I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Upper Harbour Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 5 December 2019

9:30am

Upper Harbour Local Board office boardroom

30 Kell Drive, Albany village

 

Upper Harbour Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Margaret Miles, QSM, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Lisa Whyte

 

Members

Anna Atkinson

 

 

Uzra Casuri Balouch, JP

 

 

Nicholas Mayne

 

 

Brian Neeson, JP

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Cindy Lynch

Democracy Advisor

 

29 November 2019

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 4142684

Email: Cindy.Lynch@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 21 November 2019                                                                                                                                 7

12        Caribbean Drive sports field and Unsworth Reserve service provision assessment                                                                                                                                       49

13        New community lease to Albany Hall Committee Incorporated at R21 Library Lane, Albany                                                                                                                         111

14        New community lease to Sustainable Paremoremo Group at R142-178 Sanders Road, Sanders Reserve, Paremoremo                                                                    117

15        Additional local parks land classifications                                                             123

16        Allocation of funds to unscheduled parks maintenance activities and improved levels of service in parks and reserves                                                                  145

17        Community Facilities Risk Adjusted Programme amendment                            151

18        Land owner approval application for a new amenity building at Rosedale Park 163

19        Upper Harbour Quick Response round one 2019/2020 grant allocations          173

20        Elected Members' Expense Policy 2019                                                                 249

21        Road name for new private road at 160 and 162 Greenhithe Road, Greenhithe 277

22        Approval for four new road names at 133 Clark Road, Hobsonville                   285

23        Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation                                                                  295

24        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Upper Harbour Local Board for quarter one 2019/2020                                                                                               303

25        Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 7 and 14 November 2019                                                                                                          331

26        Governance forward work calendar - January to December 2020                       337

27        Board members' reports - December 2019                                                             341  

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda, no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy. The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

                  i.        a financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member

                 ii.        a non-financial conflict interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component. It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968. The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

Any questions relating to the code or the guidelines may be directed to the Relationship Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 21 November 2019, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Upper Harbour Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority

 (ii)       the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 21 November 2019

File No.: CP2019/19311

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board ordinary meeting held on Thursday, 21 November 2019, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the board only.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      note that the open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held on Thursday, 21 November 2019, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the board only and will be confirmed under item 4 of the agenda.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board open unconfirmed minutes - 21 November 2019

9

b

Upper Harbour Local Board minutes attachments - 21 November 2019

29

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Caribbean Drive sports field and Unsworth Reserve service provision assessment

File No.: CP2019/19730

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Caribbean Drive sports field and Unsworth Reserve service provision assessment (refer Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its business meeting on 13 December 2018, the Upper Harbour Local Board approved reallocation of $10,000 from its locally driven initiatives operational expenditure budget (LDI opex) to fund a feasibility and options assessment of sports provision at the Caribbean Drive sports field, incorporating an assessment of toilet facility provision for both the sports field and neighbouring Unsworth Reserve (resolution number UH/2018/157).

3.       A professional services consultant was engaged by the Sports Advisory team to assist with the investigation and preparation of the service provision assessment.

4.       On 23 May 2019, a draft Caribbean Drive sports field and Unsworth Reserve service provision assessment was workshopped with the Upper Harbour Local Board. The assessment was updated to incorporate feedback from the local board and was finalised in June 2019. Adoption of the Caribbean Drive sports field and Unsworth Reserve service provision assessment will enable project options identified in the assessment to progress to the investigation phase.

5.       A locally driven initiatives capital expenditure (LDI capex) budget of $185,000 was approved in the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Board work programme, ID 2590 (resolution number UH/2019/70). The Community Facilities work programme activity description is as follows:

·        Design and build a new toilet facility within the Unsworth Reserve, including investigation and design work on the (Caribbean Drive) sports field requirements. Financial year 2019/20 investigation and design and physical works (LDI capex contribution $30,000); Financial year 2019/20 physical works (LDI capex contribution $155,000); Financial year 2020/21 physical works $195,000 unfunded LDI Capex.

6.       This work programme activity is consistent with the recommendations of the service provision assessment for a separate toilet facility at Unsworth Reserve.

7.       On 23 July 2019, the Governing Body’s Finance and Performance Committee resolved to update the capital budget for the allocation of $6.044 million of compensation funding provided by the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) following their compulsory acquisition of open space land in the Upper Harbour Local Board area (resolution number FIN/2019/77).

8.       The compensation funding is to fund park improvement projects in the Upper Harbour Local Board area across 2019/2020, 2020/2021 and 2021/2022, including the development of park assets, play spaces and supporting infrastructure at the Caribbean Drive sports field / Unsworth Reserve.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      adopt the Caribbean Drive sports field and Unsworth Reserve service provision assessment.

b)      request that the Community Facilities sports fields investigation and design team commence investigation of the improvement options contained in the service provision assessment and report back to the Upper Harbour Local Board with recommendations on those projects which are suitable for progressing further for budget allocation and concept design work.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The funding of a feasibility study on the use of the Caribbean Drive sports field is a key initiative in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2017.

10.     This report recommends the adoption of the Caribbean Drive sports field and Unsworth Reserve service provision assessment which has been completed through a budget reallocation of $10,000 LDI opex (resolution number UH/2018/157).

11.     Feedback received from the local board at a workshop in May 2019 to discuss the draft assessment has been incorporated into the final document and will inform the next steps that will enable projects to progress to investigation and design.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The assessment includes a feasibility and options assessment of improved sports provision opportunities at the Caribbean Drive sports field in response to the requirement for additional sports field capacity within the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

13.     Sports field upgrade options considered in the assessment relate to field surface type and number, location and orientation, field lighting and potential vehicle access and parking arrangements. The assessment also incorporates a review of toilet facility provision opportunities at the Caribbean Drive sports field and Unsworth Reserve, as well as overall park improvement opportunities across both sites relating to connectivity, park amenity, play, planting and minor parks infrastructure.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Adoption of the service provision assessment by the Upper Harbour Local Board will support strategies and objectives focused on managing council’s response to climate change. This will be achieved by enabling the future investigation and design work of project options to identify the potential for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions at the Caribbean Drive sports field and Unsworth Reserve.

15.     Potential reductions may include project decisions that support walking, cycling and public transport use to access the facilities at the reserve; water and energy efficiency around sports field and lighting technology; and tree planting and revegetation of both park areas that will support increased carbon capture.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Adoption of the service provision assessment by the Upper Harbour Local Board will support future engagement during the investigation and design phase of project delivery with Auckland Council departments and council-controlled organisations concerning best practice stormwater management, transport planning, and urban design.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Funding a feasibility study on the use of the Caribbean Drive sports field is a key initiative in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2017.

18.     Support for the development of a feasibility study on the use of the Caribbean Drive sports field is also detailed within the Upper Harbour Open Space Network Plan 2018.

19.     Adoption of the completed assessment by the Upper Harbour Local Board will guide further investigation, design and development of service provision for the local community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The Caribbean Drive sports field and Unsworth Reserve are areas of public open space. Components of the assessment which are progressed further to investigation and design are likely to be of particular interest to Māori.

21.     Early engagement with Māori will take place during the investigation and design phases of projects included in the forward works programme.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     To initiate projects based on the options presented in the Caribbean Drive sports field and Unsworth Reserve service provision assessment will require further LDI capex or allocation of NZTA compensation capex funding, noting the local board has already committed funding of LDI capex to a toilet facility at Unsworth Reserve.

23.     Community Facilities staff will work with the local board to confirm those opportunities identified in the assessment that would be appropriate for further funding, and investigation and design, as part of the proposed Community Facilities work programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The investigation and design phase of project delivery may identify issues that require the feasibility of projects identified in the service provision assessment to be reassessed.

25.     The rezoning of the Caribbean Drive sports field land parcel to an ‘active sports’ zone is necessary to facilitate a more efficient delivery of sports field upgrades and related infrastructure. This action is included in the forward programme of Unitary Plan zoning updates by the Plans and Places Policy team for completion in 2020.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Subject to adoption of the Caribbean Drive sports field and Unsworth Reserve service provision assessment, progress updates on investigation of the options contained in the assessment will be provided by Community Facilities to the local board for consideration for project funding.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Caribbean Drive sports field and Unsworth Reserve service provision assessment

53

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Paul  Dabbs - Senior Contracts Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

New community lease to Albany Hall Committee Incorporated at R21 Library Lane, Albany

File No.: CP2019/20096

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a new community lease to Albany Hall Committee Incorporated located at R21 Library Lane, Albany. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Albany Hall Committee Incorporated seeks a new community lease for the land and building at R21 Library Lane, Albany. 

3.       The group has a legacy community lease with Takapuna City Council, commencing 1 October 1983. The lease agreement reached final expiry on 10 October 2013. The lease is currently holding over on a month-by-month basis.  

4.       A comprehensive application has been submitted in support of the new lease request. Staff have assessed the application and are satisfied that the requirements under Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 will be met.

5.       The report recommends, subject to public notification of the intention to grant a new lease which is a requirement of the Local Government Act 2002 and the resolution of any objections, that the Upper Harbour Local Board grant a new community lease to the group for a term of five years, with one five-year right of renewal, as specified in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      note the public notification and iwi engagement of an intention to grant a lease for the area outlined in red on Attachment A to the agenda report, at R21 Library Lane, Albany.     

b)      appoint a hearings panel to consider any submissions or objections received following the public notification, and delegate the panel to make a decision on behalf of the local board.

c)      grant, under Section 138 of the Local Government Act 2002, subject to the resolution of any objections to the lease, a new community lease to Albany Hall Committee Incorporated for 2200m2 (more or less) at R21 Library Lane, Albany, described as Part Lot 14 DP 17618 (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report), subject to the following terms and conditions: 

i)        term – five years with one five-year right of renewal 

ii)       rent – $1 plus GST per annum if requested 

iii)      Community Outcomes Plan, to be approved by the Upper Harbour Local Board Chairperson in consultation with local board members, be attached to the community lease document.

d)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines July 2012. 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The report considers a new community lease to Albany Hall Committee Incorporated at R21 Library Lane, Albany. 

7.       The Upper Harbour Local Board is the allocated decision-maker relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.  

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Albany Hall Committee Incorporated

8.       Albany Hall Committee Incorporated (formerly The Fruitgrowers Association) was formed in 1893. The need for a community hall in the village was identified and the first public meeting to discuss its build was held in 1897. 

9.       Albany Coronation Hall was built in 1911 by the local community to serve as a venue for indoor displays at the annual Albany Agricultural Show. The hall is believed to be the first purpose-built community building in the Upper Harbour area. The construction of the hall was largely due to the efforts of the former Fruitgrowers Association. 

10.     Following discussions with the former Takapuna City Council in 1983, the land and buildings were transferred to council and a lease for 30 years was agreed between the council and the association. 

11.     Albany Hall Committee Incorporated act as custodians of the Albany Hall for Auckland Council and the local community. The volunteer committee has been administering the operation, hiring and maintenance of the hall for the past 50 years.

Albany Coronation Hall

12.     The hall is located on land legally described as Lot 14 DP 17618. The land is held by Auckland Council in fee simple, subject to the Local Government Act 2002. 

13.     The community hall is well utilised by Upper Harbour communities. It continues to host various activities such as fitness classes, various markets and fairs, annual and biennial events (Cactus and Succulent Show and Sale, North Shore Miniatures Club, Albany Vinyl Record Fair etc). 

14.     The activities of the group and the utilisation of the facility and land supports the local board plan in that it empowers and connects the community and supports a thriving local economy. 

Public notification and iwi engagement

15.     The land is owned by council under the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA). Section 138 of the LGA requires that before a lease of longer than six months is granted, council must consult the community on the proposal.

16.     A public notice will be placed in the North Harbour News and on the Auckland Council website. Submitters are allowed one calendar month from the publication date to make submissions. 

17.     Under Section 81 of the LGA, iwi engagement is required and has been undertaken with mana whenua identified as having an interest in land in the Upper Harbour Local Board geographical area. 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     There is no impact on greenhouse gas emissions as the proposal does not introduce any new source of emissions. 

19.     Climate change will unlikely impact the proposed lease as the site is not within a flooding zone or near the coast.   

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     A new community lease to Albany Hall Committee Incorporated has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The Upper Harbour Local Board is the allocated decision-making authority to approve community leases.  

22.     The propose new lease to Albany Hall Committee Incorporated is an approved item on the Community Facilities work programme for 2019/2020.  

23.     At its workshop on 22 August 2019, the local board expressed support for the group and the proposed new lease. The Upper Harbour Local Board provided direction for the proposed lease area to the Albany Hall Committee Incorporated and supported the inclusion of the carpark as part of the leased area. 

24.     The recommendations from this report support the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes for: 

·        Empowered, engaged and connected Upper Harbour communities

·        A thriving local economy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi which are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents; the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2018-2028, the Unitary Plan and local board plans. 

26.     An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development. This proposal seeks to improve access to facilities for all Aucklanders, including Māori living in the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

27.     Iwi engagement was achieved through written communication on 17 October 2019 to iwi who have a key interest in the site located at R21 Library Lane, Albany. No objections were raised by the iwi representatives who responded. 

28.     There are no changes to the use or operational activities being conducted on the land.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The costs associated with public notification and the preparation of the lease document will be borne by Auckland Council. 

30.     Albany Hall Committee Incorporated will be responsible for the maintenance of the carpark and building that is included in their lease area.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     Should the Upper Harbour Local Board resolve not to grant a new community lease to the Albany Hall Committee Incorporated, the group's ability to undertake its core activities will be materially affected, which in turn will have a negative impact on the desired local board outcomes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Subject to the Upper Harbour Local Board’s resolution, a public notice will be placed for 30 calendar days in the North Harbour News and on the Auckland Council website. 

33.     Should there be no objections, council staff will work with key representatives of the group to finalise the lease documents.    

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site plan for Albany Hall Committee Incorporated lease area

115

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Deepal Chand - Community Lease Specialist

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

New community lease to Sustainable Paremoremo Group at R142-178 Sanders Road, Sanders Reserve, Paremoremo

File No.: CP2019/20103

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a new community lease to Sustainable Paremoremo Group located on part of R142-178 Sanders Road, Sanders Reserve, Paremoremo.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Sustainable Paremoremo Group has a community lease commencing 14 December 2014 for five years. The lease finally expires on 11 December 2019.

3.       The land is legally described as Part Lot 5 DP 193647 and held in fee simple by the Auckland Council and classified as a recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.

4.       The proposed use of the site as a community hub is of a local purpose nature and a lease under Section 73(3) of the Reserves Act 1977 is required. Prior to granting the lease, public notification is required as the activity is contrary to the current classification. This includes advertising and iwi consultation. 

5.       The report recommends the Upper Harbour Local Board grant a new community lease to the group for a term of five years, with one five-year right of renewal, as specified in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      note the public notification and iwi engagement of an intention to grant a lease for the area outlined in red on Attachment A to the agenda report, at R142-178 Sanders Road, Sanders Reserve, Paremoremo.    

b)      appoint a hearings panel to consider any submissions or objections received following the public notification, and delegate the panel to make a decision on behalf of the board.

c)      grant, under Section 73(3) of the Reserves Act 1977, subject to the resolution of any objections to the lease, a new community lease to the Sustainable Paremoremo Group for 3120m2 (more or less) on part of R142-178 Sanders Road, Sanders Reserve,  Paremoremo, described as Part Lot 5 DP 193647 (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – five years with one five-year right of renewal

ii)       rent – $1 plus GST per annum if requested

iii)      Community Outcomes Plan, to be approved by the Upper Harbour Local Board Chair in consultation with local board members, be attached to the community lease document

iv)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       This report considers a new community lease to Sustainable Paremoremo for part of Sanders Reserve, R142-178 Sanders Reserve, Paremoremo.  

7.       The Upper Harbour Local Board is the allocated decision-making authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.  

Land and buildings 

8.       Sanders Reserve compromises 41ha on Sanders Road, located at the end of the Paremoremo peninsula. Since being purchased by the council in 2002, the reserve has been developed to provide for recreational cycling, equestrian and walking tracks and dog exercises areas.  

9.       The lease area is described as being located on Part Lot 5 DP 193647, held in fee simple by the Auckland Council as a classified recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.  

10.     The land and building within the proposed lease area are owned by Auckland Council.  

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Public notification and iwi engagement 

11.     The operative reserve management plan for Sanders Reserve does not contemplate a lease for any purpose on the land. The land classification of recreation reserve does not support the proposed use of the property as a community hub.  

12.     A lease can be issued pursuant to Section 73(3) of the Reserves Act 1977 when it is not practical to revoke the reserve classification. In this case, the group is occupying only a small portion of the reserve.  

13.     Pursuant to Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987, prior to the granting of any new lease, iwi engagement is required with iwi groups identified with having an interest in the Upper Harbour Local Board area. In addition, public notification is required under Section 73 of the Reserves Act 1977. Submitters are allowed one calendar month from the publication date to make submissions or objections.  

Sustainable Paremoremo Group 

14.     Sustainable Paremoremo was founded in 2007 and was established as a charitable trust on 14 October 2013. The objectives of the group are to assist people in the Paremoremo area to live and work together in planning and conducting sustainable management of the land and other resource-based projects in the area.  

15.     In recent years, Sustainable Paremoremo has initiated a project called the Pare-dise Project, which focuses on the restoration and re-vegetation of native plants in the Paremoremo catchment. This is an active project and to date, has planted over 40,000 trees.  

16.     The group has 15 part-time volunteers. It has also partnered with the Department of Corrections Work Division who provide labour to plant, weed and mulch on the reserve.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The restoration and re-vegetation of native plants assists in the mitigation of global warming. The proposal of a new lease to Sustainable Paremoremo does not introduce any new source of greenhouse gas emissions.  

18.     Climate change is unlikely to impact the site during the term of the proposed lease because the site is not within a 1-in-100 years flood zone, or by river or surface flooding. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     Staff obtained input from Parks, Sports and Recreation, Community Development and Operational Management and Maintenance in preparing this report.  

20.     No concerns were raised regarding a new community lease being granted to the group. 

21.     A new community lease to the group has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report.  

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The Upper Harbour Local Board has delegated authority to approve the granting of a new community lease. 

23.     The Upper Harbour Local Board expressed support for a new community lease at a workshop held on 22 August 2019. This item is not on the local board’s approved work programme but is being progressed, having received a directive from the local board to progress the new lease.  

24.     The recommendations in this report support the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes for:

·        Empowered, engaged and connected Upper Harbour communities 

·        Healthy and active communities 

·        Our environment is valued, protected and enhanced. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi which are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents; the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2018-2028, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.  

26.     An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development. This proposal seeks to improve access to facilities for all Aucklanders, including Māori living in the Upper Harbour Local Board area. 

27.     Iwi engagement was achieved through written communication on 14 October 2019 to iwi who have a key interest in the site located on Sanders Reserve. No objections were raised by the iwi representatives who responded.  

28.     There are no changes to the use or operational activities being conducted on the land. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The costs associated with public notification and the preparation of the lease document will be borne by Auckland Council.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     Should the Upper Harbour Local Board resolve not to grant a new community lease to the Sustainable Paremoremo Group at Sanders Reserve, the group’s ability to undertake its core activities will be materially affected, which in turn will have a negative impact on the desired local board outcomes.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Subject to the Upper Harbour Local Board’s resolution, a public notice will be placed for 30 calendar days in the North Harbour News and on the Auckland Council website. 

32.     Should there be no objections, council staff will work with key representatives of the group to finalise the lease documents.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site plan for the Sustainable Paremoremo lease area

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Deepal Chand - Community Lease Specialist

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Additional local parks land classifications

File No.: CP2019/19417

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm land to be held under the Local Government Act 2002, to make decisions on land status and classification of land under the Reserves Act 1977, and approve public notification where required.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As part of the classification programme and development of the local parks management plan under the Reserves Act 1977, additional classification decisions are needed for several local parks in the Upper Harbour Local Board area. The reasons for this are:

·        some parcels were excluded from an earlier report to the local board, pending further investigation

·        some parcels in Hobsonville Point and Scott Point were not included in the initial land status review

·        the park values of some classified Reserves Act parcels have been investigated further to determine whether they align with their primary values.

3.       Staff have considered the benefits and disadvantages of the Reserves Act 1977 and Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) in managing and enabling the use, protection and development of each local park, and have developed a set of criteria to guide assessment of each land parcel.

4.       These criteria incorporate guidance from the Reserves Act Guide[1], consideration of the local park’s values, current and likely future use of the local park, workshop feedback from the local board and consultation with mana whenua.

5.       The status and recommendations for parcels of land included in this report is as follows:

Land status

Recommended actions

Seven parcels held under the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA)

·    five parcels at Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park to be retained under the LGA to ensure flexibility for future options following development of the park

·    two parcels to be declared reserves and classified

22 unclassified parcels held under the Reserves Act 1977

·    to be classified as outlined in Attachment B – public notification is not required for these parcels

11 parcels classified and held under the Reserves Act 1977, being considered for reclassification

·    all proposed reclassifications (Attachment C) need to be publicly notified

·    two parcels at Malcolm Hahn Memorial Reserve require surveying prior to gazettal (Attachment D)

 


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      confirm that five parcels of land at Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park, as described in the following table, will continue to be held under the Local Government Act 2002:

Park

Recommendation

Public notification required?

Reason

Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park

·   Lot 1 DP 120665

·   Lot 2 DP 120665

·   Lot 10 DP 66174

·   Lot 55 DP 495850

Retain under LGA

No

Retain flexibility for future options following development of the park

Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park

·   Lot 56 DP 495850

Retain under LGA

No

Enable further discussion with mana whenua and specialists to determine the most appropriate scenic reserve classification

b)      approve Lot 106 DP 182287 at George Pannill Park to be declared and classified a local purpose (esplanade) reserve, pursuant to Section 14(1) of the Reserves Act 1977.

c)      approve Lot 300 DP 505573 (1 Observation Green, Hobsonville) to be declared and classified a recreation reserve pursuant to Section 14(1) of the Reserves Act 1977.

d)      approve 22 parcels of land to be classified pursuant to Sections 16(1) and 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, as described in Attachment B of the agenda report (dated 5 December 2019).

e)      approve public notification of the proposals to reclassify nine parcels of land pursuant to Section 24(2)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977, as described in Attachment C of the agenda report (dated 5 December 2019).

f)       approve public notification of the proposal to reclassify part of Malcolm Hahn Memorial Reserve marked in red in Attachment D of the agenda report (dated 5 December 2019) from local purpose (community building) reserve and recreation reserve to local purpose (esplanade) reserve subject to survey, pursuant to Section 24(2)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977.

 

Horopaki

Context

Background information

6.       The Upper Harbour Local Board has allocated and delegated decision-making responsibility for all local parks in the local board area.

7.       On 21 June 2018, the local board resolved to prepare an omnibus open space management plan for all local parks in the local board area (local parks management plan), to assist park management and to meet obligations for reserve management planning under the Reserves Act 1977 (RA) (resolution number UH/2018/66).

8.       An essential step in the development of a local parks management plan is to review the land status of all local parks. This process includes:

·        determining whether land should be held under the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) or the RA

·        considering the most appropriate classification options for land held under the RA.

9.       The timeline below gives an overview of the decisions made by the local board and key milestones in the development of the local parks management plan to date:  

Further decision-making required

10.     Additional classification decisions are needed for the following reasons:

·        some parcels were excluded from the May 2019 report pending further investigation

·        some parcels in Hobsonville Point and Scott Point were not included in the initial land status review

·        the park values of some classified RA parcels have been investigated further, and reclassification is recommended to align with the primary values.

11.     Some of the parcels are unclassified and this will need to be addressed before they can be included in the local parks management plan.

12.     Making decisions about these land parcels now will enable staff to begin drafting the local parks management plan in early 2020, with the confidence that the land classification stage of the project is complete.

13.     The status of the parcels still to be considered is as follows:

·        held under the LGA: seven parcels

·        unclassified RA: 22 parcels

·        classified and being considered for reclassification: 11 parcels.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Guidance about land status decision-making

14.     Throughout 2019, the local board has participated in several workshops regarding land status and land classification. These workshops have enabled the local board to become familiar with the implications of land status options and classification recommendations.

15.     The local board report presented to the May 2019 meeting (Attachment A) provides a summary of the land status and classification process and rationale. In particular:

·        paragraphs 25 – 27 and 30 – 32, which discuss land status options and what we consider when recommending whether to retain land under the LGA or declare and classify it under the RA

·        paragraphs 43 – 45, which provide background information about land classification options.

Proposed actions for seven land parcels held under the LGA

Five land parcels at Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park to be retained under the LGA

16.     Five parcels at Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park are recommended to be retained under the LGA, as per Table 1 below:

Table 1: Land to be retained under the LGA

Park

Recommendation

Public notification required?

Reason

Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park

·   Lot 1 DP 120665

·   Lot 2 DP 120665

·   Lot 10 DP 66174

·   Lot 55 DP 495850

Retain under LGA

No

Retain flexibility for future options following development of the park

Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park

·   Lot 56 DP 495850

Retain under LGA

No

Enable further discussion with mana whenua and specialists to determine the most appropriate scenic reserve classification

17.     Staff will provide further advice on whether these parcels should be declared and classified once development has been completed, and following further discussion between mana whenua and relevant council specialists to determine the most appropriate scenic classification for part of the park.

Two land parcels to be declared and classified

18.     Two land parcels currently held under the LGA are proposed to be declared a reserve and classified. Table 2 below outlines those reserves and the proposed classifications:


 

Table 2: Land to be declared reserve and classified

Park

Recommendation

Public notification required?

Reason

George Pannill Park (also known as Burnside Escarpment)

·   Lot 106 DP 182287

Declare and classify local purpose (esplanade) reserve

No

Reflect primary purpose of land; ensure consistency with adjacent parcels of park land (all held under RA)

Parkland at Observation Green

·   Lot 300 DP 505573

Declare and classify recreation reserve

No

Reflect primary purpose of land

Proposed actions for unclassified RA land

19.     This report makes recommendations concerning 22 unclassified RA land parcels (Attachment B). All RA land must be classified before being included in the local parks management plan, so the local board will need to decide the most appropriate classification for each parcel.

Proposed reclassification of RA land

20.     Staff recommend that 11 RA land parcels are wholly or partially reclassified (Attachment C).

21.     Reclassification is recommended when the current land classification does not reflect the primary use of the land, or when a classification error needs to be amended. In all cases, reclassification requires public notification, pursuant to Section 24(2)(b) of the RA.

Surveying required for parcels to be reclassified

22.     Attachment D contains a recommendation to survey off the indigenous bush that forms part of the two land parcels at Malcolm Hahn Memorial Reserve and reclassify the surveyed-off section as local purpose (esplanade) reserve.

23.     This reclassification would give additional protection to the indigenous bush, which is not protected under the Auckland Unitary Plan’s Special Ecological Area overlay. The remainder of the two land parcels would retain their existing classifications.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

Potential impact of proposed decisions on greenhouse gas emissions

24.     While the decisions in this report are administrative, decisions on land use and protection is a factor in managing climate impacts. 

25.     However, future management and potential development of park land, which is determined by its purpose, could have a potential positive or negative impact on greenhouse gas emissions. The degree and nature of the impact is dependent on the specific management and development of each park. Two examples of potential impacts are:

·        A potential reduction of emissions by classifying land as scenic reserve. The purpose of a scenic reserve is largely to protect and restore the natural environment; ecological restoration of a site could result in a reduction of emissions and increase in carbon sequestration.

·        A potential increase in emissions through increased traffic, following the development of a community facility; the development of facilities could be enabled through the classification of local purpose (community) reserve or recreation reserve. 

Effect of climate change over the lifetime of the proposed decisions

26.     Classification recommendations in this report consider the potential impacts of climate change in the context of current and future use and values of a park. An example of this is the consideration of whether a park could be affected by coastal inundation or sea level rises in the future. This can influence a recommendation on how to classify or reclassify the land.

27.     The lifetime of classification decisions is indefinite, except where the local board chooses and has the discretion under RA to change the classification in the future.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The land classification investigations that have formed the recommendations in this report have been discussed with relevant council units, including Parks, Sport, and Recreation, Community Facilities (including Leasing), Heritage, Policy and Biodiversity.

29.     The recommendation to retain Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park under the LGA has been made to enable the successful planned development of the park.

30.     Staff have reviewed the recommendation to reclassify Part Lot 14 DP 17618 in Albany Domain as a local purpose (community use) reserve (refer Attachment C), considering the investigation of potential sites for the provision of future library services in the Upper Harbour Local Board area. The recommended reclassification would not prevent any opportunities currently being investigated to be progressed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     A workshop was held with the current local board on 7 November 2019 to present the land classification recommendations detailed in this report. Amendments have been made to the proposed classifications based on feedback from local board members present at the workshop.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     As discussed in paragraphs 61 – 67 of Attachment A, extensive mana whenua engagement has been a feature of the entire Upper Harbour land classification process. Staff have developed strong relationships with mana whenua, and their feedback has strengthened and is reflected in classification recommendations.

33.     In October 2019, two separate hui were held to specifically address the land classification recommendations presented in this report. Representatives from Te Ākitai Waiohua, Te Kawerau a Maki, Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara, and Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki each attended one of the two hui. All 40 land parcels under consideration were discussed.

34.     Representatives from Te Patukirikiri, Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua, and Ngāti Manuhiri were unable to attend the two hui and requested a full written summary of land classification recommendations.

35.     In general, mana whenua supported our rationale and proposals for land classification. Two recommendations were challenged, one of which, the bush area of Malcolm Hahn Memorial Reserve, has been discussed in paragraph 22 of this report.

36.     As a result of consultation, one parcel of park land at Tauhinui Reserve requires additional investigation and discussions between mana whenua and the council’s Heritage Policy team before a recommendation can be made to the local board.

37.     Mana whenua’s land classification recommendations emphasise the importance of kaitiakitanga by protecting the environment with the highest level of protection available. However, mana whenua balances their kaitiaki role with recognition that Upper Harbour residents need access to recreational spaces.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     This report has no financial implications for the local board. The cost for public notices, surveying and hearings (if required) will be covered through existing departmental budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     Staff undertook a comprehensive risk assessment as part of the process of classifying and reclassifying land. The following table outlines relevant risks and mitigations.

Risk

Mitigation

Perception that land held under the LGA is at risk of sale or disposal

Emphasise the restrictions on disposal of parks under Section 138 of the LGA and the requirement to undertake consultation, including prior to granting leases for more than six months.

RA classifications constrain the range of uses that land can be used for

Recommendations reflect current land use and do not add additional restrictions.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The next steps following this decision are:

·        gazettal for those parcels where public notification is not needed

·        publish notice in local newspaper for parcel requiring public notification (for at least one calendar month)

·        report to the local board early in early 2020 to address any submissions and confirm classification proposals that were publicly notified.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Land classification report to Upper Harbour Local Board from 16 May 2019

131

b

Land parcels to be classified, public notification not required

139

c

Land parcels to be reclassified, public notification mandatory

141

d

Land parcels to be surveyed and reclassified, public notification mandatory

143

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacquelyn Collins - Service and Asset Planner

Nicki Malone - Service and Asset Planner

Authorisers

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Allocation of funds to unscheduled parks maintenance activities and improved levels of service in parks and reserves

File No.: CP2019/19962

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve allocation of funding for improved levels of service or unscheduled parks maintenance activities in Upper Harbour Local Board parks and reserves.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As part of the Community Facilities annual work programme, the Upper Harbour Local Board approved a total of $40,000 of locally driven initiatives operational budget (LDI opex) for improved levels of service for maintenance of reserve plantings in various parks, and to provide for unscheduled reserve maintenance as required (SharePoint ID3054).

3.       During quarter one of the 2019/2020 financial year, staff have identified three types of activities that can be delivered from this fund: to assist with pest plant control, tracks maintenance work and in-fill shrub planting of garden beds.

4.       Staff recommend the local board allocate the totality of the funding to these activities to enable efficient delivery of increased levels of service and unscheduled maintenance in parks in the 2019/2020 financial year.

5.       Staff also seek delegation to utilise this fund, in consultation with the Topic Area Leads Parks (Reserves), Sport and Recreation, noting that delivery of activities will be reported back to the local board through quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve allocation of the $40,000 from the 2019/2020 Community Facilities work programme ID 3054 ‘Upper Harbour Local Parks Maintenance for unscheduled maintenance or increased level of service’ towards pest plant control, track maintenance and in-fill shrub planting, as identified in consultation with the Topic Area Leads Parks (Reserves), Sport and Recreation.

b)      note the update to activity name and description for the 2019/2020 Community Facilities work programme ID 3054 - Upper Harbour Local Parks Maintenance - increased level of service:

i)        activity name: Upper Harbour Local Parks Maintenance for unscheduled maintenance or increased level of service

ii)       activity description: extra level of service to provide for unscheduled reserve maintenance or additional maintenance of reserve planting, as may be required, within the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

c)      delegate to staff, in consultation via email with the Topic Area Leads Parks (Reserves), Sport and Recreation, further decision-making in relation to 2019/2020 Community Facilities work programme ID 3054 ‘Upper Harbour Local Parks Maintenance for unscheduled maintenance or increased levels of service’ as required, and report progress of activity delivery through quarterly performance reports.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board can provide additional LDI opex for improving levels of service for park maintenance for unscheduled maintenance or increased levels of service via its work programme. This funding can be used for increased levels of service or additional maintenance work on an ad hoc basis.

7.       For the 2019/2020 financial year, the local board approved $40,000 to support operational management and maintenance undertaken by Community Facilities (resolution number UH/2019/70).

8.       Staff have considered options for the use of this fund which need to be approved by the local board. It is noted that the proposed activities will provide for enhanced service as envisioned at the time of approval of this funding line.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       Overall, the allocated funding supports the Community Facilities operational management and maintenance and can be used to enhance amenity shrub plantings, tackle additional pest plant control and create improved walking surfaces around the Upper Harbour track networks. All of this will lead to enhanced public space and support the native flora and fauna.

10.     Staff are seeking delegation to access this fund to undertake increased level of service or additional maintenance work on an ad hoc basis for these three types of activities:

·        to assist with pest plant control

·        tracks maintenance work

·        in-fill shrub planting of garden beds.

11.     Staff recommend the local board allocate the totality of the funding to these activities to enable efficient delivery of increased levels of service and unscheduled maintenance in parks in the 2019/2020 financial year.

12.     As subsequent operational decisions may be required, staff also seek a delegation to utilise this fund, noting that delivery of activities will be reported back to the local board through quarterly performance reports. Staff would exercise this delegation in consultation with the Topic Area Leads Parks (Reserves), Sport and Recreation

Work programme update

13.     Following the board’s approval of the 2019/2020 Community Facilities work programme and decision to allocate $40,000 to project ID3054, the work programme description of this project required updating to ensure the activity name and description reflect the board’s intended purpose and scope of this fund.

14.     This update is as follows:

·        activity name: Upper Harbour Local Parks Maintenance for unscheduled maintenance or increased level of service

·        activity description: extra level of service to provide for unscheduled reserve maintenance or additional maintenance of reserve planting, as may be required, within the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     Although this report is procedural in nature and the activities are not seen to have a substantive impact on the climate, the addition of reserve planting of any nature enhances the natural environment which in turn, leads to a decrease in the impact of carbon emissions on the environment.   

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     This initiative is supported by the Operational Management and Maintenance team as it enhances the level of services within the park network.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     The local board have shown approval for the increased level of service through the approval of LDI opex for the project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     The improvements within parks, reserves and surrounds will have a positive impact on all members of the community who utilise the spaces, including Māori. It is recognised that nature is a key foundation within Māori culture and enhancement of the natural environment within the Upper Harbour Local Board area will be beneficial to Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     LDI opex of $40,000 has been approved by the local board in the current financial year.

20.     Attachment A outlines the recommended change to activity name and description.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     There are no foreseen risks associated with the recommendation outlined in this report. Should the project not be delivered, the funds will require redistribution within the local board’s LDI opex budget prior to the end of the 2019/2020 financial year to ensure that the money can be utilised elsewhere.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Following formal approval to allocate the budget and the associated delegation to staff, as well as the recommended change in activity description, Community Facilities staff will project manage all works, with completion expected by 30 June 2020.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Amendment to Upper Harbour local parks maintenance - increased level of service

149

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cherie Veza - Stakeholder Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Community Facilities Risk Adjusted Programme amendment

File No.: CP2019/19880

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve additional projects to be included in the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Board Community Facilities Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP). 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The approved 2019/2020 Community Facilities work programme and 2020-2022 indicative work programme included projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).

3.       These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress in advance of the programmed delivery year, should there be any unforeseen delays to 2019/2020 projects, to ensure 100 per cent of financial delivery.

4.       Since approval of the work programme in June 2019, additional 2020/2021 projects have been identified by staff as being ready to deliver this financial year, should it be necessary.

5.       Approval is sought from the local board to amend the work programme to include the additional projects in the 2019/2020 Community Facilities RAP.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the addition of the following projects to the Upper Harbour Local Board 2019/2020 Community Facilities Risk Adjusted Programme and indicative 2020-2022 Community Facilities work programme, noting that these may be delivered in advance of the expected delivery year, if required, to meet expected financial expenditure for the 2019/2020 financial year:

i)        SharePoint ID 3021 Brookfield Stream Reserve – renewal of walkways and paths

ii)       SharePoint ID 2419 Huntington Reserve – develop playspace

iii)      SharePoint ID 2433 Luckens Reserve – improve parks facilities

iv)      SharePoint ID 2511 Upper Harbour – implement actions from the Marine Sport facility audit.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Upper Harbour Local Board approved its 2019/2020 Community Facilities (CF) work programme and indicative 2020-2022 work programme in June 2019. This work programme specifies activities and projects relating to building, maintaining and renewing all open spaces and community buildings, including community leasing and licensing of council-owned premises.

7.       The CF work programme is a three-year programme that provides visibility of the phasing of project delivery and to enable the organisation to prepare for delivery. The work programme is subject to a rolling review and each year the local board will be asked to approve a new three-year work programme.

8.       The delivery of the proposed work programme in an efficient and timely manner may require amendments to be made to the agreed work programme during the course of the year. Such amendments could include:

·        changes to project scope, budgets, timelines

·        addition of new projects within available budget

·        cancelling or putting approved projects on hold.

9.       Any changes to the approved work programme require approval from the local board.

10.     This report recommends amendments to project timelines in the CF work programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The approved 2019/2020 CF work programme and indicative 2020-2022 work programme included a number of projects identified as Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) projects. These are projects with budgets allocated in the 2020/2021 financial year (i.e. year two of the three-year programme) but where delivery can start in the 2019/2020 financial year.

12.     The main purpose of identifying RAP projects is to ensure 100 per cent of financial delivery of the approved annual budget; should any 2019/2020 projects be delayed due to unforeseen circumstances, RAP projects can be progressed while the causes for delays are addressed.

13.     Reasons for delays include matters such as consenting, heritage items identified, and consultation requirements.

14.     The currently approved Upper Harbour Local Board RAP includes the following projects (approved in June 2019):

·        SharePoint ID3020: Albany Lakes plant electrical facility upgrade

·        SharePoint ID2399: Exeter Reserve – replace steps to Devonshire Place and renew walkways

·        SharePoint ID2401: Fernhill Escarpment – renew walkway and wayfinding signage

·        SharePoint ID2074: Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park

·        SharePoint ID2533: Wharepapa Reserve – reconfigure playspace.

15.     Since June 2019, the additional 2020/2021 projects have been identified by work programme coordinators as being ready for delivery in the current financial year:

·        SharePoint ID 3021: Brookfield Stream Reserve – renewal of walkways and paths

·        SharePoint ID 2419: Huntington Reserve – develop playspace

·        SharePoint ID 2433: Luckens Reserve – improve parks facilities

·        SharePoint ID 2511: Upper Harbour – implement actions from the Marine Sport facility audit.

16.     Project ID 3021 Brookfield Stream Reserve – renewal of walkways and paths: this project is funded by renewals budget and therefore, can only be delivered in the current financial year if there is both financial and non-financial capacity, i.e. if a current 2019/2020 project is unable to be delivered and budget becomes available.

17.     The remaining three projects are funded from locally driven initiatives capital budgets (LDI capex) which are three-year funds that can be brought forward at any time to deliver sooner if the ideal circumstances arise, i.e. works are ready to commence and there is staff capacity for delivery.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     This report recommends amendments to the timelines of projects already included in the work programme. The addition of the proposed projects to the RAP is not expected to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

19.     Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     When developing the work programmes, council group impacts and views are presented to local boards. At this time, no further impacts are identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     A decision to include the identified projects in the RAP may result in delivery of projects earlier than initially programmed.

22.     Should work programme coordinators become aware of delays to projects in the 2019/2020, the local board will be notified at the earliest opportunity and staff will seek the board’s views on which RAP projects are to be progressed instead.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The Community Facilities work programme ensures that all facilities and open space assets continue to be well-maintained assets that benefit the local community, including Māori. When developing and delivering work programmes, consideration is given to how the activities can contribute to Māori wellbeing, values, culture and traditions.

24.     Where work programme activities are anticipated to have a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua, then appropriate engagement will be undertaken. This includes attending mana whenua forums to seek feedback on specific projects.

25.     The following RAP project has identified specific Māori outcomes:

·        Huntington Reserve – develop play space.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     Should the local board approve the proposed additions to the RAP, and such projects start delivery in the 2019/2020 financial year, financial implications will be reported through quarterly reports and financial updates.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity. The RAP can then be used to progress those projects identified as ready to proceed.

28.     If the proposed amendment to the Community Facilities Risk Adjusted Programme is not approved, there is a risk that the highest priority outcomes will not be delivered to 100 per cent of the approved budget value.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     The Community Facilities work programme will be updated to reflect the decisions of the board. A draft work programme updated with proposed additional RAP projects is included in Attachment A. 

30.     Work programme coordinators will provide regular updates to the board on the progress of project delivery, including informing the board of any project updates that require activation of RAP projects before commencing works.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Updated Community Facilities work programme (draft)

155

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rita Bento-Allpress - Senior Local Board Advisor Upper Harbour

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Land owner approval application for a new amenity building at Rosedale Park

File No.: CP2019/19426

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To give land owner approval for the Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust to construct a new amenity building inside their current leased area at Rosedale Park, Rosedale.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust are proposing to construct a new amenity building at Rosedale Park.

3.       The proposal has been assessed by council staff for the Upper Harbour Local Board area. The specialists are supportive of the proposal and have given conditions to mitigate any potential adverse effects on the reserve.

4.       The proposal aligns with Rosedale Park’s land classification and is consistent with the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2017 outcome, ‘Healthy and active communities’.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the land owner application from the Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust for the proposed amenity building within the existing leased area at Rosedale Park, as outlined in the aerial map provided at Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

Proposal

5.       The applicant, Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust (HHCT), is proposing to construct a new amenity building at Rosedale Park.

6.       The building will be two storeys high, and will consist of changing rooms, toilets, storage space for turf and training equipment, and meeting spaces for player support and coaching programmes.

7.       The building will be located south of the hockey turf (referred to as Field 5) within the current leased area, adjacent to the playground near the carpark area (refer to Attachment A).

8.       The applicant’s intention is to make the proposed building available for other sport club members on the reserve, such as the football and softball clubs, to utilise when they access the hockey turf.

9.       Stormwater from the proposed building will be captured and reused for the existing pitch irrigation system. Wastewater will be connected to the existing underground wastewater network in Rosedale Park. A detailed service plan for these connections has not yet been received.

10.     The building’s façade, backing onto the playground and carpark area, will be finished with honed blocks to mitigate the appearance of this façade on the playground and carparking area. Mitigation planting will also be undertaken to soften the appearance of the building façade when viewed from the playground and carpark area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Site details

11.     Rosedale Park is located at 320 Rosedale Road, Rosedale. The reserve is legally described as Part Lot 133 Parish of Paremoremo. Rosedale Park is a classified recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 and the activity is supported under the act.

Analysis

12.     Construction access will be via the existing access, through the lower carpark and turf driveway. Public access to Field 5, the playground and the carpark will not be obstructed during the construction phase which is expected to take four to six months. A health and safety fence will be erected around the construction area to prevent public access to the construction site.

13.     No trees will be impacted by this proposal. The building location will not have any impacts on the Alexander Stream as the building is set back approximately 28m from the stream.

14.     The following specialists in council were contacted regarding the proposal. There were no objections from the specialists:

·        Parks and Places Specialist

·        Senior Maintenance Delivery Coordinator

·        Manager Landscape Architecture

·        Senior Arboriculture and Eco-specialist

·        Sport and Recreation Lead

·        Senior Community Lease Specialist.

15.     As the building is proposed within the applicant’s current leased area, a new lease is not required. An amendment may be made by the Community Lease Specialist to include the building in the maintenance schedule of the current lease should this application be approved. This amendment will not require public notification.

Conditions

16.     The following conditions are recommended by the specialists to be included in the land owner approval to mitigate the impacts of the works:

·        the building façade adjacent to the playground and carpark area must be finished with honed blocks (this was agreed to by the applicant)

·        the trust will be responsible for all day-to-day maintenance and renewals work required to the building, including services

·        the trust must open up the toilet facilities to the public whenever the building is in use by any groups, sport teams, or users

·        the trust must make the facility available to the other groups and sports clubs when the hockey sports club is not using the building.

Alternative options

17.     Three alternative options were investigated but were discounted as discussed below (the preferred option is that outlined in the proposal above).

Option One

18.     The first option is to locate the proposed amenity building on the western side of hockey Field 5 (as indicated in Attachment B), where the side-line shelter/dugout currently sits. This is not a viable option for the following reasons:

·        The existing dugouts are essential for the turf and are required for the teams during half-time. All hockey dugouts should be positioned at the halfway mark of the hockey pitch.

·        There is not enough space to position the building elsewhere along the western side of the path. The strip between the path and the boundary fence is 7m to 8m wide. The proposed building is 8.3m deep. The building would also need to be set back from the property boundary.

·        For health and safety reasons, the proposed building needs to be located behind high fencing to protect people and property from flying balls. An extra fence, 6m high, would be required – this would give the turf a greater ‘caged in’ feeling. The two ends of the turf are already required to have 6m-high fencing and therefore, the proposed location of the building will not require additional fencing height.

·        Locating the building along the western side of the hockey turf increases the environmental risks as it is situated close to the Alexander Stream, a significant ecological area. It would require significant earthworks to ensure bank stability.

·        The proposed location near the carpark and playground areas is more centrally located so that the public, along with football and softball members, can easily access the amenity building and toilets. Its position, en route to the turf, makes it a convenient location for changing rooms. Positioning the building in the alternative location, along the western side of the turf, will make the building appear to be more exclusive to hockey and will require football and softball members, as well as the public playground users, to walk a further distance to utilise the amenities.

Option Two

19.     The second option is to incorporate the existing council public toilets into the proposed building. This would result in the removal of the existing toilet block and reduce the number of buildings on the reserve.

20.     Incorporating the Auckland Council public toilets into the applicant’s amenity building will require local board funding to go towards maintenance and/or construction of the facility. The funding would need to be agreed with by the applicant.

21.     This option was considered on the assumption that the existing public toilet was up for renewal. The Manager Work Programmes (North, West and Regional), Community Facilities, has confirmed that renewal of the subject toilet block is not currently in the three-year programme or the future pipeline programme.

Option Three

22.     The third option is to have no new amenity building supporting Field 5 at Rosedale Park.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     There are no anticipated impacts on the climate as a result of this proposal.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The applicant will be required to obtain a building consent and/or resource consent. 

25.     The application involves connecting the proposed building’s wastewater to the existing pump station servicing all buildings in the sports park (located just north of the existing public toilet block. This wastewater connection will be public, and therefore maintained by Watercare Services Limited.

26.     Truck movements to and from, as well as within, Rosedale Park for the construction of the building will be managed through a traffic management plan, approved by Auckland Transport.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     An overview of this land owner approval application was sent to the Upper Harbour Local Board for feedback on 15 May 2019. The feedback received from the local board at this time was not unified and, therefore, a formal report was requested.

28.     The application is consistent with, and supports the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2017, specifically Outcome 3: ‘Healthy and active communities’, by providing additional sports facilities.

29.     The proposal does not impact the wider environment negatively.

30.     The proposed amenity building will be available for other sports teams, such as football and softball, and users of Rosedale Park.

31.     The Harbour Hockey Charitable Trust has agreed to keep other users and groups in Rosedale Park, such as the football and softball teams, fully informed of the project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     There are no areas of significance to mana whenua at Rosedale Park. No iwi consultation has been undertaken by the applicant or the council as there is no readily identifiable impact on Māori heritage and culture.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     The proposed amenity building will be located inside the applicant’s current leased area. All maintenance responsibilities will be given to the applicant, which will be managed through their lease agreement. There are therefore no major financial implications for the local board in relation to the proposal.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The proposed building will be oriented so that it fronts the hockey turf, resulting in the back of the building fronting the playground and carpark area. This risks the building giving a ‘bunker-like’ overlook to the public playground and carparking spaces.

35.     To mitigate this risk, the building façade, which is viewed from the playground and carpark area, will be finished with honed blockwork with a good sealant. This façade will also be planted to soften the visual impact of the building on the playground area, as recommended by the Manager, Landscape Architecture.

36.     There is currently a public toilet block located west of the proposed amenity building. The proposal to construct a new amenity building in this area may result in a surplus of buildings on Rosedale Park. 

37.     As discussed in the options analysis section of this report, the option was explored to combine the public toilet into the new building to minimise this risk. The amenity building will attract users to this area, resulting in increased passive surveillance near the toilet block area. While a new building is introduced in the area, increased passive surveillance is an opportunity to improve crime prevention.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     If the Upper Harbour Local Board approves the land owner approval application, council staff will issue a land owner approval letter with relevant conditions to mitigate any potential adverse effects.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aerial map of Rosedale Park and location of proposed building

169

b

Aerial map showing alternative location for the proposed building

171

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Haya Hamilton - Land Use Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Upper Harbour Quick Response round one 2019/2020 grant allocations

File No.: CP2019/19084

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund, or decline applications received for the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Quick Response round one grants.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Quick Response round one grants (refer Attachment A).

3.       The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Grants Programme 2019/2020 on 21 March 2018 (refer Attachment B). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants submitted to the local board.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $159,883 for the 2019/2020 financial year, including $2443 carried forward from the 2018/2019 Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) filming revenue, leaving a total of $162,326 to be allocated.

5.       A total of $70,750 was allocated to Local Grants round one, and $10,000 was allocated to a parking investigation for Hooton Reserve (resolution number UH/2019/108). This leaves a budget of $81,576 to be allocated to tthree quick response grant rounds and one local grant round.

6.       Seventeen applications were received for the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Quick Response round one, requesting a total of $46,892.73.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Quick Response Grants round one listed in the following table:  

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2017-113

Ionela Badea

Community

Towards venue hire and morning tea for women in Hobsonville

$867

Eligible

QR2017-110

Sustainable Paremoremo Group

Environment

Towards labour costs, plants and equipment for the weed eradication project

$4903.03

Eligible

QR2017-101

Greenhithe Group Riding for the Disabled Incorporated

Community

A contribution towards replacing two horse saddles, girths and stirrups for Greenhithe Riding for the Disabled

$2000

Eligible

QR2017-119

Whenuapai Ratepayers and Residents Association

Community

Contribution towards delivery of the annual Whenuapai Christmas event

$1800

Eligible

QR2017-117

Clean Plate

Environment

Towards venue hire, marketing, resources and facilitation costs for the ‘Clean Plate Less Waste Lunchbox’ workshop in Upper Harbour between February to June 2020

$1600

Eligible

QR2017-109

North Shore City Baseball Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards a contribution for baseball equipment for the North Shore City Baseball Club between January to April 2020

$1676.47

Eligible

QR2017-115

Tauhinu Sea Scout Group

(under the umbrella of The Scout Association of New Zealand)

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of 30 helmets for water activities

$1800

Eligible

QR2017-118

Free Range Robotics

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of new equipment for a global robotics programme

$1000

Eligible

QR2017-116

Greenhithe Playcentre

Community

Towards the Early Childhood Centre furniture and toys

$4284.23

Eligible

QR2017-105

Albany Chinese Association

Community

Towards venue hire for the weekly Chinese cultural and social group from April 2020 to March 2021

$5000

Eligible

QR2017-106

Paremoremo Ratepayers and Residents Association Incorporated

Community

Towards stage two and three of the fencing project for Paremoremo Ratepayers and Residents Association, including fencing towards the eastern boundary and the surveyor's costs

$3334

Eligible

QR2017-111

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the overall costs to train, manage and supervise the volunteer counsellors

$2000

Eligible

QR2017-108

Greenhithe Residents Association Incorporated

Historic Heritage

Towards the costs of a bathroom upgrade in the Greenhithe Community Hall

$4500

Eligible

QR2017-112

Living Whenuapai

Environment

Towards guests and entertainment costs for Eco Family Fun Day 2020

$3200

Eligible

QR2017-114

Windsor Park Community and Multisport Hub Incorporated

Environment

Towards removal of four gum trees on the western boundary of Windsor Park

$5000

Eligible

QR2017-102

West Harbour Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of tennis balls for the West Harbour Tennis Club

$1928

Eligible

QR2017-104

Albany Badminton Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of 100 tubes of shuttlecocks for the Albany Badminton Club

$2000

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$46,892.73

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities, and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

8.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

9.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

10.     The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2019/2020 on 21 March 2018 and will operate three quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year. 

11.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through support of projects that address food production and food waste, support alternative transport methods, support community energy efficiency education and behaviour change, build community resilience, and support tree planting.

14.     Three applicants applying to quick response round one have indicated that their project supports climate change outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     According to the main focus of the application, each one has received input from a subject matter expert from the relevant department. The main focuses are identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

16.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Upper Harbour Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

18.     The board is requested to note that Section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states, ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

19.     A summary of each application received through the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Quick Response grants round one is provided at Attachment A.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improve Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

21.     Four applicants applying to quick response round one have indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

23.     The Upper Harbour Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $159,883. A total of $2443 was reallocated to the community grants budget from the 2018/2019 ATEED filming revenue. A total of $70,750 was allocated to local grants round one, and $10,000 was allocated to a parking investigation for Hooton Reserve (resolution number UH/2019/108). This leaves a total of $81,576 to be allocated to three quick response grant rounds and one local grant round.

24.     In round one of the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Quick Response Grants, 17 applications were received requesting a total of $46,892.73.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following the Upper Harbour Local Board allocating funding for round one of the quick response grants, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2019/2020 Upper Harbour Quick Response round one grant applications

179

b

2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Programme

245

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Erin Shin - Community Grants Coordinator

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Elected Members' Expense Policy 2019

File No.: CP2019/19671

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the draft Auckland Council Elected Members’ Expense Policy 2019 and provide an opportunity for the local board to record its feedback for consideration by the Governing Body.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each electoral term, the Remuneration Authority requires all councils to adopt an expense policy and forward the adopted policy to the authority for its approval. 

3.       The expense policy provides the rules for elected members’ reimbursement for expenses they incur whilst performing their duties. The authority has set parameters for the following expense reimbursements:

·        communications

·        mileage

·        travel time

·        childcare.

4.       The authority has updated vehicle mileage allowance rates to reflect the new kilometre rates for self-employed people and employees published by the Inland Revenue Department on its website as at 7 June 2019.

5.       There is a change to approval processes so that approval for mayor and deputy mayor expenses is now by the chair of the Audit and Risk Committee. There are no other changes to provisions for these expenses.

6.       Reimbursement of childcare expenses is a new provision and the council has discretion around how this is applied, within the parameters set by the authority. 

7.       In the previous term, a discussion paper about the proposed childcare allowance was published by the authority and was reported to local boards. Most local boards were generally supportive. Based on that feedback, this report proposes rules for inclusion in the council’s Elected Members’ Expense Policy 2019.

8.       The expenses policy also includes rules for the following, which relate to sensitive expenditure, and there are no recommended changes to these rules:

·        travel

·        accommodation

·        professional development

·        hospitality.

9.       The draft Auckland Council Elected Members’ Expense Policy 2019 is attached (refer Attachment A).

10.     The council’s Head of Assurance Services has reviewed the draft policy and is satisfied it is in compliance with the Local Government Members (2019/20) Determination and appropriate probity standards.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Auckland Council Elected Members’ Expense Policy 2019 before the Governing Body meeting to be held on 12 December 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     The authority sets remuneration for elected positions in local government annually. It also sets the rules for reimbursement of costs met by members in undertaking their duties.

12.     Each electoral term, the authority requires all councils to adopt an expense policy and forward the adopted policy to the authority for its approval. The expense policy provides the rules for elected members’ reimbursement for expenses they incur whilst performing their duties.

13.     The authority sets some work-related expenses for elected members:

·        the maximum allowances payable by councils to elected members for certain activities, such as transport and communications

·        the criteria for and amounts payable to, elected members sitting on resource consent hearings.

14.     The current policy was approved in November 2016. The authority has requested the council provide an Elected Members’ Expense Policy to the authority for its approval at the beginning of this term. 

15.     In the previous term, the authority circulated a discussion paper seeking feedback on a proposed childcare allowance. When the authority issued its formal 2019/20 determination, it included the childcare allowance. The Explanatory Memorandum in the Determination includes:

          ‘This year, for the first time, the Authority has introduced a childcare allowance for members who have responsibility for caring for children under the age of 14 years. The allowance is a contribution towards expenses incurred by the member for the provision of childcare while the member is engaged on local authority business. The allowance is capped and is subject to certain conditions outlined in clause 14 of this determination.

          Payment of any or all of the allowances is at the discretion of each council. All the allowances included in this determination are reviewed annually.’

16.     The actual rule about the childcare allowance in the determination is:

14      Childcare allowance

(1)     A local authority may pay a childcare allowance, in accordance with subclauses (2) and (3), to an eligible member as a contribution towards expenses incurred by the member for childcare provided while the member is engaged on local authority business.

(2)     A member is eligible to be paid a childcare allowance in respect of childcare provided for a child only if—

(a)   the member is a parent or guardian of the child, or is a person who usually has responsibility for the day-to-day care of the child (other than on a temporary basis); and

(b)   the child is aged under 14 years of age; and

(c)   the childcare is provided by a person who—

(i)    is not a family member of the member; and

(ii)   does not ordinarily reside with the member; and

(d)   the member provides evidence satisfactory to the local authority of the amount paid for childcare.

(3)     A local authority must not pay childcare allowances to a member that total more than $6,000 per annum, per child.

(4)     In this regulation, family member of the member means—

(a)   a spouse, civil union partner, or de facto partner:

(b)   a relative, that is, another person connected with the member within 2 degrees of a relationship, whether by blood relationship or by adoption.

17.     The other change in the determination relates to vehicle mileage allowance rates to reflect the new kilometre rates for self-employed people and employees published by the Inland Revenue Department on its website as at 7 June 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     The major proposed change to the expense policy is to include a provision for childcare allowance in line with the new provision in the authority’s determination.

19.     Prior to the authority including this allowance in its determination, it circulated a discussion paper for feedback, which was reported to local boards. The submission to the authority was:

          ‘Auckland Council supports the Remuneration Authority in addressing this issue which has been raised by members of other councils through submissions to the authority.  The costs of childcare can be a barrier to people with families considering becoming candidates for local government elections. The council commends the authority for recognising such barriers and for acknowledging the need to address them.

          The council’s view is that the proposed conditions to be placed in the authority’s determination are reasonable. It is concerned though that the description of the purpose of the allowance is too wide. The proposed wording is:

            “A local authority may pay a childcare allowance, in accordance with subclauses (2) and (3), to an eligible member as a contribution towards expenses incurred by the member for childcare provided while the member is engaged on local authority business.”

          The phrase “childcare provided while the member is engaged on local authority business” could include childcare that is incidental at the time the member is engaged on local authority. For example, a member may arrange childcare on a regular basis, irrespective of undertaking council duties, and on a particular occasion attends to council business papers while the children are at childcare. There could be uncertainty about whether this is claimable. The council understands that the purpose of the allowance is as a contribution towards the cost of childcare where this is an expense of undertaking council business and suggests that the wording should capture this sense of necessary expense in order to undertake council business.’

20.     A summary of local board feedback on the submission is contained in Attachment B. Most local boards endorsed the submission.

21.     The submission stated that the payment of a childcare allowance should recognise the additional cost that was caused by attending to council business rather than being paid if childcare was to be provided in any case. In other words, it was to be paid because childcare was caused by attending to council business. This point was not included in the authority’s final determination. However, any potential for over-use of the provision is controlled by the imposition of a cap of $6000 per annum per child.

22.     The proposed wording for the childcare allowance in the expense policy is:

Childcare allowance

1        Elected members who are the parent, guardian or usually have responsibility for the day to day care of the child may receive the allowance set out in the Remuneration Authority Determination for childcare provided while the member is engaged on local authority business. This is a contribution towards the expense and not intended as a full reimbursement.

2        The childcare allowance may only be claimed for childcare not provided by a family member (spouse, civil union partner or de factor partner or any relative that is connected to the members within 2 degrees of relationship, whether by blood relationship or by adoption) who does not ordinarily reside with the member

3        The allowance is only claimable:

a)    for children under the age of 14 years

b)    when attending official meetings or workshops of the council

c)    only for actual (or part thereof) expenses that have been incurred, net of any subsidies

d)    when elected members are not on recess

e)    when no other childcare arrangements would normally be made.

 

4        The allowance rates are as follows:

a)    For childcare services provided by a professional registered company, an hourly rate of up to $35 will be accepted with the receipt of a GST invoice

b)    For childcare services provided via an informal arrangement, an hourly rate of up to $20 will be accepted with the receipt of a signed invoice or signed log book

c)    The total Auckland Council may contribute is $6000 per annum per child

5        On a case-by-case basis, the General Manager Democracy Services and General Manager Local Board Services may make exceptions to the above provisions within the limits set by the Remuneration Authority.

23.     The maximum hourly rates are based on an informal survey of current market rates.

24.     Other changes in the draft expense policy are:

·        approvals for the mayor and deputy mayor travel expenses have been changed to the chair of the Audit and Risk Committee, on her recommendation

·        an added section on health, safety and wellbeing which includes access to:

o   flu vaccinations

o   ergonomic assessments

o   personal support services (Employment Assistance Programme, manawa rahi and the well-being portal).

25.     The council’s Head of Assurance Services has reviewed the draft policy and is satisfied it is in compliance with the Local Government Members’ (2019/20) Determination and appropriate probity standards.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     The adoption of the expenses policy is largely an administrative decision. Relevant to climate change is the statement in the policy (6.3): ‘Auckland Council promotes public transport and cycling as the preferred ways of moving around Auckland. Elected members are expected to use public transport in the first instance but may also use their private car or council vehicles when on council business.’

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     The authority’s determination and the Auckland Council Elected Members’ Expense Policy only affect elected Governing Body and local board members.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it decides the Auckland Council Elected Members’ Expense Policy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     The childcare allowance recognises that the cost of childcare deters some people from standing for election. The provision of the allowance may encourage more people, including Māori, to consider standing.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     The number of Auckland Council elected members who will be eligible to claim this allowance is unknown. Local Government New Zealand statistics show that approximately 6 per cent of elected members are 40 years of age or below[2].  On that basis, the cost to Auckland Council, if 6 per cent of members (10 members) claimed the allowance, would be $60,000 (assuming one child each).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     The expenditure that is the subject of this policy is sensitive expenditure. The policy needs to withstand public scrutiny and, where there is discretion, there needs to be a conservative approach. Staff believe that the conditions placed on reimbursement and the processes for approval are appropriate in this context.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Feedback from all local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it decides the Auckland Council Elected Members’ Expense Policy.

 


 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Auckland Council Elected Members' Expense Policy

255

b

Summary of local board feedback on the Remuneration Authority’s discussion paper on childcare allowances

273

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor - Democracy Services

Authorisers

Marguerite Delbet - General Manager Democracy Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Road name for new private road at 160 and 162 Greenhithe Road, Greenhithe

File No.: CP2019/19759

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve a road name for a new private road within a commonly owned access lot (COAL), created by way of a subdivision undertaken by the applicant, Will Zhang, at 160 and 162 Greenhithe Road, Greenhithe.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

3.       The applicant has submitted the following names in order of preference for consideration by the local board:

·        Ānehu Place

·        Hīpoki Place

·        Pukepuke Rise.

4.       The names are considered suitable and meet the council’s road naming guidelines.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve one road name from the following options for the private road constructed within the subdivision being undertaken by the applicant, Will Zhang, at 160 and 162 Greenhithe Road, Greenhithe:

i)        Ānehu Place

ii)       Hīpoki Place

iii)      Pukepuke Rise.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The 18-lot subdivision was approved on 12 December 2018 and is currently under construction. A scheme plan and location map can be viewed at Attachments A and B.

6.       In accordance with the national addressing standards, the private road requires naming as it serves more than five lots.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider / developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for local board approval.

8.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·        a historical or ancestral linkage to an area

·        a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature, or

·        an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

9.       In selecting the names, the applicant has considered the location of the subdivision. It is elevated approximately 85m above sea level, looking down onto the broad valley that forms part of the lower reaches of where Lucas Creek flows into the Upper Waitematā Harbour. The applicant explains that in the mornings of spring and autumn, it is often misty along the Lucas Creek and, when viewed from above, the mist appears to blanket the creek and lower lying land.

10.     The names Ānehu, Hīpoki and Pukepuke are Māori words which reflect this scenario and have the following meanings:

·        Ānehu - misty

·        Hīpoki - to cover, to blanket

·        Pukepuke – hill.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     The applicant consulted with 14 iwi identified as possibly having an interest in the proposal and received two responses as follows:

·        Ngai Tai – Taiaomaurikura: offered the alternate names Ānehu and Hīpoki to the applicant, which were accepted and are presented in this report

·        Te Runanga o Ngati Whatua: deferred to other iwi.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand; the names are then recorded on its New Zealand-wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

160 and 162 Greenhithe Road - scheme plan showing private road

281

b

160 and 162 Greenhithe Road - locality map

283

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jan Asplet - Business Coordinator

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Approval for four new road names at 133 Clark Road, Hobsonville 

File No.: CP2019/20181

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve four new private road names, being one accessway and three commonly owned access lots (COALs), created by way of a subdivision development at 133 Clark Road, Hobsonville.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

3.       Any of the 10 proposed road name options would be acceptable for the local board to approve for use in this location, having been assessed to ensure that they meet the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming.

4.       All technical standards are met, the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region and mana whenua have been consulted. It is now up to the local board to decide upon the thematic suitability of the names within the local context.

5.       The applicant, Harrison Grierson, has proposed the names presented in the table below for consideration by the local board:

Proposed road names for 133 Clark Road

Reference

Preferred name

Road type 

Accessway 13

Otaota

Road

COAL 1

Raupeka

Road

COAL 2

Tawhai

Road

COAL 3

Kahakaha

Road

Alternate names for 133 Clark Road

These alternate names can be used for any of the roads listed above

Airspeed Oxford

Walrus

Westland Wasp

Kaman Seasprite

Fairey Gordon

Fuselage

6.       This report is a re-submission for a road naming application that was deferred by the Upper Harbour Local Board in September 2019. The local board requested the applicant consider naming options that align to historical and ancestral linkages, geographical features, or a thematic identity as required by the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

7.       The applicant contacted iwi and the Hobsonville Point Residents Society Committee to request replacement road names and as a result, has now proposed 10 possible road names. These names relate to native plants, and the names of aircraft which flew in the 1930s at the site when it was previously the Royal New Zealand Airforce (RNZAF) base.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the following names for one new accessway and three commonly owned access lots (COALs), created by way of a subdivision development at 133 Clark Road, Hobsonville:

i)        Accessway 13:

ii)       COAL 1:

iii)      COAL 2:

iv)      COAL 3:

Horopaki

Context

Accessway 13

8.       Resource consent was issued in August 2018 under the Housing Accords and Special Housing Area Act 2013 (HASHAA) to allow for the creation of superlots and staged future development of sites at 133 Clark Road. A neighbourhood centre is to be located next to this accessway, at the intersection of Squadron Drive and Joshua Carder Drive.

COAL 1

9.       Resource consent was issued in March 2019 for the construction of 36 residential dwellings and one COAL.

COAL 2

10.     Resource consent was issued in March 2019 for the construction of 22 residential dwellings and one COAL.

COAL 3

11.     Resource consent was issued in March 2019 for the construction of 23 residential dwellings and one COAL.

12.     In accordance with the National Addressing Standards for road naming (the AS/NZS 4819-2011 standard), the COALs require a road name because they serve more than 5 lots. Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B respectively.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for local board approval.

14.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·        a historical or ancestral linkage to an area

·        a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature, or

·        an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

15.     The applicant has proposed names around the following two themes:

·        names of local fauna

·        names of the aircraft which flew in the 1930s at the site when it was previously the RNZAF base.

16.     The applicant’s proposed names and meanings are set out in the table below:

Preferred names and meanings for 133 Clark Road

Road number

Proposed name

Meaning

Accessway 13

Otaota Road

Māori word meaning: (noun) vegetation, weeds, grass, herbs.

As described by iwi: NZ weeds, grass and herbs. It references epilobium hirtigerum (hairy willow herb) found nearby in Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park. Current conservation status: at risk – recovering.

Suggested by Ngāti Whātua O Kaipara

COAL 1

Raupeka Road

A New Zealand native coastal orchid (noun). Easter orchid, Earina autumnalis - a fairly common endemic orchid found on trees in forests throughout Aotearoa/New Zealand. Lance-shaped leaves are carried on erect stems if short, and drooping when long, and bear fragrant, small, white flowers with yellow centres.

Suggested by Ngāti Whātua O Kaipara

COAL 2

Tawhai Road

Māori word meaning: (noun) silver beech, Nothofagus menziesii - a tall tree with roundish small alternating leaves which have rounded double teeth.

Also described by iwi as beech ngahere (forests).

Suggested by Ngāti Whātua O Kaipara

COAL 3

Kahakaha Road

Māori word meaning: (noun) perching lily, Collospermum hastatum - a native plant with long, broad, tufted, grass-like leaves with black leaf bases and arranged in fans. Grows in trees, on rocks or on the ground. Has green flowers, on spreading fingers. Fruit turns red in autumn.

Suggested by Ngāti Whātua O Kaipara

17.     The applicant has also provided a pool of names that can be use as alternates for the development at 133 Clark Road, Hobsonville.

Alternate names for 133 Clark Road

Alternates

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Airspeed Oxford

Twin-engine aircraft used for training British Commonwealth aircrews in navigation, radio operating, bombing and gunnery in World War II.

Paying tribute to the history of the Hobsonville area used as a NZRAF base. This was an aircraft used from the nearby airfield in the 1930s.

Walrus

A training plane for seaplane pilots.

Paying tribute to the history of the Hobsonville area used as a NZRAF base. This was an aircraft used from the nearby airfield in the 1930s.

Westland Wasp

Paying tribute to the history of the area used as a NZRAF base, this was a helicopter used from the nearby airfield.

Kaman Seasprite

Paying tribute to the history of the area used as a NZRAF base, this was a helicopter used from the nearby airfield.

Fairey Gordon

Paying tribute to the history of the area used as a NZRAF base, this was an aircraft used from the nearby airfield in the 1930s.

Fuselage

Paying tribute to the history of the area used as a NZRAF base, and in line with the aircraft theme, this is reference to the main body of an aeroplane.

18.     The names proposed by the applicant have been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met and the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region. Therefore, it is now up to the local board to determine the suitability of the names within the local context.

19.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all proposed names are acceptable and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

20.     Road is an acceptable road type for the new roads, suiting the form and layout, as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

21.     All 11 relevant iwi were written to (via email) and invited to comment, with only three iwi groups responding as follows:

·        Ngāti Manuhiri – deferred to Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·        Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara suggested six road name options – of the six, two names were duplicates and therefore not accepted for use. The four remaining have been included in the applicant’s proposal for consideration by the local board.

·        Ngāti Paoa Trust Board deferred to other tangata whenua who did not respond.

22.     No other iwi provided responses or comments. It is, therefore, implied that no iwi were opposed to the use of any of the proposed names in this location for this development.

23.     The applicant also contacted the Hobsonville Point Residents Society Committee for road name suggestions. They responded with a list of names that were largely based around the previous land use, as a RNZAF base. The applicant selected seven names from those provided and included these in their proposal for the local board’s consideration.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     The review sought from the Upper Harbour Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan outcome, ‘A Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world’. The use of Māori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Māori identity.

28.     Four Māori road name options have been proposed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand-wide land information database. This database includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site plan of 133 Clark Road, Hobsonville

291

b

Location plan of 133 Clark Road, Hobsonville

293

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation

File No.: CP2019/19533

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve local content and supporting information for consultation as part of the Annual Budget 2020/2021 process, along with a local engagement event.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       For each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement that is agreed for each local board area, between the Governing Body and the local board.

3.       Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation will take place from 21 February to 22 March 2020. Consultation on the proposed content of each local board agreement which sets out the priorities for the next financial year must be included as part of that consultation.

4.       This report seeks approval from local boards on the local content and supporting information for consultation. It also seeks approval of the Have Your Say event that will be held in their local board area during the consultation period, to give Aucklanders an opportunity to provide face-to-face feedback.

5.       The Governing Body and local boards will approve regional and local items respectively for consultation by 13 December 2019. The regional and local consultation items will then be incorporated into the Annual Budget consultation document and supporting information, which will be adopted by the Governing Body on 12 February 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve Attachment A local content for consultation and Attachment B local supporting information for consultation.

b)      delegate authority to the local board chairperson to approve any final changes required to the local content and supporting information for the Upper Harbour Local Board for the Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation, including online consultation content.

c)      approve the following Have Your Say event in the local board area during the Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation period:

i)        a hearing-style event to be held at 6.30pm on Thursday 5 March 2020 at the Upper Harbour Local Board office, Kell Drive, Albany village.

d)      delegate authority to the local board chairperson to approve any final changes required to the Have Your Say event.

e)      delegate to the following elected members and staff the power and responsibility to hear from the public through ‘spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction’ in relation to the local board agreement at the council’s public engagement events, during the consultation period for the Annual Budget 2020/2021:

i)        local board members and chairperson

ii)       General Manager Local Board Services, Local Board Relationship Manager, Local Board Senior Advisor, Local Board Advisor, Local Board Engagement Advisor

iii)      any additional staff approved by the General Manager Local Board Services or the Group Chief Financial Officer.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       For each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement for each local board area, that is agreed between the Governing Body and the local board.

7.       Local board agreements set out (among other things) how the council will, in the year to which the agreement relates, reflect the priorities and preferences in the local board’s plan in respect of the local activities to be provided in the local board area.

8.       The proposed content of each local board agreement must be included in the Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation document.

9.       Public consultation on the budget will take place from 21 February to 22 March 2020.

10.     Aucklanders will be able to provide feedback during the consultation process through a variety of channels which include face-to-face (verbal), written and social media.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     Local boards held workshops during November 2019 to determine their priorities for their 2020/2021 local board agreement. Local boards are now requested to approve their local content and supporting information for consultation, as per Attachments A and B.

12.     During the document production stage, if changes to the local content and supporting information are identified, these will be provided to the local board chairperson to approve.

13.     Any new local Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rates must be consulted on before they can be implemented. Local boards are therefore also requested to approve any new proposals for consultation.

14.     Aucklanders who wish to have their views on the proposed content of the local board agreement and Annual Budget 2020/2021 considered by Auckland Council should be provided a reasonable opportunity to present those views in a manner and format that is appropriate to the preferences and needs of those persons, including face-to-face.

15.     The council provides for this through its ‘Have Your Say’ events where Aucklanders can have a face-to-face dialogue with elected members or other council representatives with an appropriate delegation. The Have Your Say event recommended to be held in the Upper Harbour Local Board area is:

·        a hearing-style event to be held at 6.30pm on Thursday 5 March 2020 at the Upper Harbour Local Board office, Kell Drive, Albany village.

16.     The consultation period does not begin for a couple of months. If circumstances change between now and the consultation period and any change to the approved Have Your Say event is required, these will be provided to the local board chairperson to approve.

17.     Should a proposal requiring an amendment to the council’s long-term plan (10-year Budget) be identified during the Annual Budget 2020/2021 process, this would necessitate use of the special consultative procedure. Where an amendment to the 10-year Budget is being consulted on at the same time as consultation on the Annual Budget, the Local Government Act 2002 requires the council to use the special consultative procedure in relation to both matters.

18.     The special consultative procedure requires the council to provide an opportunity for Aucklanders to present their views to the council in a manner that enables ‘spoken (or New Zealand sign language) interaction’ between the person and the council’s decision-makers or their official delegates. The recommended Have Your Say events, along with the recommended delegation, provides for this spoken interaction.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The decision to consult is procedural in nature and the small scale of the Have Your Say events mean any climate impacts will be negligible. These decisions are unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

20.     However, where practicable, events proposed will be in locations accessible by public transport, to reduce car travel but also increase the opportunities for attendance.  

21.     Some of the proposed initiatives or projects included in the consultation content may have climate impacts. The climate impacts of any initiatives or projects Auckland Council chooses to progress with as a result of this consultation will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     The Annual Budget 2020/2021 is an Auckland Council group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level.

23.     Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Local boards will have further opportunities to provide information and views as the council progresses through the Annual Budget 2020/2021 process.

25.     Aucklanders will have the opportunity to give feedback on regional and local proposals contained in the budget. All feedback received from submitters residing in the local board area will be analysed by staff and made available for consideration by the board, prior to finalising their local board agreement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the Annual Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Māori. Local board plans, which were adopted in September and October of 2017, form the basis for local priorities.

27.     The approach to Māori engagement for the Annual Budget 2020/2021 will be finalised once consultation topics are confirmed, including development of bespoke materials subject to interest level of topics and confirmation of budget.

28.     Regionally supported local Māori engagement in the South and West will be provided subject to interest level of topics and confirmation of budget; this will be integrated with local board plan pre-engagement.

29.     There is a need to continue to build local board relationships with iwi and the wider Māori community. Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn, can influence and encourage Māori participation in the council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     Event associated costs include venue hire, where council premises cannot be utilised, and catering.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     Local boards must approve their local consultation content and supporting information by 13 December 2019 in order for it to be formatted and reviewed in time to be incorporated into the Annual Budget 2020/2021 consultation document and supporting information.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     The Governing Body will approve the consultation document, supporting information and consultation process for the Annual Budget 2020/2021 on 12 February 2020.

33.     Following consultation, the Governing Body and local boards will make decisions on the budget and local board agreements respectively.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local content for consultation

299

b

Local supporting information for consultation

301

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Beth Corlett - Advisor Plans & Programmes

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Upper Harbour Local Board for quarter one 2019/2020

File No.: CP2019/19455

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the financial and non-financial performance report for the first quarter of 2019/2020 financial year (1 July to 30 September 2019).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides a retrospective overview of the financial and non-financial performance of Auckland Council against the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Board Agreement for the period beginning 1 July 2019 to 30 September 2019 – quarter one (Q1).

3.       Key highlights for quarter one include:

·        Albany Stadium Pool (ID414) won ‘The Centre of the Year’ in the Active Recreation ‘Be inspired’ awards

·        the refreshed Upper Harbour Greenways Plan (ID429 18/19 work programme) was adopted in September 2019

·        first phase consultation completed for the Upper Harbour Local Parks Management Plan (ID1220) and initial findings presented to the board

·        procurement finalised for delivery of Industrial Pollution Prevention Rosedale phase two (ID439)

·        concept design for development of playspace at Huntington Reserve (ID2419) approved by the board

·        completion of Kell Park carpark extension (ID3557).

4.       Overall, 79 activities within the agreed 2019/2020 work programme are on track, four have some identified risk or issue which is being managed, and four have been identified as being behind delivery and having a significant risk. Of these, the following are highlighted:

·        Limeburners Reserve – develop esplanade with walkway (ID2430)

·        Wharepapa Reserve – reconfigure playspace (ID2533)

·        Hooton Reserve – improvements (ID3534, previously ID2116 in 2018/2019).

5.       No activities have been cancelled or merged.

6.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2019/2020 is attached to this report (Attachment A). There are some points of note. 

7.       The net operational financial performance of the board is tracking at revised budget for year to date (101 per cent). Revenue is ahead of budget for the year to date and relates to fitness memberships and the learn to swim programme at Albany Stadium Pool. From the local boards’ locally driven initiatives (LDI) funding, the majority of projects are underway and on track to be completed during the year. Capital projects completed include the carpark at Kell Park and renewal of Sunderland Lounge. There are also ongoing works on various small parks asset renewals across the local board area.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the quarterly performance report for the period corresponding to quarter one of the 2019/2020 financial year (1 July 2019 to 30 September 2019).

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Upper Harbour Local Board agreed key initiatives, budgets and levels of service for the 2019/2020 financial year with the Governing Body on 6 June 2019 through the adoption of its local board agreement.

9.       The annual local board agreement aims to meet the Upper Harbour Local Board priorities as identified in the three-year Upper Harbour Local Board Plan (2017) outcomes:

·        Empowered, engaged and connected Upper Harbour communities

·        Efficient and effective transport links

·        Healthy and active communities

·        A thriving local economy

·        Our environment is valued, protected and enhanced.

10.     Specific activities and projects to be delivered every year against the agreed budgets are outlined in work programmes developed alongside local board agreements.

11.     The 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Board work programme was approved on 20 June 2019 and includes activities delivered by the following operating departments:

·        Arts, Community and Events

·        Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED)

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

·        Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Libraries

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation

·        Community Leases.

12.     The following graph (graph 1) shows how the work programme activities meet local board plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

13.     This report provides non-financial and financial performance information for the period between 1 July 2019 and 30 September 2019 – the first financial quarter of the 2019/2020 year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local board work programme snapshot

14.     Quarterly performance of each agreed work programme activity is reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues which are being managed), grey (cancelled, deferred or merged), and red (behind delivery, significant risk) – the RAG (red/amber/green/gey) status.

15.     Graph 2 provides the percentage of activities by RAG status in Q1 of 2019/2020: 91.92 per cent of activities were identified to be on track (green); 4.4 per cent of activities were identified to be in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber); and 4.4 per cent of activities were identified in Q1 to have significant issues.

16.     There are no cancelled, deferred or merged activities in Q1.

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

17.     To complete the snapshot, and in addition to a RAG status, information on activity status is also collected for each quarter to show the stage of the activity.

18.     Activity status for Q1 of 2019/2020 is provided in graph 3 below. The number of activities differ by department as approved in the local board work programme. 

19.     The complete work programme with Q1 commentary from operating departments can be found in Attachment B.

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter one

20.     Arts, Community and Events

·        Placemaking: Albany Placemaking and Neighbourhood Engagement (ID157) – analysis from the community feedback at the Albany Family Fun Day informed the Albany activation plan for 2019/2020, with a focus on Albany Village.

·        Placemaking: fund Hobsonville Community Trust (HCT) to deliver placemaking activities to meet the needs of local residents and promoted community participation and wellbeing (ID159) – HCT continued to deliver community events and activities on behalf of the local board, including a Scott Point community meeting attended by over 100 people, extending the existing Hobsonville resident street initiative to Scott Point, and providing support and equipment to the Winter Festival led by the Hobsonville Point Residents Society.

·        Community Grants (ID348) – Upper Harbour Local Grants Round One completed.

21.     ATEED

·        Pop Up Business School North (ID 1204) – Venue and dates confirmed for 10 to 21 February 2020.

22.     Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

·        Scott Point: develop sustainable sports park (ID2074) – resource consent lodged for stage one design; park vision and timelines presented to the community at the Scott Point community meeting organised by HCT.

·        Huntington Reserve: develop playspace (ID2419) – concept design approved by the local board in September.

·        One Local Initiative (OLI) Upper Harbour: develop an indoor sports facility (ID2549) – progressed to detailed business case.

·        Kell Park carpark (ID3557) – the extension of the existing carpark at the area adjacent to the Plunket building was completed and additional provision of car parking facilities opened to the public in September 2019.

23.     Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration

·        Upper Harbour Local Parks Management Plan (ID1220) – first phase consultation completed and initial findings presented to the board. Classifications requiring public notification were completed and confirmed by the board at its September 2019 business meeting.

24.     Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Pest Free Upper Harbour (ID438) – project to be integrated with the Healthy City Landscape Framework in quarter two, a regionally funded ecological spatial analysis project to improve data gathering and informational availability.

·        Industrial Pollution Prevention Rosedale phase two (ID239) – procurement for delivery of this project finalised.

·        North-West Wildlink Assistance Programme (ID440) – seven projects across the 24 participating groups have been allocated funding. These projects were prioritised based on demonstrated high participation, environmental outcomes and strong organisations.

25.     Libraries

·        Access to Library Service (ID911) – there was a 6 per cent increase in visits to the library in Q1.

26.     Parks, Sport and Recreation

·        Albany Stadium Pool (ID414) won ‘the Centre of the Year’ in the Active Recreation ‘Be inspired’ awards in recognition for the strong financial position, staff engagement levels, commitments to health and safety and customer feedback. Overall, there were 133,260 visits during Q1, with a Customer Engagement Score 1.9 per cent higher than the same period last year.

·        Greenways Plan refresh (ID429 18/19 work programme) – adopted by the board in September 2019.

·        Hooton Reserve (east car park) parking assessment (ID3819) – this is a new project line following the board’s decision to progress the investigation of solutions to reduce peak average occupancy to 85 per cent; $10,000 of locally driven initiative operational funding was re-allocated from Community Grants (ID348).

Activities on Hold

27.     The following activities have been placed on hold and have a red RAG status:

·        Limeburners Reserve: develop esplanade with walkway (ID2430) – the level of funding is insufficient to progress to the detailed design stage.

·        Upper Harbour – implement actions from the marine sport facility audit (ID2511, previously ID2124 in 2018/2019) – this project has been placed on hold until the marine facility audit is complete.

·        Wharepapa Reserve: reconfigure playspace (ID2533) – the existing playspace is compliant and safe but the playground at Bluebird Reserve was closed off due to lack of compliance and safety; the reconfiguration of playspace at Wharepapa was put on hold pending further discussions with the board.

·        Hooton Reserve: improvements (ID3534, previously ID2116 in 2018/2019) – project on hold due to major Auckland Transport projects in the area which are expected to impact on the reserve space in the near future.

Activities to watch

28.     The following key activities have either been placed on hold or are progressing, but have an amber RAG status which indicates there is some risk or issues which are being managed:

·        Hobsonville Headquarters redevelopment, exterior landscaping and car park construction (ID3547) – project was in progress in Q1 with the building re-opening to the public; the carpark remained closed awaiting ownership transfer from developer to Auckland Council; surrounding roads also not public.

·        Albany Pool: install disability amenities (ID3659) – project was in progress in Q1 but there was a budget increase resulting from a change of scope which requires board approval.

·        Gills Reserve: install concrete walkway (ID3693, previously ID3002 in 2018/2019) – project was still on hold in Q1, awaiting Auckland Transport project decisions.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

30.     Work programmes were approved in June 2019 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     When developing the work programmes, council group impacts and views are presented to local boards. As this is an information only report, there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     This report informs the Upper Harbour Local Board of the Auckland Council performance for the quarter starting 1 July 2019 and ending 30 September 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     The Upper Harbour Local Board allocated the balance of its Auckland Regional Services Trust (ARST) funding to the Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust (MKCT) who designed a sculpture for installation in the Albany area in 2018/2019.

34.     The final design was presented to the local board at a workshop in July 2019 where there was also discussion on preferred location.

35.     The application for land owner approval was submitted at the end of Q1.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     This report is provided to enable the Upper Harbour Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2019/2020 work programmes and to report this to the public. This report is for information only and therefore there are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

37.     Operating expenditure relating to asset based services (ABS) is above budget by $276,000 for the year to date, while the LDI operational projects are currently $147,000 below budget.  This is due to a variety of projects yet to draw down on financial allocations. 

38.     Capital spend of $780,000 represents investment in renewals at Sunderland Lounge, carpark development at Kell Park, sustainable sports park development at Scott Point, and various small parks asset renewals. The board has also seen progress on a number of projects from their discretionary LDI capital fund.

39.     The complete Upper Harbour Local Board Financial Performance report can be found in Attachment A.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

41.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     A performance report for the second quarter (1 October 2019 to 31 December 2019) will be prepared and provided to the local board in the new year.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board Financial Performance as at 30 September 2019

311

b

Upper Harbour Local Board Non-Financial Performance as at 30 September 2019

315

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rita Bento-Allpress - Senior Local Board Advisor Upper Harbour

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


 


 


 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 



Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 7 and 14 November 2019

File No.: CP2019/19140

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An Upper Harbour Local Board workshop was held on Thursday 7 and 14 November 2019. Copies of the workshop records are attached (refer to Attachments A and B).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 7 and 14 November 2019 (refer to Attachments A and B to the agenda report).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 7 November 2019

333

b

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 14 November 2019

335

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Governance forward work calendar - January to December 2020

File No.: CP2019/20509

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Upper Harbour Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·     ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·     clarifying what advice is expected and when

·     clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the Upper Harbour Local Board governance forward work calendar for the period January to December 2020, as set out in Attachment A to this agenda report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar - January to December 2020

339

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

05 December 2019

 

 

Board members' reports - December 2019

File No.: CP2019/19401

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for members to update the Upper Harbour Local Board on projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

[Note: This is an information item and if the board wishes any action to be taken under this item, a written report must be provided for inclusion on the agenda.]

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal board members’ reports.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

     

    



[1] Local Government New Zealand and Department of Conservation (n.d), Reserves Act Guide, retrieved from https://www.doc.govt.nz/Documents/about-doc/role/legislation/reserves-act-guide.pdf

[2] http://www.lgnz.co.nz/assets/e41e5fb07f/Elected-Members-Profile-Report-FINAL.pdf