I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Puketāpapa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 5 December 2019

10:00am

Local Board Office
560 Mt Albert Road
Three Kings

 

Puketāpapa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Harry Doig

 

Deputy Chairperson

Julie Fairey

 

Members

Ella Kumar, JP

 

 

Fiona Lai

 

 

Bobby Shen

 

 

Jon Turner

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Selina Powell

Democracy Advisor - Puketapapa

 

28 November 2019

 

Contact Telephone: 021 531 686

Email: selina.powell@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Establishing a working group to guide the development of an Integrated Area Plan for part of Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa                                                                     7

12        Auckland Transport December 2019 Report                                                            15

13        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Puketāpapa Local Board for quarter one 2019/2020                                                                                                 21

14        Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation                                                                    63

15        Local board governance work management for the 2019-2022 triennium           71

16        Local board appointments and delegations for the 2019-2022 electoral term     77

17        Appointment of Local Board members to external community organisations    85

18        Process for appointment of Local Government New Zealand National Council representative                                                                                                              91

19        Resinstatement of Manukau Harbour Forum                                                           97

20        Adoption of a business meeting schedule                                                             143

21        Urgent decision-making process                                                                             147

22        Elected Members Expense Policy 2019                                                                  151

23        Albert-Eden Roskill Ward Councillor Update                                                         179

24        Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar                                                181

25        Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes                                          185  

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

Member Fairey will deliver the welcome message.

 

2          Apologies

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its inaugural meeting, held on Thursday, 31 October 2019, as a true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Puketāpapa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Establishing a working group to guide the development of an Integrated Area Plan for part of Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa

File No.: CP2019/19460

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the establishment of a working group to guide the development of an Integrated Area Plan for parts of the Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa local board areas.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The process for developing an Integrated Area Plan for parts of the Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa local board areas was endorsed by the Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa Local Boards in July 2019, and by the Planning Committee in August 2019.  The process includes setting up a working party to oversee the plan progress. This report seeks the nomination of members to that working party.

3.       The development of the Integrated Area Plan will be informed by Kāinga Ora’s spatial plan (Spatial Delivery Strategy) for parts of Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa local board areas, where significant increase in housing stock on Government-owned land is proposed over the next 10-15 years. 

4.       Development of an Integrated Area Plan will provide the opportunity for the community, mana whenua and stakeholders to provide feedback on the outcomes, opportunities and actions in the spatial plan, and on the future of the area.

5.       A working group comprising representatives of the Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa Local Boards, with six representatives from the Puketāpapa Local Board is recommended to guide development of the Integrated Area Plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      nominates six Local Board representatives to participate in a working group to oversee the development of the Integrated Area Plan for parts of the Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa local board areas.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Development of the Integrated Area Plan was endorsed by the Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa Local Boards in July 2019, and by the Planning Committee in August 2019.

7.       The area from Ōwairaka to Three Kings, including Mt Roskill, has been identified by the Government as a key development area because it has significant Government-owned land, the need to renew the state housing assets, good transport links, and community facilities.

8.       The Auckland Plan 2050 also identifies this area as a development area that is expected to undergo a significant amount of housing and business growth in the next 30 years to achieve a quality compact approach for future growth.

9.       The Integrated Area Plan will:

·    respond strategically to the increase in housing stock, including the development of high and medium density housing in parts of the Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa local board areas over the next 10 to 15 years as part of the Auckland Housing Programme

·    provide the opportunity for the council, community, mana whenua, Kāinga Ora, and key stakeholders to work collaboratively to capitalise on the benefits of Government investment in its housing programme including improvements to infrastructure and council’s investment in services to support the housing programme (including streets, transport and community facilities) within these areas

·    enable relationship building and collaboration with key stakeholders and community

·    help guide future investments in infrastructure and services

·    identify quick wins (actions) that can be progressed.

10.     A map of the study area for the Integrated Area Plan, and key steps for developing the plan are provided in Attachments A and B.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Integrated Area Plan will set out long term aspirations for the area.  Aspects to be addressed in the plan include centres and business areas, transport, community and network infrastructure, the natural environment (including water quality), heritage and urban design.

12.     Detailed analysis and advice will be prepared as the project progresses.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The impacts of climate change, and areas that may be affected by sea level rise in the future, will inform the development of the Integrated Area Plan. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The development of the Integrated Area Plan will involve relevant council departments, and agencies including Auckland Transport and Watercare.  Many of these stakeholders were engaged by Kāinga Ora to inform the development of its draft spatial plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     Development of the Integrated Area Plan was endorsed by the Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa Local Boards in July 2019, and by the Planning Committee in August 2019.

16.     The commencement of the Integrated Area Plan is appropriate and timely, given the completion of Kāinga Ora’s spatial plan.

17.     The Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa Local Boards have developed a terms of reference for the working group which will support the representatives guide the development of the Integrated Area Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     The development of an Integrated Area Plan will include engagement with all mana whenua groups with an interest and kaitiakitanga obligations in these areas.  Early and ongoing engagement will help grow relationships with mana whenua, and identify key issues and matters to be considered during the development of the plan.  A process for engagement with mana whenua will be developed specifically for the plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The preparation of the Integrated Area Plan will be funded from existing Plans and Places departmental budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     The risks of the project are considered low.  A project team has been established, supported by specialist drawn from across the wider council group; and funding is available to develop and complete the Integrated Area Plan.

21.     The most likely risk to this project will be changes to key milestone dates.  The Integrated Area Plan will be developed as local board plans are being consulted and developed next year.  An engagement plan will be developed to avoid unnecessary duplication and consultation fatigue.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Working group meetings will be set up to progress the development of the Integrated Area Plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Integrated Area Plan study area

11

b

Key steps for developing the Integrated Area Plan

13

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David Wong - Principal Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tamaki & Puketāpapa

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Auckland Transport December 2019 Report

File No.: CP2019/19979

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Puketāpapa Local Board (the Board) on transport related matters in the local board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report updates the Board on regional and local matters including the Auckland Transport Speed Management Bylaw, Carlton Street works, proposed pedestrian improvements on Frost and Carr Roads and the OuterLink services proposed changes. Also reported are the projects being progressed with regard to the Board’s Local Board Capital Fund and Community Safety Fund.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport December 2019 report.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       This report addresses transport related matters in the local board area.

4.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. It reports on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in its Local Board Engagement Plan.

5.       This month’s report provides updates on the speed bylaw, Carlton Street, Frost and Carr Roads safety improvements, the outer link service and the community safety and local board transport capital funds.

6.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport.  Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·    build a transport asset

·    be within the road corridor or if outside the corridor, where there is a clear benefit in terms of supporting alternative means of transport including walking and cycling (eg, shared paths through parks that provide a better/safe/more direct route, between community facilities)

·    be technically deliverable

·    meet transport safety criteria

·    not impact negatively on transport network efficiency

·    be aligned with local board plans

 

7.       The Board’s LBTCF allocation for the 2019-22 term is $2,242,983.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Speed bylaw

8.       In December 2018, the AT Board gave approval to publicly consult on a proposed speed limit bylaw. AT consulted on the proposed bylaw using the special consultative procedure and invited feedback to be provided between 28 February 2019 and 31 March 2019.

9.       After considering nearly 12,000 public submissions and reviewing technical reports, AT’s board approved a bylaw on 22 October 2019 - which will reduce speed limits on around 10% of Auckland’s urban and rural roads. The speed limited changes outlined in the bylaw will become effective on 30 June 2020. Between now and this date there is a significant amount of work required to install the necessary signage. This will require further investigations to determine the exact sign locations and then a procurement process. It is expected that the signage will be installed in stages but remain covered until the bylaw becomes effective.

10.     Changes to town centres are scheduled to take a slightly different path as supporting speed reduction infrastructure needs to be installed prior to speed reductions being implemented. Some town centres that are already in an advanced stage of planning have been designated “early start.” These are expected to be implemented by 30 November 2020.

11.     Other town centres with plans that are less well developed have been designated “late start” and will proceed for an expected 30 June 2021 completion date.

12.     Further information on the phasing of the changes will be provided by Auckland Transport as plans are finalised and confirmed.

Carlton Street

13.     Works are progressing on schedule to improve and reposition traffic calming measures along the street. The Traffic Management Plan is working effectively and there have been minimal issues.

14.     A residents meeting was held on 21 November and was attended by approximately 20 residents, and by local board member Fairey, Councillor Fletcher and AT staff. The primary concerns of residents related to the safety of running a bus service in the street. The outcome of the meeting has led to the commissioning of a further independent safety audit that covers the street, the intersection with Hillsborough Road and the roundabout at the bottom of the street. The terms and scope of the audit are currently being agreed between all parties.

Frost and Carr Road Safety Improvements

15.     The aim of the safer communities project in Mount Roskill is to make changes to Carr Road and Frost Road which will improve safety for pedestrians and help ensure walking is a desirable option for people. This project is on track and is about to go to tender with the works commencing in the first half of 2020.

16.     At the request of some business owners on Carr Road AT staff attended a meeting on Wednesday, 20 November. Their principle concern was the impact the project could have on parking and accessibility for businesses.

17.     AT has undertaken to update all stakeholders as soon as the information on construction is available. This will include timing and staging of the works and outline when the works will be in the vicinity of each retailer or resident. There will also be information provided on how the traffic management plan will work.

18.     Local board members: Doig and Kumar were in attendance

 

Outerlink Service

19.     Auckland Transport is proposing changes to the OuterLink bus service to make the route more reliable. The proposed changes include removing the section of the OuterLink route between St Lukes and Newmarket where there is duplication with other bus services. These proposed changes would also see the removal of the wait at Victoria Park. Most people will see no change to the way they travel, but some customers may need to transfer between buses to complete the journeys they are currently doing.

20.     The section of the OuterLink that will be removed would see the existing route 650 renamed as route 65, and its frequency boosted to every 15 minutes between 7am and 7pm, seven days a week. Evening services will also be added. More services will also be added to Manukau Road services 30/309 at peak times.

21.     A new school bus service will be introduced between Epsom schools and Balmoral and Mt Eden. It will travel on Mt Eden Road, Valley Road, Dominion Road and Balmoral Road on its way to and from Epsom schools.

22.     No bus stops will lose bus services and all existing journeys can continue to be made. Even if the changes mean passengers need to transfer between two buses, their journey may be quicker taking the more direct routes.

Update on Puketāpapa Local Board Transport Capital Funded Projects

23.     The table below reflects the status of three projects which have been supported by resolution and are progressing using the Local Board Transport Capital Fund. An update on progress and next steps will be provided to the Board’s February meeting. The next tranche of projects will be identified and workshopped in the first half of 2020.

Project

Description

Status

Projected Cost

Greenway Cycling Project – Route D (modified)

This route includes shared paths on Frost Road and then a combination of traffic calming measures, signs, markings along Britton and Dornwell Roads, shared paths through the laneways and then traffic calming on Hayr Road and Haughey Avenue through to, but not across Hillsborough Road

Detailed design due to be complete in mid-December

$600,000 (allocated)

Hillsborough Road Crossing (1)

The installation of a pedestrian refuge on Hillsborough Road, vicinity of Haughey Street/Delargey Avenue. This will support the greenway cycle route by aiding access to Monte Cecilia Park.

 

Scheme design work is in progress.

$90,000

 

Hillsborough Road (2) Signalised Pedestrian Crossing

The installation of a signalised crossing of Hillsborough Road in the vicinity of Goodall Street.  Residents have reported that Hillsborough Road can be very difficult to cross as there is a considerable distance between pedestrian facilities.

 

Scheme design work is in progress.

$338,000

 

24.    The Board has also approved a small allocation from its local board transport capital fund to contribute towards the Mt Roskill Village Upgrade project that is currently underway. This project is funded by the local board, who has developed the project with assistance from the Plans and Places team at Auckland Council. The aim of this project is to create an improved environment for pedestrians, bus passengers, shoppers and the business community at Mt Roskill village. Improved footpaths, seating and landscaping are proposed within the road corridor.

Puketāpapa Local Board Community Safety Projects

25.     Listed below are a number of Community Safety Fund projects that are currently in detailed design and waiting on a more precise costing. An update on the full list of projects will be provided at the next meeting.

Location

Description

383 Hillsborough Road

Signalised crossing

639 Richardson Road

Safety improvements to the existing crossing

Pah Road Crossing Awareness

Signage and road marking to highlight existing crossing

Wesley Primary School

Replace existing kea crossing on Potter Avenue with a raised table.

40 Stoddard Road

Improvements to the existing crossing

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     Auckland Transport is committed to minimising the negative effects that transport operations have on climate change. This includes encouraging emission neutral modes (walking & cycling) and low emission modes (public transport & ride sharing).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.       The impact information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group. Any engagement with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

28.       AT is delivering the Mt Roskill Streetscape project for the Board, who has been assisted to develop the project by Auckland Council’s Planning and Places team.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     The Board receives update reports from AT as part of its monthly business meeting agendas.

30.     The Board also holds regular workshops with AT between business meetings, with briefing memos provided as necessary.

31.     Local board members may direct queries on issues via electedmember@at.govt.nz.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     Consideration of impacts and opportunities for engagement will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     There are no financial implications that result from receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The proposed decision of receiving this report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for the transport projects undertaken in the local board area. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     A more detailed and comprehensive update report will be submitted to the first meeting in 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Thomas – Elected Members Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Member Unit

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki & Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Puketāpapa Local Board for quarter one 2019/2020

File No.: CP2019/19466

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Puketāpapa Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter one, 1 July – 30 September 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2019/2020 work programme. Detailed information is provided in the following:

·        Attachment A, Puketāpapa Work Programme Update (Q1)

·        Attachment B, Puketāpapa Community Facilities Three Year Work Programme (Q1)

·        Attachment C, Puketāpapa Local Board Monthly Financial Performance (Q1)

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        The Integrated Area Plan project has been added to the work programme (ID 3817)

·        The Healthy Puketāpapa Action Plan (ID 883) has progressed to the delivery stage

·        The Harold Long Reserve and Fearon Park greenways and linkages project (ID 1964) was completed in quarter one. Stage Three of this project (ID 2410), which will include the bush playground and hard-court construction, is currently being designed

·        The Keith Hay Park (Noton and Richardson Road entrances) project to renew both carparks and install amenity lighting was completed in quarter one.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of:

·        red (behind delivery, significant risk)

·        amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed)

·        green (on track)

·        grey (cancelled, deferred or merged)

6.       No activities are reported with a status of red in quarter one.

7.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2019/2020 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note:

·        Puketāpapa Local Board capital investment for the period was $1.0 million and net operational cost of service was $2.7 million.

·        Operating expenditure is thirteen per cent over budget mainly due to more parks and facilities maintenance than was scheduled. Operating revenue is largely in line with budget, with higher revenue from community centres offset by lower fees and charges from libraries.

·        Capital expenditure is twenty nine per cent over budget, mainly due to sport development work at Keith Hay Park.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That thePuketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter one ending 30 September 2019.

b)      note that the Community Facility 2019/2020 work programme and 2020-2022 indicative work programme has been updated to reflect financial deferrals as a part of the Annual Plan process as shown in Attachment B

c)      reallocate $12,000 from the ‘Taste of Puketapapa’ (ID 294) budget to the ‘Increase diverse participation’ (ID 149) budget.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Puketāpapa Local Board has an approved 2019/2020 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Arts, Community and Events

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation

·        Libraries and Information

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

·        Community Leases

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Plans and Places

·        The Southern Initiative

·        ATEED.

9.       Work programmes are produced annually, to meet the Puketāpapa Local Board outcomes identified in the three-year Puketāpapa Local Board Plan. The local board plan outcomes are:

·        Connected communities with a sense of belonging

·        Improved wellbeing and safety

·        Thriving local economy and good job opportunities

·        Transport choices meet our varied travel needs

·        Urban development meets community needs

·        Vibrant and popular parks and facilities

·        Treasured and enhanced natural environment

10.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

 

 

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

11.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

12.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each department’s work programme. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

 

 

 

 

 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter one

13.     The Integrated Area Plan project has been added to the work programme (ID 3817) – this will involve the development of an integrated area plan for part of the Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Board areas. It will involve working closely with the local boards, community, mana whenua and Kāinga Ora–Homes and Communities (Crown agency). This work will build on the spatial delivery strategy being undertaken by the Kāinga Ora in these local board areas.

14.     Healthy Puketāpapa Action Plan (ID 883) – the Healthy Puketapapa Health and Wellbeing Strategic Framework and Action Plan was adopted by the local board in August 2019. This project is now in its second of three years. This year will focus on managing the implementation of the action plan, ensuring central government agencies and community groups and are engaged in the process.

15.     Harold Long Reserve and Fearon Park greenways and linkages (ID 1964) – this project was completed in quarter one. Funding is available for stage three (ID 2410), which will include the bush playground and hard-court construction.

16.     Keith Hay Park (Noton and Richardson Road entrances) renew both carparks, install amenity lighting – this project was completed in September 2019.

Activities with significant issues

17.     There are no activities with significant issues.

Activities on hold

18.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        Monte Cecilia Park – restore Whare (ID 2198): This project has an amber status and is on hold. The local board will be updated once the James Wallace Arts Trust confirms how they wish to proceed in relation to the potential lease and restoration of the Whare.

 

 

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

16. There are no activities deferred from the 2019/20 work programme.

Cancelled activities

19.     This activity is cancelled:

·        Taste of Puketapapa (ID 294): based on advice from staff at a workshop on 12 September 2019, the board gave direction to cancel this project and reallocate the budget to the ‘Increase diverse participation: social innovation and enterprise’ budget (ID 149)

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

20.     No activities have been merged with other activities for efficient delivery:

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

22.     Work programmes were approved in June 2019 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

23.     The local board is currently investing in several sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

·        EcoNeighbourhoods Puketāpapa (ID 640) – an EcoNeighbourhood is made up of groups of six or more neighbours within a local board area, with a shared objective to adopt sustainable practices and increase resilience within their homes, lifestyles and neighbourhoods. The EcoNeighbourhood group decides what sustainable living actions they wish to undertake, and the project co-ordinator supports these groups to act. A minimum of four EcoNeighbourhoods will be set up in the local board area.

·        Healthy Rentals Puketāpapa (ID 641) - The healthy rentals project aims to raise housing literacy, support tenants to create warmer, drier homes, and reduce energy use and associated carbon emissions. It is targeted at private rental tenants.

·        Puketāpapa Low Carbon Network (ID 646) - The low carbon network is a collection of individuals, households, groups, businesses, operating within the local board area working together to promote, support and implement community level low carbon activities. Through a low carbon community broker, the network will determine the direction of and priority areas they would like to focus on, in accordance with the low carbon plan.

·        Low Carbon Lifestyles Puketāpapa (ID 649) - The project supports householders to lead low carbon lifestyles, with two objectives: to reduce residential energy use and associated carbon emissions and improve resident health by keeping houses warmer and drier. The project involves a doorstep conversation with residents and may also include the provision of energy saving devices.

24.     The board is also investing in initiatives that respond to climate change, such as:

·        Urban Forest/Ngahere Strategy (ID456) – this seeks to increase the amount of urban forest cover. This is the second year of local board specific implementation of Auckland’s Ngahere Strategy.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     This report informs the Puketāpapa Local Board of the performance for the quarter ending 30 September 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     The Puketāpapa Local Board is committed to strengthening and formalising its relationships with mana whenua and mataawaka. “Māori are recognised and affirmed as mana whenua” is an objective within the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2017.

28.     The local board continues to work with the Ngāti Tamaoho Trust to grow the relationship that was formalised in the Relationship Agreement signed in Manukau in July 2018.

29.     The board has included, in its Local Board Plan and work programme, a number of activities which mana whenua have been engaged in. These include:

·        Te Auaunga Placemaking - Mana whenua have been engaged as a partner throughout the development of Te Auaunga Tohu and design guide. Representatives from Te Akitai Waiohua, Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāti Whātua Orākei, Te Kawerau a Maki, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, and Ngāti Whanaunga provided advice to guide development of the design guide at multiple hui. Capital budget is available to progress this plan.

·        Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori Naming of Reserves and Facilities). Work has continued with mana whenua to identify opportunities for Māori names for local parks to enhance and recognise Auckland’s Māori identity and heritage.

·        Build capacity; Māori responsiveness – this project seeks to respond to the key aspirations and priorities for Maori in the Puketāpapa Local Board area.

30.     The board has several projects that seek to restore the mauri of awa, whanga, ngahere and projects that celebrate Te Ao Maori:

Arkells Reserve Weed Control and Volunteer Planting - focusses on plant pest control and riparian planting for Te Auaunga

Increasing local employment through Freeland Reserve stream restoration project – seeks to use a local nursery (Te Whangai Trust) to provide landscaping for this project. This will support local social outcomes and connection to the awa

Community Management Plan for Te Auaunga and Mt Roskill schools – this involves the development of a restoration plan for the pars of Te Auaunga that run through Mt Roskill Primary, Mt Roskill Intermediate and Mt Roskill Grammar

Ecological Volunteers and Environmental Programme – with contractor assistance Friends of Wairaki Stream have cleared areas of persistent weeds and planted 1100 trees at Lynfield Reserve

Manukau Harbour Forum – the board participates in this co-governance forum to restore the mauri of the whanga

Ngahere Strategy – seeks to increase the amount of urban forest cover

Te Manu Aute Kite Day as a celbrates Matariki on Puketāpapa/Pukewiwi maunga

Whakatipu i te reo Māori – this libraries programme celebrates Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori.

31.     The local board seeks to acknowledge Te Ao Māori and tikanga through karakia before meal breaks, special meetings/workshops with mana whenua on key projects of mutual interest, and blessings when large local board projects are undertaken or concluded in the community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

33.     Operating expenditure of $2.9 million is $326,000 over budget mainly resulting from higher parks and facilities maintenance than was planned. 

34.     Operating revenue of $187,000 is $4,000 over budget mainly due to higher fees from Fickling and Wesley Community Centres offset by lower fees and charges at Mt Roskill Library.

35.     Overall capital expenditure of $1.0million is above budget by $223,000. This was mainly due to sport development work at Keith Hay Park. The main expenditure in the quarter was at Keith Hay Park-carpark and lighting, Arthur Faulkner Reserve-tennis court renewal and Pah Homestead-heating and ventilation installation.

36.     The Puketāpapa Local Board Financial performance report is in attachment C.

Revised Budget

37.     For quarterly reporting purposes, annual plan budgets are revised to reflect changes in timing of delivery for individual projects.

38.     Projects that were still in progress at 30 June 2019 have had their remaining required budget carried forward to the current or future financial years to fund the remaining works.

39.     If a multi-year capital project was completed earlier than anticipated, the annual plan budget is reduced or brought forward to 30 June 2019 to reflect early completion.

40.     Consideration is also given to the status of current capital projects and where required budgets are rephased in whole or part to outer years to reflect current timelines for delivery.

41.     The net budgetary impact of these changes is reflected in the revised budget for the board.

42.     The Community Facilities Build Maintain Renew work programme financial allocations have been updated in accordance with the carry forwards (refer attachment B).

 

Risk Adjusted Projects (RAP)

43.     The approved Community Facilities 2019/2020 work programme and 2020-2022 indicative work programme includes projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the 2019/2020 financial year, by ensuring that if projects intended for delivery in the 2019/2020 financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances, that other projects can be progressed while the causes for delays are addressed.

 

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery, are dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and are susceptible to market conditions.

45.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter two, December 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20191205 Attachment A, Puketāpapa Work Programme Update (Q1)

29

b

20191205 Attachment B, Puketāpapa Community Facilities Three Year WP (Q1)

47

c

20191205 Attachment C, Puketāpapa Local Board Monthly Financial Performance (Q1)

57

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mary Hay - Local Board Advisor - Puketapapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki & Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

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Puketāpapa Local Board

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Puketāpapa Local Board

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Puketāpapa Local Board

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Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation

File No.: CP2019/19572

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve local content and supporting information for consultation as part of the Annual Budget 2020/2021 process, along with a local engagement event.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       For each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement that is agreed for each local board area, between the Governing Body and the local board.

3.       Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation will take place from 21 February to 22 March 2020. Consultation on the proposed content of each local board agreement which sets out the priorities for the next financial year must be included as part of that consultation.

4.       This report seeks approval from local boards on the local content and supporting information for consultation. It also seeks approval of the Have Your Say event that will be held in their local board area during the consultation period, to give Aucklanders an opportunity to provide face-to-face feedback.

5.       The Governing Body and local boards will approve regional and local items respectively for consultation by 13 December 2019. The regional and local consultation items will then be incorporated into the Annual Budget consultation document and supporting information, which will be adopted by the Governing Body on 12 February 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      approve Attachment A local content for consultation and Attachment B local supporting information for consultation.

b)      delegate authority to the local board chairperson to approve any final changes required to the local content and supporting information for the Puketāpapa Local Board for the Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation, including online consultation content.

c)      approve the following Have Your Say event in the local board area during the Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation period:

i)        Community Forum

Thursday, 5 March 2020 at 6.30 -8.00 pm

Lynfield Youth and Leisure Centre -YMCA Auckland

16-18 Griffen Park Road, Mt Roskill

d)      delegate authority to the local board chairperson to approve any final changes required to the Have Your Say event.

e)      delegate to the following elected members and staff the power and responsibility to hear from the public through ‘spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction’ in relation to the local board agreement at the council’s public engagement events, during the consultation period for the Annual Budget 2020/2021:

 

i)        local board members and chairperson

ii)       General Manager Local Board Services, Local Board Relationship Manager, Local Board Senior Advisor, Local Board Advisor, Local Board Engagement Advisor

iii)      any additional staff approved by the General Manager Local Board Services or the Group Chief Financial Officer.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       For each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement for each local board area, that is agreed between the Governing Body and the local board.

7.       Local board agreements set out (among other things) how the council will, in the year to which the agreement relates, reflect the priorities and preferences in the local board’s plan in respect of the local activities to be provided in the local board area.

8.       The proposed content of each local board agreement must be included in the Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation document.

9.       Public consultation on the budget will take place from 21 February to 22 March 2020.

10.     Aucklanders will be able to provide feedback during the consultation process through a variety of channels which include face-to-face (verbal), written and social media.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     Local boards held workshops during November 2019 to determine their priorities for their 2020/2021 local board agreement. Local boards are now requested to approve their local content and supporting information for consultation, as per Attachments A and B.

12.     During the document production stage, if changes to the local content and supporting information are identified, these will be provided to the local board chairperson to approve.

13.     Any new local Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rates must be consulted on before they can be implemented. Local boards are therefore also requested to approve any new proposals for consultation.

14.     Aucklanders who wish to have their views on the proposed content of the local board agreement and Annual Budget 2020/2021 considered by Auckland Council should be provided a reasonable opportunity to present those views in a manner and format that is appropriate to the preferences and needs of those persons, including face-to-face.

15.     The council provides for this through its ‘Have Your Say’ events where Aucklanders can have a face-to-face dialogue with elected members or other council representatives with an appropriate delegation. The Have Your Say event recommended to be held in the Puketāpapa Local Board area is:

iv)      Community Forum

Thursday, 5 March 2020 at 6.30 -8.00 pm

Lynfield Youth and Leisure Centre -YMCA Auckland

16-18 Griffen Park Road, Mt Roskill

16.     The consultation period does not begin for a couple of months. If circumstances change between now and the consultation period and any change to the approved Have Your Say event is required, these will be provided to the local board chairperson to approve.

17.     Should a proposal requiring an amendment to the council’s long-term plan (10-year Budget) be identified during the Annual Budget 2020/2021 process, this would necessitate use of the special consultative procedure. Where an amendment to the 10-year Budget is being consulted on at the same time as consultation on the Annual Budget, the Local Government Act 2002 requires the council to use the special consultative procedure in relation to both matters.

18.     The special consultative procedure requires the council to provide an opportunity for Aucklanders to present their views to the council in a manner that enables ‘spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction’ between the person and the council’s decision-makers or their official delegates. The recommended Have Your Say events, along with the recommended delegation, provides for this spoken interaction.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The decision to consult is procedural in nature and the small scale of the Have Your Say events mean any climate impacts will be negligible. These decisions are unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

20.     However, where practicable, events proposed will be in locations accessible by public transport, to reduce car travel but also increase the opportunities for attendance.  

21.     Some of the proposed initiatives or projects included in the consultation content may have climate impacts. The climate impacts of any initiatives or projects Auckland Council chooses to progress with as a result of this consultation will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     The Annual Budget 2020/2021 is an Auckland Council group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level.

23.     Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Local boards will have further opportunities to provide information and views as the council progresses through the Annual Budget 2020/2021 process.

25.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals contained in the budget. All feedback received from submitters residing in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the board, prior to finalising their local board agreement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the Annual Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Māori. Local board plans, which were adopted in September and October of 2017, form the basis for local priorities.

27.     The approach to Māori engagement for the Annual Budget 2020/2021 will be finalised once consultation topics are confirmed, including development of bespoke materials subject to interest level of topics and confirmation of budget.

28.     Regionally supported local Māori engagement in the South and West will be provided subject to interest level of topics and confirmation of budget; this will be integrated with local board plan pre-engagement.

29.     There is a need to continue to build local board relationships with iwi and the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn, can influence and encourage Māori participation in the council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     Event associated costs include venue hire, where council premises cannot be utilised, and catering.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     Local boards must approve their local consultation content and supporting information by 13 December 2019 in order for it to be formatted and reviewed in time to be incorporated into the Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation document and supporting information.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     The Governing Body will approve the consultation document, supporting information and consultation process for the Annual Budget 2020/2021 on 12 February 2020.

33.     Following consultation, the Governing Body and local boards will make decisions on the budget and local board agreements respectively.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Local content for consultation

67

b

Attachment B - Local supporting information for consultation

69

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Beth Corlett - Advisor Plans & Programmes

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki & Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Local board governance work management for the 2019-2022 triennium

File No.: CP2019/19477

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To outline the options for efficiently and effectively managing the governance work of the local board for 2019-2022 triennium.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the end of each triennium the Local Board Services (LBS) department delivers a review of local board work practices, including the organisational support they require and how well they support the boards in their governance role. The 2016-2019 triennium review gathered feedback from local board members, and staff from LBS and other council departments and Council-Controlled Organisations (CCOs).

3.       In response to the review, this report outlines a recommended approach for local boards to manage their governance workload as follows:

·   maintain a key focus on annual work programmes and their implementation through quarterly reporting and regular workshops with the whole local board, with decisions made at business meetings

·   appoint nominated local board members who will be consulted on landowner consents and events, and who will provide feedback on liquor licences and resource consents

·   appoint nominated local board members to external organisations.

4.       These practices support the local board to undertake their governance role in an efficient and effective way, reflect the priority work of the local board and help the organisation focus its resources. Some of these practices require a decision of the local board, such as specific appointments of local board members, and separate reports cover these recommendations and associated advice.

5.       Local boards are also able to identify topic area leads who would act as a champion with the local board on specific topic areas. Leads would focus on work programme activities/ projects within their topic areas and understanding relevant community needs and preferences enabling other members to focus their time on other parts of the board’s workload.

6.       The review feedback suggests the following advantages for having a full board involved in direction-setting discussions on issues, rather than identifying topic area leads:

·   staff are confident that the direction is the view of the whole board rather than one member

·   knowledge and information is retained by the full local board rather than one member

·   discussions with staff are less likely to enter into management or operational level detail

·   it avoids inefficient duplication, when conversations are held between staff and a lead, and then repeated with the full local board.

7.       The feedback from the review highlighted that if a board does appoint topic area leads, the risks should be mitigated by providing a clear scope for that role and ensuring it does not lead to inefficiency or adversely affect staff receiving clear direction from the full local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      endorse the following approach to effectively and efficiently manage the governance work of the local board for the 2019-2022 triennium:

i)        maintain a key focus on annual work programmes and their implementation through quarterly reporting and regular workshops with the whole local board, with decisions made at business meetings

ii)       appoint nominated local board members who will be consulted on landowner consents and events, and who will provide feedback on liquor licences and resource consents

iii)      appoint nominated local board members to external organisations.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The governance role of an elected member is to:

·   set direction and policy

·   set priorities

·   make significant decisions

·   test advice

·   monitor performance and risk

·   connect with and represent the community

·   be accountable to the public.

9.       At the end of each triennium the Local Board Services (LBS) department undertakes a review of the work practices of, and organisational support provided for, local boards and how this supports them in their governance role. Previous reviews have noted the progress the organisation has made in supporting the governance role of local boards over the past nine years. Improved support and delivery from the organisation have enabled local board members’ time to be used in a more effective and efficient manner as the governance model has matured.

10.     During the 2016-2019 triennium review, feedback was gathered from local board members and staff from LBS and other council departments and council-controlled organisations (CCOs) who work with local boards.

11.     Key themes from local board members related to having topic area leads. Both positives and negatives were identified.

12.     Key themes from staff were that clear direction is given from the full local board and local board members operate at the governance level. Staff identified both positive and negatives aspects of having topic area leads.

13.     The findings from the review have informed the content of this report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Work practices supporting the governance role of local boards (recommended approach)

14.     There are established work practices in place which support the governance role of local boards as follows:

·   Local boards adopt an annual work programme each June for implementation by the council organisation in the next financial year (July-June). Local boards maintain a key focus on these annual work programmes and their implementation through quarterly reporting and regular workshops with the whole local board, with decisions made at business meetings.

·   Local boards appoint a nominated local board member who will be consulted on landowner consents and events by staff carrying out their delegations. Local boards can also appoint a nominated local board member to provide feedback and attend hearings on liquor licences and notified resource consents to ensure that local board views are taken into account in these timebound processes. These appointments are made via a separate report.

·   Local boards appoint nominated local board members to external organisations (via separate report) to exercise their role in the external organisation as per the relevant constitution on behalf of the local board.

15.     Together these practices constitute the recommended approach for managing the governance work of the local board for the 2019-2022 triennium, reflect the priority work of the local board and are the focus of the organisation’s staff and resources.

16.     This approach allows all members to have an overview and collective understanding of work programme matters, and for the whole local board to be able to provide direction to staff and track performance and delivery throughout the financial year. It also enables collective discussions that utilise individual member’s skills and knowledge and ensures elected member and staff time are used effectively and efficiently.

17.     Transparency to the public is ensured by local board decisions occurring through the formal business meeting process with associated standing orders.

Optional addition: Topic area leads (not recommended)

18.     An optional addition to the recommended approach is that the local board identifies topic area leads. Leads would:

·   act as a champion for the topic area in full local board conversations

·   focus on work programme activities / projects within their topic area

·   maintain relationships with key stakeholders

·   understand relevant community needs and preferences.

19.     Leads may also:

·   be appointed as the nominated local board member to provide feedback on behalf of the board on relevant matters (e.g. landowner consents) and appointed to related external organisations

·   undertake learning and development opportunities and attend conferences (using their individual development budget provided as part of the Kura Kāwana development programme) relevant to the topic area

·   highlight relevant issues and emerging priorities during local board plan and work programme development

·   act as a key contact for community groups and members of the public on the topic area.

20.     Topic area leads would enable individual local board members to use existing or build new knowledge and expertise in the topic area and enable other members to focus their time on other parts of the governance workload.

21.     Should the local board identify topic area leads, there are the following risks to consider:

·   a member may provide direction or views which do not reflect those of the full local board

·   staff may seek direction from a topic area lead instead of the full local board, or seek direction from a topic area lead prior to the full local board, resulting in duplication of work

·   key knowledge and information on a topic may be retained with the topic area lead and not shared with the whole local board

·   a topic area lead may enter into discussions at the management or operational level if meeting regularly with staff without a clear governance purpose for the discussion.

22.     These risks can be addressed by:

·   using the workshop process as the mechanism for all local board members to receive updates and provide governance direction on approved work programme projects

·   clarifying the limited resources available to any topic area lead.

23.     Staff resourcing is focussed on work programme development and delivery, along with advice to support workshops and business meetings. Topic area leads can be supported by staff to undertake the following responsibilities:

·   when issues arise at a full board workshop, the lead can be directed to meet with staff on that issue and explore solutions; staff would report back to the full board for direction, and the lead can assist with explanation and support during that discussion

·   develop local board feedback on regional policies, plans and strategies relevant to the topic area, for full local board approval

·   respond to constituent enquiries relevant to the topic area

·   report back to the local board at workshops, and publicly via board member reports at business meetings, on the activities undertaken as the topic area lead.

24.     If a local board does want to appoint topic area leads, it may wish to consider identifying alternates. The role of the alternate would be to support the topic area lead in their responsibilities and undertake any roles the lead has been formally appointed by the whole board when the lead is unavailable. Having an alternate means that the information, knowledge, skills and workload can be shared by more than one member, but it could also lead to confusion between the two roles where the alternate acts as a co-lead.

25.     If a local board’s preference is to appoint topic area leads, this will require a local board decision via a resolution to this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     This report is procedural in nature so does not have direct climate impacts. However, a key focus for the council in the current term will be how it responds to the climate emergency and this may be a consideration for how local boards manage their governance work.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     Feedback was gathered from staff from the LBS department, and other departments and CCOs who work with local boards, about practices to manage the local board governance work through the 2016-2019 triennium review.

28.     The practices used by a local board to manage their governance work can impact on the efficiency of staff engagement with members. Some variation in practices is required to reflect local differences, but overall large differences in work practices is challenging and consistency is beneficial.

 

29.     In light of this, Local Board Services has provided consistent advice and recommendations on work practices to all local boards to consider when making decisions on how they will manage their governance work for the 2016-2019 triennium.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     Feedback was gathered from local board members about practices to manage local board governance work through the 2016-2019 triennium review. This included: a workshop attended by 13 local board members from 10 local boards; and a survey to all members, with responses provided by 29 members, from 13 local boards.  

31.     The practices used by a local board to manage their governance work can impact efficiency and effectiveness of engagement with communities and the opportunities that members have to provide local leadership beyond the formal decision-making process.

32.     The topic of managing the governance work of the local board was discussed at a workshop on 23 October 2019, as part of the Puketāpapa Local Board induction programme for the 2019-2022 triennium.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     This decision is procedural in nature so does not have immediate impacts on Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     This decision is procedural in nature so does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     The risks and mitigations of having topic area leads are outlined in the ‘Analysis and Advice’ section of this report.

36.     Risks relating to any specific decision required for the work practices that form the recommended approach are outlined in the respective separate reports relating to those decisions.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Staff from the Local Board Services department will work with staff from other departments and CCOs to ensure the practices of the local board are implemented.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Reed - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Kerri Foote – Operations and Improvements Manager

Oliver Roberts – Central Teams Manager

Louise Mason  - General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki & Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Local board appointments and delegations for the 2019-2022 electoral term

File No.: CP2019/19478

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To recommend that the Puketāpapa Local Board appoints a local board member to:

·   be the nominated local board member for landowner consents (including affected party approvals)

·   be the nominated local board member for film applications

·   be the nominated local board member for events

·   provide formal reports on liquor licence applications and attendance at hearings

·   provide formal views on whether a resource consent should proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application

·   provide formal views (feedback) on notified resource consents and attend the council hearings.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In order to enable effective and efficient decision-making, the council delegates some responsibilities to staff or individual elected members. This report seeks to appoint nominated local board members who will be consulted on landowner consents and events, and who will provide feedback on liquor licences and resource consents.

3.       If local boards choose not to appoint a nominated board member for landowner consents staff will consult with the local board chairperson, as outlined in the Local Board Delegation Protocols.

4.       District Licensing Committees consider, and grant or renew applications for liquor licences and manager’s certificates. These applications are publicly notified and local boards can provide views on an application to the District Licensing Committee. A delegation to a nominated local board member is recommended to allow local boards to provide formal views as part of the liquor licensing process.

5.       Local boards can provide feedback on whether resource consent applications should be publicly notified. Local boards can also provide written feedback once the applications are notified and can subsequently speak to their feedback to support their views at the council hearing. A delegation to a nominated local board member is recommended.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      appoint a member as Lead and a member as Alternate for landowner consents (excluding landowner consents for filming) and authorise them to:

i)        be the point of consultation for staff on all applications for landowner consent and, at their discretion, refer any application for landowner consent to the local board for a local board decision, and

ii)       to be the point of consultation for staff on proposed asset renewal works and, at their discretion, refer any proposed asset renewal works to the local board for a local board decision

iii)      receive staff notifications of areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk.

b)      appoint a member as Lead and a member as an Alternate for landowner consents for filming and authorise them to:

i)        to be the point of consultation with staff on all applications for landowner consent for filming and, at their discretion, refer any applications for landowner consent for filming to the local board for a local board decision

ii)       receive notifications from staff of areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk.

c)      appoint a member as Lead and a member as an Alternate to be the nominated member for events and authorise them to receive staff notifications of areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk.

d)      delegate to the Lead and the Alternate, the authority to prepare and provide local board views and speak to those local board views at any hearings on applications for liquor licences

e)      delegate to the Lead and the Alternate, the authority to provide the local board views on whether a resource consent should proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application

f)       delegate to the Lead and the Alternate the authority to prepare and provide local board views and speak those local board views at any hearings on notified resource consents.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

Background

6.       Decision-making within Auckland Council is shared between the Governing Body and local boards. Local boards have made a general delegation to the Chief Executive of all of their responsibilities, duties and powers subject to the exclusions, restrictions and clarifications set out in the Chief Executive’s Delegations Register. The Chief Executive has in turn delegated those responsibilities, duties and powers to staff. The exercise of those responsibilities, duties and powers is subject to a set of delegation protocols. These protocols provide a set of expectations and directions to staff and require a number of actions that are relevant to all local activities. These delegations help Auckland Council to operate efficiently and effectively.

7.       In some cases, delegations are given to individual local board members, usually due to short timeframes constrained by operational requirements, customer expectations and deadlines set by statute. Having a delegation in place to one local board member helps to ensure that council can continue to undertake its normal business practices without undue delays.

8.       Local boards have allocated responsibility for decision-making with respect to local parks and have delegated landowner consent decisions to staff subject to a number of delegation protocols. The delegation protocols require that the nominated local board member is consulted on every landowner consent. Landowner consents encompass a broad range of activities, including affected party approvals, filming and events. Local boards also are able to provide their formal views in a report at liquor licence hearings.

9.       Under the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 the Governing Body must consider any views and preferences expressed by a local board, where a Governing Body decision affects or may affect the responsibilities or operation of the local board or the well-being of communities within its local board area. Local boards’ ability to provide local views can be affected because of statutory timeframes or external agency deadlines. Delegating authority for providing local board views to individual members provides local boards the opportunity to give local views within prescribed timeframes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Landowner consents

10.     Under Auckland Council’s Combined Chief Executive Delegations Register, council staff are delegated authority to approve landowner consents on behalf of local boards. This delegation is subject to the Local Board Delegations Protocols. These protocols require that before exercising their delegations, staff must consult with a nominated local board member for landowner consents. If required, by the nominated local board member, the staff member must refer the landowner consent decision to a local board business meeting for a decision.

11.     It is therefore recommended that the local board appoint a nominated local board member for landowner consents to enable staff to exercise their delegation.

Landowner consents for filming

12.     Screen Auckland (Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development) processes requests for filming in the Auckland Region, and seeks landowner consent from local boards. Over 600 permits are granted each year, with the largest number of permits being granted in Waitematā, Wāitakere Ranges and Rodney Local Board areas.

13.     Screen Auckland must process the applications within three to five working days, and therefore require feedback from local boards within two working days. These timeframes are short because filming activities often have a fast turnaround for productions from concept to delivery. To keep filming in Auckland, in a competitive international market, film crews often have to work within short timeframes.

14.     Due to the extremely short timeframes for film applications, where local boards have a large number of filming applications, it may be beneficial for this subset of landowner consents to be referred to a different nominated local board member, to manage workloads.

Events

15.     Under the Local Board Delegations Protocols staff must consult with and obtain the views of the nominated local board member on:

·   applications to hold events on council-owned land in the local board area that require regulatory approval and involve one or more of the following matters:

o complete or substantial closure of the public open space

o more than 500 people

o road closure

o liquor

o ticketed event.

·   Any regulatory decision to set fees and charges for holding local events on council-owned local parks and reserve (and refer the matter to the local board to obtain local board views and input where required by the delegated local board member).

·   Staff are also required to notify the nominated local board member of:

o areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk

o decisions to approve events on council owned land in the local board area.

16.     The appointment of a nominated local board member for events is therefore recommended to enable staff to exercise their delegation.

17.     Under the Local Board Delegations Protocols landowner consent is also required for all event proposals on local parks. To avoid double-handling of applications, it is recommended that the local board member nominated for events is the same as that local board member nominated for landowner consents.

Formal submissions at liquor licence hearings

18.     District Licensing Committees consider, and grant or renew applications for liquor licences and manager’s certificates. When a business applies for an on-licence, off-licence, or club licence, new or renewed, they are publicly notified. On 25 September 2014, the Governing Body (GB/2014/103) agreed to a process where local boards can provide views on an application in a report to the District Licensing Committee. If the District Licensing Committee considers that the local board’s report has raised issues that it needs to hear more about, it can call a hearing and invite the local board to appear and talk to its report and respond to questions as a witness.

19.     Once the public notice has been posted online, the local board has 15 working days to provide their report to council.

20.     This report recommends a delegation to a nominated local board member to allow local boards to provide formal views as part of the liquor licensing process.

Notified resource consents

21.     Local boards can provide feedback, within the statutory timeframes, on whether resource consent applications should be publicly notified. This was resolved by the Governing Body on 28 July 2011 (GB/2011/156). Resource consent planners email the planning lead copies of applications that meet the triggers set by the local boards (last reviewed in 2017). The planning leads have three working days to provide comment on the matter of whether the application should be publicly notified or limited notified to particular persons who may be adversely affected by the proposal. Where comments are provided, these are included verbatim as part of the reporting planner’s notification report to the decision-maker.

22.     Local boards can also provide written feedback once resource consent applications have been notified. Written feedback needs to be provided prior to the submission closing date (usually 20 working days after public notification). Local boards can subsequently speak to their feedback to support their views at any hearing.

23.     This report recommends a planning lead for each local board to provide the local board’s formal views on whether or not resource consents should be notified or limited notified and to provide written feedback on notified applications and speak on the local board’s behalf at the council hearing.

Options considered

24.     Options available for local boards to input into landowner consents, events, planning processes and liquor licences have been summarised in Tables 1 and 2.

25.     It is recommended that local boards select both a nominated local board member and an alternate. The alternate is available to act when the nominated local board member is unable to act (eg leave of absence, illness) and has agreed (via written communication) that the alternate take the role of nominated local board member for a specified time period.

26.     We recommend that local boards appoint one nominated local board member (and alternate). Appointing more than one nominated local board member increases administration for staff and can create unnecessary confusion where local board members provide differing views to staff.

Nominated local board members under the Local Board Delegations Protocol

27.     The preferred option is that a nominated local board member is appointed for landowner consents and events (option two in Table 1). This option is preferred because it aligns with council’s existing delegations and local board delegation protocols and allows for council to undertake core business in a timely manner. There is reputational risk to council if it is unable to administer landowner consents in a timely manner.

Table 1: Options for local boards to address requirement for nominated local board members under the Local Board Delegations Protocol for landowner consents and events

Options

Pros

Cons

1.   There are no nominated local board members and staff must consult with the local board chairperson as a primary point of contact

·      The local board chairperson will become the subject matter expert for the local board on landowner approvals and events

·      Local boards can provide their views in a timely way that better meets organisational deadlines

·      The local board chairperson’s work-load will be increased

·      Decisions are not made by the full local board

·      Decisions are not made at a public meeting

2.   Nominated local board members appointed for landowner consents and events (preferred option)

·      The nominated local board member will become subject matter expert for local board on topic they are nominated for

·      Local boards can provide their views in a timely way that better meets organisational deadlines

·      Decisions are not made by the full local board

·      Decisions made under delegation are not made at a public meeting

Notified applications (resource consents and liquor licences)

28.     Local boards normally provide their formal views at business meetings (option two in Table 2). Because local board reporting timeframes do not usually align with process and statutory timeframes outlined above, in most instances reporting at a business meeting will not be a viable option. Providing a delegation to one local board member and one alternate (option three in Table 2) is considered the most efficient way of providing formal views for the matters discussed in this report.

Table 2: Options for local boards to provide their formal views on notification of resource consents and liquor licences

Options

Pros

Cons

1.   No formal local board views are provided

 

·      Local board views will not be considered by the hearing commissioners

2.   Formal local board views are provided at a business meeting

·      All local board members contribute to the local board view

·      Provides transparent decision making

·      Local board meeting schedules and agenda deadlines are unlikely to align with statutory deadlines imposed by the planning process

3.   Formal local board views are provided by way of delegation to one local board member for all applications (preferred option)

·      Nominated local board member will become subject matter expert for local board on topic they are nominated for

·      Local boards can provide their views in a timely way that meets statutory deadlines

·      Any feedback can be reported back to the local board

·      Decisions are not made by the full local board

·      Decisions made under delegation are not made at a public meeting (decisions are made public once submitted via the planning process)

 


 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     These decisions are procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     This report recommends the appointment of nominated local board members to ensure that council can undertake its operational and statutory duties in a timely manner, while receiving local board input and decision-making in matters that are of local importance.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     This report seeks to appoint nominated board members to perform particular functions.

32.     Any local board member who is appointed as a nominated board member should ensure that they represent the wider local board views and preferences on each matter before them.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have a positive or negative impact for Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have financial implications on Auckland Council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     If local boards choose not to appoint a nominated board member for landowner consents (including film applications) and events, staff will need to seek feedback from the chairperson. This could potentially lead to a busy workload for the local board chairperson, in addition to their existing duties.

36.     If local boards choose not to delegate to provide views on notified applications, there is a risk that they will not be able to provide formal views prior to submission closing dates and miss the opportunity to have their feedback presented and heard at a hearing.

37.     If local boards choose not to delegate to provide their views on liquor licences, there is a risk that they will not be able to provide formal views prior to closings dates for submissions not coinciding with political meetings.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     Nominated local board members providing feedback on landowner consents and events will engage with staff acting in accordance with the Local Board Delegation Protocols.

39.     Training for local board members will be offered on the Resource Management Act 1991 and the preparation of effective feedback for applications notified as part of a Resource Management Act 1991 process.

40.     Nominated local board members (and alternates) who are delegated to provide reports and speak at District Licensing Committee Hearings should sign-up to receive alcohol notices. This will ensure that they hear about new applications as soon as they are open for comment.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol Stewart - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki & Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Appointment of Local Board members to external community organisations

File No.: CP2019/19479

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To appoint board members to external community organisations relevant to the Puketāpapa Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Elected members participate as representatives of the local board on a number of external community and national organisations.

3.       The beginning of the new electoral term generates the need for new appointments. This report provides details of the external organisations relevant to the local board and requests that the local board nominates a lead and alternate member to represent the board on those external organisations for the 2019-2022 triennium.

4.       In addition, there are a small number of appointments which, due to legislation or the terms in a deed are the responsibility of the Governing Body, but because the relationship between the council and the organisation is local, the Governing Body has delegated its responsibility to nominate an elected member to the relevant local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      appoint the following board members to the external community groups and organisations listed below for the 2019-2022 triennium:

External organisation

 

Lead

Alternate

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

 

 

The Mt Roskill Sports and Recreation Trust

 

 

Pah Homestead Joint Liaison Body

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       A number of external organisations provide for the formal participation of Auckland Council elected members in their affairs.  Elected member appointees will have a variety of duties and liabilities depending on the individual organisation.

6.       At the commencement of each triennium, the Governing Body and local boards make appointments to external organisations.

7.       As local board representatives, the nominated members represent the board, and do not attend in a personal capacity.  Nominated local board members will provide updates at local board meetings to regularly inform all local board members of discussions and decisions made of their activities, unless good reasons exist for confidentiality. These updates are in the form of business meeting reports which maintain public transparency.

8.       The reasons for elected member participation in external organisations can be described in a number of ways:

·        a trust deed, that requires Auckland Council to make an appointment to an organisation

·        an organisation of interest to the local board is inviting elected member representation at its meetings

·        associations entered into by the council which provide for elected member representation

·        organisation governance, or project or programme oversight, such as regional or local parks management groups

·        a statutory or regulatory provision (for example a regulation providing for a community liaison committee) or

·        a resource consent requiring the formation of a committee or hearing panel.

9.       In making decisions about these appointments, it is suggested that local boards are mindful of:

·        the elected member’s availability

·        any conflict of interests, including whether the local board provides funding to the entity

·        relevance

·        historical relationship with the organisation and Auckland Council.

10.     Members are delegated in their capacity as elected local board members. Should they no longer be a local board member, their nominations would be automatically repealed.

11.     Local board members may be part of any organisation in their private capacity and personal interests. They are encouraged to disclose memberships of external organisations in the conflict of interest register.

Relevant external organisations

12.     The details of the organisations relevant to the local board are detailed below.

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

13.     Under Designation 1100 of the Auckland Unitary Plan Operative in part, the Auckland International Airport Limited is required to maintain the Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group. The purpose of the group is to consider, and where appropriate, make recommendations to Auckland International Airport Limited on aircraft noise and concerns that arise from the operations and activities at the airport.

14.     Membership of the group comprise an Auckland Council Governing Body representative, 12 local board representatives, and representatives from industry, Mana Whenua, the community, Airways, Board of Airline Representatives of New Zealand and Auckland International Airport Limited.

15.     One local board member is selected from each of the following local boards: Mangere-Ōtāhuhu, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Manurewa, Howick, Franklin, Maungakiekie-Tamaki, Albert-Eden, Puketāpapa, Whau, Orākei, Wāitakere Ranges, and Papakura.

16.     The meetings are held every three months. The next meeting occurs on 9 December 2019, 1-3pm, Pavilion Roam III, Sudima Hotel, 18 Airport Drive, Auckland Airport.

17.     In the previous term the board appointed a lead and an alternate to this group.

The Mt Roskill Sports and Recreation Trust

18.     On 12 November 2019 the Governing Body delegated this appointment to an outside organisation to the Puketāpapa Local Board.

19.     In 1995 Auckland City Council and the Mt Roskill Grammar School established the Mt Roskill Grammar School Artificial Playing Surface Trust to “promote sports, recreation and community facilities and in particular the establishment of an all-weather synthetic sports field at Mt Roskill Grammar School.”

20.     In 2014 Mt Roskill Grammar School Artificial Playing Surface Trust changed its name to the Mt Roskill Sport and Recreation Trust.  As a result of the 2014 amendment to the trust deed, there is no specific requirement for the local board to be represented on the trust board, or be responsible for appointing new trustees.

21.     This is a trustee position.  Section 6 of the Trust Deed states: … the statutory power of appointment of new Trustees shall be vested in the following or shall be the person who is the holder of the designated position, as appropriate:

(iv)     one of the elected members of the Auckland City Council Mt Roskill Community Board; and

(v)     two nominees by the Director of City Services for The Auckland City Council.

22.     In the previous term the board decided not to appoint a member to this trust.

Manukau Harbour Forum

23.     The Manukau Harbour Forum was created in November 2010 to advocate for the restoration of Manukau Harbour.  It is a collective of representatives of the nine local boards that border the harbour.

24.     In the previous term the board appointed a lead and an alternate to the forum.

25.     The delegation of a board member to this forum will be the subject of a separate report on the 5 December Puketāpapa Local Board agenda.

Pah Homestand Joint Liaison Body

26.     Pah Homestead is a local arts facility, funded by Council, and leased by James Wallace Arts Trust (JWAT). This is a significant facility in the board area and JWAT is a key stakeholder for the local board. 

27.     The terms of reference for the liaison body were developed pre-amalgamation by Auckland City Council. It allows for one governing body member and one local board member on the group.

28.     In the previous term the board appointed a lead and an alternate to the group.

29.     The next meeting of the liaison body is scheduled for 25 November 2019.

Integrated Area Plan, Mt Roskill

30.     This term the board will be embarking on a significant piece of planning work with an Integrated Area Plan. This will cover approximately half of the board area, large parts of the Albert-Eden Local Board Area and parts of the Whau Local Board Area. This project will include the establishment of a political working party, which will seek local board delegates.

31.     The establishment of the political working party will be the subject of a separate report on the 5 December Puketāpapa Local Board agenda.

Healthy Puketāpapa Kaitiaki group

32.     The Healthy Puketāpapa Strategic Framework and Action Plan was adopted by the board in August 2019. This was developed collaboratively, and the action plan will be delivered by a coalition of community and agencies supported by a kaitiaki group. 

33.     The terms of reference for the kaitiaki group have not been confirmed but it is anticipated that it would include representatives from community, mana whenua, Local Board, Auckland Council and Public Health representatives.  

34.     The establishment of the kaitiaki group will be the subject of a separate report on the Puketāpapa Local Board agenda.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     These decisions are procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     This report enables Auckland Council to meet its requirements or duties to have representation on external community organisations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     This report seeks the local board’s decision on representatives to external community organisations relevant to the local board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     This report has no specific impact on Māori.  It covers appointments of local board members to external organisations and community networks to represent the view of local communities, including Māori communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     There are no financial implications as a result of this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     Local board members may be part of any organisation in their private capacity and personal interests. They are encouraged to disclose memberships of external organisations in the conflict of interest register.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     Local Board Services staff will inform each external organisation of the name of the local board appointment. They will also inform the local board representative of the meeting time, date and location.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol Stewart - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki & Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Process for appointment of Local Government New Zealand National Council representative

File No.: CP2019/19481

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the process for making the local board representative appointment to the Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) National Council and inform elected members of changes to the LGNZ rules.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) amended its rules at its Annual General Meeting on 7 July 2019 and these were confirmed at a meeting of the LGNZ National Council in September. There are some key changes affecting Auckland.

3.       There are now three dedicated seats on the LGNZ National Council for Auckland Council representatives. These will be filled by the Mayor of Auckland (or his alternate) and representatives to be appointed by local boards and the Governing Body. The LGNZ rules require these appointments to be made within eight weeks of the triennial local government elections.

4.       This report outlines a process to appoint the local boards representative. Nominations will be open to all local board elected members and this can be done in mid-end November. Local boards are being asked to delegate authority to select the representative by nominating one of its members, preferably the chairperson, to be part of a local board selection panel. This process will enable the representative to be appointed as quickly as possible.

5.       The LGNZ rules now excludes Auckland from LGNZ Zone 1. Although not officially a member of an LGNZ zone group, the expectation is that Auckland Council schedules regular meetings with the president and chief executive (or their representatives) of LGNZ and organise itself as if it were a zone group. These meetings could be co-chaired by the councillor and local board member who are appointed to the LGNZ National Council.

6.       Other arrangements such as the sector-based groups remain unchanged. Auckland Council is eligible to be a member of the Metropolitan and Regional Groups and the Governing Body will be asked to select representatives to these groups.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      note the amended Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) rules.

b)      endorse Option A (selection panel made up of representatives from each local board) as the process for appointing the local board representative to the LGNZ National Council.

c)      delegate to the chairperson to be part of the selection panel to appoint the local board representative to the LGNZ National Council.

d)      agree in principle to two annual meetings of Auckland Council and LGNZ (or their representatives) with the arrangements to be decided by the three Auckland Council representatives to the LGNZ National Council and staff.

e)      endorse the proposal that the meetings of the Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings be co-chaired by the governing body and local board representatives appointed to the LGNZ National Council.

 

Horopaki

Context

Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ)

7.       LGNZ is an incorporated society (New Zealand Local Government Association Inc) which represents the national interests of councils around New Zealand and leads best practice in the local government sector.

8.       The objectives of LGNZ include promoting and advocating matters affecting the national interests of local government. LGNZ holds regular dialogue with government, parliamentarians and government agencies and provides thought leadership and research on matters of interest to local authorities.

9.       LGNZ is governed by a national council made up of members elected to represent geographic zones, representatives of various sector groups, Chair of Te Maruata (LGNZ’s national collective of Māori in local government governance roles), the President and three seats reserved for representatives of Auckland Council.

10.     The establishment of dedicated Auckland seats were made as part of amendments to the LGNZ Rules agreed at its AGM in July 2019 (available online). The amended rules stipulate that the composition of the National Council will include the Mayor of Auckland (or an alternate) and two further persons: one to represent the Governing Body and one to represent local boards. The appointments are for three years.

11.     LGNZ members are organized in zones and sectors generally. These zones and sectors make appointments to the National Council, provide advice on issues affecting their geographical or sector areas and provide information to their members.

12.     Auckland Council is no longer a member of any zone group. Due to its size and governance structure, it is expected that the council will organise itself as if it were a zone.

13.     The amendments did not change arrangements for sector groups. Auckland Council remains eligible to be a member of the Metro Sector Group and the Regional Sector Groups. The Governing Body usually appoints Auckland Council’s representatives to these groups and will be asked to do so again.

14.     Auckland Council’s benefits from its interactions with LGNZ include keeping abreast of national issues affecting local government, advocating for and influencing local government issues on the national agenda and providing a forum where elected representatives connect and network with their peers from across the country.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Appointment of local board representative to LGNZ National Council

15.     The appointment of a local board representative will need to be decided by local boards. This is outlined in LGNZ Rule E1A “(b) one person appointed by Auckland Council local boards, from Elected members of the local boards”.

16.     The restricted timeframes (eight weeks from start of the term) requires an agile selection process. Staff considered several options and recommend Option A as detailed in the following table:

 

 

Process for selection of local board representative to the LGNZ National Council

Option

Process

Details of process

A

Selection panel made up of representatives from each local board

·    Each local board delegates authority to one of their members to be part of a selection panel.

·    The selection panel can be called to meet once all candidates are confirmed and they will agree the voting system to be used.

·    One vote per local board is considered a fair way to select a single representative for all 21 local boards.

·    Members can utilise an existing meeting to get the selection panel together (such as the Chair’s Forum).

·    Process can start in mid-November with a two-week nomination period.

B

Reports to local boards seeking decision/preference (may require urgent decisions)

·    This would involve seeking a vote/preference from each local board through a formal report and resolution.

·    The report can only be produced once nominations have closed and the candidates list is available – this will delay the report to early December.

·    Where there is a tie between candidates based on local board votes, staff will need to be delegated authority to resolve the candidate by lot or go back to local boards for a decision.

·    This process is unlikely to produce an agreed appointment in a timely fashion.

 

17.     Staff also considered the option of a popular vote of all local board members. This would involve setting up an online voting system, where each local board member would have one vote. However, this option may not comply with the LGNZ Rules which anticipates a selection by local boards rather than by individual members. 

18.     The recommended Option A will enable a fair process by giving each local board a vote and an opportunity for their representatives to properly consider each nominee. This selection can take place at the planned meeting of the Chairs’ Forum on 9 December 2019 to avoid arranging an additional meeting.

Nominations for the local board representative

19.     The LGNZ anticipates that all local board elected members are eligible to be a candidate for the LGNZ National Council. The nominations process will therefore need to allow self-nominations.

20.     To facilitate this process in the timeframes required, staff will call for nominations on Friday 15 November and will allow a two-week period closing on 29 November 2019.

Auckland Council / LGNZ meetings

21.     The role of a zone includes receiving reports from LGNZ about matters of national interest to local authorities and communicating to LGNZ the issues and concerns. The key item of interest at Zone meetings is the national update from LGNZ.  The president and chief executive of LGNZ (or their representatives) attend to present the update.

22.     Auckland Council could continue to meet with the president and chief executive (or their representatives) of LGNZ on a regular basis. Although not expressly set out in the changes to the LGNZ Rules, there is an understanding that Auckland Council will continue with these meetings in order to ensure an ongoing regional dialogue and continue to identify and advise LGNZ on issues and concerns affecting the Auckland region.

23.     Staff recommend these meetings are co-chaired by the councillor and local board member appointed to the LGNZ national council. A co-chair approach recognises the shared governance role of local boards. Following discussions with LGNZ, staff also recommend that the meetings be open to all elected members.

24.     The proposed meeting dates for the Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings are 13 March 2020 and 11 September 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     These decisions are procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. Staff will look to schedule meetings of the Auckland/LGNZ on days where there are other city-based activities and meetings for elected members in order to minimise travel requirements. Staff will also explore the use of skype and livestreaming so elected members may choose to avoid travel.

26.     Regarding engagement with the LGNZ, Auckland Council has declared a climate emergency, along with other councils around the country, so there will be an opportunity for partnership and joint leadership on this issue.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     Secretariat support for the Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings will be provided by the Governance Division.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The changes to the LGNZ Rules and the designated seat on the LGNZ National Council acknowledges the role of local boards and gives it greater recognition in LGNZ.

29.     Local board chairs were briefed on anticipated changes at the May 2019 Chairs’ Forum.

30.     The amended rules were confirmed at a meeting of the LGNZ National Council in September. Due to the elections and end of term timeframes, staff were unable to seek the views of local boards on the process for appointing a representative.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     These decisions are procedural in nature and do not impact on Māori.

32.     At the LGNZ level, the LGNZ has provided for representation on the National Council by the Chair of Te Maruata.

33.     Te Maruata is LGNZ National Council sub-committee which has the role of promoting increased representation of Māori as elected members of local government, and of enhancing Māori participation in local government processes. They provide support for councils in building relationships with iwi, hapu and Māori groups and provides Māori input on development of future policies or legislation relating to local government. 

34.     Appointments to Te Maruata are not made by councils. In the previous term Councillor Alf Filipaina was invited to be a member of the sub-committee.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     Membership of LGNZ incurs a cost to ratepayers. Auckland Council’s annual subscription to LGNZ in 2019/2020 is $340,148 excluding GST.

36.     The establishment of Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings will incur expense currently unbudgeted for. Staff from the Governance Division will support the first meeting using existing resources. 

37.     As the Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings are expected to bring together all elected members from across the region including the islands, this will impact on governance administration budgets over time.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     The LGNZ Rules require persons appointed to the LGNZ National Council to assume office within eight weeks of the triennial local government elections. This creates some difficulties in designing a process for all 21 local boards to agree their single representative. The recommended option (Option A) proposed in this report will enable the process to be completed as quickly as possible, on the first working day after the eight week period. The LGNZ secretariat has indicated this would be acceptable.

39.     If all local boards do not endorse the same process (Option A), this would affect how quickly the appointment is able to be made.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The Governing Body will be making their appointment in November 2019 including appointment of Auckland Council representatives to the sector groups.

41.     Appointments of Auckland Council seats to the LGNZ National Council will be communicated to the LGNZ by 6 December 2019.

42.     Staff will work with the appointed representatives of Auckland Council to make arrangements for the first Auckland Council/LGNZ meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shirley Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki & Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Resinstatement of Manukau Harbour Forum

File No.: CP2019/19950

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the reconstitution of the Manukau Harbour Forum (the forum), including the Puketāpapa Local Board, for the 2019 to 2022 local government term, and confirm the Terms of Reference for the forum.

2.       To nominate a board member, and an alternate, to represent the Puketāpapa Local Board on the forum.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Manukau Harbour Forum was established in 2012 as a joint committee of nine local boards bordering the Manukau Harbour. Member boards recognised the need for joint decision making and advocacy to achieve water quality improvements for the Manukau Harbour.

4.       The committee ceases to exist at the end of every electoral term and can be reconstituted following agreement of the entities involved. This report invites boards to consider reconstitution of the forum, and to nominate a board member (and alternate) to represent this board on the Forum.

5.       The forum’s purpose is to champion a sustainable management approach for the Manukau Harbour. This is detailed in the attached Terms of Reference, which all nine of the member boards are asked to confirm.

6.       A review of the forum was undertaken in mid-2019 to develop a future state direction and new three-year work programme. The review recommended the forum be continued but found that the forum is failing to achieve its vision due to a combination of factors, including resourcing and lack of an integrated strategic plan and must be strengthened and appropriately resourced to deliver on the vision.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      agree to re-constitute the Manukau Harbour Forum Joint Committee with the Franklin, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Manurewa, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Papakura, Whau, and Waitākere Ranges Local Boards for the 2019/22 electoral term.

b)      appoint one named member and one named alternate member to the Manukau Harbour Forum.

c)      note the first workshop and meeting of the Manukau Harbour Forum is scheduled for 10.00am–1.00pm Friday 13th December 2019 in Mangere.

d)      note that the reconstituted Forum will have two co-chairs one being a local board member and one being a governing body representative of the Manukau Harbour Forum. The local board co-chair representative will be elected by a majority of members at the first meeting. An invitation will be extended to the Governing Body to appoint two members noting one will act in a co-chair role.

e)      confirm the updated Terms of Reference for the Manukau Harbour Forum as outlined in Attachment A, noting they have been amended enabling two members of the Governing Body to be invited to join the forum, one of the Governing Body members will be co-chair of the forum.

f)       delegate authority to the Manukau Harbour Forum to make decisions within its Terms of Reference, noting that any significant or controversial decisions will only be made by the forum with the confirmation by resolution of all the member boards that would be affected by the decision and that the local board will reserve the right to hold and promote a different view to that of the forum on any issue that may impact the local board area.

g)      confirm that any further changes to the Manukau Harbour Forum’s Terms of Reference will be agreed first by the forum then recommended to the nine member boards for their approval, noting that resolutions must be identical.

h)      note that in order for the requirements of this agreement for the Manukau Harbour Forum to be reached, the resolutions of each of the nine-member boards made in respect of recommendations a) (b)-(f) above (with the exception of (b) where appointees are to be named) must be identical and that in the absence of identical resolutions by all member boards, the forum will not meet the requirements under clause 30a of Schedule 7 to the Local Government Act 2002.

i)        receive and note the Manukau Harbour Forum governance and management support review report (Attachment B).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Nine local boards (Franklin, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Manurewa, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Papakura, Puketāpapa, Whau and Waitākere Ranges Local Boards) together formed the Manukau Harbour Forum with the view to form a means of collective local board advocacy on common issues affecting the Manukau Harbour.

8.       The Manukau Harbour Forum was constituted formally as a joint committee of nine local boards under standing orders 2.8.1 and 2.8.2. Standing orders 2.8.1 and 2.8.2 enable a local board to appoint a joint committee with another local board or boards. Being a joint committee enables the forum to conduct business more efficiently, as a local board joint committee can make decisions and provide direction to officers without seeking confirmation and/or ratification from the individual member boards. In accordance with clause 30(7) of the Local Government Act 2002, the Forum automatically dissolved following the 2019 local government elections.

9.       An updated Terms of Reference for the Manukau Harbour Forum setting out the purpose and principles of the forum are presented in Attachment A. The purpose of the forum is to champion a sustainable management approach for the Manukau Harbour. Since its formation the Forum has:

·     identified issues, such as mangroves, pacific oysters, coastal erosion, stormwater, recreational access/wharves and Maui Dolphin Sanctuary as high priority

·     funded a work programme consisting of annual seminar, communications programme, and a business to business education programme

·     developed a ‘Manukau Harbour Forum Vision and Strategy’, undertaken a comprehensive stocktake of all research pertaining to the Manukau Harbour and catchment, produced a set of maps and a list of stakeholders

·     received regular updates on marine monitoring within the Manukau Harbour

·     advocated to central government and Auckland Council (e.g. feedback on the Unitary Plan) on issues affecting the Harbour, including hydrodynamic modelling of sediment runoff

·     identified areas of interest and potential projects that the local boards surrounding the Manukau Harbour could progress jointly and through funding from the member local boards’ budget, adopted a work programme to deliver the forum’s objectives.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     It is recommended that each constituting local board agrees to reinstate the Manukau Harbour Forum for another term and appoints one member plus an alternate to represent the board on the forum.

11.     During the 2016/19 term of the forum a review was undertaken of the role of the forum in order to recommend a decision-making structure that will enable the objectives relating to the Manukau Harbour to be addressed effectively (Attachment B).

12.     The review recommended the continuation of the forum, but found that the forum is failing to achieve its vision and must be strengthened and appropriately resourced to deliver on the vision. The failure was found to be a combination of factors, including:

·    inadequate resourcing through the current funding model and inadequate staffing resource

·    lack of understanding of the health of the catchment and harbour, and absence of long-term integrated strategic planning

·    lack of clear rationale or resourcing for mana whenua involvement

·    a local board-focused work programme that does not address larger scale strategic issues.

13.     The forum endorsed the key recommendations of the review at its meeting on 30 August 2019. The forum also resolved to invite Governing Body involvement via two councillor representatives to be appointed to the forum when reconstituted following the 2019 local body elections, including one as co-chair, and retaining local board membership as is. (Resolution number MHFJC/2019/29).

14.     Staff have amended the Manukau Harbour Forum Terms of Reference (Attachment A) to include two Governing Body representatives, at the request of the forum.

15.     The chair and deputy chair of the forum presented the report to the Environment and Community Committee on 10 September 2019, which resolved (Resolution number ENV/2019/146) to refer the recommendations and review report:

·    to a workshop of the relevant committee in the new term of council

·    to the Auckland Plan Strategy and Research department for evaluation and advice in the new term of council.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible.

17.     The purpose of the forum is to champion a sustainable management approach for the Manukau Harbour. The forum should have positive climate impacts. Climate impacts of any projects or initiatives to be progressed by the forum can be assessed as needed.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The forum has referred the recommendations and report from the 2019 review of the forum to the Governing Body for their consideration, which could result in resourcing impacts for the organisation if these are progressed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     Local boards have previously agreed, through adoption of the forum’s Terms of Reference, that the Manukau Harbour is a regional asset and it was appropriate that local boards collectively contribute to strategies and outcomes that enhance the social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being of the harbour.

20.     The role of the forum is to champion the sustainable management of the Manukau Harbour and adjacent communities. It developed a vision and strategy in line with this which was adopted in September 2014.

21.     In previous terms, the forum agreed a work programme following the ratification of each board allocating committed funding from its budget to implement a general work programme allocation to the Manukau Harbour Forum. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     The Manukau Harbour Forum recognised mana whenua interest in Manukau Harbour.

23.     While the forum did discuss a joint committee with mana whenua, or mana whenua representatives being appointed to the forum, it was agreed that this was inappropriate while treaty negotiations are pending. The forum anticipates receiving further advice and options as to how it interfaces with mana whenua as treaty settlement progresses.

24.     Workshops of the Manukau Harbour Forum were held in 2015 to discuss the ongoing role of mana whenua in relation to the forum. Some minor changes were made to the forum’s Terms of Reference as a result of this to reflect the forum’s obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi/The Treaty of Waitangi, and its desire to work with mana whenua on an ongoing basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The nine member boards have previously provided funding of between $8,000 and $15,000 from their budgets to implement the forum’s work programme.

26.     The forum has $70,000 allocated to it by members boards for the 2019/20 work programme. $48,000 has already been allocated as outlined below with the remaining balance to be given direction to by incoming members:

i)     Delivery of a youth leadership sustainability wanānga ($15,000)

ii)    Communications plans ($10,000)

iii)    support for the Southern Auckland youth Environmentalists ($5,000)

iv)   enabling Seaweek volunteer action across the Manukau Harbour ($18,000).

27.     Member boards will be asked to continue their funding support to the forum for the triennium.

28.     Acquiring adequate resourcing and operational support for delivery of activities within the Manukau Harbour is an action for the forum.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There are no significant risks from reconstituting the forum. Any issues arising from the forum can be mitigated through operational management of the forum.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Arrangements for the meetings of the forum will be made once the forum is reconstituted, and staff will progress the Governing Body’s consideration of the review recommendations.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference for the Manukau Harbour Forum

103

b

Manukau Harbour Forum governance and management support review report prepared by Envirostrat Consulting dated August 2019

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anna Bray - Policy and Planning Manager - Local Boards

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki & Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Adoption of a business meeting schedule

File No.: CP2019/19482

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Puketāpapa Local Board meeting schedule for the 2019-2022 electoral term.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules. In particular, clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings. Sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of LGOIMA require that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting, and that local board meetings are open to the public.

3.       Adopting a meeting schedule helps with meeting these requirements. Adopting a business meeting schedule also allows for a planned approach to workloads and ensures that local board members have clarity about their commitments.

4.       A draft meeting schedule for the 2019-2022 electoral term has been developed and is included below for adoption by the local board.

5.       Commencing the business meeting during business hours will enable meetings to be productive and ensures best use of resources.

6.       One business meeting per month is sufficient for formal business to be considered. There are some instances for which the local board may need to have meetings in addition to this schedule. The specific times and dates for meetings for matters such as local board plans and local board agreements are yet to be finalised. Local board meeting schedules may need to be updated once these details are confirmed.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      adopt the meeting schedule outlined below for the 2019-2022 electoral term:

Year

Date

2020

Thursday, 20 February

Thursday 19 March

Thursday, 16 April

Recess week: Monday, 20 April – Friday, 24 April

Thursday, 07 May Special Meeting

Thursday, 21 May

Thursday, 18 June

Recess week: Monday, 06 July – Friday, 10 July

Thursday, 16 July

Thursday, 20 August

Thursday, 17 September

 

Thursday, 15 October

Thursday, 19 November

 

Thursday, 10 December

2021

Thursday, 18 February

Thursday, 18 March

Recess week: Monday, 05 April - Friday, 09 April

Thursday, 15 April

Thursday, 20 May

Thursday, 17 June

Thursday, 15 July

Recess week: Monday, 19 July – Friday 23 July

Thursday, 19 August

Thursday, 16 September

Thursday, 21 October

Thursday, 18 November

Thursday, 09 December

2022

Thursday, 17 February

Thursday, 17 March

Thursday, 21 April

Recess week: Monday, 25 April – Friday, 29 April

Thursday, 19 May

Thursday, 16 June

Recess week: Monday, 11 July – Friday, 15 July

Thursday, 21 July

Thursday, 18 August

Thursday, 15 September

 

b)      agree to commence business meetings at 10.00 am to be held at the Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.  Public forum and deputations will be scheduled in the early part of the business meeting, to enable participation by the public and stakeholders in the democratic process.

c)      note for Calendar Year 2020 the date and time for a special meeting to approve feedback and advocacy for Annual Budget 2020/2021 is scheduled for Thursday, 07 May at 10.00 am to be held at the Puketāpapa Local Board, 560 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

d)      note two recess weeks a year the dates are:

(i)         Calendar Year 2020 week 1:  from Monday, 20 April to Friday, 24 April 2020, week 2 from Monday, 19 July to Friday, 28 July 2020

(ii)        Calendar Year 2021 week 1:  from Monday, 05 April to Friday, 09 April 2021, week 2 from Monday, 05 July to Friday, 09 July 2021

(iii)       Calendar Year 2022 week 1:  from Monday, 25 April – Friday, 29 April 2022, week 2 from Monday, 11 July to Friday, 15 July 2022

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anna Bray - Policy and Planning Manager - Local Boards

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Urgent decision-making process

File No.: CP2019/19483

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek the Puketāpapa Local Board’s agreement to use the urgent decision-making process when appropriate.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The urgent decision-making process enables the local board to make decisions to manage unforeseen and urgent circumstances when it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirements of a quorum. By agreeing to this process, the local board delegates decision-making authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirements of a quorum.

b)      delegate authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board.

c)      agree that the relationship manager, chair and deputy chair (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off an authorisation memo.

d)      note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary meeting of the local board.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       The urgent decision-making process enables the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make decisions to manage unforeseen and urgent circumstances when it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirements of a quorum. Examples include during the Christmas and New Year period or for providing input to the council’s central government submission process in tight timeframes.

4.       By agreeing to this process, the board delegates decision-making authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles during that period.

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 provides for local boards to delegate to committees, members of the local board or Auckland Council staff any of its responsibilities and powers, with some specific exceptions (clause 32, Schedule 7). This legislation enables the urgent decision-making process.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       The urgent decision-making process provides an alternative decision-making mechanism to an extraordinary meeting. An extraordinary meeting is called when an urgent decision is required on matters that cannot wait until the next scheduled business meeting of the local board.

7.       Urgent decisions are different from emergency decisions, which are only made if there is a risk to public health and safety.

8.       All requests for an urgent decision will be supported by a memo stating the nature of the issue, reason for urgency and the decisions or resolutions sought.

9.       The local board relationship manager will use the information in this memo to determine whether or not to authorise the urgent decision-making process.

10.     A number of factors will be considered by the relationship manager before approval to use the urgent decision-making process is given, such as:

·   the timing of the next scheduled meeting

·   confirmation that the local board has the delegation to make the decision

·   consideration of the rationale for the urgency

·   the significance of the decision and whether the urgent decision-making process is appropriate.

11.     Once the relationship manager authorises the use of the urgent decision-making process, the chair and deputy chair (or any person/s acting in these roles) also need to approve the use of the urgent decision-making process by signing the same memo.

12.     Once the authorisation memo has been approved, the chair and deputy chair will refer to the substantive report for advice and staff recommendations to inform their decision. This report will meet Auckland Council quality advice standards and adhere to the report authorisation processes.

13.     Any decision made using the urgent decision-making process will be reported as an information item to the next ordinary meeting of the local board and the signed approval memo will be attached.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The urgent decision-making process proposed in this report enables the council group to progress urgent decisions efficiently, when it is not practical to call the full local board together.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     This report outlines the local board urgent decision-making process, and seeks the local board’s agreement to adopt this process.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have specific implications for Māori, and the arrangements proposed in this report do not affect the Māori community differently to the rest of the community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     There are no financial implications arising from the procedural decision sought by this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     To mitigate any risk that the urgent decision-making process could be used inappropriately, the relationship manager will assess a number of factors including timing of the next scheduled meeting, the reason for urgency, and significance of the decision. If a matter is of major significance, an extraordinary meeting can be called instead.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     If the local board adopts the use of the urgent decision-making process, the local board relationship manager and delegated members will execute the urgent decision-making process outlined in this report if the need arises.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anna Bray - Policy and Planning Manager - Local Boards

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki & Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Elected Members Expense Policy 2019

File No.: CP2019/19667

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the draft Auckland Council Elected Members’ Expense Policy 2019 and provide for the local board to record its feedback for consideration by the Governing Body.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each electoral term, the Remuneration Authority (the Authority) requires all councils to adopt an expense policy and forward the adopted policy to the Authority for its approval. 

3.       The expense policy provides the rules for elected members’ reimbursement for expenses they incur whilst performing their duties.  The Authority has set parameters for the following expense reimbursements:

i)     communications

ii)    mileage

iii)    travel time

iv)   childcare.

4.       The Authority has updated vehicle mileage allowance rates to reflect the new kilometre rates for self-employed people and employees published by the Inland Revenue Department on its website as at 7 June 2019.

5.       There is a change to approval processes so that approval for mayor and deputy mayor expenses is now by the chair of the Audit and Risk Committee. There are no other changes to provisions for these expenses.

6.       Reimbursement of childcare expenses is a new provision and the council has discretion around how this is applied, within the parameters set by the Authority. 

7.       In the previous term, a discussion paper about the proposed childcare allowance was published by the Authority and was reported to local boards.  Most local boards were generally supportive. Based on that feedback, this report proposes rules for inclusion in the council’s Elected Member Expense Policy 2019.

8.       The expenses policy also includes rules for the following, which relate to sensitive expenditure and there are no recommended changes to these rules:

i)     travel

ii)    accommodation

iii)    professional development

iv)   hospitality.

9.       The draft Auckland Council Elected Members Expense Policy is attached in Attachment A.

10.     The council’s Head of Assurance Services has reviewed the draft policy and is satisfied it is in compliance with the Local Government Members (2019/20) Determination and appropriate probity standards.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     The Authority sets remuneration for elected positions in local government annually.  It also sets the rules for reimbursement of costs met by members in undertaking their duties.

12.     Each electoral term, the Authority requires all councils to adopt an expense policy and forward the adopted policy to the Authority for its approval. The expense policy provides the rules for elected members’ reimbursement for expenses they incur whilst performing their duties.

13.     The Authority sets some work-related expenses for elected members:

·   the maximum allowances payable by councils to elected members for certain activities, such as transport and communications

·   the criteria for and amounts payable to, elected members sitting on resource consent hearings.

14.     The current policy was approved in November 2016.  The Authority has requested the council provide an Elected Members’ Expense Policy to the Authority for its approval at the beginning of this term. 

15.     In the previous term the Authority circulated a discussion paper seeking feedback on a proposed childcare allowance.  When the Authority issued its formal 2019/20 determination it included the childcare allowance.  The Explanatory Memorandum in the Determination includes:

   “This year, for the first time, the Authority has introduced a childcare allowance for members who have responsibility for caring for children under the age of 14 years. The allowance is a contribution towards expenses incurred by the member for the provision of childcare while the member is engaged on local authority business. The allowance is capped and is subject to certain conditions outlined in clause 14 of this determination.

   Payment of any or all of the allowances is at the discretion of each council. All the allowances included in this determination are reviewed annually.”

16.     The actual rule about the childcare allowance in the Determination is:

14      Childcare allowance

(1)     A local authority may pay a childcare allowance, in accordance with subclauses (2) and (3), to an eligible member as a contribution towards expenses incurred by the member for childcare provided while the member is engaged on local authority business.

(2)     A member is eligible to be paid a childcare allowance in respect of childcare provided for a child only if—

(a)   the member is a parent or guardian of the child, or is a person who usually has responsibility for the day-to-day care of the child (other than on a temporary basis); and

(b)   the child is aged under 14 years of age; and

(c)   the childcare is provided by a person who—

(i)    is not a family member of the member; and

(ii)   does not ordinarily reside with the member; and

(d)   the member provides evidence satisfactory to the local authority of the amount paid for childcare.

(3)     A local authority must not pay childcare allowances to a member that total more than $6,000 per annum, per child.

(4)     In this regulation, family member of the member means—

(a)   a spouse, civil union partner, or de facto partner:

(b)   a relative, that is, another person connected with the member within 2 degrees of a relationship, whether by blood relationship or by adoption.

17.     The other change in the Determination relates to vehicle mileage allowance rates to reflect the new kilometre rates for self-employed people and employees published by the Inland Revenue Department on its website as at 7 June 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     The major proposed change to the expense policy is to include a provision for childcare allowance in line with the new provision in the Authority’s Determination.

19.     Prior to the Authority including this allowance in its Determination, it circulated a discussion paper for feedback.  This was reported to local boards.  The submission to the Authority was:

   ‘Auckland Council supports the Remuneration Authority in addressing this issue which has been raised by members of other councils through submissions to the Authority.  The costs of childcare can be a barrier to people with families considering becoming candidates for local government elections.  The council commends the authority for recognising such barriers and for acknowledging the need to address them.

   The council’s view is that the proposed conditions to be placed in the authority’s determination are reasonable.  It is concerned though that the description of the purpose of the allowance is too wide.  The proposed wording is:

        “A local authority may pay a childcare allowance, in accordance with subclauses (2) and (3), to an eligible member as a contribution towards expenses incurred by the member for childcare provided while the member is engaged on local authority business.”

   The phrase “childcare provided while the member is engaged on local authority business” could include childcare that is incidental at the time the member is engaged on local authority.  For example, a member may arrange childcare on a regular basis, irrespective of undertaking council duties, and on a particular occasion attends to council business papers while the children are at childcare.  There could be uncertainty about whether this is claimable.  The council understands that the purpose of the allowance is as a contribution towards the cost of childcare where this is an expense of undertaking council business and suggests that the wording should capture this sense of necessary expense in order to undertake council business.’

20.     A summary of local board feedback on the submission is contained in Attachment B.  Most local boards endorsed the submission.

21.     The submission stated that the payment of a childcare allowance should recognise the additional cost that was caused by attending to council business rather than being paid if childcare was to be provided in any case.  In other words, it was to be paid because child-care was caused by attending to council business. This point was not included in the Authority’s final Determination.  However, any potential for over-use of the provision is controlled by the imposition of a cap of $6,000 per annum per child.

22.     The proposed wording for the childcare allowance in the Expense Policy is:

Childcare allowance

1        Elected members who are the parent, guardian or usually have responsibility for the day to day care of the child may receive the allowance set out in the Remuneration Authority Determination for childcare provided while the member is engaged on local authority business.  This is a contribution towards the expense and not intended as a full reimbursement.

2        The childcare allowance may only be claimed for childcare not provided by a family member (spouse, civil union partner or de factor partner or any relative that is connected to the members within 2 degrees of relationship, whether by blood relationship or by adoption) who does not ordinarily reside with the member

3        The allowance is only claimable:

a)    for children under the age of 14 years

b)    when attending official meetings or workshops of the council

c)    only for actual (or part thereof) expenses that have been incurred, net of any subsidies

d)    when elected members are not on recess

e)    when no other childcare arrangements would normally be made.

 

4        The allowance rates are as follows:

a)    For childcare services provided by a professional registered company, an hourly rate of up to $35 will be accepted with the receipt of a GST invoice

b)    For childcare services provided via an informal arrangement, an hourly rate of up to $20 will be accepted with the receipt of an signed invoice or signed log book

c)    The total Auckland Council may contribute is $6,000 per annum per child

5        On a case by case basis the General Manager Democracy Services and General Manager Local Board Services may make exceptions to the above provisions within the limits set by the Remuneration Authority.

23.     The maximum hourly rates are based on an informal survey of current market rates.

24.     Other changes in the draft expense policy are:

i)       approvals for the mayor and deputy mayor travel expenses have been changed to the chair of the Audit and Risk Committee, on her recommendation

ii)      an added section on health, safety and well-being which includes access to:

·    flu vaccinations

·    ergonomic assessments

·    personal support services (Employment Assistance Programme, manawa rahi and the well-being portal).

25.     The council’s Head of Assurance Services has reviewed the draft policy and is satisfied it is in compliance with the Local Government Members (2019/20) Determination and appropriate probity standards.

 

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     The adoption of the expenses policy is largely an administrative decision.  Relevant to climate change is the statement in the policy (6.3): “Auckland Council promotes public transport and cycling as the preferred ways of moving around Auckland. Elected members are expected to use public transport in the first instance but may also use their private car or council vehicles when on council business.”

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     The Authority’s Determination and the Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy only affect elected governing body and local board members.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it decides the Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     The childcare allowance recognises that the cost of childcare deters some people from standing for election.  The provision of the allowance may encourage more people, including Māori, to consider standing.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     The number of Auckland Council elected members who will be eligible to claim this allowance is unknown. LGNZ statistics show that approximately 6 per cent of elected members are 40 years of age or below[1].  On that basis, the cost to Auckland Council, if 6 percent of members (10 members) claimed the allowance, would be $60,000 (assuming one child each). 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     The expenditure that is the subject of this policy is sensitive expenditure. The policy needs to withstand public scrutiny and where there is discretion there needs to be a conservative approach. Staff believe that the conditions placed on reimbursement and the processes for approval are appropriate in this context.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Feedback from all local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it decides the Auckland Council Elected Members Expense Policy.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy

157

b

Summary of local board feedback on the Remuneration Authority’s discussion paper on childcare allowances

175

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor - Democracy Services

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - General Manager Democracy Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki & Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Albert-Eden Roskill Ward Councillor Update

File No.: CP2019/20474

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the Albert-Eden Roskill Ward Councillors to verbally update the Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

The ward councillors provide an verbal update.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      thank Albert-Eden-Roskill Ward Councillors Cathy Casey and Christine Fletcher for their update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki & Puketapapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar

File No.: CP2019/19812

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Puketāpapa Local Board with its updated governance forward work programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Puketāpapa Local Board is in Attachment A.  The calendar is updated monthly reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work programme calendar for November 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar, December

183

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki & Puketāpapa

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2019/19813

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of Puketāpapa Local Board (the Board) workshop notes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The attached summary of workshop notes provides a record of the Board’s workshops held in October and November 2019.

3.       These sessions are held to give informal opportunity for board members and officers to discuss issues and projects and note that no binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the Puketāpapa Local Board workshop notes for: 17 October, 23 October, 31 October, 07 November, 14 November, 21 November 2019 and 28 November 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 17 October 2019

187

b

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 23 October 2019

189

c

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 31 October 2019

191

d

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 07 November 2019

193

e

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 14 November 2019

195

f

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 21 November 2019

197

g

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 28 November 2019

199

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki & Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 

    

    



[1] http://www.lgnz.co.nz/assets/e41e5fb07f/Elected-Members-Profile-Report-FINAL.pdf