an agreement to lease to the Auckland Hockey Facilities Trust Incorporated for the new artificial hockey turf facility at Colin Maiden Park, subject to the following conditions:

i)        agreement term – 36 months (three years) with a commencement date of 30 November 2019, to undertake fundraising for the project and to seek all approvals for the construction and development of the proposed activity

ii)       prior to any works being carried out at the site, Auckland Hockey Facilities Trust Incorporated will obtain at its own cost, any resource and building consents required and landowner approval for the works

iii)      the Auckland Hockey Facilities Trust being granted access to the site prior to the commencement of the lease to carry out the required works

iv)      the Auckland Hockey Facilities Trust providing an approved Memorandum of Understanding or similar agreement for the shared use of the adjacent Auckland University Rugby Club facility for toilet and changing facilities during the use of the hockey turf areas

v)      or as an alternative to the use of the Auckland University Rugby Club facility, providing their own toilet and changing room facilities within the proposed lease area.

b)      subject to there being no submissions, and the terms of the agreement to lease being met, grant a community lease to the Auckland Hockey Facilities Trust Incorporated at 71-73 Merton Road for the new artificial hockey turf facility at Colin Maiden Park under the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 for the area described on Attachment B to this report subject to:

i)        an initial term of 10 years with one right of renewal of 10 years

ii)       commencement date – 1 December 2022 or the date of issue of the code compliance certificate or other approval of the proposed development works

iii)      rent - $1 plus GST per annum

iv)      a community outcomes plan being negotiated and agreed with the trust and approved by the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Ōrākei Local Board

v)      the trust will at no cost to council manage the operation of the facility including the booking, scheduling, and day to day management and capital replacement and maintenance

vi)      all other terms and conditions will be in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

c)      appoint a hearings panel to hear submissions for the agreement to lease or the proposed lease to the Auckland Hockey Facilities Trust Incorporated at 71-73 Merton Road for the new artificial hockey turf facility at Colin Maiden Park, if required, and make any recommendations to the board for further decisions, if required.

d)      agree that if the requirements of the agreement to lease to the Auckland Hockey Facilities Trust Incorporated for the new artificial hockey turf facility at Colin Maiden Park are not satisfied by 1 December 2022, the agreement to lease will end.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Colin Maiden Park is a strategic park in east Auckland, accommodating several sporting codes and is co located with Ngahue Reserve and the adjacent tennis centre.

7.       The park is owned by Auckland Council in several titles. The land supports several buildings providing a range of activities and services.

8.       The land to which this Agreement to Lease applies is legally described as Lot 2 DP 153308, comprising 9.8505 hectares, and contained in NA91C/70.  Lot 2 is held in fee simple by the Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002.

9.       The Auckland Hockey Association Incorporated (the association) is the oldest hockey association in New Zealand, having established in 1903 to run competitions for its member clubs.  Today, the association is the largest hockey organisation in New Zealand with 12 member clubs operating in different locations. 400 teams across adult, youth and junior competitions are involved, with 6,500 participants throughout the winter season and 3,500 during the summer season.

10.     Since 1990, the home base of the association has been at Lloyd Elsmore Park.  This is a high-class facility that hosts numerous national and international tournaments. The association currently has a community lease for their facilities at Lloyd Elsmore Park.  Prior to 1990, they were situated at Hobson Park on Market Road in Remuera.

11.     There are two legal entities affiliated with this application.  Auckland Hockey Association Incorporated is the regional sports organisation, and Auckland Hockey Facilities Trust Incorporated (the trust). The trust was incorporated on 30 November 2018 and is the applicant for the Agreement to Lease.

12.     The trust would like to establish an artificial hockey turf facility to offer year-round opportunities for hockey training and games. This report deals with the initial step toward achieving this –an agreement to lease to allow the trust to raise funds, occupy the site to undertake the establishment works and subsequently to be granted a community lease once the terms of the agreement to lease are met.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The land and site

The Proposal

13.     Colin Maiden Park is a strategically significant park located adjacent to Ngahue Reserve and Scarbro Tennis Centre. It provides the base for a variety of sports clubs and organisations. It is an important part in meeting direction five of the Auckland Plan of activating children and young people, recognising the diverse communities and the growing population, as well as the importance of quality opportunities and maximising of joint resources.

14.     The Colin Maiden Park Precinct Master Plan described in Attachment A, was approved by the Ōrākei Local Board in 2016 to plan the future of the park.  The master plan identifies the new hockey facilities.

15.     The association and trust have been discussing the proposed hockey facility with the Ōrākei Local Board for some time. The association began these discussions with the wider Colin Maiden Park user groups in 2010.  This was when the University of Auckland owned the site.  Although the trust itself was not on site at that time, discussions for the use of the Auckland University Rugby Football Club clubrooms were underway between the two groups with the prospect of utilising the vacant land for hockey and other sports. 

16.     The groups and the university recognised the value of a multisport partnership and were aiming to prepare a memorandum of understanding to represent the possible synergies to reflect this. The discussions centered on partnering the existing university sports teams and other stakeholders to create a more collaborative approach for the growth of sport and recreation on the site.

17.     The hockey site at Colin Maiden Park has been part of the Auckland Regional Hockey Facility Report since 2013.  The report identified Colin Maiden Park as a key location as a regional high performance centre and a community hub for the delivery of hockey activities in central Auckland. It is the highest regional priority for hockey after the National Hockey Centre in Albany, due to be completed in December 2019.

18.     The association and trust considered potential sites across Auckland including North Harbour and Counties Manukau.  Alternative sites were tested and reviewed through a needs analysis prior to the final acceptance of the Colin Maiden Park Sports Precinct Masterplan by the local board in 2016. This followed council’s purchase of the park from the university, and necessitated a review of existing, current and future users on the park.

19.     Through that process, other sports and activities were considered for the same site, with hockey being identified as the highest and best user of the site.  There was a demonstrated need in the eastern part of the Auckland region for additional hockey facilities. The association and trust were also identified as a partner owing to their connections and link with local school hockey programs, and the community.

The Application

20.     The trust intends to build a facility (Attachment B) which will include:

·   two artificial turf surfaces (1)

·   a central muster area (2)

·   two artificial training areas (3)

·   sport field lighting, platform structures (4)

·   fencing surrounding the proposed warm up and turf areas 

·   a car park (5)

·   irrigation system (water tanks) (6)

·   associated utility services such as storm water, water and electrical supply. 

21.     While the trust will be the owner and primary user of the facility, subject to any funding agreement with council, it is intended that other sporting codes and cross-park users can access the facility for active recreation opportunities.

22.     Specialists from Land Advisory, Parks and Places, Operations Maintenance and Management, Sports Parks, Arboriculture and Eco, Closed Landfills, Archaeology departments of the council were consulted for their input and assessment of the trust’s application. 

23.     All were supportive of the application and made the following recommendations:

·   that measures be put in place to cause as little disruption to other areas of the park during the works.  This included the reserve being left in a tidy manner, with vehicle access restrictions in certain areas, and health and safety requirements being adhered to

·   that protective fencing be erected at the edge of the dripline of trees that are near the works site access points

·   that heritage conditions be implemented including compliance with the accidental discovery protocol.  This ensures that artefacts such as bones, middens, bottles, or anything that may be deemed of archaeological value are passed onto the heritage team upon its discovery.

24.     The trust has been informed by the council’s Land Advisory team of the contamination issues at the site.  The closed landfill at Ngahue Reserve is south of the proposed hockey area and may encroach into the hockey turf area, in which case, the trust would require closed landfill asset owner approval.  This is currently being reviewed by the closed landfill team who will need to make the final determination in this regard. 

25.     Land owner approval for the project was granted by the local board in March 2019.  It stipulated that all work would need to be completed in accordance with the requirements of the Health and Safety Works Act 2015; that safety fencing be erected around the works site and no access to the works area would be permitted to the public.

26.       The approval was granted for the following reasons:

·   it would allow for the delivery of the new hockey facilities which is a part of the Colin Maiden Park Master Plan 

·   the development aligns with key outcomes in the Ōrākei Local Board Plan

·   relevant specialists had provided input and were supportive of the proposal; and conditions would be put in place to mitigate any potential adverse effects of the proposal.

Identifying Occupants

27.     When land is vacant and available for community use, calling for expressions of interest to occupy is usually undertaken.

28.     The master plan of the park identified the need for the sport of hockey and this is the highest and best use for the site. In this case the local board has chosen to forego the expression of interest process having identified hockey as a suitable occupant during the development of the master plan for the park.

Agreement to lease and community lease

29.     An agreement to lease shows the intent to grant a community lease provided the performance criteria in the agreement are met within the timeframe indicated. It will provide time for the trust to raise funds, specify the proposed works, obtain the required approvals and carry out the works. Attached to the agreement to lease will be a draft lease that will set out the terms that will apply once the lease takes effect.

30.     The trust advises that they anticipate the fundraising will take approximately 36 months (three years) from the time of signing the agreement to lease. This timeframe allows some flexibility to coordinate with the timeframes of funding organisations.  It also includes the time to obtain consents and other approvals and to carry out the works to create the facility.  Some of these activities can be undertaken concurrently.

31.     The agreement to lease will also provide for access to the site to allow the group to undertake the works for the anticipated use ahead of the lease commencing.

Lease

32.     The term of a lease for a group occupying a tenant-owned facility is described in the community occupancy guidelines as being ten years with a right of renewal of ten years for a total term of 20 years.  Local boards have discretion to vary the term and the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 contemplate this.  The guidelines suggest that any changes be in multiple of the above noted terms.

33.     The trust is proposing to make a significant investment in building the facility that will also be available to others, providing an amenity for the wider community.  An initial estimate of the project costs indicates a project value of six million dollars ($6,000,000).  The trust has indicated that they wish to have a longer-term lease to amortise their investment in the facility.

Management of the facility

34.     As the trust will be the owner of the improvements on the site and prime user of the facility, management and maintenance together with day to day operation of the facility will be undertaken by the trust and the association.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     There is no impact on Green House Gas emissions as the proposal does not introduce any new source of emissions.

36.     Climate change will unlikely impact the proposed lease, as the site is not within a flooding zone or near the coast.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     The proposed agreement to lease has been discussed with relevant council staff who have provided relevant advice to support the proposal and have no objections to the proposed agreement.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     In adopting the Colin Maiden Park master plan, the local board considered a range of options and uses for the site.  The master plan provides clear direction that a hockey facility is the best use of this site.

39.     The activity proposed by the trust aligns with the Orakei Local Board Plan outcome one: “our local parks and open space areas are valued and enjoyed”, and outcome two: “our residents are proud of their community facilities and public places”.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori.  The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tamaki Makaurau context.

41.     The purpose of community leases is to encourage participation and to create local benefits for all communities. The trust’s activities benefit the whole community particularly eastern Auckland community including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     The trust’s objectives are consistent with the council’s empowered community objectives, namely encouraging and empowering community organisations to operate more sustainably through activities that help reduce the funding burden on ratepayers.  The local board should consider this also in the context of the duration of the lease, the type of facility being leased, and its value to the community.

43.     This is a premises lease, and the trust is contributing by building the facility.

44.     With the specialist nature of the turf surfaces and the proposed use by the trust and associated groups, it is not anticipated that there will be a significant additional income from other users.

45.     The land is owned by the council and administered under the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002. Section 138 of this Act requires that before a lease of six months or longer is granted, the council must consult the community on the proposal.  This is undertaken by public advertisement.  According to legal advice, best practice is to also consult with iwi in accord with section 81 of the act.  This is by way of a presentation to the Mana Whenua Forum and direct email to iwi with specific interest in the area.  The public notification and iwi consultation processes take six weeks, are run concurrently and are undertaken before granting the lease.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     If the trust is not able to fund or complete construction of the facility, the use may not be realised and alterative funds or users may need to be identified.

47.     The trust and the association had anticipated that council funding will be available to construct the carpark as this will be utilised at times by wider park users. At the time of reporting, council funding has not been allocated for this part of the project. The Trust will need to identify an alternate funding source to provide the carpark as it is an integral part of the facility.

48.     There is no agreement with the Auckland University Rugby Club for either the use or redevelopment of their clubrooms to use in association with the hockey turfs. This needs to be confirmed and an approved agreement provided as part of the conditions that will need to be met prior to the lease being granted.

49.     If landfill or archaeological issues are uncovered during the works, this may add to the cost or complexity of developing the site.

50.     There are small risks associated with the iwi consultation and public notification process that objections may be received that are required to be heard and delay consideration of the approval.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     As the lease is proposed to be longer than six months iwi consultation and public notification is required under the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002.

52.     Staff will undertake the iwi consultation and public notification and provided there are no objections progress the documentation with the club.  This can be progressed in anticipation while other statutory requirements are dealt with.

53.     If there are any submissions resulting from the consultation and notification process staff will work with the chair of the local board on the process to consider any submissions.  If any of the submitters wish to be heard, a hearing panel should be appointed to hear these and make any recommendations to the board for further decisions.  The local board can either appoint the whole board as the hearings panel or delegate to fewer members to form the panel. This report recommends that a hearing panel be appointed.

54.     Subject to the local board’s approval to grant an agreement to lease, staff will prepare the deed and associated documents for signing and sealing by the trust and execution by council.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Colin Maiden Park Master Plan

101

b

Aerial view of the proposed artificial hockey turf facility

135

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Valerie Vui - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 



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Ellerslie War Memorial Town Hall hire fee options

File No.: CP2019/19946

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the standard application of the Hire Fee Framework in regard to the Ellerslie Theatrical Society’s use of the Ellerslie War Memorial Town Hall.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ellerslie Theatrical Society (the society) has accrued debt of $32,062.39 from hireage of the Ellerslie War Memorial Town Hall (the hall) since January 2018.

3.       As this debt has been outstanding for more than 90 days, standard council procedure is to cancel all future bookings and pursue repayment of the debt. 

4.       The society previously paid a flat rate hire fee of $971.35 per month, regardless of the amount of use in the month.

5.       After the transition to standard fees set through the Hire Fee Framework, the society’s average monthly invoice increased to $3,273.30.

6.       There is currently a community needs assessment of the hall underway, which will look at wider community and community group needs, including the society’s, and will provide a long-term option for use of the hall.

7.       Due to several risks identified with the standard procedure of debt recovery, and the fact that a needs assessment is currently in progress, staff worked to identify a range of alternate options for the local board to consider.

8.       Three options were discussed with the Board at a workshop on Thursday, 21 November 2019. These were the status quo enforcement of the Hire Fee Framework, a return to partial subsidy, or a full subsidy. Either subsidy option would require additional Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) funding.

9.       Standard application of the Hire Fee Framework is consistent with council policy and would ensure equity in access to the hall for other groups in the community. 

10.     This option would provide all current and future hirers with a clear process for access to the subsidies provided by the Board, and is the only option that does not require allocation of funding for an additional subsidy.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      endorse the standard application of the Hire Fee Framework in regard to the Ellerslie Theatrical Society’s use of the Ellerslie War Memorial Town Hall.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     The council provides fair, easy and affordable access to safe and welcoming venues across Auckland. Ellerslie War Memorial Hall is one of six council-managed venues in the Orakei local board area.

12.     In 2014, the council adopted the Hire Fee Framework. This operational policy guides the setting of fees and charges across the network of council-managed community centres and venues for hire. The framework also includes financial incentives aimed at enabling community outcomes.

13.     Local boards are responsible for setting local fees and charges.

14.     Post the adoption of the framework, the local board provided additional subsidy to allow some legacy hirers to remain on their legacy rates. This was funded through the allocation of LDI funds. This subsidy was gradually decreased until 2017/2018 when all community groups were transitioned onto standard fees set through the framework.

15.     The current fees and charges for access in the local board area are:

 

Hourly rate

as of 1 July 2019

Facility Category

Facility Name

Room

Standard

Off-Peak Standard

Community Centres

Orakei Community Centre

Community Room 

$       34.00

$      27.20

 

 

Main Hall

$       49.00

$       39.20

Venues for hire

 Ellerslie War Memorial Hall

 

Main Room

 

Committee Room 

$       59.00

 

$       24.00

$       47.20

 

$       19.20

 

 Leicester Hall

Main Hall

$       49.00

$      39.20

 

Tamaki Ex-Services Association Hall

Main Hall

$       59.00

$      47.20

 

16.     Hirers that meet the criteria for the Local Board priority subsidy receive 50 per cent off the standard rate.

Ellerslie War Memorial Town Hall

17.     The Ellerslie War Memorial Hall is one of two halls in Ellerslie, the other being Leicester Hall.

18.     The hall has two bookable spaces, the Main Hall and the Committee Room. The venue was booked on average 43 hours per week during the 2018/2019 financial year and 87 per cent of the use was for Arts and Cultural activities, this is predominantly the theatrical society’s use.

19.     The local board allocated $20,000 in the 2019/2020 works programme to undertake a community needs assessment, to be completed prior to June 2020, that identifies current usage and users of the Ellerslie War Memorial Hall from a network perspective. This assessment will enable future management options for the hall to be considered.

Ellerslie Theatrical Society Incorporated

20.     Ellerslie Theatrical Society Incorporated has used the Ellerslie War Memorial Town Hall since 1989 for rehearsal and production of their shows. Annual membership dues for the society are:

·   Adult - $20.00

·   Student - $10.00

·   Senior Citizen - $10.00.

21.     The society delivers three ticketed productions per year and uses the hall for shows and rehearsals.

22.     The hall seats 90 for performances and ticket prices are usually $25 each for evening performances and $20 each for matinees. Discounts are available for members, bookings of 10 or more, and to Community Services card-holders, students and senior citizens.

23.     The society books the Main Hall every weekend and most weeknights for rehearsals. Before a performance it requires exclusive use of the hall to build the set. During the week of the production members require exclusive use of both the Main Hall and the Committee Room in order to leave their seating and their set up.

24.     Until January 2018 the society received the preferential legacy rate, through subsidy from the local board. The hire fee was a flat rate of $971.35 per month, regardless of the amount of use in the month.

25.     When the society transitioned onto standard fees set through the framework, which included a 50 per cent local board subsidy, its average invoice was $3,273.30 per month.

26.     This amount aligns to the Hire Fee Framework and is based on hours booked at an hourly rate. This applies regardless of activity and covers the times the society requires exclusive use of the hall.

27.     The local board and the council have continued to support the society through the following provision of other funding:

·   Local board grant towards the costs of the venue hire - $10,000

·   Local board quick response fund towards publicity costs - $500

·   Creative Communities Scheme grant towards developing new forms of publicity - $1,000.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

28.     The society is currently $32,062.39 in arrears on hire fee charges for use of the hall during 2018 and year-to-date of 2019.

29.     The society currently pays $1,060.90 per month. This does not cover the total amount due on each invoice and therefore it continues to generate debt.

30.     Staff have met with the group several times to offer ways to reduce their charges and to manage their current debt. These have included:

·   installation of a roller door to protect sets during prior to and during productions so the society would not require exclusive use of the hall

·   use of Leicester Hall for rehearsals as this is a cheaper space

·   development of a payment plan for debt reduction.

31.     Staff from the council’s Arts and Culture unit have also met with the society to discuss alternative operational models and funding sources, including sponsorship, which is used by other amateur and professional theatre groups in Auckland.

32.     The society is unwilling to pay any of the outstanding debt and have not reduced their hours of use, so are continuing to incur debt.

33.     The society has advised staff that it will not be able to continue to operate if required to pay the outstanding amount and the standard hire fees going forward.

34.     As this debt has been outstanding for more than 90 days, action is required from the council. The normal process would mean cancellation of all future bookings and perusing repayment of the debt.

35.     Due to the impact of this action on the society and reputational risks for the local board, staff developed the following three options for consideration by members that were discussed at a workshop on 21 November 2019:

 

Options

Description

Benefits

Disbenefits

Recommended Option one

Status quo: Standard application of Hire Fee Framework and council process

All future booking for the society from 1 December 2019 will be cancelled.

As amount is over $5,000 Auckland Council will proceed with debt recovery.

Requires no additional funds

Aligns to current region-wide processes

Provides equity to all users across the local board area, and Auckland

 

Loss of partial revenue currently collected

Loss of activity at a local level – 3 ticketed theatre performances a year.

Probable disestablishment of the Ellerslie Theatrical Society Inc

Action does not align to timelines of needs assessment findings

Possible reputational damage to Auckland Council and the local board

Option two

Return of subsidy:

Local Board partially subsidise the activity of the society

 

 

The society are charged legacy rate - $971.35 per month.

Local Board ‘top up’ to hire fee through LDI*.

Staff work with the society to continue to pay negotiated monthly instalments to clear outstanding debt and provide proof of future sustainability.

Once needs assessment findings are available subsidy will be reviewed.

Continued activity in the community – 3 ticketed theatre performances a year.

Continued rehearsal space for members

Aligns to timelines for needs assessment findings

Continued limited revenue collected.

Lost revenue recovered as group will pay off outstanding debt over time.

Amount of LDI required is less than full subsidy.

Requires additional funds be allocated from LDI budget.

Debt recovery will be slow.

Does not align to current region-wide process.

Does not support equity of access for groups to spaces or support.

Creates a president for additional support for specific activities.

Continuation of almost exclusive use by group, supported by local board. Possible exclusion of other potential hirers.

Option three

Local Board fully subside the society’s activity

The society have ‘free’ use of the hall, fully subsidised by ratepayers

Local Board allocate LDI* to fully subsidise all use.

The society pay legacy monthly amount directly to clear outstanding debt.

Once debt cleared, subsidy could be reviewed, this may align with wider needs assessment findings.

Continued activity in the community – 3 ticketed theatre performances a year.

Continued rehearsal space for members

Lost revenue recovered as group will pay off outstanding debt over time.

Debt recovery will be faster

Aligns to timelines for needs assessment findings

 

Required substantial additional LDI allocation.

No revenue will be generated through use.

Does not align to current region-wide process.

Does not support equity of access for groups to spaces or support.

Creates a president for additional support for specific activities.

Continuation of almost exclusive use by group, supported by local board. Possible exclusion of other potential hirers.

* Note: LDI amount will be calculated on a monthly basis, based on use by group

 

36.     Staff recommend Option one: the standard application of the Hire Fee Framework for the society’s use of the hall, as it is consistent with the council’s policy and ensures that access to the hall is equitable for the entire community.

37.     This option will provide all hirers with a clear and transparent process for access to the subsidies provided by the local board and does not require allocation of funding for a venue hire fee subsidy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     There are no identified climate impacts associated with this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     The council provides fair, easy and affordable access to safe and welcoming venues through Community Places in the Arts, Community and Events department of the Customer and Community Directorate.

40.     The Community Places Unit manages bookings, fees and charges and relationships with users.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     The local board supports activities contributing to community outcomes, such as those offered by not-for-profit charities or community organisations, particularly if hosting free public events or activities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     There are no identified impacts for Māori associated with the society’s use of the hall.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

43.     The local board would be required to allocate Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) funding for options two and three as follows:

Approximate LDI allocation required

LDI amount will be calculated on a monthly basis, based on use by group

 

Until 2019/2020 year end

(7months, including $10,000 allocated in 2019/2020)

Full year at full subsidy

(excluding $10,000 allocated in 2019/2020)

Option one

Status quo:

Proceed to manage debt

No additional funds required

 

No additional funds required

 

Option two

Return of subsidy:

Local Board partially subsidise the activity of the society

$10,802.54

 

$28,518.64

Options three

Local Board fully subside group activity:

Ellerslie Theatrical Society have ‘free’ use

$17,601.99

 

$40,174.84

 

44.     Staff recommend the standard application of the Hire Fee Framework as the model for venue hire fee subsidy at the hall, which does not require local board budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

45.     There is a potential risk that the society cannot meet the financial demand and as a result will not go ahead with activities or events as planned if there is no funding allocated to support their use of the hall. This could have an impact on both the wider community and the local board’s reputation.

46.     While these risks have been considered, staff do not recommend allocating funding for the purposes of subsidising venue hire fees. A specific subsidy for the society means that only that group will benefit as this would not be available to all hirers.

47.     The society could request for financial assistance through the existing contestable community grants budget and process.

48.     Requests for subsidy can be balanced against all community group requests for support, providing a clear and transparent process and needs analysis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

49.     Staff will continue to support and administer access to the Ellerslie War Memorial Town Hall in alignment standard application of Hire Fee Framework and council process.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kat Teirney - Team Leader – Community Facilities, South

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection Round One 2019/2020 grant allocations

File No.: CP2019/19480

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund, or decline applications received for Orakei Quick Response and Tree Protection Round One 2019/2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Orakei Quick Response and Tree Protection Round One 2019/2020 (refer Attachment B).

3.       The Orakei Local Board adopted the Orakei Local Grants Programme 2019/2020 on 18 April 2019 (refer Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants submitted to the local board.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $219,000 for the 2019/2020 financial year. A total of $85,444 was allocated in local grants round one 2019/2020, leaving a total of $133,556 for two quick response and one local grant round in 2019/2020.

5.       Sixteen applications were received for Orakei Quick Response Round One 2019/2020, including two tree protection grants, requesting a total of $38,933.54.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in Round One of the Orakei Quick Response and Tree Protection Grants 2019/2020 listed in the following table:   

Table One: Orakei Quick Response and Tree Protection Grants 2019/2020 grant applications:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QRTP2012-102

Eastern Bays Toy Library

Community

Towards rental costs at Glendowie Community Centre from 1 January 2020 to 31 December 2020.

$2,800.00

Eligible

QRTP2012-107

Meadowbank and St Johns Residents Association Incorporated

Environment

Towards a bouncy castle hire and the purchase of rat traps.

$2,800.00

Eligible

QRTP2012-109

Remuera Chinese Association

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire from 1 January to 31 March 2020 for the Remuera Chinese Association.

$3,354.00

Eligible

QRTP2012-110

St Heliers Scottish Country Dancing Club

Sport and recreation

Towards a laptop and bag, a software programme, a laptop hard drive.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QRTP2012-112

Bach Musica New Zealand Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire for rehearsals at the Somervell Church from February 2020 to June 2020.

$1,200.00

Eligible

QRTP2012-113

Communicare Civilian Maimed Association (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire costs for the two Communicare friendship centers.

$4,148.00

Eligible

QRTP2012-114

Ellerslie Toy Library Incorporated

Community

Towards purchasing new toys for the toy library.

$1,950.67

Eligible

QRTP2012-116

Orakei Community Association Incorporated

Community

Towards costs of venue hire, advertising and audio-visual equipment hire.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QRTP2012-120

St Heliers and Community Support Trust

Community

Towards the replacement of the children's outdoor equipment at St Heliers Centre.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QRTP2012-121

The College Rifles Rugby Union Football and Sports Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the ANZAC Day march and memorial service in 2020 including advertising and the printing of programmes.

$2,500.00

Eligible

QRTP2012-122

Central Syncho Club

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire for the North Island synchronised swimming championships in 2020 from 22 to 24 May 2020.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QRTP2012-123

Tread Lightly Charitable Trust

Environment

Towards the Tread Lightly programme in Churchill Park School from 30 April to 7 May 2020.

$1,495.00

Eligible

QRTP2012-125

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the direct service delivery costs for the Youthline helpline from 1 January to 30 June 2020.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QRTP2012-126

Ellerslie Theatrical Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the printing of publicity materials for four plays in 2020 for the Ellerslie Theatrical Theatre.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QRTP2012-104

Susie Springhall

Tree Protection

Towards the pruning of a Pohutukawa tree.

$1,060.87 

Eligible

QRTP2012-106

Sun Jae Lee and Hyun Sun Lee

Tree Protection

Towards the pruning of a Pohutukawa tree.

$625.00 

Eligible

 

 

 

Total

$38,933.54

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities, and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

8.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

9.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

10.     The Orakei Local Board adopted its grants programme for 2019/2020 on 18 April 2018 and will operate two quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year. 

11.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; decreasing access to single-occupancy transport options, home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

14.     One applicant applying to quick response round one has indicated that their project supports climate change outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     According to the main focus of the application, each one has received input from a subject matter expert from the relevant department. The main focuses are identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

16.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Orakei Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

18.     The board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

19.     A summary of each application received through round one of the Orakei Quick Response and Tree Protection 2019/2020 grant round is provided (refer Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

21.     Three applicants applying to quick response round one, have indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

23.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $219,000 for the 2019/2020 financial year. A total of $85,444 was allocated in local grants round one 2019/2020, leaving a total of $133,556 for two quick response and one local grant round in 2019/2020.

24.     Sixteen applications were received for Orakei Quick Response Round One 2019/2020, including two tree protection grants, requesting a total of $38,933.54.

25.  Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Following the Orakei Local Board allocating funding for round one of the quick response and tree protection grants, the grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Orakei Grant Programme 2019/2020

149

b

Orakei Quick Response Round One and Tree Protection 2019/2020 grant applications

153

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Approval of the Ōrākei Local Board Engagement Strategy 2019-2022

File No.: CP2019/20051

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Ōrākei Local Board Engagement Strategy 2019-2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards have a series of statutory responsibilities under the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009. This includes decision-making responsibility for community engagement, consultation and advocacy.

3.       The purpose of the Ōrākei Local Board Engagement Strategy 2019-2022 is to set objectives to guide the local engagement and consultation programme. The engagement strategy will also inform the delivery of the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020 by guiding improvements to the engagement work undertaken by council staff on behalf of the local board. In addition, the engagement strategy will guide plans developed by staff to consult with the community  during the implementation of special consultative procedures including for the annual plan, the long-term plan and the local board plan.

4.       The Ōrākei Local Board Engagement Strategy 2019-2022 captures the aspirations of the Ōrākei Local Board to value local diversity and inclusion through creating meaningful opportunities for engagement and participation with the local community, as well as ensuring that the local board is well-informed about the make-up and needs of the community and identifies a commitment to improving Māori engagement.

5.       Engagement will be evaluated to ensure effectiveness and to identify ongoing improvements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve the Ōrākei Local Board Engagement Strategy 2019-2022 (Attachment A).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires local boards to:

·   communicate with community organisations

·   communicate the interests and preferences of people in relation to strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws (to the governing body)

·   use the local board plan process to provide an opportunity for people to participate in decision-making processes on the nature and level of local activities to be provided by council within the local board area.

7.       The Local Government Act 2002 also establishes engagement principles:

·   A local authority should conduct its business in an open, transparent, and democratically accountable manner and give effect to its identified priorities and desired outcomes in an efficient and effective manner

·   A local authority should make itself aware of, and should have regard to, the views of all its communities

·   When making a decision, a local authority should take account of the diversity of the community, and the community’s interests, within its district or region; and the interest of future as well as current communities; and the likely impact of any decision on them

·   A local authority should provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to its decision-making processes.

8.       The Auckland Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy 2014:

·   Identifies how and when communities can expect to be engaged in, or specifically consulted on, decisions about issues, proposals, assets, decisions and activities

·   Enables the council and our communities to understand the significance that council places on certain issues, proposals, assets, decisions, and activities.

9.       Evaluation of engagement across the wider council is needed in order to ensure reflective practice and ongoing improvement. This should also occur with local board engagement.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Analysis

10.     The 2018 census results identified that Ōrākei has a population of 84,318 people and has the sixth largest population in Auckland. It is home to a growing population and trends forecast that ethnic diversity will continue to increase. The 2018 census highlighted that Ōrākei’s population comprises 72.6 per cent European, 22.9 per cent Asian, 3.2 per cent Pacific and 5.7 per cent Māori.

11.     The population of Ōrākei has a high level of voter participation. Ongoing community engagement with the local board, however, remains low. Some of the challenges include:

·   Low awareness of the work of the local board at a regional level which impacts trust and confidence on council decision-making

·   Rapid urban growth and demographic changes impact long-term engagement aspirations;

·   The changing nature of engagement, community expectations of engagement and reputation risks;

·   Historical context of engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka;

·   Fragmented approach to community engagement within Council;

·   Varying capacity of community groups as well as barriers to effective engagement, including language barriers, cultural barriers, socio-economic barriers, age difference and diverse interests;

·   There will likely be many other challenges that we are not aware of so it will be important to continue to work with the community to identify barriers and seek to develop shared understandings and collective solutions to these.

Advice

12.     The Ōrākei Local Board Engagement Strategy 2019-2022 will guide delivery of engagement, consultation and communication initiatives in the local board area. The engagement strategy sets the following objectives for all consultation, engagement and communication:

·   We are leaders in building and strengthening relationships with our communities

·   Our communities are well informed about local board activities and opportunities to engage  

·   Our engagement efforts are strategic, purposeful and continuously improve based on evidence, local knowledge and innovation

·   We value our diverse communities and ensure that our community members are given opportunities for their views to be considered prior to decision-making

·   Mana Whenua and Mataawaka are provided with meaningful opportunities for their input to be considered prior to decision-making.

13.     Auckland Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy is embedded in this engagement strategy via multiple avenues including:

·   Reporting on measures of success

·   Calendarising upcoming engagement and communications opportunities

·   Engagement opportunities led by the Board

·   High quality and effective communications

·   Efforts to engage hard-to-reach communities

·   Efforts to engage with Māori

·   Engagement with communities to enable effective advocacy.

14.     The amount and timing of engagement activities each year will be dictated by the work programme of each electoral cycle and will include statutory processes (i.e. annual plan, local board plan), work programme project needs, and so on. It will also be influenced by the availability of resources including staff capacity.

15.     A coordinated approach to engagement will hopefully help us achieve other objectives such as growing the local board database, creating ongoing relationships with the diverse communities of Ōrākei and ensuring our well engaged communities continue to feel included.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     No direct impact on climate change will result from the Ōrākei Local Board Engagement Strategy 2019-2022.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The proposed draft Ōrākei Local Board Engagement Strategy 2019-2022 pertains to the Ōrākei Local Board and has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The draft Ōrākei Local Board Engagement Strategy 2019-2022 has a local impact as it is developed to guide Board engagement with local communities. Other Local Boards are in the process of adopting, or have already adopted, a local board engagement strategy.

19.     Ōrākei elected members understand the statutory requirements of engagement within their role. They are aware of the diverse needs of their communities and actively seek to engage with all of Ōrākei’s communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     Local government has obligations to Māori through legislation and the local board is committed to honoring te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi.

21.     Māori are a diverse group and the local board provides opportunities to Māori to contribute to its decision-making in its dialogue with:

·   Mana whenua – currently represented by 19 tribal authorities in Auckland

·   Matāwaka - which includes individuals, whanau and organisations.

22.     The local board is committed to improved engagement with Māori so that the views and preferences of Māori are considered and factored into its decision making

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The local board’s engagement activities are supported by the Engagement Advisor on a part-time basis. The Engagement Advisor role is shared with the Albert-Eden Local Board.

24.     Funding will be required depending on the number of engagement and consultation activities and associated events and activities. Most programmes or projects that require consultation have a small budget but there will be instances where additional funding is required. These will be sought from the local board as and when they arise.

25.     Promotion and communication costs associated with promotion of the local board’s engagement activities in the community will be met through the Local Communications budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     Insufficient resources and capacity to implement actions within the life of each workplan. Mitigation includes considering engagement as a priority for resource allocation in annual budgets and work programmes, as well as staggering timelines for delivery over the three-year term.

27.     Engagement priorities change over the course of the term. Mitigation includes devising the Strategy as a ‘living document’ to be reviewed and amended as needed.

28.     Staff turnover and the complex nature of engagement make ‘tracking success’ a challenge. This risk is mitigated by staff actively recording information about engagement and communications activities as well as feedback from the community on engagement processes. Staff place emphasis on recording qualitative feedback to provide a more complete depiction of the value of engagement activities.

29.     The local board could suffer a loss of reputation if the engagement strategy does not deliver improved meaningful engagement or increase engagement with hard-to-reach communities. This risk is mitigated by staff prioritizing the co-delivery of engagement opportunities with community groups that have access to hard-to-reach communities, employing best practice approaches. Key performance indicators are set to reflect reasonable incremental targets based off previous engagement results.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     The Engagement Advisor will develop an annual engagement plan to be delivered alongside the local board plan.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board Engagement Strategy 2019-2022

207

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ollin Perez Raynaud, Local Board Engagement Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation

File No.: CP2019/20380

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve local content and supporting information for consultation as part of the Annual Budget 2020/2021 process.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       For each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement that is agreed for each local board area, between the Governing Body and the local board.

3.       Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation will take place from 21 February to 22 March 2020. Consultation on the proposed content of each local board agreement which sets out the priorities for the next financial year must be included as part of that consultation.

4.       This report seeks approval of the local content and supporting information for consultation. This includes the Glen Innes Business Association’s proposed business improvement district (BID) programme boundary expansion, noting that if the council approves the BID programme boundary expansion the targeted rate will increase from $166,000 to $250,000 as of 1 July 2020. It also seeks approval for a local Have Your Say event during the consultation period, to provide Aucklanders the opportunity to provide face-to-face feedback.

5.       The Governing Body and local boards will approve regional and local items respectively for consultation by 13 December 2019. The regional and local consultation items will then be incorporated into the Annual Budget consultation document and supporting information, which will be adopted by the Governing Body on 12 February 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve its Annual Budget 2020/2021 local content for consultation and local supporting information for consultation (Attachment A and B)

b)      delegate authority to the chairperson to approve any final changes required to the local content and supporting information for the Ōrākei Local Board for the Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation, including online consultation content.

c)      approve, for consultation, the Glen Innes Business Association’s proposed business improvement district (BID) programme boundary expansion, noting that if the council approves the BID programme boundary expansion the targeted rate will increase from $166,000 to $250,000 as of 1 July 2020.

d)      approve a ‘Have Your Say’ event in the local board area during the Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation period.

e)      delegate authority to the chairperson to approve any final changes required to the Annual Budget 2020/2021 Have Your Say event.

f)       delegate to the following elected members and staff the power and responsibility to hear from the public through ‘spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction’ in relation to the local board agreement at the council’s public engagement events, during the consultation period for the Annual Budget 2020/2021:

i)        local board members and chairperson

ii)       General Manager Local Board Services, Local Board Relationship Manager, Local Board Senior Advisor, Local Board Advisor, Local Board Engagement Advisor

iii)      any additional staff approved by the General Manager Local Board Services or the Group Chief Financial Officer.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       For each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement for each local board area, that is agreed between the Governing Body and the local board.

7.       Local board agreements set out (among other things) how the council will, in the year to which the agreement relates, reflect the priorities and preferences in the local board plan in respect of the local activities to be provided in the local board area.

8.       The proposed content of each local board agreement must be included in the Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation document.

9.       Public consultation on the budget will take place from 21 February to 22 March 2020.

10.     Aucklanders will be able to provide feedback during the consultation process through a variety of channels which include face-to-face (verbal), written and social media.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     Local boards held workshops during November 2019 to determine their priorities for their 2020/2021 local board agreement. Local boards are now requested to approve their local content and supporting information for consultation, as per Attachments A and B.

12.     During the document production stage, if changes to the local content and supporting information are identified, these will be provided to the chairperson to approve.

13.     Any new local Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rates must be consulted on before they can be implemented. Local boards are therefore also requested to approve any new proposals for consultation.

14.     Aucklanders who wish to have their views on the proposed content of the local board agreement and Annual Budget 2020/2021 considered by Auckland Council should be provided a reasonable opportunity to present those views in a manner and format that is appropriate to the preferences and needs of those persons, including face-to-face.

15.     The council provides for this through its ‘Have Your Say’ events where Aucklanders can have a face-to-face dialogue with elected members or other council representatives with an appropriate delegation. Staff recommend that the board hold a Have Your Say’ event.

16.     The consultation period does not begin for a couple of months. If circumstances change between now and the consultation period and any change to the approved Have Your Say event is required, these will be provided to the chairperson to approve.

17.     Should a proposal requiring an amendment to the council’s long-term plan (10-year Budget) be identified during the Annual Budget 2020/2021 process, this would necessitate use of the special consultative procedure. Where an amendment to the 10-year Budget is being consulted on at the same time as consultation on the Annual Budget, the Local Government Act 2002 requires the council to use the special consultative procedure in relation to both matters.

18.     The special consultative procedure requires the council to provide an opportunity for Aucklanders to present their views to the council in a manner that enables ‘spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction’ between the person and the council’s decision-makers or their official delegates. The recommended Have Your Say events, along with the recommended delegation, provides for this spoken interaction.

Proposed boundary expansion to Glen Innes Business Association Business Improvement District programme

19.     As part of the Auckland Council Business Improvement District (BID) Policy the local board must approve the proposed BID programme boundary expansion.

20.     The Glen Innes Business Association (GIBA) is proposing to expand the boundary of the Glen Innes BID programme across two local board boundaries, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and Ōrākei. The GIBA will hold a postal ballot of the business ratepayers located in the defined Glen Innes BID expansion area in early 2020.

21.     If the council approves the BID programme boundary expansion, the Glen Innes Business Association membership will also increase to about 190 business ratepayers and owners, and the targeted rate will increase from $166,000 to $250,000 as of 1 July 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     The decision to consult is procedural in nature and the small scale of the Have Your Say events mean any climate impacts will be negligible. These decisions are unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

23.     However, where practicable, events proposed will be in locations accessible by public transport, to reduce car travel but also increase the opportunities for attendance.  

24.     Some of the proposed initiatives or projects included in the consultation content may have climate impacts. The climate impacts of any initiatives or projects Auckland Council chooses to progress with as a result of this consultation will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     The Annual Budget 2020/2021 is an Auckland Council group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level.

26.     Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     Local boards will have further opportunities to provide information and views as the council progresses through the Annual Budget 2020/2021 process.

28.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals contained in the budget. All feedback received from submitters residing in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the board, prior to finalising their local board agreement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the Annual Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Māori. Local board plans, which were adopted in September and October of 2017, form the basis for local priorities.

30.     The approach to Māori engagement for the Annual Budget 2020/2021 will be finalised once consultation topics are confirmed, including development of bespoke materials subject to interest level of topics and confirmation of budget.

31.     Regionally supported local Māori engagement in the South and West will be provided subject to interest level of topics and confirmation of budget; this will be integrated with local board plan pre-engagement.

32.     There is a need to continue to build local board relationships with iwi and the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn, can influence and encourage Māori participation in the council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     Event associated costs include venue hire (where council premises cannot be utilised) and catering.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     Local boards must approve their local consultation content and supporting information by 13 December 2019 in order for it to be formatted and reviewed in time to be incorporated into the Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation document and supporting information.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     The Governing Body will approve the consultation document, supporting information and consultation process for the Annual Budget 2020/2021 on 12 February 2020.

36.     Following consultation, the Governing Body and local boards will make decisions on the budget and local board agreements respectively.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local content for consultation

219

b

Local supporting information for consultation

221

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Beth Corlett - Advisor Plans & Programmes

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter one 2019/2020

File No.: CP2019/20376

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter one, 1 July – 30 September 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes an update on financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2019/2020 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with the Ōrākei Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·   (ID 344) Community Grants: $85,444 was allocated to local community groups.

·   (ID 510) Eastern Bays Songbird Project: This initiative has engaged over 1,000 participating members and a funding agreement has been proposed for quarter two that will continue to support this work.

·   (ID 1978) Andersons Beach – renew retaining seawall: physical works are progressing on schedule and this project is expected to be complete at the end of November 2019.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery/significant risk):

·   (ID 2067) Colin Maiden Park – develop site - stage 2: this project is awaiting the findings from the transport and circulation analysis which will inform the wider transport infrastructure needs of the Colin Maiden Precinct.

·   (ID 3785) The Landing Reserve – develop dinghy access ramp: a comprehensive strategic assessment is underway which includes engagement with mooring owners and boat users to determine whether this facility is still required.

6.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2019/2020 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note:

·   The overall expenditure result for the first quarter (July – September 2019) is below budget by 24 per cent due to lower operating revenue and expenditure.

·   Revenue is below budget by 14 per cent due mainly to lower revenue from The Landing operations.

·   Operating expenditure (OPEX) is 23 per cent lower from facility and park maintenance.

·   Capital expenditure (CAPEX) is 38 per cent under budget due to asset renewals and Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) CAPEX projects.

7.       The annual plan budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value. The net effect of these changes is reflected in the full year revised budget. The work programmes have also been updated to reflect these changes, including recommendations for additional Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) projects.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter one ending 30 September 2019.

b)      note that the Community Facilities 2019/2020 work programme and 2020-2022 indicative work programme has been updated to reflect financial deferrals as a part of the Annual Plan process as shown in Attachment C.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Ōrākei Local Board has an approved 2019/2020 work programme for the following operating departments:

·   Arts, Community & Events;

·   Auckland Tourism, Events, & Economic Development (ATEED);

·   Community Facilities: Build, Maintain & Renew;

·   Community Services: Service, Strategy & Integration;

·   Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·   Libraries;

·   Parks, Sports & Recreation;

·   Community Leases.

9.       Work programmes are produced annually, to meet the Ōrākei Local Board outcomes identified in the three-year Ōrākei Local Board Plan. The local board plan outcomes are:

·   Our local parks and open spaces are valued and enjoyed;

·   Our residents are proud of their community facilities and public places;

·   People can move around our area easily and safely;

·   The natural environment is valued, protected and enhanced by our communities;

·   A thriving economy which supports local businesses and town centres.

10.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.


 

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), activities in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

 

12.     The graph below shows the status of activities for each department’s work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 


 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter one

13.     The following are progress updates and achievements of key activities in the local board work programmes for the first quarter:

·   (ID 344) Community Grants: the Ōrākei Local Board allocated $85,444 through its contestable grants in Round One 2019/2020. $133,556 remains for two quick response rounds, and for Round Two for additional grants.

·   (ID 510) Eastern Bays Songbird Project: public trap handout events continued across the local board area, along with bird counting sessions and monitoring activities. At the end of quarter one, the number of participating members reached 1,199. A funding agreement has been proposed for quarter two that can continue supporting this work.

·   (ID 1978) Andersons Beach – renew retaining seawall: physical works are progressing, and this project is expected to be complete at the end of November 2019.

·   (ID 2205) Churchill Park Pathways – develop and renew pathways: physical works to the new central footpaths, boardwalk, and pathways to the Clubhouse are complete. Further works are being undertaken to renew existing pathways across the park.

·   (ID 3259) Michaels Avenue Reserve – renew footpaths and lighting: scoping work is underway to progress the renewal of damaged footpaths and lighting in the reserve. Tendering is underway for detailed design.

·   (ID 3325) Tahuna Torea – renew tracks and pathways: preliminary designs for the renewal of tracks and pathways that are in poor condition will be presented to the local board for approval in February 2020. Stakeholders and partners, such as Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and community groups will be engaged through this phase prior to physical works taking place.

Activities with significant issues

14.     The following are updates on identified activities which have significant issues or challenges which are delaying or preventing their progress.

·   (ID 2067) Colin Maiden Park – develop site - stage 2: this project is awaiting the findings from the transport and circulation analysis which will inform the wider transport infrastructure needs of the Colin Maiden Precinct.

·   (ID 3785) The Landing Reserve – develop dinghy access ramp: a comprehensive strategic assessment is underway which includes engagement with mooring owners and boat users to determine whether this facility is still required.

Activities on hold

15.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·   (ID 1443) 4 Victoria Avenue, Remuera – Lease to the Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust: this is a community lease that is now on hold due to the sale of 4 Victoria Avenue. The proceeds are funding the site optimisation process being undertaken by Panuku at the Meadowbank Community Centre to redevelop this facility.

·   (ID 1444) 4 Victoria Avenue, Remuera – Lease to Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB): this is a community lease that is now on hold due to the sale of 4 Victoria Avenue. The proceeds are funding the site optimisation process being undertaken by Panuku at the Meadowbank Community Centre to redevelop this facility.

·   (ID 2137) Ōrākei Spine Shared Path – develop feeder links: physical works are progressing to develop the feeder links as part of the wider Greenways development, and for the construction of the playspace in Tahapa Reserve East. Physical works on the playspace were delayed due to the discovery of a midden. New Zealand Heritage was notified and after archaeological surveying, work was granted approval to continue.

·   (ID 3464) Madills Farm Reserve – Lease to Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club Incorporated (ESAFC): This lease is on hold due to the pending redevelopment of the ESAFC facility.

Changes to the local board work programme

Cancelled activities

16.     These activities have been cancelled from the 2019/2020 work programme:

·   (ID 635) Waiatarua Reserve – phase three (ecological restoration and pest management): this project line has been cancelled as local board funding is no longer required to undertake this work in the reserve. Staff have confirmed this project will be funded through the natural environment targeted rate.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

18.     Work programmes were approved in June 2019 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     This report informs the Ōrākei Local Board of the performance for the quarter ending 30 September 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The following activities are identified as contributing positively to Māori outcomes:

·   (ID 955) Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori. Whakatipu i te reo māori – Ōrākei: Matariki and Māori Language Week were celebrated at Remuera Library through several activities mainly for children and families, including poi making, Māori story time and learning waiata with ukuleles.

·   (ID 1075) Programming in Community Places – Ōrākei: during quarter one, staff at the Ōrākei Community Centre worked with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Whai Maia Limited to deliver two free Te Reo Māori language classes during Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori. Thirty-four people participated across the two sessions, and 80 per cent of them were from the local board area. There is a strong interest in future sessions from both the working group and the community.

22.     The following activities have been identified as partnership activities with mana whenua:

·   (ID 539) Pourewa Valley Integrated Plan: this project involves the development of a masterplan for the Pourewa Valley. It will involve extensive community, stakeholder, and partner engagement, and collaboration with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, and is tied to the May 2019 Ōrākei Visual Framework.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     This report is for information only and has no associated financial implications.

Financial Performance

24.     Revenue this quarter is $58,000 under budget due to lower revenue received from The Landing operations ($41,000) and lower sales revenue from the libraries ($17,000).

25.     Operational Expenditure (OPEX) this quarter is $849,000 under budget. This relates to facilities and park maintenance and Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) as many projects are in the planning stage.

26.     Capital Expenditure (CAPEX) this quarter is $484,000 under budget. This relates to asset renewals and LDI CAPEX funded projects. The main expenditure in this quarter is for the Ōrākei Spine shared path and Tahapa Reserve improvements, totaling $351,000. Coastal asset renewals at Andersons Beach amounts to $129,000 and is on target.

27.     Further details of capital delivery by projects are provided in the work programme update.

Revised Budget

28.     For quarterly reporting purposes, annual plan budgets are revised to reflect changes in timing of delivery for individual projects.

29.     Projects that were still in progress at 30 June 2019 have had their remaining required budget carried forward to the current or future financial years to fund the remaining works.

30.     If a multi-year capital project was completed earlier than anticipated, the annual plan budget is reduced or brought forward to 30 June 2019 to reflect early completion.

31.     Consideration is also given to the status of current capital projects and where required budgets are rephased in whole or part to outer years to reflect current timelines for delivery.

32.     The net budgetary impact of these changes is reflected in the revised budget for the board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

34.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter two, December 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Orakei Q1 Work Programme

231

b

Orakei Q1 Operating Performance Financial Summary

249

c

Orakei Community Facilities Work Programme 19-22

255

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Nick Palmisano - Local Board Advisor - Orakei

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 



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Auckland Transport December 2019 report to the Ōrākei Local Board

File No.: CP2019/19977

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Auckland Transport report to the Ōrākei Local Board for December 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each month, Auckland Transport provides an update to the Ōrākei Local Board on transport-related matters and relevant consultations in its area, Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects and decisions of Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee.

3.       The Auckland Transport update for December 2019 report is attached to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport December 2019 update report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport monthly report - December 2019

267

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Local board governance work management for the 2019-2022 triennium

File No.: CP2019/18977

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To outline the options for efficiently and effectively managing the governance work of the local board for 2019-2022 triennium.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the end of each triennium the Local Board Services (LBS) department delivers a review of local board work practices, including the organisational support they require and how well they support the boards in their governance role. The 2016-2019 triennium review gathered feedback from local board members, and staff from LBS and other council departments and council-controlled organisations (CCOs).

3.       In response to the review, this report outlines a recommended approach for local boards to manage their governance workload as follows:

·   maintain a key focus on annual work programmes and their implementation through quarterly reporting and regular workshops with the whole local board, with decisions made at business meetings

·   appoint nominated local board members who will be consulted on landowner consents and events, and who will provide feedback on liquor licences and resource consents

·   appoint nominated local board members to external organisations.

4.       These practices support the local board to undertake their governance role in an efficient and effective way, reflect the priority work of the local board and help the organisation focus its resources. Some of these practices require a decision of the local board, such as specific appointments of local board members, and separate reports cover these recommendations and associated advice.

5.       Local boards are also able to identify topic area leads who would act as a champion with the local board on specific topic areas. Leads would focus on work programme activities/ projects within their topic areas and understanding relevant community needs and preferences enabling other members to focus their time on other parts of the board’s workload.

6.       The review feedback suggests the following advantages for having a full board involved in direction-setting discussions on issues, rather than identifying topic area leads:

·   staff are confident that the direction is the view of the whole board rather than one member

·   knowledge and information is retained by the full local board rather than one member

·   discussions with staff are less likely to enter into management or operational level detail

·   it avoids inefficient duplication, when conversations are held between staff and a lead, and then repeated with the full local board.

7.       The feedback from the review highlighted that if a board does appoint topic area leads, the risks should be mitigated by providing a clear scope for that role and ensuring it does not lead to inefficiency or adversely affect staff receiving clear direction from the full local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      endorse the following approach to effectively and efficiently manage the governance work of the local board for the 2019-2022 triennium:

i)        maintain a key focus on annual work programmes and their implementation through quarterly reporting and regular workshops with the whole local board, with decisions made at business meetings

ii)       appoint nominated local board members who will be consulted on landowner consents and events, and who will provide feedback on liquor licences and resource consents

iii)      appoint nominated local board members to external organisations.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The governance role of an elected member is to:

·   set direction and policy

·   set priorities

·   make significant decisions

·   test advice

·   monitor performance and risk

·   connect with and represent the community

·   be accountable to the public.

9.       At the end of each triennium the Local Board Services (LBS) department undertakes a review of the work practices of, and organisational support provided for, local boards and how this supports them in their governance role. Previous reviews have noted the progress the organisation has made in supporting the governance role of local boards over the past nine years. Improved support and delivery from the organisation have enabled local board members’ time to be used in a more effective and efficient manner as the governance model has matured.

10.     During the 2016-2019 triennium review, feedback was gathered from local board members and staff from LBS and other council departments and council-controlled organisations (CCOs) who work with local boards.

11.     Key themes from local board members related to having topic area leads. Both positives and negatives were identified.

12.     Key themes from staff were that clear direction is given from the full local board and local board members operate at the governance level. Staff identified both positive and negatives aspects of having topic area leads.

13.     The findings from the review have informed the content of this report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Work practices supporting the governance role of local boards (recommended approach)

14.     There are established work practices in place which support the governance role of local boards as follows:

·   Local boards adopt an annual work programme each June for implementation by the council organisation in the next financial year (July-June). Local boards maintain a key focus on these annual work programmes and their implementation through quarterly reporting and regular workshops with the whole local board, with decisions made at business meetings.

·   Local boards appoint a nominated local board member who will be consulted on landowner consents and events by staff carrying out their delegations. Local boards can also appoint a nominated local board member to provide feedback and attend hearings on liquor licences and notified resource consents to ensure that local board views are taken into account in these timebound processes. These appointments are made via a separate report.

·   Local boards appoint nominated local board members to external organisations (via separate report) to exercise their role in the external organisation as per the relevant constitution on behalf of the local board.

15.     Together these practices constitute the recommended approach for managing the governance work of the local board for the 2019-2022 triennium, reflect the priority work of the local board and are the focus of the organisation’s staff and resources.

16.     This approach allows all members to have an overview and collective understanding of work programme matters, and for the whole local board to be able to provide direction to staff and track performance and delivery throughout the financial year. It also enables collective discussions that utilise individual member’s skills and knowledge and ensures elected member and staff time are used effectively and efficiently.

17.     Transparency to the public is ensured by local board decisions occurring through the formal business meeting process with associated standing orders.

Optional addition: Topic area leads (not recommended)

18.     An optional addition to the recommended approach is that the local board identifies topic area leads. Leads would:

·   act as a champion for the topic area in full local board conversations

·   focus on work programme activities / projects within their topic area

·   maintain relationships with key stakeholders

·   understand relevant community needs and preferences.

19.     Leads may also:

·   be appointed as the nominated local board member to provide feedback on behalf of the board on relevant matters (e.g. landowner consents) and appointed to related external organisations

·   undertake learning and development opportunities and attend conferences (using their individual development budget provided as part of the Kura Kāwana development programme) relevant to the topic area

·   highlight relevant issues and emerging priorities during local board plan and work programme development

·   act as a key contact for community groups and members of the public on the topic area.

20.     Topic area leads would enable individual local board members to use existing or build new knowledge and expertise in the topic area and enable other members to focus their time on other parts of the governance workload.

21.     Should the local board identify topic area leads, there are the following risks to consider:

·   a member may provide direction or views which do not reflect those of the full local board

·   staff may seek direction from a topic area lead instead of the full local board, or seek direction from a topic area lead prior to the full local board, resulting in duplication of work

·   key knowledge and information on a topic may be retained with the topic area lead and not shared with the whole local board

·   a topic area lead may enter into discussions at the management or operational level if meeting regularly with staff without a clear governance purpose for the discussion.

22.     These risks can be addressed by:

·   using the workshop process as the mechanism for all local board members to receive updates and provide governance direction on approved work programme projects

·   clarifying the limited resources available to any topic area lead.

23.     Staff resourcing is focussed on work programme development and delivery, along with advice to support workshops and business meetings. Topic area leads can be supported by staff to undertake the following responsibilities:

·   when issues arise at a full board workshop, the lead can be directed to meet with staff on that issue and explore solutions; staff would report back to the full board for direction, and the lead can assist with explanation and support during that discussion

·   develop local board feedback on regional policies, plans and strategies relevant to the topic area, for full local board approval

·   respond to constituent enquiries relevant to the topic area

·   report back to the local board at workshops, and publicly via board member reports at business meetings, on the activities undertaken as the topic area lead.

24.     If a local board does want to appoint topic area leads, it may wish to consider identifying alternates. The role of the alternate would be to support the topic area lead in their responsibilities and undertake any roles the lead has been formally appointed by the whole board when the lead is unavailable. Having an alternate means that the information, knowledge, skills and workload can be shared by more than one member, but it could also lead to confusion between the two roles where the alternate acts as a co-lead.

25.     If a local board’s preference is to appoint topic area leads, this will require a local board decision via a resolution to this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     This report is procedural in nature so does not have direct climate impacts. However, a key focus for the council in the current term will be how it responds to the climate emergency and this may be a consideration for how local boards manage their governance work.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     Feedback was gathered from staff from the LBS department, and other departments and CCOs who work with local boards, about practices to manage the local board governance work through the 2016-2019 triennium review.

28.     The practices used by a local board to manage their governance work can impact on the efficiency of staff engagement with members. Some variation in practices is required to reflect local differences, but overall large differences in work practices is challenging and consistency is beneficial.

29.     In light of this, Local Board Services has provided consistent advice and recommendations on work practices to all local boards to consider when making decisions on how they will manage their governance work for the 2016-2019 triennium.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     Feedback was gathered from local board members about practices to manage local board governance work through the 2016-2019 triennium review. This included: a workshop attended by 13 local board members from 10 local boards; and a survey to all members, with responses provided by 29 members, from 13 local boards.  

31.     The practices used by a local board to manage their governance work can impact efficiency and effectiveness of engagement with communities and the opportunities that members have to provide local leadership beyond the formal decision-making process.

32.     The topic of managing the governance work of the local board was discussed at a workshop on 17 October 2019, as part of the Ōrākei Local Board induction programme for the 2019-2022 triennium.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     This decision is procedural in nature so does not have immediate impacts on Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     This decision is procedural in nature so does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     The risks and mitigations of having topic area leads are outlined in the ‘Analysis and Advice’ section of this report.

36.     Risks relating to any specific decision required for the work practices that form the recommended approach are outlined in the respective separate reports relating to those decisions.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Staff from the Local Board Services department will work with staff from other departments and CCOs to ensure the practices of the local board are implemented.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Emma Reed - Local Board Advisor Albert-Eden

Authorisers

Kerri Foote, Operations and Improvements Manager

Oliver Roberts, Central Teams Manager

Louise Mason, General Manager Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

Local board appointments and delegations for the 2019-2022 electoral term

File No.: CP2019/18980

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To recommend that the Ōrākei Local Board appoints a local board member to:

·   be the nominated local board member for landowner consents (including affected party approvals)

·   be the nominated local board member for film applications

·   be the nominated local board member for events

·   provide formal reports on liquor licence applications and attendance at hearings

·   provide formal views on whether a resource consent should proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application

·   provide formal views (feedback) on notified resource consents and attend the council hearings.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In order to enable effective and efficient decision-making, the council delegates some responsibilities to staff or individual elected members. This report seeks to appoint nominated local board members who will be consulted on landowner consents and events, and who will provide feedback on liquor licences and resource consents.

3.       If local boards choose not to appoint a nominated board member for landowner consents staff will consult with the local board chairperson, as outlined in the Local Board Delegation Protocols.

4.       District Licensing Committees consider, and grant or renew applications for liquor licences and manager’s certificates. These applications are publicly notified and local boards can provide views on an application to the District Licensing Committee. A delegation to a nominated local board member is recommended to allow local boards to provide formal views as part of the liquor licensing process.

5.       Local boards can provide feedback on whether resource consent applications should be publicly notified. Local boards can also provide written feedback once the applications are notified and can subsequently speak to their feedback to support their views at the council hearing. A delegation to a nominated local board member is recommended.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      appoint a member and an alternate for landowner consents (excluding landowner consents for filming) and authorise them to:

i)        be the point of consultation for staff on all applications for landowner consent and, at their discretion, refer any application for landowner consent to the local board for a local board decision, and

ii)       to be the point of consultation for staff on proposed asset renewal works and, at their discretion, refer any proposed asset renewal works to the local board for a local board decision

iii)      receive staff notifications of areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk.

b)      appoint a member and an alternate, for landowner consents for filming and authorise them to:

i)        to be the point of consultation with staff on all applications for landowner consent for filming and, at their discretion, refer any applications for landowner consent for filming to the local board for a local board decision

ii)       receive notifications from staff of areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk.

c)      appoint to a member and an alternate for events and authorise them to receive staff notifications of areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk.

d)      delegate to a member, with an alternate, the authority to prepare and provide local board views and speak to those local board views at any hearings on applications for liquor licences.

e)      delegate to a member, with an alternate, the authority to provide the local board views on whether a resource consent should proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application.

f)       delegate to a member, with an alternate, the authority to prepare and provide local board views and speak those local board views at any hearings on notified resource consents.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

Background

6.       Decision-making within Auckland Council is shared between the Governing Body and local boards. Local boards have made a general delegation to the Chief Executive of all of their responsibilities, duties and powers subject to the exclusions, restrictions and clarifications set out in the Chief Executive’s Delegations Register. The Chief Executive has in turn delegated those responsibilities, duties and powers to staff. The exercise of those responsibilities, duties and powers is subject to a set of delegation protocols. These protocols provide a set of expectations and directions to staff and require a number of actions that are relevant to all local activities. These delegations help Auckland Council to operate efficiently and effectively.

7.       In some cases, delegations are given to individual local board members, usually due to short timeframes constrained by operational requirements, customer expectations and deadlines set by statute. Having a delegation in place to one local board member helps to ensure that council can continue to undertake its normal business practices without undue delays.

8.       Local boards have allocated responsibility for decision-making with respect to local parks and have delegated landowner consent decisions to staff subject to a number of delegation protocols. The delegation protocols require that the nominated local board member is consulted on every landowner consent. Landowner consents encompass a broad range of activities, including affected party approvals, filming and events. Local boards also are able to provide their formal views in a report at liquor licence hearings.

9.       Under the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 the Governing Body must consider any views and preferences expressed by a local board, where a Governing Body decision affects or may affect the responsibilities or operation of the local board or the well-being of communities within its local board area. Local boards’ ability to provide local views can be affected because of statutory timeframes or external agency deadlines. Delegating authority for providing local board views to individual members provides local boards the opportunity to give local views within prescribed timeframes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Landowner consents

10.     Under Auckland Council’s Combined Chief Executive Delegations Register, council staff are delegated authority to approve landowner consents on behalf of local boards. This delegation is subject to the Local Board Delegations Protocols. These protocols require that before exercising their delegations, staff must consult with a nominated local board member for landowner consents. If required, by the nominated local board member, the staff member must refer the landowner consent decision to a local board business meeting for a decision.

11.     It is therefore recommended that the local board appoint a nominated local board member for landowner consents to enable staff to exercise their delegation.

Landowner consents for filming

12.     Screen Auckland (Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development) processes requests for filming in the Auckland Region, and seeks landowner consent from local boards. Over 600 permits are granted each year, with the largest number of permits being granted in Waitematā, Wāitakere Ranges and Rodney Local Board areas.

13.     Screen Auckland must process the applications within three to five working days, and therefore require feedback from local boards within two working days. These timeframes are short because filming activities often have a fast turnaround for productions from concept to delivery. To keep filming in Auckland, in a competitive international market, film crews often have to work within short timeframes.

14.     Due to the extremely short timeframes for film applications, where local boards have a large number of filming applications, it may be beneficial for this subset of landowner consents to be referred to a different nominated local board member, to manage workloads.

Events

15.     Under the Local Board Delegations Protocols staff must consult with and obtain the views of the nominated local board member on:

·   applications to hold events on council-owned land in the local board area that require regulatory approval and involve one or more of the following matters:

o complete or substantial closure of the public open space

o more than 500 people

o road closure

o liquor

o ticketed event.

·   Any regulatory decision to set fees and charges for holding local events on council-owned local parks and reserve (and refer the matter to the local board to obtain local board views and input where required by the delegated local board member).

·   Staff are also required to notify the nominated local board member of:

o areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk

o decisions to approve events on council owned land in the local board area.

16.     Ōrākei Local Board has additional requirements for events under the Local Board Delegations Protocols.

17.     The appointment of a nominated local board member for events is therefore recommended to enable staff to exercise their delegation.

18.     Under the Local Board Delegations Protocols landowner consent is also required for all event proposals on local parks. To avoid double-handling of applications, it is recommended that the local board member nominated for events is the same as that local board member nominated for landowner consents.

Formal submissions at liquor licence hearings

19.     District Licensing Committees consider, and grant or renew applications for liquor licences and manager’s certificates. When a business applies for an on-licence, off-licence, or club licence, new or renewed, they are publicly notified. On 25 September 2014, the Governing Body (GB/2014/103) agreed to a process where local boards can provide views on an application in a report to the District Licensing Committee. If the District Licensing Committee considers that the local board’s report has raised issues that it needs to hear more about, it can call a hearing and invite the local board to appear and talk to its report and respond to questions as a witness.

20.     Once the public notice has been posted online, the local board has 15 working days to provide their report to council.

21.     This report recommends a delegation to a nominated local board member to allow local boards to provide formal views as part of the liquor licensing process.

Notified resource consents

22.     Local boards can provide feedback, within the statutory timeframes, on whether resource consent applications should be publicly notified. This was resolved by the Governing Body on 28 July 2011 (GB/2011/156). Resource consent planners email the planning lead copies of applications that meet the triggers set by the local boards (last reviewed in 2017). The planning leads have three working days to provide comment on the matter of whether the application should be publicly notified or limited notified to particular persons who may be adversely affected by the proposal. Where comments are provided, these are included verbatim as part of the reporting planner’s notification report to the decision-maker.

23.     Local boards can also provide written feedback once resource consent applications have been notified. Written feedback needs to be provided prior to the submission closing date (usually 20 working days after public notification). Local boards can subsequently speak to their feedback to support their views at any hearing.

24.     This report recommends a planning lead for each local board to provide the local board’s formal views on whether or not resource consents should be notified or limited notified and to provide written feedback on notified applications and speak on the local board’s behalf at the council hearing.

Options considered

25.     Options available for local boards to input into landowner consents, events, planning processes and liquor licences have been summarised in Tables 1 and 2.

26.     It is recommended that local boards select both a nominated local board member and an alternate. The alternate is available to act when the nominated local board member is unable to act (eg leave of absence, illness) and has agreed (via written communication) that the alternate take the role of nominated local board member for a specified time period.

27.     We recommend that local boards appoint one nominated local board member (and alternate). Appointing more than one nominated local board member increases administration for staff and can create unnecessary confusion where local board members provide differing views to staff.

Nominated local board members under the Local Board Delegations Protocol

28.     The preferred option is that a nominated local board member is appointed for landowner consents and events (option two in Table 1). This option is preferred because it aligns with council’s existing delegations and local board delegation protocols and allows for council to undertake core business in a timely manner. There is reputational risk to council if it is unable to administer landowner consents in a timely manner.

Table 1: Options for local boards to address requirement for nominated local board members under the Local Board Delegations Protocol for landowner consents and events

Options

Pros

Cons

1.   There are no nominated local board members and staff must consult with the local board chairperson as a primary point of contact

·      The local board chairperson will become the subject matter expert for the local board on landowner approvals and events

·      Local boards can provide their views in a timely way that better meets organisational deadlines

·      The local board chairperson’s work-load will be increased

·      Decisions are not made by the full local board

·      Decisions are not made at a public meeting

2.   Nominated local board members appointed for landowner consents and events (preferred option)

·      The nominated local board member will become subject matter expert for local board on topic they are nominated for

·      Local boards can provide their views in a timely way that better meets organisational deadlines

·      Decisions are not made by the full local board

·      Decisions made under delegation are not made at a public meeting

Notified applications (resource consents and liquor licences)

29.     Local boards normally provide their formal views at business meetings (option two in Table 2). Because local board reporting timeframes do not usually align with process and statutory timeframes outlined above, in most instances reporting at a business meeting will not be a viable option. Providing a delegation to one local board member and one alternate (option three in Table 2) is considered the most efficient way of providing formal views for the matters discussed in this report.

Table 2: Options for local boards to provide their formal views on notification of resource consents and liquor licences

Options

Pros

Cons

1.   No formal local board views are provided

 

·      Local board views will not be considered by the hearing commissioners

2.   Formal local board views are provided at a business meeting

·      All local board members contribute to the local board view

·      Provides transparent decision making

·      Local board meeting schedules and agenda deadlines are unlikely to align with statutory deadlines imposed by the planning process

3.   Formal local board views are provided by way of delegation to one local board member for all applications (preferred option)

·      Nominated local board member will become subject matter expert for local board on topic they are nominated for

·      Local boards can provide their views in a timely way that meets statutory deadlines

·      Any feedback can be reported back to the local board

·      Decisions are not made by the full local board

·      Decisions made under delegation are not made at a public meeting (decisions are made public once submitted via the planning process)

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.     These decisions are procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     This report recommends the appointment of nominated local board members to ensure that council can undertake its operational and statutory duties in a timely manner, while receiving local board input and decision-making in matters that are of local importance.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     This report seeks to appoint nominated board members to perform particular functions.

33.     Any local board member who is appointed as a nominated board member should ensure that they represent the wider local board views and preferences on each matter before them.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have a positive or negative impact for Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have financial implications on Auckland Council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     If local boards choose not to appoint a nominated board member for landowner consents (including film applications) and events, staff will need to seek feedback from the chairperson. This could potentially lead to a busy workload for the local board chairperson, in addition to their existing duties.

37.     If local boards choose not to delegate to provide views on notified applications, there is a risk that they will not be able to provide formal views prior to submission closing dates and miss the opportunity to have their feedback presented and heard at a hearing.

38.     If local boards choose not to delegate to provide their views on liquor licences, there is a risk that they will not be able to provide formal views prior to closings dates for submissions not coinciding with political meetings.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Nominated local board members providing feedback on landowner consents and events will engage with staff acting in accordance with the Local Board Delegation Protocols.

40.     Training for local board members will be offered on the Resource Management Act 1991 and the preparation of effective feedback for applications notified as part of a Resource Management Act 1991 process.

41.     Nominated local board members (and alternates) who are delegated to provide reports and speak at District Licensing Committee Hearings should sign-up to receive alcohol notices. This will ensure that they hear about new applications as soon as they are open for comment.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Carol Stewart - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Appointment of local board members to external community organisations

File No.: CP2019/18984

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To appoint board members to external community organisations relevant to the Ōrākei Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Elected members participate as representatives of the local board on a number of external community and national organisations.

3.       The beginning of the new electoral term generates the need for new appointments. This report provides details of the external organisations relevant to the local board and requests that the local board nominates a lead and alternate member to represent the board on those external organisations for the 2019-2022 triennium.

4.       In addition, there are a small number of appointments which, due to legislation or the terms in a deed are the responsibility of the Governing Body, but because the relationship between the council and the organisation is local, the Governing Body has delegated its responsibility to nominate an elected member to the relevant local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      appoint a local board member and an alternate to the external community groups and organisations listed below for the 2019-2022 triennium:

i)        Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board

ii)       Ellerslie Business Association Incorporated

iii)      Remuera Business Association

iv)      St Heliers Bay Village Association

v)      Mission Bay Business Association

vi)      Ellerslie Residents Association Inc

vii)     Meadowbank and St Johns Residents Society Inc.

viii)    Mission Bay - Kohimarama Residents Association

ix)      Ōrākei Community Association Inc.

x)      Remuera Residents Association Inc.

xi)      St Heliers/Glendowie Residents Association

xii)     Stonefields Residents Association

xiii)    Friends of Churchill Park

xiv)    Friends of Kepa Bush

xv)    Friends of Madills Farm Reserve

xvi)    Friends of Tahuna Torea

xvii)   Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum

xviii)  Tāmaki Drive Protection Society

xix)    Waiatarua Reserve Protection Society Inc.

xx)    Ōrākei Basin Advisory Group

xxi)    From the Deck Newmarket Stream Restoration group

xxii)   Mission Bay Working Party

xxiii)  St Heliers Working Party

xxiv)  East City Community Trust

xxv)  Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

xxvi)  Auckland Netball Centre Incorporated

xxvii) Michaels Avenue Reserve Community Liaison Committee

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       A number of external organisations provide for the formal participation of Auckland Council elected members in their affairs. Elected member appointees will have a variety of duties and liabilities depending on the individual organisation.

6.       At the commencement of each triennium, the Governing Body and local boards make appointments to external organisations.

7.       As local board representatives, the nominated members represent the board, and do not attend in a personal capacity.  Nominated local board members will provide updates at local board meetings to regularly inform all local board members of discussions and decisions made of their activities, unless good reasons exist for confidentiality. These updates are in the form of business meeting reports which maintain public transparency.

8.       The reasons for elected member participation in external organisations can be described in a number of ways:

·   a trust deed, that requires Auckland Council to make an appointment to an organisation

·   an organisation of interest to the local board is inviting elected member representation at its meetings

·   associations entered into by the council which provide for elected member representation

·   organisation governance, or project or programme oversight, such as regional or local parks management groups

·   a statutory or regulatory provision (for example a regulation providing for a community liaison committee) or

·   a resource consent requiring the formation of a committee or hearing panel.

9.       In making decisions about these appointments, it is suggested that local boards are mindful of:

·   the elected member’s availability

·   any conflict of interests, including whether the local board provides funding to the entity

·   relevance

·   historical relationship with the organisation and Auckland Council.

10.     Members are delegated in their capacity as elected local board members. Should they no longer be a local board member, their nominations would be automatically repealed.

11.     Local board members may be part of any organisation in their private capacity and personal interests. They are encouraged to disclose memberships of external organisations in the conflict of interest register.

12.     The details of the organisations relevant to the local board area are detailed below.

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Reserves Board

13.     The Ngāti Whātua Reserves Board is a statutory body set up to oversee and manage the Whenua Rangatira and Pourewa Reserve. It is a co-governance arrangement between Auckland Council and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, with each entity appointing three representatives. The Governing Body of Auckland Council has delegated one of the three roles to the Ōrākei Local Board. 

Ellerslie Business Association; Remuera Association; St Heliers Business Association

14.     Business Improvement District (BID) Partnership Programmes are local economic development initiatives run by a business association in partnership with the council, supported by a designated targeted rate. BID programmes operate in Ellerslie, Remuera and St Heliers.

15.     The local board has a day-to-day relationship with the business associations as a joint partner in the BID Partnership Programme. The local board will work with the business associations to align the direction for the BID programme and local priorities expressed in the Local Board Plan. The local board will receive regular reporting on the BID Partnership Programme and review progress against objectives.

16.     The business association may invite the appointed member onto the BID Governance Board or Executive Committee. The discretion on whether this member has voting rights will lie with the business association under the rules of their constitution.

17.     The previous local board representative was Member Rundle, with Member Claridge as alternate for Ellerslie, Member Wong as alternate for Remuera and Member Davis as alternate for St Heliers respectively.

Mission Bay Business Association

18.     The Mission Bay Business Association is a business association within the local board area which is not part of the BID programme.

19.     The previous local board representative for Mission Bay Business Association was Member Rundle with Member Wong as alternate.

Residents’ Associations

20.     The Board also appoints representatives to work with the following residents’ associations, which meet once a month at variable times and locations:

·   Ellerslie Residents Association Incorporated

·   Meadowbank and St Johns Residents Society Incorporated

·   Mission Bay - Kohimarama Residents Association

·   Ōrākei Community Association Incorporated

·   Remuera Residents Association Incorporated

·   St Heliers/Glendowie Residents Association

·   Stonefields Residents Association.

Environmental Care Groups

21.     The Board also appoints representatives to work with the following environmental care groups, which meet once a month at variable times and locations:

·   Friends of Churchill Park

·   Friends of Kepa Bush

·   Friends of Madills Farm Reserve

·   Friends of Tahuna Torea

·   Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum

·   Tāmaki Drive Protection Society

·   Waiatarua Reserve Protection Society Incorporated

·   Ōrākei Basin Advisory Group

·   From the Deck Newmarket Stream restoration group.

22.     The Ōrākei Basin Advisory Group appears to have stopped meeting and Board may wish to delay appointing a representative to this group until the group reconvenes.

Auckland Transport working parties

23.     In July 2019, proposals for lowering speed limits and road safety improvements in local centres attracted a large amount of community interest and Auckland Transport initiated two local working parties made up of Auckland Transport staff, local representatives from the residents’ and business associations, and an Ōrākei Local Board representative. The two working groups are:

·   Mission Bay Working Party

·   St Heliers Village Working Party.

East City Community Trust

24.     The East City Community Trust was established to raise and administer funds for the purpose of providing buildings, plant, equipment, land and recreation facilities at Selwyn College, Kohimarama and to operate and maintain such facilities for the benefit of the community and the School.

25.     Barfoot & Thompson Stadium is administered under the East City Community Trust Deed by a Board of Trustees. The Trust is a fully constituted Charitable Trust made up of three members, i.e. Selwyn College (Ministry of Education), Barfoot & Thompson Stadium Sports Club and the community.

26.     According to the Trust rules, the community Trustee is appointed by Auckland Council.

27.     At the Governing Body meeting held on 11 November 2019, the Governing Body resolved to delegate this appointment on behalf of Auckland Council to the Ōrākei Local Board (Resolution number GB/2019/117).

28.     The previous local board representative was Member Wong, with Member Parkinson as alternate.

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

29.     Under Designation 1100 of the Auckland Unitary Plan Operative in part, the Auckland International Airport Limited is required to maintain the Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group. The purpose of the group is to consider, and where appropriate, make recommendations to Auckland International Airport Limited on aircraft noise and concerns that arise from the operations and activities at the airport.

30.     Membership of the group comprise an Auckland Council Governing Body representative, 12 local board representatives, and representatives from industry, Mana Whenua, the community, Airways, Board of Airline Representatives of New Zealand and Auckland International Airport Limited.

31.     One local board member is selected from each of the following local boards: Mangere-Ōtāhuhu, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Manurewa, Howick, Franklin, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Albert-Eden, Puketāpapa, Whau, Ōrākei, Waitākere Ranges, and Papakura.

32.     The meetings are held every three months. The next meeting occurs on 9 December 2019, 1-3pm, Pavilion Roam III, Sudima Hotel, 18 Airport Drive, Auckland Airport.

Auckland Netball Centre Incorporated

33.     Originally founded in 1911, Auckland Netball Centre Incorporated is the oldest and largest netball centre in New Zealand and is registered as a Charitable Entity.

34.     They are home to over 27,780 members and participants, and also provide multipurpose sporting and recreation facilities for the wider community, with over 435,473 people passing through the gates annually.

35.     In 2014 the Auckland Netball Centre Incorporated requested a liaison person from the Ōrākei Local Board be appointed to their organisation.

36.     The previous local board representative was Member Davis, with Member Rundle as alternate.

Michaels Avenue Reserve Community Liaison Committee

37.     As per conditions of consent following the Environment Court’s decision regarding Auckland Council’s resource consent application for lights and noise (winter months only) at Michaels Avenue Reserve, the Board was requested to nominate two representatives to sit on the Michaels Avenue Reserve Community Liaison Committee.

38.     The previous local board representative was Member Parkinson and Member Davis as Board’s Parks lead and alternate.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

39.     Appointments to the external organisations set out above are made at the start of each triennium. The appointees are required to report regularly back to the Local Board on the activities of those organisations. The appointments enable the Council to participate and assist in the affairs of the organisations while ensuring oversight of any funding arrangements that the organisation may have with the council.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

40.     This report has no specific implications for climate change. It covers appointments of local board members to external organisations and community networks to represent the view of local communities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     This report has no specific impacts for most of the appointments. It covers appointments of local board members to external organisations and community networks to represent the view of local communities. The Ngāti Whātua Reserves Board appointment will be in conjunction with other local board and governing appointments as provided for by the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Settlement Act 2012.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     This report seeks the local board’s decision on representatives to external community organisations relevant to the local board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     This report has no specific impact on Māori. It covers appointments of local board members to external organisations and community networks to represent the view of local communities, including Māori communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     There are no financial implications as a result of this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

45.     Local board members may be part of any organisation in their private capacity and personal interests. They are encouraged to disclose memberships of external organisations in the conflict of interest register.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     Once the appointments are made, local board representatives will participate in meetings with the organisations.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Carol Stewart - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Adoption of a business meeting schedule

File No.: CP2019/18998

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Ōrākei Local Board meeting schedule for the 2019-2022 electoral term.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules. In particular, clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings. Sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of LGOIMA require that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting, and that local board meetings are open to the public.

3.       Adopting a meeting schedule helps with meeting these requirements. Adopting a business meeting schedule also allows for a planned approach to workloads and ensures that local board members have clarity about their commitments.

4.       A draft meeting schedule for the 2019-2022 electoral term has been developed and is included below for adoption by the local board.

5.       Commencing the business meeting during business hours will enable meetings to be productive and ensures best use of resources.

6.       One business meeting per month is sufficient for formal business to be considered. There are some instances for which the local board may need to have meetings in addition to this schedule. The specific times and dates for meetings for matters such as local board plans and local board agreements are yet to be finalised. Local board meeting schedules may need to be updated once these details are confirmed.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      adopt the meeting schedule outlined below for the 2019-2022 electoral term:

Year

Date

Venue

2020

Thursday, 20 February

St Chads Church and Community Centre

38 St Johns Road, Meadowbank

 

Thursday, 19 March

Thursday, 16 April

Monday, 18 May

Thursday, 18 June

Thursday, 16 July

Thursday, 20 August

Thursday, 17 September

Thursday, 15 October

Thursday, 19 November

2021

Thursday, 18 February

St Chads Church and Community Centre

38 St Johns Road, Meadowbank

 

Thursday, 18 March

Thursday, 15 April

Thursday, 20 May

Thursday, 17 June

Thursday, 15 July

Thursday, 19 August

Thursday, 16 September

Thursday, 21 October

Thursday, 18 November

2022

Thursday, 17 February

St Chads Church and Community Centre

38 St Johns Road, Meadowbank

 

Thursday, 17 March

Thursday, 21 April

Thursday, 19 May

Thursday, 16 June

Thursday, 21 July

Thursday, 18 August

Thursday, 15 September

 

b)      agree to commence business meetings at 3.00pm, noting that public forum and deputations will be scheduled in the early part of the business meeting, to enable participation by the public and stakeholders in the democratic process.

c)      note the dates and time for meetings for local board plans and local board agreements are yet to be finalised.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Anna Bray - Policy and Planning Manager - Local Boards

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Process for appointment of Local Government New Zealand National Council representative

File No.: CP2019/18989

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the process for making the local board representative appointment to the Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) National Council and inform elected members of changes to the LGNZ rules.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) amended its rules at its Annual General Meeting on 7 July 2019 and these were confirmed at a meeting of the LGNZ National Council in September. There are some key changes affecting Auckland.

3.       There are now three dedicated seats on the LGNZ National Council for Auckland Council representatives. These will be filled by the Mayor of Auckland (or his alternate) and representatives to be appointed by local boards and the Governing Body. The LGNZ rules require these appointments to be made within eight weeks of the triennial local government elections.

4.       This report outlines a process to appoint the local boards representative. Nominations will be open to all local board elected members and this can be done in mid-end November. Local boards are being asked to delegate authority to select the representative by nominating one of its members, preferably the chairperson, to be part of a local board selection panel. This process will enable the representative to be appointed as quickly as possible.

5.       The LGNZ rules now excludes Auckland from LGNZ Zone 1. Although not officially a member of an LGNZ zone group, the expectation is that Auckland Council schedules regular meetings with the president and chief executive (or their representatives) of LGNZ and organise itself as if it were a zone group. These meetings could be co-chaired by the councillor and local board member who are appointed to the LGNZ National Council.

6.       Other arrangements such as the sector-based groups remain unchanged. Auckland Council is eligible to be a member of the Metropolitan and Regional Groups and the Governing Body will be asked to select representatives to these groups.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the amended Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) rules.

b)      endorse Option A (selection panel made up of representatives from each local board) as the process for appointing the local board representative to the LGNZ National Council.

c)      delegate to the chairperson to be part of the selection panel to appoint the local board representative to the LGNZ National Council.

d)      agree in principle to two annual meetings of Auckland Council and LGNZ (or their representatives) with the arrangements to be decided by the three Auckland Council representatives to the LGNZ National Council and staff.

e)      endorse the proposal that the meetings of the Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings be co-chaired by the governing body and local board representatives appointed to the LGNZ National Council.

 

Horopaki

Context

Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ)

7.       LGNZ is an incorporated society (New Zealand Local Government Association Inc) which represents the national interests of councils around New Zealand and leads best practice in the local government sector.

8.       The objectives of LGNZ include promoting and advocating matters affecting the national interests of local government. LGNZ holds regular dialogue with government, parliamentarians and government agencies and provides thought leadership and research on matters of interest to local authorities.

9.       LGNZ is governed by a national council made up of members elected to represent geographic zones, representatives of various sector groups, Chair of Te Maruata (LGNZ’s national collective of Māori in local government governance roles), the President and three seats reserved for representatives of Auckland Council.

10.     The establishment of dedicated Auckland seats were made as part of amendments to the LGNZ Rules agreed at its AGM in July 2019 (available online). The amended rules stipulate that the composition of the National Council will include the Mayor of Auckland (or an alternate) and two further persons: one to represent the Governing Body and one to represent local boards. The appointments are for three years.

11.     LGNZ members are organized in zones and sectors generally. These zones and sectors make appointments to the National Council, provide advice on issues affecting their geographical or sector areas and provide information to their members.

12.     Auckland Council is no longer a member of any zone group. Due to its size and governance structure, it is expected that the council will organise itself as if it were a zone.

13.     The amendments did not change arrangements for sector groups. Auckland Council remains eligible to be a member of the Metro Sector Group and the Regional Sector Groups. The Governing Body usually appoints Auckland Council’s representatives to these groups and will be asked to do so again.

14.     Auckland Council’s benefits from its interactions with LGNZ include keeping abreast of national issues affecting local government, advocating for and influencing local government issues on the national agenda and providing a forum where elected representatives connect and network with their peers from across the country.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Appointment of local board representative to LGNZ National Council

15.     The appointment of a local board representative will need to be decided by local boards. This is outlined in LGNZ Rule E1A “(b) one person appointed by Auckland Council local boards, from Elected members of the local boards”.

16.     The restricted timeframes (eight weeks from start of the term) requires an agile selection process. Staff considered several options and recommend Option A as detailed in the following table:

 

 

Process for selection of local board representative to the LGNZ National Council

Option

Process

Details of process

A

Selection panel made up of representatives from each local board

·    Each local board delegates authority to one of their members to be part of a selection panel.

·    The selection panel can be called to meet once all candidates are confirmed and they will agree the voting system to be used.

·    One vote per local board is considered a fair way to select a single representative for all 21 local boards.

·    Members can utilise an existing meeting to get the selection panel together (such as the Chair’s Forum).

·    Process can start in mid-November with a two-week nomination period.

B

Reports to local boards seeking decision/preference (may require urgent decisions)

·    This would involve seeking a vote/preference from each local board through a formal report and resolution.

·    The report can only be produced once nominations have closed and the candidates list is available – this will delay the report to early December.

·    Where there is a tie between candidates based on local board votes, staff will need to be delegated authority to resolve the candidate by lot or go back to local boards for a decision.

·    This process is unlikely to produce an agreed appointment in a timely fashion.

 

17.     Staff also considered the option of a popular vote of all local board members. This would involve setting up an online voting system, where each local board member would have one vote. However, this option may not comply with the LGNZ Rules which anticipates a selection by local boards rather than by individual members. 

18.     The recommended Option A will enable a fair process by giving each local board a vote and an opportunity for their representatives to properly consider each nominee. This selection can take place at the planned meeting of the Chairs’ Forum on 9 December 2019 to avoid arranging an additional meeting.

Nominations for the local board representative

19.     The LGNZ anticipates that all local board elected members are eligible to be a candidate for the LGNZ National Council. The nominations process will therefore need to allow self-nominations.

20.     To facilitate this process in the timeframes required, staff will call for nominations on Friday 15 November and will allow a two-week period closing on 29 November 2019.

Auckland Council / LGNZ meetings

21.     The role of a zone includes receiving reports from LGNZ about matters of national interest to local authorities and communicating to LGNZ the issues and concerns. The key item of interest at Zone meetings is the national update from LGNZ.  The president and chief executive of LGNZ (or their representatives) attend to present the update.

22.     Auckland Council could continue to meet with the president and chief executive (or their representatives) of LGNZ on a regular basis. Although not expressly set out in the changes to the LGNZ Rules, there is an understanding that Auckland Council will continue with these meetings in order to ensure an ongoing regional dialogue and continue to identify and advise LGNZ on issues and concerns affecting the Auckland region.

23.     Staff recommend these meetings are co-chaired by the councillor and local board member appointed to the LGNZ national council. A co-chair approach recognises the shared governance role of local boards. Following discussions with LGNZ, staff also recommend that the meetings be open to all elected members.

24.     The proposed meeting dates for the Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings are 13 March 2020 and 11 September 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     These decisions are procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. Staff will look to schedule meetings of the Auckland/LGNZ on days where there are other city-based activities and meetings for elected members in order to minimise travel requirements. Staff will also explore the use of skype and livestreaming so elected members may choose to avoid travel.

26.     Regarding engagement with the LGNZ, Auckland Council has declared a climate emergency, along with other councils around the country, so there will be an opportunity for partnership and joint leadership on this issue.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     Secretariat support for the Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings will be provided by the Governance Division.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The changes to the LGNZ Rules and the designated seat on the LGNZ National Council acknowledges the role of local boards and gives it greater recognition in LGNZ.

29.     Local board chairs were briefed on anticipated changes at the May 2019 Chairs’ Forum.

30.     The amended rules were confirmed at a meeting of the LGNZ National Council in September. Due to the elections and end of term timeframes, staff were unable to seek the views of local boards on the process for appointing a representative.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     These decisions are procedural in nature and do not impact on Māori.

32.     At the LGNZ level, the LGNZ has provided for representation on the National Council by the Chair of Te Maruata.

33.     Te Maruata is LGNZ National Council sub-committee which has the role of promoting increased representation of Māori as elected members of local government, and of enhancing Māori participation in local government processes. They provide support for councils in building relationships with iwi, hapu and Māori groups and provides Māori input on development of future policies or legislation relating to local government. 

34.     Appointments to Te Maruata are not made by councils. In the previous term Councillor Alf Filipaina was invited to be a member of the sub-committee.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     Membership of LGNZ incurs a cost to ratepayers. Auckland Council’s annual subscription to LGNZ in 2019/2020 is $340,148 excluding GST.

36.     The establishment of Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings will incur expense currently unbudgeted for. Staff from the Governance Division will support the first meeting using existing resources. 

37.     As the Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings are expected to bring together all elected members from across the region including the islands, this will impact on governance administration budgets over time.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     The LGNZ Rules require persons appointed to the LGNZ National Council to assume office within eight weeks of the triennial local government elections. This creates some difficulties in designing a process for all 21 local boards to agree their single representative. The recommended option (Option A) proposed in this report will enable the process to be completed as quickly as possible, on the first working day after the eight week period. The LGNZ secretariat has indicated this would be acceptable.

39.     If all local boards do not endorse the same process (Option A), this would affect how quickly the appointment is able to be made.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The Governing Body will be making their appointment in November 2019 including appointment of Auckland Council representatives to the sector groups.

41.     Appointments of Auckland Council seats to the LGNZ National Council will be communicated to the LGNZ by 6 December 2019.

42.     Staff will work with the appointed representatives of Auckland Council to make arrangements for the first Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Shirley  Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Elected Members Expense Policy 2019

File No.: CP2019/19541

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the draft Auckland Council Elected Members’ Expense Policy 2019 and provide for the local board to record its feedback for consideration by the Governing Body.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each electoral term, the Remuneration Authority (the Authority) requires all councils to adopt an expense policy and forward the adopted policy to the Authority for its approval. 

3.       The expense policy provides the rules for elected members’ reimbursement for expenses they incur whilst performing their duties.  The Authority has set parameters for the following expense reimbursements:

i)     communications

ii)    mileage

iii)    travel time

iv)   childcare.

4.       The Authority has updated vehicle mileage allowance rates to reflect the new kilometre rates for self-employed people and employees published by the Inland Revenue Department on its website as at 7 June 2019.

5.       There is a change to approval processes so that approval for mayor and deputy mayor expenses is now by the chair of the Audit and Risk Committee. There are no other changes to provisions for these expenses.

6.       Reimbursement of childcare expenses is a new provision and the council has discretion around how this is applied, within the parameters set by the Authority. 

7.       In the previous term, a discussion paper about the proposed childcare allowance was published by the Authority and was reported to local boards.  Most local boards were generally supportive. Based on that feedback, this report proposes rules for inclusion in the council’s Elected Member Expense Policy 2019.

8.       The expenses policy also includes rules for the following, which relate to sensitive expenditure and there are no recommended changes to these rules:

i)     travel

ii)    accommodation

iii)    professional development

iv)   hospitality.

9.       The draft Auckland Council Elected Members Expense Policy is attached in Attachment A.

10.     The council’s Head of Assurance Services has reviewed the draft policy and is satisfied it is in compliance with the Local Government Members (2019/20) Determination and appropriate probity standards.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     The Authority sets remuneration for elected positions in local government annually.  It also sets the rules for reimbursement of costs met by members in undertaking their duties.

12.     Each electoral term, the Authority requires all councils to adopt an expense policy and forward the adopted policy to the Authority for its approval. The expense policy provides the rules for elected members’ reimbursement for expenses they incur whilst performing their duties.

13.     The Authority sets some work-related expenses for elected members:

·   the maximum allowances payable by councils to elected members for certain activities, such as transport and communications

·   the criteria for and amounts payable to, elected members sitting on resource consent hearings.

14.     The current policy was approved in November 2016.  The Authority has requested the council provide an Elected Members’ Expense Policy to the Authority for its approval at the beginning of this term. 

15.     In the previous term the Authority circulated a discussion paper seeking feedback on a proposed childcare allowance.  When the Authority issued its formal 2019/20 determination it included the childcare allowance.  The Explanatory Memorandum in the Determination includes:

   “This year, for the first time, the Authority has introduced a childcare allowance for members who have responsibility for caring for children under the age of 14 years. The allowance is a contribution towards expenses incurred by the member for the provision of childcare while the member is engaged on local authority business. The allowance is capped and is subject to certain conditions outlined in clause 14 of this determination.

   Payment of any or all of the allowances is at the discretion of each council. All the allowances included in this determination are reviewed annually.”

16.     The actual rule about the childcare allowance in the Determination is:

14      Childcare allowance

(1)     A local authority may pay a childcare allowance, in accordance with subclauses (2) and (3), to an eligible member as a contribution towards expenses incurred by the member for childcare provided while the member is engaged on local authority business.

(2)     A member is eligible to be paid a childcare allowance in respect of childcare provided for a child only if—

(a)   the member is a parent or guardian of the child, or is a person who usually has responsibility for the day-to-day care of the child (other than on a temporary basis); and

(b)   the child is aged under 14 years of age; and

(c)   the childcare is provided by a person who—

(i)    is not a family member of the member; and

(ii)   does not ordinarily reside with the member; and

(d)   the member provides evidence satisfactory to the local authority of the amount paid for childcare.

(3)     A local authority must not pay childcare allowances to a member that total more than $6,000 per annum, per child.

(4)     In this regulation, family member of the member means—

(a)   a spouse, civil union partner, or de facto partner:

(b)   a relative, that is, another person connected with the member within 2 degrees of a relationship, whether by blood relationship or by adoption.

17.     The other change in the Determination relates to vehicle mileage allowance rates to reflect the new kilometre rates for self-employed people and employees published by the Inland Revenue Department on its website as at 7 June 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     The major proposed change to the expense policy is to include a provision for childcare allowance in line with the new provision in the Authority’s Determination.

19.     Prior to the Authority including this allowance in its Determination, it circulated a discussion paper for feedback.  This was reported to local boards.  The submission to the Authority was:

   ‘Auckland Council supports the Remuneration Authority in addressing this issue which has been raised by members of other councils through submissions to the Authority.  The costs of childcare can be a barrier to people with families considering becoming candidates for local government elections.  The council commends the authority for recognising such barriers and for acknowledging the need to address them.

   The council’s view is that the proposed conditions to be placed in the authority’s determination are reasonable.  It is concerned though that the description of the purpose of the allowance is too wide.  The proposed wording is:

        “A local authority may pay a childcare allowance, in accordance with subclauses (2) and (3), to an eligible member as a contribution towards expenses incurred by the member for childcare provided while the member is engaged on local authority business.”

   The phrase “childcare provided while the member is engaged on local authority business” could include childcare that is incidental at the time the member is engaged on local authority.  For example, a member may arrange childcare on a regular basis, irrespective of undertaking council duties, and on a particular occasion attends to council business papers while the children are at childcare.  There could be uncertainty about whether this is claimable.  The council understands that the purpose of the allowance is as a contribution towards the cost of childcare where this is an expense of undertaking council business and suggests that the wording should capture this sense of necessary expense in order to undertake council business.’

20.     A summary of local board feedback on the submission is contained in Attachment B.  Most local boards endorsed the submission.

21.     The submission stated that the payment of a childcare allowance should recognise the additional cost that was caused by attending to council business rather than being paid if childcare was to be provided in any case.  In other words, it was to be paid because child-care was caused by attending to council business. This point was not included in the Authority’s final Determination.  However, any potential for over-use of the provision is controlled by the imposition of a cap of $6,000 per annum per child.

22.     The proposed wording for the childcare allowance in the Expense Policy is:

Childcare allowance

1        Elected members who are the parent, guardian or usually have responsibility for the day to day care of the child may receive the allowance set out in the Remuneration Authority Determination for childcare provided while the member is engaged on local authority business.  This is a contribution towards the expense and not intended as a full reimbursement.

2        The childcare allowance may only be claimed for childcare not provided by a family member (spouse, civil union partner or de factor partner or any relative that is connected to the members within 2 degrees of relationship, whether by blood relationship or by adoption) who does not ordinarily reside with the member

3        The allowance is only claimable:

a)    for children under the age of 14 years

b)    when attending official meetings or workshops of the council

c)    only for actual (or part thereof) expenses that have been incurred, net of any subsidies

d)    when elected members are not on recess

e)    when no other childcare arrangements would normally be made.

 

4        The allowance rates are as follows:

a)    For childcare services provided by a professional registered company, an hourly rate of up to $35 will be accepted with the receipt of a GST invoice

b)    For childcare services provided via an informal arrangement, an hourly rate of up to $20 will be accepted with the receipt of an signed invoice or signed log book

c)    The total Auckland Council may contribute is $6,000 per annum per child

5        On a case by case basis the General Manager Democracy Services and General Manager Local Board Services may make exceptions to the above provisions within the limits set by the Remuneration Authority.

23.     The maximum hourly rates are based on an informal survey of current market rates.

24.     Other changes in the draft expense policy are:

i)       approvals for the mayor and deputy mayor travel expenses have been changed to the chair of the Audit and Risk Committee, on her recommendation

ii)      an added section on health, safety and well-being which includes access to:

·    flu vaccinations

·    ergonomic assessments

·    personal support services (Employment Assistance Programme, manawa rahi and the well-being portal).

25.     The council’s Head of Assurance Services has reviewed the draft policy and is satisfied it is in compliance with the Local Government Members (2019/20) Determination and appropriate probity standards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     The adoption of the expenses policy is largely an administrative decision.  Relevant to climate change is the statement in the policy (6.3): “Auckland Council promotes public transport and cycling as the preferred ways of moving around Auckland. Elected members are expected to use public transport in the first instance but may also use their private car or council vehicles when on council business.”

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     The Authority’s Determination and the Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy only affect elected governing body and local board members.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it decides the Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     The childcare allowance recognises that the cost of childcare deters some people from standing for election.  The provision of the allowance may encourage more people, including Māori, to consider standing.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     The number of Auckland Council elected members who will be eligible to claim this allowance is unknown. LGNZ statistics show that approximately 6 per cent of elected members are 40 years of age or below[1].  On that basis, the cost to Auckland Council, if 6 percent of members (10 members) claimed the allowance, would be $60,000 (assuming one child each). 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     The expenditure that is the subject of this policy is sensitive expenditure. The policy needs to withstand public scrutiny and where there is discretion there needs to be a conservative approach. Staff believe that the conditions placed on reimbursement and the processes for approval are appropriate in this context.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Feedback from all local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it decides the Auckland Council Elected Members Expense Policy.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy

305

b

Summary of local board feedback on the Remuneration Authority’s discussion paper on childcare allowances

323

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor - Democracy Services

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - General Manager Democracy Services

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Urgent decision-making process

File No.: CP2019/19000

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek the Ōrākei Local Board’s agreement to use the urgent decision-making process when appropriate.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The urgent decision-making process enables the local board to make decisions to manage unforeseen and urgent circumstances when it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirements of a quorum. By agreeing to this process, the local board delegates decision-making authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirements of a quorum.

b)      delegate authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board.

c)      agree that the relationship manager, chair and deputy chair (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off an authorisation memo.

d)      note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary meeting of the local board.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       The urgent decision-making process enables the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make decisions to manage unforeseen and urgent circumstances when it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirements of a quorum. Examples include during the Christmas and New Year period or for providing input to the council’s central government submission process in tight timeframes.

4.       By agreeing to this process, the board delegates decision-making authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles during that period.

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 provides for local boards to delegate to committees, members of the local board or Auckland Council staff any of its responsibilities and powers, with some specific exceptions (clause 32, Schedule 7). This legislation enables the urgent decision-making process.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The urgent decision-making process provides an alternative decision-making mechanism to an extraordinary meeting. An extraordinary meeting is called when an urgent decision is required on matters that cannot wait until the next scheduled business meeting of the local board.

7.       Urgent decisions are different from emergency decisions, which are only made if there is a risk to public health and safety.

8.       All requests for an urgent decision will be supported by a memo stating the nature of the issue, reason for urgency and the decisions or resolutions sought.

9.       The local board relationship manager will use the information in this memo to determine whether or not to authorise the urgent decision-making process.

10.     A number of factors will be considered by the relationship manager before approval to use the urgent decision-making process is given, such as:

·   the timing of the next scheduled meeting

·   confirmation that the local board has the delegation to make the decision

·   consideration of the rationale for the urgency

·   the significance of the decision and whether the urgent decision-making process is appropriate.

11.     Once the relationship manager authorises the use of the urgent decision-making process, the chair and deputy chair (or any person/s acting in these roles) also need to approve the use of the urgent decision-making process by signing the same memo.

12.     Once the authorisation memo has been approved, the chair and deputy chair will refer to the substantive report for advice and staff recommendations to inform their decision. This report will meet Auckland Council quality advice standards and adhere to the report authorisation processes.

13.     Any decision made using the urgent decision-making process will be reported as an information item to the next ordinary meeting of the local board and the signed approval memo will be attached.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The urgent decision-making process proposed in this report enables the council group to progress urgent decisions efficiently, when it is not practical to call the full local board together.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ng