I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 25 February 2020

09.30am

Local Board Chambers
Pukekohe Service Centre
82 Manukau Road
Pukekohe

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Deputy Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Lance Gedge

 

 

Amanda Kinzett

 

 

Matthew Murphy

 

 

Logan Soole

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Denise  Gunn

Democracy Advisor - Franklin

 

17 February 2020

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 295 1310

Email: denise.gunn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Franklin Arts Festival Committee                                                5

8.2     Deputation  - Te Arahikoi                                                                                     6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Auranga Fitness Station and Dog Agility Course                                                      9

12        Appointment of LGNZ Lead and nominee for LGNZ Conference 2020                 19

13        Auckland Transport monthly update to the Franklin Local Board - February 2020                                                                                                                                       25

14        New road name for a new road in the subdivision of land at 252 Clevedon- Kawakawa Road, Clevedon by Netherlea Holdings Limited                                   39

15        Approval for new road names at 110 Maraetai School Road Maraetai                 47

16        Correction of a road name in the subdivision at Drury South Crossing (425 Quarry Road, Drury) by Drury South Limited                                                                        55

17        Urgent Decisions in the period 9 November 2019 to 13 February 2020 by the Franklin Local Board                                                                                                   63

18        Governance Forward Work Calendar February 2020                                              77

19        Resolutions Pending Action                                                                                       81

20        Franklin Local Board workshop records                                                                  91

21        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Franklin Local Board for Quarter Two 2019/2020                                                                                             107  

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

23        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               115

21        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Franklin Local Board for Quarter Two 2019/2020

b.      Franklin Local Board Financial Report - Confidential                                 115  

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 3 December 2019 as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Franklin Arts Festival Committee

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Members of the Franklin Arts Festival Committee will be in attendance to address the Franklin Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.         Members of the Franklin Arts Festival Committee will be in attendance in order to introduce themselves to the Franklin Local Board. 

3.       The festival committee note that the Franklin Local Board has been generous in support of the Franklin Arts Festival, particularly with regard to ongoing funding and use of the Pukekohe Town Hall and the Franklin NZ Steel gallery arts centre. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      thank the members of the Franklin Arts Festival Committee for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

8.2       Deputation  - Te Arahikoi

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Glenn Richards and Andrew Sinclair will be in attendance to address the board on Te Arahikoi, a new organisation that aims to strengthen local community biodiversity efforts in the Franklin area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Te Arahikoi is a new organisation established by existing landcare groups, iwi and central and local government agencies working on predator control in the Franklin area and parts of the North Waikato.

3.       The aim is to enhance biodiversity, with a current focus on predator control activities.

4.       Te Arahikoi will play a coordinating role for community groups working in the area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      thank Glenn Richards and Andrew Sinclair for their attendance and presentation on Te Arahikoi, a new organisation that aims to strengthen local community biodiversity initiatives in the Franklin and some North Waikato areas.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 

Auranga Fitness Station and Dog Agility Course

File No.: CP2020/00316

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek approval for the proposed development of the Auranga Esplanade Reserve fitness station and dog agility course at Bremner Road, Drury, Auckland.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The esplanade reserve has been created as part of the residential development at Bremner Road.  The proposed development of this reserve includes:

a)      a fitness station covering 150m2 and including parallel bars, triple sit up bench, triple chin up set, horizontal ladder and push up bars.  The assets will have a softfall bark base.

b)      a dog agility course including a balance beam, jump through, hurdles, agility bridge, tunnel, sit/stay platform and weave poles.  The assets will be made from Replas (recycled plastic products) with a concrete base to provide a mowing edge. The area between assets will remain grassed.

3.      Development of the Auranga Esplanade Reserve fitness station and dog agility course will be carried out by Karaka & Drury Consultant Ltd.

4.      Karaka & Drury Consultant Ltd have prepared concept plans for the Auranga Esplanade Reserve fitness station and dog agility course in consultation with council staff and the local board following a local board workshop held on 3rd December 2019. These are provided for the local board’s consideration and approval. The proposed development of the Auranga Esplanade Reserve fitness station and dog agility course forms part of the wider Auranga open space network. The new network includes four 3,000m2 reserves, one 6,000m2 reserve and five kilometres of esplanade reserve along the north coastline and through the centre of the development area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)    approve the Auranga fitness station plans prepared by Playco Playgrounds (Attachment A)

b)    approve the Auranga dog agility course design plans prepared by Replas NZ (Attachment B)

c)    delegate the approval of engineering detailed design to Parks Services and Community Facilities.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.      Karaka & Drury Consultant Ltd, a land development organisation formed in March 2014, are overseeing the Auranga development in Drury, Auckland. The development of this land was initiated in 2016 when the site was rezoned through the Housing Accord and Special Housing Areas Act. The development involves the creation of approximately 1,000 new homes across 85 hectares. The development will also include five new neighbourhood reserves, five kilometres of esplanade walkways and a neighbourhood centre. The overall vision for Auranga is to provide residents with a connection to the outdoors Kiwis love.

6.      The site is located 40km south of Auckland city and directly west of the Southern Motorway and Drury township. An additional 83 hectares of land south and west of the subject site has been rezoned for development in a Plan Change granted in December 2018.

7.      Civil works have taken place over much of the site and housing construction is currently underway.

8.      Karaka & Drury Consultant Ltd propose to develop the open space adjoining Drury creek with a fitness station and dog agility course.

9.      The open space to vest is currently in private ownership and will be transferred to Auckland Council as part of the residential subdivision. This means the new assets within the reserves to vest will be owned and maintained by Auckland Council long term.

10.    The development of the esplanade and playground will be completed by Karaka & Drury Consultant Ltd in accordance with the Auranga fitness station plans, prepared by Playco Playgrounds (Attachment A) and the Auranga dog agility course design plans, prepared by Replas NZ (Attachment B). The fitness station and dog agility course developments meet the Auckland Council standards and Auckland Council will be responsible for the ongoing management and maintenance of these reserves following handover to Council. Handover will be arranged as part of an infrastructure funding agreement.

11.    The Auranga fitness station plans, prepared by Playco Playgrounds (Attachment A) and the Auranga dog agility course design plans, prepared by Replas NZ (Attachment B) have been developed following consultation with Council staff and the local  board at a workshop held on 3rd December 2019.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.   The concepts of a dog park and fitness station are considered a great opportunity given the limited facilities of this nature in the Franklin Local Board area.

13.   Providing for an active lifestyle is also supported by Auckland Plan in terms of Outcome: Belonging and Participation and Focus area 7: Recognise the value of arts, culture, sports and recreation to quality of life

14.   These assets will add value to this community’s informal recreation network.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.    The proposal has been assessed from a climate change resilience perspective.  Dr Natasha Carpenter, Auckland Council Coastal Management Practice Lead, considers the proposed locations appropriate from a coastal hazard perspective. A coastal hazard assessment was provided as part of the subdivision application creating the esplanade areas.

16.    The dog agility course assets will be made from Replas.  This is made from recycled plastic products and is a great example of recycling products.  Other elements of the assets are made from natural materials, such as timber for the fitness station.

17.    Overall, the proposal is appropriate from a climate change impact perspective and is consistent with the Chief Sustainability Office objectives.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.    The proposal has been assessed from a maintenance, safety, accessibility and design perspective by council staff.

19.    Parks, Sport and Recreation and Community Facilities staff have discussed the concept plans and support the preferred concept for the Esplanade Reserve fitness station and dog agility course development at Auranga. The landscape architecture team are satisfied that the design is acceptable for maintenance and has a robust design. The Parks & Places specialist is also supportive of the overall proposal. Council support the approach to establishing fitness station zones rather than scattering individual pieces of equipment along a walkway.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.    The proposal for the esplanade and playground development was presented to the local board in a workshop on 3rd December 2019. Feedback from the local board was supportive of the overall proposal. Two matters were raised at the workshop:

a)      Firstly, the board noted availability of bins to dispose of dog waste would be important.  This has been considered and taken on board by Karaka & Drury Consultant Ltd, who have committed to bins along the esplanade extent and a water-fountain with a dog water feature.

b)      The local board also raised concern relating to the surface treatment of the dog agility course, with a preference to avoid concrete.  This is achieved with grass between the agility elements.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.    No direct impacts on iwi arising from this development have been identified.

22.    Karaka & Drury Consultant Ltd have undertaken hui with Ngati te Ata, Te Akitai, Ngati Tamaoho throughout the development of the Auranga site. Iwi have provided a Cultural Impact Statement (CIA) looking at the development as a whole. Key aspects of the CIA relevant to the proposed development include support for vesting of esplanade reserve, the riparian margins being planted, park edge roads being developed adjoining the esplanade reserve, and three metre shared paths developed along the coastline. Iwi have been presented the overall landscape masterplan for the site, which establishes an integrated design masterplan for the location of recreation amenity. Overall, the CIA is supportive of the approach by Auranga and monthly hui continue to take place to discuss project updates.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.    The esplanade development area is currently in private ownership. It is agreed that all land with the proposed park assets will be transferred to Auckland Council upon the completion of subdivision (anticipated in 2020). All recreational assets within the reserve will be owned by Auckland Council and the local board has delegated decision making responsibility for the development of the open space.

24.    All construction costs will be funded and carried out by Karaka & Drury Consultant Ltd. The annual operational costs of maintaining the proposed Esplanade Reserve fitness station and dog agility course has been estimated by Community Facilities to be approximately $3,760 per annum, subject to detailed design. The funding for this will come from the operational expenditure budget. Council’s obligation for maintenance of the park assets will commence upon the completion of the assets. The procedure for inspections and handover to Community Facilities will be outlined in the Infrastructure Funding Agreement. There will be one agreement for the esplanade development and a second for the playground so that these may be delivered in stages.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.    Risks associated with the proposed esplanade and playground development sit with the private developer.  In the unlikely event that Karaka & Drury Consultant Ltd went into receivership the work could be left incomplete.  A performance bond will be taken by Council prior to construction to cover this risk. It is also noted that this is a low risk as the developer has a proven track record.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.    The developer wishes to develop the fitness station and the dog agility course in early/mid-2020. Once approval for the concept plan has been provided, council staff will work with Karaka & Drury Consultant Ltd on engineering details of the proposed developments to ensure the proposal meets the council’s park construction standards and is appropriate in regard to maintenance.

27.    Parks Planning and Community Facilities staff (from the Landscape Architecture; Parks & Places Specialist and Maintenance Delivery teams) have reviewed concept design and provided their approval.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auranga Fitness Station Plans (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Auranga Dog Agility Course Design Plans

13

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kate Richardson - Parks Planner

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 

Appointment of LGNZ Lead and nominee for LGNZ Conference 2020

File No.: CP2020/01182

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To appoint a lead for Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) matters and nominate a representative to attend the 2020 LGNZ Annual Conference and General Meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards are invited to appoint a lead (and alternate) on Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) matters. The lead will be the main contact for all LGNZ issues and will represent the local board at meetings of Auckland/LGNZ zone and any related meetings.

3.       The LGNZ Annual Conference and General Meeting (AGM) takes place at the ASB Theatre Marlborough in Waiharakeke Blenheim from 8am Thursday 16 July to 3pm Saturday 18 July 2020.

4.       Local boards are invited to nominate a representative to attend the LGNZ conference. This can be the local board appointed LGNZ lead or another member of the local board. Given the cost of and overall numbers of elected member attendance, staff recommend that one member per local board attend.

5.       In addition to the official delegates, LGNZ requires prior notice of which local board members plan to attend the AGM. Members wishing to attend are asked to register their intention with the Democracy Services Business Hub team by Friday 17 April 2020 so that this information can be provided to LGNZ.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      appoint a lead and alternate for LGNZ related matters for the 2019-2022 triennium and task these members with representing the local board at Auckland/LGNZ meetings.

b)      nominate one elected member per local board to attend the Local Government New Zealand 2020 Conference and Annual General Meeting in Waiharakeke Blenheim, Thursday 16 July to Saturday 18 July 2020.

c)      confirm that conference attendance including travel and accommodation will be paid for in accordance with the current Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy.

d)      note that any members who wish to attend the AGM must provide their names to the Democracy Services Business Hub team by Friday 17 April 2020 to ensure that they are registered with Local Government New Zealand.

Horopaki

Context

6.       LGNZ is an incorporated society of local government organisations whose primary objective is to represent and advocate for the interests of local authorities in New Zealand. LGNZ champions policy positions on key issues that are of interest to local government and holds regular meetings and events throughout the year for members. The schedule of meetings includes an annual conference and meetings of local government geographical clusters (known as LGNZ zones) and sectors.

7.       LGNZ is governed by a National Council made up of representatives from member authorities as outlined in the constitution. Some of its work is conducted through committees and working groups which include representatives from member authorities.

8.       Elected members who have been formally appointed to LGNZ roles are:

Elected Member

Appointed role

Mayor Phil Goff

National Council representative for Auckland

Auckland Council representative on the Metropolitan Sector Group

Councillor Pippa Coom

Local Board Member Richard Northey

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by Governing Body)

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by local boards)

Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore

Auckland Council representative on Regional Sector

 

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

9.       As part of recent changes to the LGNZ Rules, Auckland Council is no longer part of LGNZ Zone 1 but is expected to organize itself, with its multiple local boards and Governing Body, as an informal LGNZ zone.

10.     Meetings of the Auckland/LGNZ zone have been scheduled on a biannual basis. These meetings will be co-chaired by the two Auckland representatives appointed to the LGNZ National Council by the Governing Body (Councillor Pippa Coom) and local boards’ (Member Richard Northey).

11.     Meetings of the Auckland/LGNZ zone will be open to all elected members but formal representation will sit with the nominated leads.

LGNZ Annual conference and AGM 2020

12.     This year the LGNZ conference and AGM will be held at the ASB Theatre Marlborough, Waiharakeke Blenheim, Thursday 16 July to Saturday 18 July 2020.

13.    The conference takes place over the first two days commencing at 9.30am on Thursday

16 July 2020 and closing with the LGNZ Excellence Awards on the evening of Friday 17 July 2020.

14.     The conference programme has the theme “Natural Capital”. The final programme will be publicly available at the end of February however we have had indication from LGNZ that the programme is expected to include addresses from the Prime Minister, various political leaders and President of LGNZ as well as sessions on the following topics:

·   Natural capital - the Marlborough story

·   Fishes in the river, fishes in the sea (Water, aquaculture and the Resource Management Act)

·   Tourism – working together to care for people, place and culture

·   Building towards sustainable supply (housing)

·   Resilience in the face of natural hazards (infrastructure and communities)

·   Cultural wellbeing plenary session

·   Interactive workshops on cultural, economic, environmental and social well-being

·   Tours, showcases and dinners.

15.     The AGM takes place on the last day of the conference from 9.30am to 12.30pm.  The LGNZ constitution permits the Auckland Council to appoint four delegates to represent it at the AGM, with one of the delegates being appointed as presiding delegate.

16.     Traditionally the four AGM delegates have been the Mayor, the Chief Executive and two Governing Body members who hold LGNZ roles. Delegates in 2019 were Mayor Phil Goff, Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore, Councillor Penny Hulse and local board Chair Pippa Coom.

17.     The Governing Body will consider an item on AGM attendance at its meeting on 27 March 2020 which includes the recommendation that Mayor Phil Goff be the presiding delegate and the other three delegates be comprised of either:

a)         two members of the Governing Body who hold a formal representation role with LGNZ and the Chief Executive; or

b)         one member of the Governing Body who holds a formal representation role with LGNZ and the Chief Executive, and a local board member; or

c)         two members of the Governing Body who hold a formal representation role with LGNZ and a local board member.

18.     In addition to the official delegates, LGNZ requires prior notice of which local board members plan to attend the AGM. Attendance at the AGM is not compulsory for conference participants.

Pre-conference meetings

19.     On Wednesday 15 July 2020, there will be a pre-conference meeting of the National Council as well as a Te Maruata Hui. Elected members that are on these two groups and wish to attend these meetings would need to arrive earlier than other meeting participants.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

20.     Local boards are requested to appoint a lead for the 2019-2022 triennium. The lead’s responsibilities include:

·   attend and represent the local board at meetings of Auckland/LGNZ zone and other LGNZ meetings, as appropriate

·   be the main contact for the local board on all LGNZ matters

·   share information from Auckland/LGNZ and other LGNZ-related meetings attended with the local board.

    LGNZ Annual conference and AGM 2020

21.     In 2020, with the venue in Waiharakeke, Blenheim and given the cost and overall numbers of elected member attendance, it is recommended that one member per local board attend. Having one attendee per local board means a maximum of 21 Auckland Council local board members would attend the conference.

22.     The annual conference and AGM are two separate meeting sessions.

23.     Local board members are invited to attend and take part in the conference.

24.     For the AGM, member authorities will be represented by officially appointed delegates. Members who are not appointed delegates can attend as observers provided they are included in the AGM registration form. Local board members who wish to attend the AGM as observers must register their intention with the Democracy Services Business Hub team by Friday 17 April 2020 so that their names can be included on the AGM registration form.

25.     Local board members who attend the conference and/or AGM are strongly encouraged to report back to their local boards on proceedings at the conference. This ensures members who do not attend can still benefit from this opportunity.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     Conferences and events involving multiple participants especially those requiring long distance travel can generate a sizable carbon footprint. This is due to emissions associated with flights, car and taxi travel, hotel and event site emissions.

27.     Estimates for emissions associated with travel to Blenheim or travel within Auckland for local meetings have not been calculated at the time of writing this report. Emissions, when known, can be offset through a verified carbon offset programme at a small cost.

28.     Other opportunities to reduce emissions include:

a)      reducing the number of delegates to the Blenheim conference as recommended

b)      encouraging participants to opt for public transport options when attending meetings in Auckland

c)      encouraging delegates to provide updates to their local boards, including the option of daily updates from the conference and meetings via the local board Facebook pages, so that non-attendance does not disadvantage other members

d)      ensuring elected members are aware of the session recordings that LGNZ will make available after the conference.  LGNZ have advised that they don’t webcast or live stream any parts of the conference as they try to encourage as many people as possible to attend in person.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     There are no impacts for CCOs or departments of council as the focus is on elected members attendance at meetings including the LGNZ conference.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     LGNZ advocates for issues that are important to local government. Many of these issues are aligned with local board priorities e.g. climate change. As such, there is interest at local board level in staying across the work of LGNZ and in identifying and harnessing opportunities to progress other advocacy areas that local boards may have.

31.     Having a dedicated lead who can attend Auckland meetings on LGNZ matters and who can be part of future discussions about remits and other topics, will enable local boards and their communities to continue to be informed and give considered input to work being led by LGNZ.

32.     The LGNZ Annual conference is always of interest to local board members. They provide a unique networking opportunity for local government leaders from around the country and the agenda of these meetings are designed to support local leaders in their roles and responsibilities. This is in line with the purpose of the elected member development programme which is to support elected members as governors and decision-makers.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     The work of LGNZ is expected to impact positively on Māori. LGNZ advocates on a variety of issues that are important to Māori including Māori housing, various environmental issues and Council-Māori participation/relationship arrangements. In addition, LGNZ provides advice including published guidance to assist local authorities in understanding values, aspirations and interest of Māori.

34.     The LGNZ National Council has a sub-committee, Te Maruata, which has the role of promoting increased representation of Māori as elected members of local government, and of enhancing Māori participation in local government processes.  It also provides support for councils in building relationships with iwi, hapu and Māori groups.  Te Maruata provides Māori input on development of future policies or legislation relating to local government. In the previous term Councillor Alf Filipaina was a member of the sub-committee.  Te Maruata will hold a hui on Wednesday 15 July 2020 from 10am to 4.30pm.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

35.     Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ are a new initiative being introduced this triennium following amendments to LGNZ zones. The two meetings for 2020 are scheduled for 13 March 2020 and 11 September 2020 and are not currently budgeted for. Staff will use existing resources and liaise with Kura Kāwana to identify combined opportunities for these meetings dates.

36.     Managing attendance numbers by only requiring attendance of leads, with others as optional attendees if they wish, should contribute towards keeping meeting costs down.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

37.     The normal registration rate for the LGNZ Conference and AGM is $1,410 (early bird) or $1,510 (standard). The total cost for early bird registration for 21 local board members is $29,610, with flights and accommodation additional.

38.     Costs of attendance for one member from each local board are to be met from the elected members’ development budget as managed centrally by the Kura Kāwana Programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

39.     The inaugural meeting of the Auckland Zone is planned for 13 March 2020. If a local board has not chosen an LGNZ lead by this date, they would need to select a member to attend this meeting as their official representative.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

40.     The key risk is of delayed decision-making which can impact costs and registration choices. The sooner the registration for the nominated local board member can be made, the more likely it is that Auckland Council can take advantage of early bird pricing for the conference and flights, all done via bulk booking. Delayed information may also impact registration into preferred conference streams or events.

41.     There is always a level of reputational risk associated with any financial expenditure. Large delegations to conferences can be costly hence the advice that only one per local board attend.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

42.     There are two planned meetings for the Auckland Zone in 2020. The inaugural meeting is scheduled for 13 March 2020 and the second meeting is on 11 September 2020.

43.     Preparations for the inaugural meeting are being made by staff with guidance from the co-chairs. The agenda will include a report from LGNZ Executive and will also include an update on the Localism project. The agenda will be made available to members closer to the time of the meeting.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

44.     Once members are confirmed to attend, the Democracy Services Business Hub team will co-ordinate and book all conference registrations, as well as requests to attend the AGM.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Shirley Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Linda Gifford, Programme Manager – Elected Member Development

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport monthly update to the Franklin Local Board - February 2020

File No.: CP2020/00391

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Franklin Local Board (FLB) about transport related matters in its area including its Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A decision is not required this month but the report contains information about the following matters:

·    Tourist Road-Monument Road intersection electronic warning signage

·    responses to resolutions

·    a summary of Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area

·    a summary of the board’s Transport Capital Fund and Community Safety Fund projects

·    a summary of general information items.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive Auckland Transport monthly update to the Franklin Local Board - February 2020.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play in the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

4.       This report updates the local board on AT projects and operations in the Franklin Local Board area, it summarises consultations and Traffic Control Committee decisions, and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and Community Safety Fund (CSF).

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects they believe are important to their communities but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·         be safe

·         not impede network efficiency

·         be in the road corridor (although projects in parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

6.       AT’s Community Safety Fund (CSF) comprises $20 million in total allocated across all 21 local boards, with $5 million to be allocated during the 2019/2020 financial year and the balance of $15 million over the 2020/2021 financial year. This is a safety fund that sits within AT’s safety budget so the major component of the funding allocation formula is the number of deaths and serious injuries (DSI) in a local board area. The purpose of the fund is to allow local communities to address long-standing road safety issues that have yet to become regional priorities and have therefore not been addressed by AT.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       Through Auckland Council’s Long-Term Plan 2018-2028, LBTCF funding has increased to a total of $20.8 million per annum across all 21 local boards.

8.       The allocation for the Franklin Local Board has also increased. The updated figures for this electoral term are reflected in the table below:

 

Table 1: Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Amount committed in the 2016-2019 electoral term

$2,855,965

Current 2019-2022 LBTCF allocation

$3,278,661

Total Funds Available for allocation in 2019-2022 political term

$3,278,661

 

9.       Updates on projects approved for design and/or construction are provided below. A series of workshops has been scheduled to discuss projects the local board may wish to nominate using the balance of funding available this electoral term. The first of these was held on the 28 January, with a follow-up workshop to take place on 3 March 2020.

 

Table 2: Status update on current Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects

Project

Description

Current status

Status change

Funds allocated

Station Road parking and pedestrian improvements

A project to formalise and improve parking on Station and Birch Roads, and to improve pedestrian safety by providing new footpath on Station Road, Pukekohe.

On 25 September 2018, the FLB approved $181,104

A firm order of costs was completed and presented to the local board at a workshop on 9 April 2019.

 

A funding shortfall was identified and at the 23 June meeting the local board allocated the balance of $320,000 from its Community Safety Fund to fully fund the project.

 

This project is now being delivered as a Community Safety Fund project

 

Prior to Christmas 2019, Opus were re-engaged and the project is proceeding with the original design but amended with the footpath section in front of KiwiRail land now proposed to be constructed.

 

The scope increase was included in the cost estimation.

 

The revised plan is to be presented to the local board at the next earliest opportunity, prior to public consultation.

 

Yes

$181,104 ($30,554 spent to date)

Beachlands kerb and channel

 

Improvements

project to install kerb and channel in Beachlands on following roads:

· Shelley Bay Road

· Karaka Road

· First View Ave

· Second View Ave

The local board approved project rough order cost (ROC) estimate up to $1.18m to progress to detailed design and report back with Firm Estimate of Cost.

 

A workshop was held on the 10 September 2019 for the local board to prioritise the various sections in order to progress this project through the electoral period and summer months. The confirmed order is as follows:

 

i) Shelley Bay Road

ii) Karaka Road

iii) First View Ave

iv) Second View Ave

 

All four sites have been designed to construction drawing phase.  AT is in the process of procuring this work (contract documents are being peer reviewed before it goes out to the market).  It is expected that AT will go to the market in the next two weeks with a contractor engaged by the end of March.  Physical works will commence thereafter.  They will be constructed in the order of priority as resolved by the board

 

Yes

$1.18m

($70,490 spent to date.)

 

Tourist Road-Monument Road intersection electronic warning signage

 

Installation of electronic warning signage on each leg of the intersection and smart studs on Tourist Road.

The local board approved project ROC estimate up to $80,000 to progress to detailed design and report back with Firm Estimate of Cost.

 

Follow up with NZTA resulted in advice that their trial is not accepting further sites.

 

At the 23 July 2019 meeting the local board resolved that the $80,000 Local Transport Capital Funding allocated to this project be reserved until such time NZTA confirms the outcome of its trial.

 

Direction from AT is that this project is to be progressed as the NZTA trial is now over – see below.

No

$80,000

 

Tourist Road-Monument Road intersection - electronic warning signage

10.     Recently, a number of near misses were reported at the Tourist Road-Monument Road intersection. Local board members requested that the issue be investigated as a priority.

11.     A site visit was undertaken in early December to confirm the conditions of existing treatments and determine potential improvements.

12.     As noted in the LBTCF update above, the local board had previously allocated $80,000 for electronic warning signage at this intersection which was to be included as part of an NZTA trial, but not permitted to progress at that time.

13.     This most recent investigation of the intersection noted the LBTCF allocation to the electronic warning signage and staff have been directed to progress the delivery of the project in liaison with NZTA now that their trial has ended.

14.     Identified improvements to road markings are in the process of being delivered with agreement that our maintenance contractors will undertake the work. An update will be provided in next month’s report.

Community Safety Fund (CSF)

15.     At its meeting on 23 July 2019, the Franklin Local Board resolved the following priority for projects nominated for construction using AT’s Community Safety Fund (CSF) monies (FR/2019/103):

i.       Clevedon Town Centre pedestrian crossing

ii.      Gun Club Road / Patumahoe intersection improvements

iii.     Hart / Gun Club Road intersection improvements

iv.     Queen Street and Victoria Avenue (Waiuku) intersection improvements

v.      Racecourse / Kitchener Road (Waiuku) intersection improvements

vi.     Station Road (Pukekohe) parking upgrade

vii.    Taurangaruru Road (Waiuku) safety improvements

viii.   Woodhouse Road pedestrian crossing, Patumahoe.

16.     Design work is now progressing on these projects and it is anticipated that those funded through the CSF process will be completed during the 2020/2021 financial year.

17.     As advised previously, the CSF is a finite fund that must be spent by June 30, 2021. If final pricing for a particular project (post tender) exceeds the available budget, local boards will have the option of either re-allocating some of their CSF budget (meaning not doing another of the CSF projects chosen by the local board) or using their LBTCF to top-up the budget, as opposed to being unable to fund the project. This will allow each local allocation of the CSF to be fully utilised.

18.     The majority of the listed projects are progressing. Design and consultation will take place in 2020, except for Gun Club Road/ Patumahoe intersection improvements, Hart-Gun Club Road Intersection and Gun Club-Helvetia Road intersection improvements, which are planned for delivery in the current financial year.

Responses to resolutions

19.     The local board has passed various resolutions related to AT, which are responded to in this report. The resolution is outlined in italics and the response is directly below.

Resolution number FR/2019/114:

e)      suggest that AT establish a separate contingency budget to address storm damage caused by significant weather events, to enable road maintenance and renewals budget to progress improvements to the Franklin Local Board area roading network.

The suggestion from the local board has been noted and referred to senior management for consideration. The local board may also wish to consider this issue as an advocacy issue for their upcoming local board plan development.

Resolution number FR/2019/103:

d)      request clarification from AT on the criteria and process for allocating regional funding toward significant rural road safety projects, noting that there are a number of on-going and significant safety projects for rural areas identified that do not meet the Transport Community Safety fund criteria.

Advocacy to the Governing Body through the Long-Term Plan and AT Board via the Regional Land Transport Plan development processes is the prioritisation method that determines AT’s allocation of regional funding to various programmes. The approval of those two plans/programmes, the next to be signed off in June 2021, will determine the extent of funding allocated to rural road safety projects.

Resolution number FR/2019/4:

f)       request technical advice and a rough order of costs on improvements to roading and parking provision on Otau Mountain Road (Clevedon) that will support increased and safer use after the opening of the Hunua Trail, a NZ Cycle Trail Heartland ride.

An investigation was untaken as part of the Community Safety Fund process to provide a rough estimate of costs, to be presented to the local board for its consideration.

The initial response from the investigation team was that sealing the road is impractical, as the cost to seal between 3-5.3km, including retaining walls, is significantly cost prohibitive and in excess of the funding allocation for the Franklin Local Board for sealing. Otau Mountain Road is listed at number 722 on AT’s seal extension list.

Local Projects and activities

Stadium Drive Overbridge

20.     AT’s Rail team is currently looking at installing vertical anti-throw nets on the Stadium Drive overbridge in Pukekohe. This is a result of a number of incidents linked to this site.

21.     AT is currently in the planning stages for this project, considering various options.  These will be presented to the local board as soon as possible at a workshop. 

Whitford-Maraetai Road known as Siberia Hill  

22.     Whitford-Maraetai Road between Waikopua Bridge and the bottom of Siberia Hill has been programmed for rehabilitation work this financial year. Due to clashes with a private development in the area, work was deterred until 1st quarter of 2020. 

23.     The work is now programmed to be carried out between January 2020 and March 2020.  

24.     The section leading up to Siberia Hill is also due to be resurfaced and this work is likely to be carried out following the completion of the rehabilitation work.

Regional Impacts

Chair and Director Appointed to Auckland Transport Board

25.     Auckland Council has appointed Adrienne Young-Cooper as the new chair of Auckland Transport and Darren Linton as a board director starting from 1 January 2020.

26.     The council’s Appointments and Performance Review Committee approved the two appointments at its 5 December 2019 meeting following a rigorous selection process that considered several highly qualified and experienced candidates. The Appointments and Performance Review Committee is responsible for all appointments to the boards of council-controlled organisations (CCOs).

27.     Adrienne Young-Cooper’s past and present governance roles span large infrastructure projects, housing and urban growth and transport. She is the chair of Panuku Development Auckland and will keep that position in the short term, alongside her new role as chair of Auckland Transport.

28.     The two appointments are for a three-year term beginning from 1 January 2020 until 31 October 2023.

Speed Limit Bylaw

29.    AT is implementing a speed management plan for Auckland and delivering an ambitious $700 million safety infrastructure acceleration programme. It is estimated that the plan will reduce deaths and serious injuries (DSIs) by up to 18% over an initial three-year period and by up to 60% by 2028. It will deliver major, minor and mass-action safety engineering projects, including speed management on high-risk routes and locations across the network.

30.    As part of this programme, AT proposed to change speed limits across Auckland using the Speed Limits Bylaw, the legal process required for changing speed limits under Section 27.1 of the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017.

31.    Consultation on the bylaw ran from February to March 2019. Over 11,000 submissions were received and because of the high volume and level of detail in the submissions, the AT Board extended the timeframe for decision making to allow the necessary analysis of the feedback.

32.    Following technical analysis by AT engineers, three options were developed for consideration by the AT Board in October:

a)   Option 1: Defer the decision on the bylaw and direct a reassessment of the speed limits proposed and/or other travel speed measures.

b)   Option 2: Make the bylaw in a form that implements the proposed speed limit changes on all roads with minor modifications and staged implementation.

c)   Option 3: Make the bylaw in a form that implements, on a staged basis, all proposed speed limit changes except for on roads that are not categorised as high risk and where there is significant preference for the status quo, with adjustments to the speed limits to take account of implementation of enhanced engineered safety features on key arterials in the City Centre.

33.    The AT Board has resolved to proceed with Option 3.

34.    The speed limited changes outlined in the bylaw will become effective on 30 June 2020. Before then there is a significant amount of work required to install the necessary signage. This will require further investigations to determine the exact sign locations and then a procurement process. Signage will be installed in stages but remain covered until the bylaw becomes effective.

35.    Some town centres that are already in an advanced stage of planning have been designated ‘early start’. These are expected to be implemented by 30 November 2020. Construction of supporting speed reduction infrastructure will take place prior to signs being installed.

36.    Other town centres with plans that are less well developed have been designated ‘late start’ and will proceed for an expected 30 June 2021 completion date.

37.    Further information on the phasing of the changes will be provided by AT as plans are finalised and confirmed.

38.    The updated timeline is as follows:

Step

When

Compile list of changes to speed limits

Completed

Engagement with local boards and Councillors

Completed in October – December 2018

Approval for consultation sought from the Auckland Transport Board

Completed in December 2018

Public consultation on the Bylaw

Carried out 28 February – 31 March 2019

Analysis and feedback

Completed April – October 2019

Bylaw (with changes resulting from public feedback) approved by the Auckland Transport Board

22 October 2019

Preparing for the speed limit changes

October 2019 onwards

Implementation of changes

30 June 2020

Implementation of town centres early start

30 November 2020

Implementation of town centres late start

30 June 2021

 

39.    Further information on the safer speeds programme is available at: https://at.govt.nz/speed.

A big year for public transport

40.     More Aucklanders are jumping on public transport with annual growth of almost eight per cent.

41.     Last year public transport patronage totaled 103.2 million passenger boardings with AT Metro train services carrying more than 22 million passengers in the past 12 months. That’s the highest rate ever; train patronage is growing at six per cent a year.

42.     Last year AT added an additional 13 per cent capacity at peak times to the busiest bus corridors and more services are on the way.

43.     AT is adding an additional 20 NX2 peak services. These will be express services from Hibiscus Coast station to the city and will improve travel time for Hibiscus Coast customers by taking away the need to transfer at Albany. It will also increase capacity for people who use the service from other busway stations.

44.     Last year bus patronage grew at almost nine per cent and ferry passenger numbers were up two per cent.

45.     In the Pukekohe area rail boardings increased in the year to August 2019 by 43,000, up 21 per cent from 199,131 the previous year.

46.     Bus patronage in the same period has also increased by 27,000 up 28 per cent from 93,600 boardings the previous year.

47.     The first three of Auckland’s new trains have arrived. The trains are currently being tested and certified meaning we can run larger trains during the morning and afternoon peak.

48.     The remaining 12 will arrive before the end of the year, bringing the fleet to 72.

Annual Public Transport Fares Review from 9 February 2020

49.     AT reviews public transport (PT) fares annually, taking into account such factors as contract price indexing (operator cost increases), agreed fare policies and the need to fund any extra services. The AT Board has agreed some modest changes to bus, rail and ferry fares in 2020.

50.     Building on input from councillors at a Planning Committee Workshop on 5 May 2019 and the Mayor’s budget proposal, which was adopted by the Governing Body and provided for targeted fare reductions including ‘child fare free weekends’ and ‘ferry fare integration’, this fare review will support AT achieving operational financial performance in line with its budget and the Statement of Intent (SOI) performance target for the farebox recovery ratio.

51.     Fare increases have been able to be contained through financial support from Auckland Council and NZTA and as a result of efficiency savings made by AT.

52.     Key points to note are:

·    the average fare increase has been held to just 2.34 per cent (or five cents per trip).

·    these modest increases will help fund a portion of AT’s annual cost increases and enable AT to target additional funding on:

Increase peak time frequencies

Expansion into new growth areas

Free child weekend fares

·    for some journeys, the cost will decrease.

·    there will be no change to cash fares, some longer zone fares and monthly bus and rail passes.

·    not increasing fares would slow down the rate of future investment in public transport.

·    the changes will see a farebox recovery ratio of 42.14 per cent to 42.71 per cent against a 43-46 per cent SOI target.

·    the fare review quantum was identified in the 2019/2020 budget and was part of deliberations by Council and Governing Body in setting the budget.

 

53.     AT is increasing the ferry monthly passes (inner-harbour; mid-harbour; outer-harbour) by $10 due to the pending implementation of ferry fare integration, which will provide additional value for money for customers who purchase a ferry monthly pass, with the new fare including free travel in the zone of origin and arrival.

54.     An annual PT fare review is a requirement under the Regional Land Transport Plan. In the SOI, the target of the percentage of PT costs recovered through fares for 2019-2022 is 43-46 per cent. However, the main driver for fare increases is investing back into public transport and ensuring a safe and reliable public transport system that supports Auckland’s growing population. In the past year AT has grown the public transport system in the following key areas:

·    timetable changes in July saw additional peak bus services for West Auckland heading into the city centre via the motorway, and a route change from Henderson into the city via Williamson Avenue in Ponsonby

·    timetable changes in October saw several additions across Auckland

 

55.     Central Auckland:

·    more services for the 101 – Herne Bay across the city to the universities

·    additional peak services for the 105 – serving Richmond Road, Ponsonby and Queen Street

·    additional peak services on the 75 – Remuera Road and Newmarket into the city centre.

 

56.     North Shore:

·    more services from Hillcrest, down Lake Road (923/934) into the city centre

·    additional services from Beach Haven into the City Centre and return

·    the extension of the 861 route to service the new residential development in Long Bay.

 

57.     In October, the Waiheke New Network was introduced, bringing five new routes to the island and increasing services by 120 per cent to match frequency principles which are applied across the Auckland region.

58.     General improvements include:

·    32.5 per cent increase in AT Metro bus kilometres operated since 2015

·    82.3 per cent increase in rail services since 2013

·    163 per cent increase in the number of people now living within 500 metres of a frequent and/or rapid public transport stop or station.

 

59.     Public transport fares also provide revenue that allows AT and Auckland Council to provide initiatives such as ‘home free’, free public transport after 4pm on the last Friday before Christmas, and fare free days such as the one held in June 2019.

Road Resurfacing

60.     The drier summer months see a surge in road resurfacing works across Auckland.  Roads require periodic resurfacing (resealing) to keep the sealed surface waterproof and to maintain good skid resistance.  The bitumen in the surfacing oxidises over time causing it to become brittle and either crack, unravel or lose chip.  Similarly, the chip can become polished and/or the road surface flushed resulting in a loss of skid resistance.

61.     This process is similar to maintenance of a painted house; when this is left too long water penetrates the paint surface, resulting in costlier repairs. If roads are resurfaced at the right time, the surface remains waterproof, skid resistance is maintained and surface water does not penetrate the road pavement.

62.     Roads are resurfaced using either a chip seal or a thin asphaltic concrete surfacing (hotmix).  Generally, chip seals have a life of 8-12 years and cost in the order of $4-8 m2, while hotmix can be expected to last 10-14 years and costs $20-30 m2, depending on the type of mix used.

63.     Chip seals are therefore the most cost-effective method of resurfacing and in many situations are the only method that can practically be used to restore the road surface to a suitable condition.  Hotmix is generally only used on high trafficked roads (those carrying more than 10,000 vehicles per day), or in high-stress areas such as at intersections or cul-de-sac heads.

64.     Each resurfacing site is subject to a specific seal design and the choice of surfacing and chip size used is dependent on factors such as the traffic volumes and loading, the existing surface texture and pavement strength, turning stresses etc. Chip seals can be either single or two coat seals, though in most cases two coat seals are used as they are more resistant to turning stresses. Prior to resurfacing, pre-seal repairs such as dig outs, crack sealing and surface levelling are undertaken.

65.     Chip seals also continue to shed excess chip for several months following resurfacing, which is a nuisance for adjoining landowners and can create the mistaken impression that the new chip seal surface is defective.  New chip seals, particularly two-coat seals, can therefore require 4-5 sweeps to remove excess chip from the surface.

66.     It is also usual for the bitumen to soften during warm weather for several years following application, until such time as the kerosene fully evaporates from the bitumen.  At this time it will be susceptible to scuffing from turning vehicles, but these areas can be treated with the application of fresh sealing chip. 

67.     Many of the enquiries AT receives about resurfacing result from existing aged hotmix surfaces being resurfaced with chip seal when they reach the end of their serviceable life. Most hotmix surfaces were constructed by developers at the time of subdivision so when they are resurfaced with chip seal residents complain.  The need to periodically resurface the road to avoid water ingress into the road pavement is often not understood by residents and they consider the rougher chip seal surface to be inferior to that of the smoother hotmix. Residents can be reassured in these circumstances that chip sealing is the most cost-effective use of their ratepayer funds.

Vector and AT sign memorandum of understanding

68.     On 20 January 2020 Auckland Transport and Vector announced a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to explore the impacts of a full implementation.

69.     The MoU is a direct response to AT’s low emission bus roadmap, published in late 2018, that outlined its commitment to have all new buses in Auckland being electric from 2025, with the whole fleet fully electric by 2040.

70.     A faster transition to electric buses requires a detailed assessment of the future demand on the electricity network.

71.     Two reports will be produced as part of the MoU, the first exploring a route and service profile, which will model the electricity demand that a fully electrified bus fleet will require. The second report will provide guidance on the electricity network infrastructure upgrades required at each bus depot, as well as likely timings and costs. These two reports are expected to be delivered by June 2020.

72.     Buses make up 87 per cent of the carbon emissions produced from public transport, so converting them from diesel to electric will also be a significant step towards meeting New Zealand’s 2050 zero-carbon emissions goal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

73.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

74.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

75.     To this end, Auckland Transport’s Statement of Intent contains three performance measures:

Measure

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Number of buses in the Auckland bus fleet classified as low emission

5

25

55

Reduction in CO2 (emissions) generated annually by Auckland Transport corporate operations (from 2017/18 baseline)

7%

9%

11%

Percentage of Auckland Transport streetlights that are energy efficient LED

56%

66%

76%

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

76.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Auckland Transport consultations

Local Board consultations

77.     Auckland Transport provides the FLB with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in the local board area.

78.     The local board’s views on any proposed schemes are taken into account during consultation on those proposals.

79.     In the reporting period from September 2019 to January 2020, seven proposals were put forward for comment by the FLB. The local board transport representative’s views and ongoing communication are recorded in the table below.

Table 3: Local Board Consultations

Location

Proposal

Details and Local Board Feedback

Victoria Street, Pukekohe

School-patrolled crossing

Circulated to the local board on 4 December 2019.

Third View Avenue, Beachlands

Footpath

This was circulated to the local board members on 22 October 2019. Local board members were supportive of the proposal though wanted additional consultation with the adjoining neighbour.

Brookesmith Drive, Waiuku

Angle car parking spaces

Circulated to local board members 12 November. The local board raised no objections.

743 Upper Queen Street, Pukekohe

Traffic control changes – 80m of NSAAT for heavy vehicle manoeuvring.

This was circulated to the local board members on 21 October 2019. The local board feedback asked that the ‘no right turn’ sign is large enough and highly visible prior to the intersection. It is also suggested that a warning sign further back saying ‘no right turn’ into the café or the side road might be appropriate due to the curve in the road.

King Street, Waiuku

Upgrade existing pedestrian crossing to zebra crossing

Circulated to the local board members on 21 October 2019. The local board raised no objections.

150 Whitford-Maraetai Road

Proposed flush median – part of a new development

Circulated to the local board members on 21 October 2019. The local board raised no objections and noted that this seemed to be a technical change to make the area safer.

Paerata Rise – Stage 2B & 2C Subdivisions         

Traffic controls including NSAAT, give ways

Circulated to the FLB Transport on 27 September 2019. The transport representatives raised concerns about the use of NSAAT’s, lack of parking and the concern that illegal parking will be result due to this proposal. 

 

Feedback from the consultant agreed that there is a general basis for concern and viewed the adequate supply of on-street parking as an important matter.

 

In this subdivision the supply of on-street parking has generally been incorporated into the design wherever possible, given the need to also provide rain gardens along the sides of each street. In some cases, like on Simmonds House Road, small areas of angle parking have been introduced to supply additional parking.

In the particular instance mentioned, Winstone House Road between Simmonds House Road and Te Paea Avenue, the drawings provided to you showed one indented parking bay, and the combination of no-stopping restrictions and driveways prevented parking elsewhere in this street.

 

Although there is some on-street parking available in other streets nearby, a further review of the design found that the proposed no-stopping restriction could be removed from two short sections of Winstone House Road, providing two additional on-street parking spaces. A review of the remaining streets in this resolution has not been able to identify any other lengths of no-stopping restriction that could be removed.

 

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

80.     Traffic Control Committee (TCC) decisions within the FLB area are reported on a monthly basis. The decisions within the local board area during September 2019 to January 2020 are included in this report to the local board.

Table 4: TCC Decisions


Decision

Report Type

Nature of Restriction

Decision

Ararimu Road / Hillview Road / Mceldownie Road / Ramarama School entryway

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

 

No Stopping At All Times / Traffic Signal / Pedestrian Crossing / Road Hump / Traffic Island / Edge Line / Road Markings For Speed Management / Surface Friction Treatment / No Right Turn / Stop Control

 

Approved with Conditions

Maraetai Coast Road / Maraetai Drive / North Road

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

 

No Stopping At All Times / Bus Stop / Angle Parking / Mobility Parking / Traffic Island / No Passing / Pedestrian Crossing / Footpath

 

Carried

Belmont Road

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

No Stopping At All Times / Road Hump / Flush Median / Shoulder Marking / Traffic Island / Pedestrian Crossing / Footpath / Give-Way Control

Carried

Upper Queen Street

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

No Right Turn / No Passing

Carried

Shelly Bay Road

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

Lane Arrow Marking / No Stopping At All Times / Footpath / Edge Line

Carried

Maraetai Drive / Maraetai Coast Road

 

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Event)

Temporary Traffic and Parking Controls

Carried

Beachlands Road / Constellation Avenue / Mahutonga Avenue / Whitford-Maraetai Road / Kouka Road / Karo Road

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

Cycle Lane / No Stopping At All Times / Shared Path / Angle Parking / Loading Zone / Parking Zone / P90 Parking / P15 Parking / Bus Stop / Bus Shelter / Mobility Parking / P180 Parking / Traffic Island / Road Hump / Pedestrian Crossing / Give-Way Control / Roundabout / Flush Median

Carried

Beachlands Road / Shelly Bay Road / Second View Avenue

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times / Bus Stop / Bus Shelter / Flush Median / Roundabout / Give-Way Control / Traffic Island / Edge Line

Carried

Roulston Street / Roulston Lane

 

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Event)

Temporary Traffic and Parking Controls

Carried

Adams Road South / Road 1

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times / Road Hump / Flush Median / Footpath / Give-Way Control

Approved in Principle

Bowen Street / Queen Street

 

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Event)

 

Temporary Traffic and Parking restrictions

 

Carried

Hamilton Drive / Matai Street

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

 

No Stopping At All Times, Traffic Island, Road Hump, Give-Way control, Flush Median

 

Carried

Manukau Road / Buckland Road / Kitchener Road

 

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Event)

 

Temporary Traffic and Parking restrictions

 

Carried

Roulston Street / Roulston Lane

 

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Event)

 

Temporary Traffic and Parking restrictions

 

Carried

Road 3 / Road 4 / Road 6 / Road 17 / Road 19 / Road 20 / Road 22 / Road 78 / Road 71 / Road 72 / Road 73 / Road 74 / Road 79

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes Combined

 

Lane Arrow markings, Cycle Lane, No Stopping At All Times, Traffic Island, Footpath, Give-Way control, Flush Median, Lane markings

 

Approved in Principle

 

 


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

81.     The proposed decision of receiving the report or requesting cost estimates has no impacts or opportunities for Māori.  Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

82.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

83.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

84.     AT will provide an update report to the local board next month

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kenneth Tuai – Elected Member Relationship Manager Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 

New road name for a new road in the subdivision of land at 252 Clevedon- Kawakawa Road, Clevedon by Netherlea Holdings Limited

File No.: CP2020/01339

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board for the name of one new private road, being a commonly owned accessed lot, created by way of a subdivision development at 252 Clevedon Kawakawa Road, Clevedon by Netherlea Holdings Limited (MC 52676, SUB60300549).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

3.       Any of the three proposed road name options would be acceptable for the local board to approve for use in this location, having been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met, and with the exception of the preferred name Riverside, the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region.  Therefore, it is up to the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names. 

4.       An application for road naming has been submitted by Peter Mandeno on behalf of Netherlea Holdings Limited. The following names have been provided for consideration for one new road created by way of a subdivision development at 252 Clevedon-Kawakawa Road, Clevedon:

·        Riverside Way (Applicant’s preferred name)

·        Pathfinder Way (Alternative 1)

·        Netherlea Way (Alternative 2)

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the name (local board to insert chosen name and road type) for the new private road created by way of a subdivision development at 252 Clevedon- Kawakawa Road, Clevedon (Council reference: MC52676, SUB60300549), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Netherlea Holdings Limited is developing a residential subdivision of 10 lots (Lots 1 - 9, and 11) with one access lot (Lot 10) on land at 252 Clevedon Kawakawa Road, Clevedon.  Access to the new lots will be provided by the access lot (Lot 10) running northwards from the Clevedon Kawakawa Road frontage.

6.       The road is required to be named in accordance with the national addressing standard as each road will serve more than 5 lots.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The Auckland Council road naming guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

8.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

-   a historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

-   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

-   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

9.       Land Information New Zealand has confirmed that any of the applicant’s proposed names are acceptable to use but noted that it would be more unique to use Pathfinder Way or Netherlea Way rather than Riverside Way. Riverside Way is still acceptable due to its distance from other examples of use of the same road name, but the other two names are better options.

10.     Iwi Consultation: Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki was contacted by Peter Mandeno prior to submitting the formal road naming application. A response was received from Lucy Steel of Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki that the names were acceptable to the iwi. 

11.     Formal comment, via Council’s iwi facilitation service, was sought from eight relevant iwi groups with an interest in the locality. No other iwi provided responses or comments. It is therefore implied that no iwi were opposed to the use of any of the proposed names in this location for this small private road.

12.     The applicant has proposed the following names for consideration for the new road created in the subdivision at 252 Clevedon-Kawakawa Road, Clevedon:

Proposed Private Way Name

Meaning

Riverside Way

(Applicant preferred)

The subdivision is located on land that extends down to the Wairoa River.

Pathfinder Way

(Alternative 1)

The name of aircraft flown by the developer’s father - Graham Mandeno DSO, DFC and Bar, a pilot in Bomber Command in the R A F in Britain.

Netherlea Way

(Alternative 2)

The name of the farm on which the subdivision is located.

 

13.     Assessment: The names proposed by the applicant have been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s road naming guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met and with the exception of ‘Riverside’, the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region. Therefore, it is up to the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context.

14.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all the proposed names are acceptable and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

15.     Road type: ‘Way’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the road, as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The review sought from the Franklin Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Locality Plan - 252 Clevedon Kawakawa Road Clevedon

43

b

Aproved Scheme of Subdivision

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lesley Wood – Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 

Approval for new road names at 110 Maraetai School Road Maraetai

File No.: CP2020/01345

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to name two new roads and two new private roads, being commonly owned access lots (COALs), created by way of a subdivision development at 110 Maraetai School Rd, Maraetai.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

2.       The applicant, The Neil Group Ltd, has proposed the following preferred names for consideration by the local board:

ROAD 1

ROAD 2

COAL 1

COAL 2

Arthur Wright Place

Platts-Mills Avenue

George Couldrey Lane

Eckford Lane


Following consultation with iwi, Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki suggested the following additional options:

·    Matara

·    Mamao

3.       The proposed road names have been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s road naming guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. Mana whenua were also consulted.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)            approve the four preferred names for the two new roads and two new commonly-owned access lots created by way of subdivision at 110 Maraetai School Road, Maraetai in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent reference BUN60311766:

Road 1 – Arthur Wright Place

Road 2 – Platts-Mills Avenue

COAL 1 – George Couldrey Lane

COAL 2 – Eckford Lane.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       Resource consent BUN60311766 was issued 13 September 2018 for the subdivision of 70 vacant residential allotments, five commonly-owned access lots, two roads, one drainage reserve and one balance allotment, over two stages.

5.       Two of the COALs will serve 16 lots.

6.       In accordance with the National Addressing Standards for road naming (the AS/NZS 4819-2011 standard), the commonly owned access lots require road names because they serve more than 5 lots. COALs are access lots which are held in shares by properties which have no direct access to a legal road.

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B respectively.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The Auckland Council road naming guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

9.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

-   a historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

-   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

-   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

10.     Theme: The applicant has selected names sourced from the book “Greys Folly” written by historian Alan La Roche and relate to the area of Maraetai and also from information supplied to them by the Beachlands, Maraetai and Districts Historical Society when they undertook the naming of Stage 1.

11.     The Applicant’s proposed names and meanings are set out in the table below:

Proposed Names & Preferences

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Arthur Wright

Road 1

He was the owner of the underlying block of 48 hectares from 1973 until his death. This land was later sold to Maraetai Land Developments Limited.

Platts-Mills

Road 2

Dr Adah Platts-Mills set up the local medical practice from her home at 51 Rewa Rd in 1953, eventually retiring in 1988 (aged 84). She was respected in the community for her diagnostic skills and her availability day and night. She was a passionate environmentalist and was later appointed Auckland Officer of Health and worked alongside Sir Dove Meyer Robinson in 1984 to divert the proposed sewerage scheme to Manukau rather than Brown’s Island. In 1988 Manukau Council purchased and named after her 27 acres of native bush from her turning it into a public reserve.

George Couldrey

COAL 1

George Couldrey purchased the land from Thomas Eckford in 1877 and grew crops & sold firewood. Couldrey operated the first Maraetai Post Office from his home between 1888 and 1917.

Eckford

COAL 2

Thomas Eckford bought 368 acres in the area in 1851. He was the first purchaser of land from the Fairburn block and farmer pigs as well as growing oats & wheat.

Matara (alternative)

“Distant” in Maori

Mamao (alternative)

“Far away” in Maori

 

12.    Assessment: The names proposed by the Applicant have been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s road naming guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming.

13.    Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all the proposed names are acceptable and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

14.    Road type: ‘Place, Avenue and Lane’ are acceptable road types for the new roads and private roads, suiting the form and layout of the road, as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

15.    Iwi Consultation: All relevant local iwi were written to (via email) and invited to comment. Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki, Ngati Maru, Ngati Paoa, Ngati Tamatera, Ngati Te Ata, Nga Whanaunga, Te Ahiwaru-Waiohu, Te Akitai Waiohua, Waikato-Tainui and Ngati Tamaoho were contacted. Of these Iwi, Ngati Tamaoho deferred their engagement to Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki, who suggested the alternatives of Matara and Mamao.

16.    No objections or additional comments were raised by mana whenua for any of the other proposed names.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The decision sought from the Franklin Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome “A Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Māori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Māori identity.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

23.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Plan

51

b

Attachment B - Location Plan

53

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dean Dickson - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 

Correction of a road name in the subdivision at Drury South Crossing (425 Quarry Road, Drury) by Drury South Limited

File No.: CP2020/00829

 

  

 

Ack Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to rename a public road within the Drury South Crossing development at 425 Quarry Road, Drury, by Drury South Limited. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.  Unfortunately, an internal error has resulted in a duplication of a road name approved within one week of each other.

3.       Drury South Limited (the Applicant) request to rename the road known as ‘ROAD 6’ within their Drury South Crossing subdivision (DSC) due to duplication issues, as the name ‘Noia’ was already approved in 2019 for another road in the Drury area. LINZ has confirmed this name is no longer acceptable for use in the DSC subdivision and needs to be renamed.

4.       The applicant has proposed two replacement names for the local board to consider for ROAD 6. These names were previously submitted as alternative names for ROAD 6 in the original report.

Table 1: Proposed Road Names for Road 6

First Alternative

Toiawaka

Road

Second Alternative

Pukekura

Place

5.       Any of the two proposed road name options would be acceptable for the local board to approve for use in this location, having been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met and the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region. Mana Whenua were also consulted. Therefore it is up to the local board to decide upon the thematic suitability of the names within the local context.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      rescind resolution FR/2019/183 to name ‘ROAD 6’ being ‘Noia Place’ (due to duplication issues), within the Drury South Crossing development at 425 Quarry Road, Drury, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

b)      approve the replacement name for ‘ROAD 6’ as ‘Toiawaka Road’, within the Drury South Crossing development at 425 Quarry Road, Drury, (Council reference SUB60325513), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B respectively.

7.       A road naming report for the DSC subdivision in Drury was presented to and approved by the Local Board on 3 December 2019. Since that approval, new information has come to light requiring one of the road names contained in that report to be replaced.

8.       Due to a duplicate error that was not picked up at the time of writing the prior report, the same name has been approved simultaneously for two separate developments in Drury.

9.       Due to the close proximity of the two Drury developments, LINZ has advised that keeping both names would cause potential confusion for road users, including postal and emergency services.

10.     Only ROAD 6 is to be renamed. The road names ‘Bill Stevenson Drive’ (Road 2W & 2E) and ‘Jack Stevenson Road’ (Road 4) approved on 3 December 2019 are to remain unchanged.  

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

12.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

-    a historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

-    a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

-    an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

13.     The Applicant’s proposed replacement names and meanings for ROAD 6 are set out in the table below:

Table 2: ROAD 6 Proposed Names and Meanings

Proposed Name

Meaning

Toiawaka Road

(First Alternative)

 

A descendant of Poutūkeka and a leading rangatira of Te Uri O Pou in the Te Maketū area. After the death of Poutūkeka II (the leading rangatira of Te Uri O Pou), the mana of the Tāmaki and Te Hūnua region passed to his two grandsons Huakaiwaka and Toiawaka).

While Huakaiwaka took up residence at Maungakiekie and held mana over the Tāmaki isthmus, Toiawaka remained in Te Hūnua taking up residence at Te Maketū. Here he continued to uphold the rangatiratanga and kaitiakitanga of Te Uri O Pou. Toiakaiwaka is thought to have lived during the late 17th century.

Name and meaning suggested by Ngāti Tamaoho

Pukekura Place

(Second Alternative)

 

The name of a punawai (spring) to the immediate south of the project area. The Pukekura Puna (Spring) was a key site for Ngāti Tamaoho in the area. It was strategically located along an important north-south travel route to allow travellers to replenish their water supplies between the Tuhimata settlement and the Opaheke or Te Aparangi settlement to the north.

The Pukekura Puna is both a taonga and wahi tapu for Ngáti Tamaoho. The springs also provide water for healing and were a place of ceremonial blessings at times of birth and death and the leaving and returning of travellers.

Name and meaning suggested by Ngāti Tamaoho

 

14.     Assessment: The names proposed by the Applicant have been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met and the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region, therefore it is up to the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context.

15.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all the proposed names are acceptable and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

16.     Road type: ‘Road’ and ‘Place’ would be acceptable road types for the new road replacement names, suiting the form and layout of the roads, as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

17.     Iwi consultation: All relevant local iwi were written to (via email) and invited to comment as part of the previous road naming for the Drury South Crossing development.

Ngāti Tamaoho had suggested two road names (‘Toiawaka’ and ‘Pukekura’) which the applicant included as alternative names to ROAD 6 in the original report. The applicant has proposed these two names in this report for the local board to consider as ROAD 6 replacement names.

Ngaati Whanaunga responded acknowledging Drury South Limited for their consultation with Ngāti Tamaoho and Ngaati Whanaunga and supported the applicants proposed names.

No other responses were received, as well as any objections for any of the two names proposed in this report. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The review sought from the Franklin Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome “A Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Māori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Māori identity. Two Māori road name options have been proposed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site locality map of Drury South Crossing

59

b

Site Plan showing ROAD 6 to be renamed in Drury South Crossing

61

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lesley Wood – Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 

Urgent Decisions in the period 9 November 2019 to 13 February 2020 by the Franklin Local Board

 

File No.: CP2020/00392

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To report on urgent decisions made by Franklin Local Board in the period 22 November 2019 to 13 February 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       At its meeting on 26 November 2019 the Franklin Local Board resolved (FR/2019/168) the following in relation to urgent decision-making:

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)           adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meeting with requirements of a quorum.

b)           delegate authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board.

c)           agree that the relationship manager (or any person/s acting in this role) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off an authorisation memo.

d)           note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary business meeting of the local board.

3.       The relationship manager for the Franklin Local Board authorised the urgent decision-making process on two occasions since the last local board business meeting. In both instances the urgent decision process was triggered as a result of consultation timeframes that did not allow for resolution by the full local board.

4.       Feedback on behalf of the Franklin Local Board, approved under delegated authority of the Chair and Deputy Chair, was provided on the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) proposed speed limit changes to State Highway 22 – Drury interchange to Paerata (Attachment A).

5.       Feedback on behalf of the Franklin Local Board, approved under delegated authority of the Chair and Deputy Chair, was provided on the Auckland Council draft submission to the Ministry for the Environment’s review of the effectiveness of the waste levy (Attachment B).

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the urgent decision providing Franklin Local Board’s feedback on the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) proposed speed limit changes to State Highway 22 (Attachment A).

b)      note the urgent decision providing Franklin Local Board’s feedback on the Auckland Council submission to the Ministry for Environment’s review of the effectiveness of the waste levy (Attachment B).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

22 November 2019 Urgent Decision by Franklin Local Board on NZTA proposed speed limit changes to SH22 - Drury interchange to Paerata

65

b

22 January 2020 Urgent Decision by Franklin Local Board on AC draft submission on the Ministry for Environment's review - effectiveness of the waste levy

71

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor - Franklin

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar February 2020

File No.: CP2020/01265

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Franklin Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Franklin Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar dated February 2020 (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

February 2020 governance forward work calendar

79

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor - Franklin

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 

Resolutions Pending Action

File No.: CP2020/01267

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Franklin Local Board with an opportunity to track progress of local board resolutions requesting response and advice from staff.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

 

a)      note the February 2020: Resolutions pending 2019-2020 report (Attachment A).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resolutions Pending report 2019 -2020 - February

83

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor - Franklin

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 

Franklin Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2020/00394

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for workshops held on 19 and 26 November 2019, 3 and 10 December 2019, 28 January 2020, 4 and 11 February 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board holds weekly workshops to facilitate oversight and delivery of projects in their work programme or that have significant local implications.

3.       The local board does not make decisions at these workshops.

4.       Workshops are not open to the public, but records of what was discussed and presented at the workshop are reported retrospectively.

5.       Workshop records for the Franklin Local Board are attached for 19 and 26 November 2019, 3 and 10 December 2019, 28 January 2020, 4 and 11 February 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for 19 and 26 November 2019, 3 and 10 December 2019, 28 January 2020, 4 and 11 February 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

19 November 2019 Franklin Local Board workshop record

93

b

26 November 2019 Franklin Local Board workshop record

95

c

3 December 2019 Franklin Local Board workshop record

97

d

10 December 2019 Franklin Local Board workshop record

99

e

28 January 2020 Franklin Local Board workshop record

101

f

4 February 2020 Franklin Local Board workshop record

103

g

11 February 2020 Franklin Local Board workshop record

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor - Franklin

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Franklin Local Board for Quarter Two 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/01246

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Franklin Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for Quarter Two, 1 October – 31 December 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2019/2020 work programme (WP).

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with the Franklin Local Board Plan outcomes. The full work programme is provided as Attachment A.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        A new Kahawairahi Playground was completed and opened

·        A new basketball hoop at Patumahoe and new picnic table at Hunua were installed

·        The board granted $39,927 to Mauku Stream Waterway improvement initiatives

·        The Wairoa River restoration project planted 2,120 plants along 209 metres of river

·        The final phase of the Waiuku skatepark upgrade was completed.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activity is reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·        Beachlands Waste Minimisation (WP ID 813)

6.       The 2019/2020 financial performance report for 31 December 2019 is attached under confidential cover. This is due to restrictions on releasing interim report (half year) results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – expected to be made public from 28 February 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial Quarter Two ending 31 December 2019.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment A of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group interim report (half year) are released to the NZX which are expected to be made public on 28 February 2020.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Franklin Local Board has an approved 2019/2020 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Arts, Community and Events

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation

·        Libraries and Information

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

·        Community Leases

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Plans and Places

·        The Southern Initiative

·        ATEED.

8.       Work programmes are produced annually to meet the Franklin Local Board outcomes identified in the three-year Franklin Local Board Plan. The local board plan outcomes are:

·        A well cared-for natural environment

·        A thriving local economy

·        An improved transport system

·        Growth is dealt with effectively

·        Communities feel ownership and connection to their area.

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, or activities delivered by Auckland Transport, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

10.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

 

11.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department


 

Key activity updates from quarter two

12.     The following activities were completed in quarter two;

WP ID refs

Outcome

Activity

Location

218/2212

Growth is dealt with effectively

New Kahawairahi Playground completed and opening ceremony delivered

Beachlands

2033

Growth is dealt with effectively

Ngakaroa Reserve bridge renewal

Drury

2897

Communities feel ownership and connection to their area

New Patumahoe basketball hoop and court markings

Patumahoe

2938

Communities feel ownership and connection to their area

New picnic table installed at Hunua Village Green

Hunua

3595

Communities feel ownership and connection to their area

Phase 3 of the Waiuku Skatepark upgrade completed

Waiuku

3655

Growth is dealt with effectively

Replaced tiles at the Jubilee Pool

Pukekohe

753/56/853

A well cared-for natural environment

Litter clean up at Whangapouri Stream

Pukekohe

845

A well cared-for natural environment

Wairoa River Restoration, 2,120 plants planted along 209 metres of river. Three co-ordinator roles created including a pest co-ordinator.

Clevedon

840

A well cared-for natural environment

Mauku Stream Waterway Protection funding allocated $39,927 in funding to initiatives to improve the water in the Mauku Stream leading to the Manukau Harbour.

Patumahoe

1126

Growth is dealt with effectively

Te Puru Park service assessment is complete

Beachlands

752

A well cared-for natural environment

Ecological Volunteer grant of $10,000 paid to the Mudlarks to continue mangrove removal programme.

Waiuku

 

Activities with significant issues

13.     The Beachlands waste minimisation project (WP ID 813), a new project for 2019/2020, can no longer be delivered as planned. The Beachlands Community Trust, who delivered the waste education programme that the project supported, have ceased operating.

14.     This project was allocated $20,000 in 2019/2020. Staff intend workshopping alternative waste minimisation activities with the board in Quarter Three of 2020.

Activities on hold

15.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        WP ID 1985 Ray Fausett Reserve playground, pending allocation of delivery budget.

·        WP ID 2370 Beachlands Library renewal. Asset condition assessed as satisfactory. On hold pending reallocation to future work programme.

·        WP ID 2141 Clarks Beach skatepark renewal, pending completion of reserve concept plan (WP ID 3048). Note that WP ID 2141 (skatepark renewal) and WP ID 2385, (Clarks Beach play spaces and land fixtures renewals) have now been merged into one project.

·        WP ID 2384 Clarks Beach accessway renewals, pending review of renewal options and priorities.

·        WP ID 2507 Te Puru Park skatepark renewal, pending completion of a strategic assessment (WP ID 1126), and development of a Te Puru Park concept plan (WP ID 3047). The Service assessment is now complete and concept plan develop will progress in Quarter Three.

·        WP ID 2928 Clevedon Playground renewal, pending completion of a service assessment of local play facilities (WP ID 645) which will identify future play facility needs. Staff expect this service assessment work to be completed in Quarter Four.

·        WP ID 2966 Matakawau Point new boat ramp. Project is on hold pending the Matakawau Boat Club re-engaging on the proposed project scope. The local board members are facilitating dialogue between the Matakawau Boat Club and the project team.

·        WP ID 3085 Clevedon Showgrounds Masterplan review pending direction from the board.

·        WP ID 3746 Pukekohe Stadium slip remediation pending feedback from the property owner on the findings of the investigation.

·        WP ID 3483 Renewal of lease at 62 Wakelin Road Beachlands. The incumbent leaseholder has ceased to operate. A new process is under investigation for the ongoing access and use of the property.

·        WP ID 3497 New ground lease at 100 Stevensons Road, Clarks Beach pending completion of the Regional Facilities Golf Plan so that principles can be applied to the new lease.

·        WP ID 3498 New ground lease at 56 Kitchener Road, Waiuku pending completion of the Regional Facilities Golf Plan so that principles can be applied to the new lease.

·        WP ID 3499 Renewal of ground lease at Puni Recreation Reserve, Puni pending incorporation of the group as a legal entity.

·        WP ID 3500 New ground lease at 19 Stadium Drive, Pukekohe. The incumbent leaseholder has terminated their lease. Staff will seek direction from the board on the future use of the land in Quarter Three.

·        WP ID 3501 New ground lease at 89 Ardmore Quarry Road pending confirmation on noise monitoring and minimisation assessment.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

16.     These activities are deferred from the 2019/2020 work programme:

·        WP ID 1985 Ray Fausett Reserve Playground development

·        WP ID 2370 Beachlands library minor renewal

·        WP ID 2698 Park Sign renewals east Franklin

·        WP ID 2699 Park Furniture renewals Franklin

·        WP ID 2700 Park Structure renewals Franklin

·        WP ID 2704 Park Sign renewals west Franklin

·        WP ID 2895 Orere Point track renewals

·        WP ID 2896 Park fencing renewals west Franklin

·        WP ID 2908 Waiau Beach wharf toilet block renewal

·        WP ID 2972 Matakawau Point Reserve toilet renewal  

·        WP ID 3620 Identify park run routes and install signage.          

 

Cancelled activities

17.     These activities are cancelled:

·        WP ID 3711 Sports lighting and sports field upgrades. This project has been split into three distinct projects (WP ID 3022, 2923 and 2585)

·        WP ID 813 Beachlands waste minimisation project has been cancelled as the Beachlands Community Trust has ceased operating. Staff will advise the Franklin Local Board of alternative uses for the budget allocation to further waste reduction aspirations in the next quarter.

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

18.     These activities have been merged with other activities for efficient delivery:

·        WP ID 2385 Clarks Beach play space renewals merged with WP ID 2141 Clarks Beach skate park renewal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

20.     Work programmes were approved in June 2019 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impact will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.    This report informs the Franklin Local Board of the performance for Quarter Two ending

         31 December 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The following activities delivered directly to local Maori outcomes;

WP ID ref

Activity Name

Commentary

55

Local Māori responsiveness plan

Improvements in Maori representation at local board inauguration were delivered with iwi representation at the inaugural meeting.

Board represented at the Ngati Tamaoho Trust premises opening at Hingaia.

Staff attending the Christmas at the Marae event at Nga Hau e Wha to seek input into the McShane Street play space opening.

Baseline review of the Franklin Local Maori Responsiveness Action Plan has commenced.

501

Franklin Arts Centre programme

Exhibition of the work of local weavers and master weaver Matekino Lawless.

504

Arts Broker Programme

Te Taki Tu Charitable trust was supported to deliver the “Retelling our Stories” project, working with tamariki to tell Maori stories from the Franklin local board area.

1189/3353

Hūnua Trail Plan implementation

Work to open the existing Watercare road network to walkers and cyclists has progressed. Next steps are to engage with local communities and mana whenua on the opportunity to tell Maori stories and generate local benefit from the trail.

2017

Umupuia Coastal Reserve playground renewal

Draft concepts are under development in close consultation with Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki.

2907

Umupuia Reserve toilet and changing block renewal

Project on hold pending completion of playground renewal consultation so that works can be delivered simultaneously

2911

Waiuku Trails

Engagement with Ngati Te Ata on short term and long-term planning, including on the Awaroa Portage, is underway.

3662

Pohutukawa Coast Trails

Iwi engagement is continuing to inform the development of the trails.

808

Awakura restoration project

Staff continue to work with marae and mana whenua to plant for the 20/21 planting programme, with site preparation expected in quarter 3.

873

Manukau Harbour Forum

The board voted to reinstate the Manukau Harbour Forum, appointing Alan Cole as the board representative. Funding has been applied for a co-ordinator to help deliver the forum vision, including a plan for engaging with mana whenua

980

Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Maori

Waiuku library has continued visits to the Puna pre-school at Tāhuna Marae.

358

Te Kete Rukruku FY20

The process of identifying overlapping interests is expected to take longer than planned, however mana whenua received the new tranche list of parks in December 2019. 

57

Youth Connections Franklin

Te Ara Rangitahi continue to be funded to facilitate a Franklin Skills Network and work opportunities for local Rangitahi.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     There are no financial implications to report due to restrictions on releasing interim report (half year) financial results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX.

Financial Performance

25.     Auckland Council currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of half year financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – expected to be made public from 28 February 2020.

26.     Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

28.     The approved Community Facilities 2019/2020 work programme and 2020-2022 indicative work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the 2019/2020 financial year, by ensuring that if projects intended for delivery in the 2019/2020 financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances, that other projects can be progressed while the causes for delays are addressed.

29.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of Quarter Three (31 March 2020).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Full Work Programme Q2 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Franklin Local Board Financial Report - Confidential (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Georgina Gilmour - Senior Advisor, Franklin Local Board Services

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

     

 


Franklin Local Board

25 February 2020

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Franklin Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

21        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Franklin Local Board for Quarter Two 2019/2020  - Attachment b - Franklin Local Board Financial Report - Confidential

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.