I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 20 February 2020

2:00pm

Council Chamber
Orewa Service Centre
50 Centreway Road
Orewa

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Gary Brown

 

Deputy Chairperson

Victoria Short

 

Members

Andy Dunn

 

 

Janet Fitzgerald, JP

 

 

Gary Holmes

 

 

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

 

Alexis Poppelbaum

 

 

Leanne Willis

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Gemma Kaldesic

Democracy Advisor for Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

14 February 2020

 

Contact Telephone: 02 152 7397

Email: gemma.kaldesic@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum - Paul Roberts: Greenways Plan 2016                                       5

9.2     Public Forum - Mike Phillips: Placemaking for Silverdale                              6

9.3     Public Forum - Lorraine Sampson: Silverdale Hall                                          6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Centennial Park Bush Society 2019-2020 annual LDI Grant Report 2020 Draft     9

12        Auckland Transport Update to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board February 2020                                                                                                                                       15

13        Local board governance work management for the 2019-2022 triennium           27

14        Local Board Representative on the Auckland Council Hauraki Gulf Political Reference Group                                                                                                          41

15        Regional Facilities Auckland: Quarter 1 performance report for the period ending 30 September 2019                                                                                                           43

16        Appointment of LGNZ Lead and nominee for LGNZ Conference 2020                 55

17        Deputations update                                                                                                     61

18        Governance forward work calendar                                                                          65  

19        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 12 December 2019, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Paul Roberts: Greenways Plan 2016

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Paul Roberts has requested time at public forum to discuss the Greenways Plan 2016.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Mr Roberts for his verbal presentation

 

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Mike Phillips: Placemaking for Silverdale

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Mike Phillips has requested time at public forum to discuss Placemaking for Silverdale.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Mr Phillips for his verbal presentation

 

 

 

9.3       Public Forum - Lorraine Sampson: Silverdale Hall

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Lorraine Sampson has requested time at public forum to discuss Placemaking for Silverdale.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Ms Sampson for her verbal presentation

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Centennial Park Bush Society 2019-2020 annual LDI Grant Report 2020 Draft

File No.: CP2020/01209

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for the allocation of $10,000 of Locally Driven Initiatives funding to facilitate a proposed work programme in Centennial Park by the Centennial Park Bush Society during the 2019/2010 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Centennial Park in Campbells Bay is 73 hectares (including the Pupuke Golf Course) and is the largest reserve in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Area. The park is enjoyed by a sizeable highly populated urban catchment. It also has direct connection to large, privately owned, significant natural areas of local bush. Centennial Park contains one of the largest pieces of council managed native bush in the local board area and has a well-developed and maintained track network.

3.       Centennial Park Bush Society Incorporated was formed in 1976 and carries out native forest restoration work in Centennial Park, Campbells Bay. This involves removing invasive weeds, raising and planting native plants, trapping animal pests, maintaining tracks, supporting and advocating to council for reserve development and raising community awareness.

4.       The aim of the Centennial Park Bush Society is to increase the ecological health of Centennial Park for long-term enjoyment. To fulfil its aim and work towards its vision, the society has the following objectives:

·    provide guardianship and protect the long-term interests of the park

·    educate the public and harness community interest

·    advocate for flood management and improved water quality

·    work with council to achieve weed control, planting and plant management

·    advocate for track maintenance and development.

5.       For the last six years, the Centennial Park Bush Society have received additional support through a $10,000 Locally Driven Initiatives operational funding allocation from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to manage the park to a higher standard. This funding has helped the Centennial Park Bush Society to undertake weed control, through specialist contractors, which is outside of the scope of the Full Facilities and Ecological contract.

6.       Staff have provided an indication of the proposed works for the 2019/2020 allocation of $10,000 Locally Driven Initiatives operational funding included in the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, item 423, to continue to consolidate and improve on the work completed to date.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approves the $10,000 Locally Driven Initiatives operational funding allocation to the Centennial Park Bush Society to undertake the work programme set out in the table below during the 2019/2020 financial year.

Park area

2019/2020 proposed  works

Estimated  Cost

(excl GST)

 

Centennial Park 4th, 8th and 17th bush blocks

Control of pest plants including vines and ground weeds

$1000

Centennial Park main valley, Park Rise Bush and 5th bush block

Control of pest plants arum, tradescantia and alligator weed.

$6000

Centennial Park

Control of pest trees

$2000

Centennial Park

Native trees (new plantings)

$1000

Centennial Park

Interpretive signs for arboretum, riparian improvements including erosion mitigation and planting

$ if surplus funds available from above work

 

 

Total $10,000.00

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Pest plants, pest animals and stormwater erosion are the greatest threat to the ecological integrity of the native bush in Centennial Park. Ongoing control of these is essential.

8.       Under the umbrella of the Centennial Park Bush Society (CPBS), volunteers currently undertake the majority of weed control within the park.

9.       In addition to ongoing volunteer work, CPBS has developed a wider pest animal control model for the Campbells Bay Urban Sanctuary (CBUS), which covers the whole Campbells Bay catchment from within the bounds of East Coast Road, Aberdeen Road, Kowhai Road and Campbells Bay Beach. Volunteers are maintaining bait stations on private property to protect the birds in the park and the wider catchment.

10.     Recently CPBS has developed a community stream care group to support the private owners on the northern stream in the Campbells Bay catchment. The stream care group has been established to protect and restore the stream from flooding, pollution and pest species.

11.     The Community Park Ranger for Volunteering and Programmes has met with the CPBS and discussed the proposed allocation of $10,000 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational funding from the local board for 2019/2020. The funding will facilitate contractor support for weed management within Centennial Park. This will include the removal of pest trees, planting native trees, development of interpretive signage (relating to ecology and conservation), as well as riparian improvements including erosion mitigation and planting.

12.     The paid contractor works will supplement the CPBS’s significant, focused and ongoing volunteer contribution to maintaining the reserve and wider catchment. In addition, works undertaken will supplement the existing full facilities and ecological contract weed control in the park which only covers very limited pest plants.  Volunteers undertake the majority of weed control within Centennial Park.  The work proposed is essential to protect the main bush valley and neighbouring properties from pest plant reinvasion.

13.     Upon approval of the funding allocation, a $10,000 grant will be provided to the CPBS through a formal council agreement that will require the group to report on the works carried out and the budget spend.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The table below outlines the expenditure forecast and associated proposed work programme for the 2019/2020 financial year.  This is largely based on the 2018/2019 work undertaken in Centennial Park.

Park area

2019/2020 proposed  works

Estimated  Cost

(excl GST)

 

Centennial Park 4th, 8th and 17th bush blocks

Control of pest plants including vines and ground weeds

$1000

Centennial Park main valley, Park Rise Bush and 5th bush block

Control of pest plants arum, tradescantia and alligator weed.

$6000

Centennial Park

Control of pest trees

$2000

Centennial Park

Native trees (new plantings)

$1000

Centennial Park

Interpretive signs for arboretum, riparian improvements including erosion mitigation and planting

$ if surplus funds available from above work

 

 

Total $10,000.00

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     CPBS is contributing/addressing climate change, by showcasing major opportunities and benefits to Auckland such as:

·    cleaner air and water i.e. cooler streams through planting and carbon sequestration by maintaining the health of the current trees and planting new ones.

·    healthier communities i.e. people connected to their whenua and protecting it.

 

16.     The aims of the CPBS  align with a number of  Auckland Council strategies that consider climate impact; The Auckland Plan, Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan 2013, Urban Ngahere (Forest) Strategy, Auckland Regional Pest Management Strategy, Auckland Council’s Indigenous Biodiversity Strategy, Pest Free Auckland, Auckland Council Regional Pest Management Plan, Indigenous Biodiversity Strategy

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     CPBS have developed strong connections directly with Environmental Services, Healthy Waters, Community Facilities and Parks Sport and Recreation to support the CBUS project.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board 2019/2020 Parks, Sport and Recreation Work Programme, approved in June 2018 (HB2019/97) includes the allocation of $10,000 LDI opex for the ‘Centennial Park Bush Society Maintenance Grant’.

19.     The local board has supported the CPBS in their environmental work over the last 10 years.

20.     The activities of the CPBS help meet the needs of an active volunteer community and align to the local board plan outcome “A protected and enhanced environment”.

21.     The ongoing activities of the CPBS have also resulted in a well maintained, natural, streamside environment in the southern part of the local board catchment.

22.     In 2018 the Hibiscus and Bays Biodiversity and Pest Free Plan was developed by the Hibiscus and Bays Restoration Network consisting of key community members from local conservation groups together with Auckland Council staff. CPBS were key stakeholders in the development of this plan.

23.     With the recent development of the Devonport-Takapuna, Takapuna North Pest Free Project, the Castor Bay Ratepayers’ and Residents’ Association Incorporated have developed a pest free plan with council staff that will align and connect up to the CBUS project and eventually provide for a greater pest free haven.

24.     The Hauraki Gulf Islands and Waitakere Ranges sanctuaries provide safe breeding grounds for native birds. Because of these safe havens the community are starting to see the return of more native birds to the mainland. There is a fantastic opportunity to encourage more native animals back to the suburbs. CBUS provides a major first step towards these bird species being able to find homes on the mainland and to contribute to the greater North West Wildlink project.

25.     The activities of the CPBS aligns to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2017 Outcome: Our community enjoys access to quality parks, reserves and facilities for leisure, sport and recreation; Outcome: Our people are involved and have a strong sense of pride in the look and feel of their local areas and Outcome: A protected and enhanced environment.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan recognises and supports local iwi and hapu in their role as kaitiaki.  The environmental work that the CPBS carries out aligns with the values of protecting and enhancing the mauri of reserves in the Hibiscus and Bays area. There is a commitment to consult and work with mana whenua on all projects to ensure the protection and restoration of sites of significance to Māori.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     Currently a Funding Agreement with CPBS is signed for a 1-year period.

28.     Providing the CPBS with a three-year agreement would be more supportive for the group. The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board may wish to consider this approach when the 2020/2021 Parks Sport and Recreation Work Programme is discussed with the board in quarter three.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     It is important to consider the community, contractor and funding resource that has been invested in the catchment for the last six years. Support for the ongoing local kaitiakitanga of this catchment will help to make the delivery model broader to support further environmental initiatives across the wider catchment.

30.     Multiple Auckland Council departments are engaged including Parks Sport and Recreation, Healthy Waters and Environmental Services which have provided advice and support to CPBS about the catchment management. It is important to support CPBS to continue to strongly advocate for council engagement.

31.     The CPBS have a long-standing working relationship with the Pupuke Golf Course and have co-delivered restoration of the bush on the golf course leased area as well as the public park.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Following local board approval, a funding agreement will be prepared and upon signing, funds released to CPBS.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Paul Duffy - Parks Advisor - Devonport Takapuna

Authoriser

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport Update to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board February 2020

File No.: CP2020/01288

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board members on transport related matters in their area, including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund and Auckland Transport’s Community Safety Fund.

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report covers:

·  a summary of Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area;

·  a summary of the board’s Transport Capital and Community Safety Funds;

·  a summary of general information items.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Update February 2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play in the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities.

4.      This report updates the local board on AT projects and operations in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area, it summarises consultations and Traffic Control Committee decisions, and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and Community Safety Fund (CSF).

5.      The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects they believe are important to their communities but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must:

·   be safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   be in the road corridor (although projects in parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

6.      AT’s CSF comprises $20 million in total allocated across all 21 local boards, with $5 million to be allocated during the 2019/2020 financial year and the balance of $15 million over the 2020/2021 financial year. This is a safety fund that sits within AT’s safety budget so the major component of the funding allocation formula is the Deaths and Serious Injuries (DSI) in a local board area. The purpose of the fund is to allow local communities to address long-standing road safety issues that have yet to become regional priorities and have therefore not been addressed by AT.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s share of the LBTCF allocated with effect from 1 July 2018, as per the local board funding policy, is $1,237,015 per annum.

8.       The total funds in the current electoral term available to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is $5,061,244. This includes $1,350,304 carried over from the previous electoral term.

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$6,760,460

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$1,699,216

Remaining Budget left

$5,061,244

 

9.       Updates on projects approved for design and/or construction are provided below. A series of workshops has been scheduled to discuss projects the local board may wish to nominate using the balance of funding available this electoral term. The first of these was scheduled for 13 February.

10.    A speed reduction on Hibiscus Coast Highway and those roads intersecting within the Boulevard area associated with Project 578 - Orewa Boulevard Stage 3, was consulted on as part of AT’s Speed Limit Bylaw Review. Additional improvements proposed by AT in association with the speed limit reductions will focus on improving some of the existing pedestrian crossings and investigating new crossings and curb build outs on those roads intersecting with the Hibiscus Coast Highway.

11.    The speed limit changes outlined in the bylaw will become effective on 30 June 2020 and it is anticipated that the reduction approved for the Boulevard will be implemented with others for the Orewa Town Centre in November 2020.

12.    At the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board meeting on 21 August the local board resolved to (HB/2019/134):

  advise Auckland Transport that the local board prefers Option Two, with a shared pedestrian/cycle path on the seaward side, for Local Board Transport Capital Fund Project 578, Orewa Boulevard Stage Three.

13.    AT staff have established a community liaison group to consider the proposed improvements noted in paragraph 10. Public consultation for the improvements proposed under Project 578 – Orewa Boulevard Stage 3 will be carried out at the same time as public consultation for the improvements proposed by AT.

14.    Speed reductions in the Mairangi Bay and Torbay town centres associated with Project 580 – Town Centre Slow Zones, were included in AT’s Speed Limit Bylaw Review.

15.    The speed limited changes outlined in the bylaw will become effective on 30 June 2020 and it is anticipated that those for Mairangi Bay and Torbay will be implemented in November 2020.

16.    At the local board meeting on 21 August the local board resolved to (HB/2019/132):

  endorse the final designs in Attachments A and B of the agenda report for improvements in the town centres of Torbay and Mairangi Bay, to be constructed from the Local Board’s Transport Capital Fund under Project 580 – Town Centre Slow Zones and note that Auckland Transport has agreed to fund any overrun in the cost of the crossing outside the Four Square in Torbay

17.    Construction of the physical works on Beach Road, Torbay began on 18 November and was completed early in December as anticipated.

18.    The Mairangi Bay improvements are scheduled to begin in mid-February and be completed by the end of April 2020.

 

Community Safety Fund

19.     At its meeting on 19 June 2019, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board resolved the following priority for projects nominated for construction using AT’s CSF monies (HB/2019/91):

i)      20 Ramsgate Terrace, Mairangi Bay – conversion of existing raised table to a zebra crossing;

ii)     214 Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa – signalised mid-block crossing facility;

iii)     Hatfields Beach, Orewa - gateway treatment;

iv)     Saddleback Rise, Murrays Bay - pedestrian crossing.

20.    At its meeting on 15 August 2019 the local board resolved (RD/2019/132) to maximise the use of its Community Safety Fund on construction of these projects, authorising top-up funding from its LBTCF to meet any shortfall in funding for construction of the final project, the Saddleback Rise pedestrian crossing. If there is a shortfall in CSF funding, the Saddleback Rise project will be delivered on the provision of supplementary funding from the local board’s LBTCF. Staff will advise the local board if this situation should eventuate, providing full details at that time.

21.    Design work is now progressing on all the CSF projects nominated by local boards. It is anticipated that those funded will be completed during the 2020/2021 financial year.

 

Auckland Transport Consultations

22.    Over the last reporting period, AT has invited the local board to provide its feedback on the following proposals:

Location

Proposal

Details and Local Board Feedback

Glenvar and East Coast Roads, Torbay

Proposed safety improvements to the intersection of Glenvar/East Coast/Lonely Track Roads, Torbay.

Documentation was forwarded to members on 6 November 2019 explaining improvements proposed to increase safety at the intersection of Glenvar and East Coast Roads, Torbay. Subject to consultation, improvements could include footpath upgrades; intersection upgrades for safer and more efficient traffic flow; transit / bus lanes; and cycle facility upgrades. The local board is invited to provide its feedback to the proposal and the matter will be discussed at a workshop being held on 13 February 2020 and any feedback can be confirmed at the February business meeting.

Rishworth Avenue, Stanmore Bay

Proposed parking restrictions on Rishworth Avenue, Stanmore Bay.

Documentation explaining AT’s proposal to convert eight unrestricted parking spaces to P60 (1-hour) parking restrictions on Rishworth Avenue in Stanmore Bay, operating Monday-Sunday 8am-6pm, was forwarded to members on 28 November 2019 The proposal responds to requests from local businesses for more available short-term parking for customers and aims to improve parking turnover and availability.  Member Fitzgerald suggested that 90 minute or 120 minute restrictions were more appropriate, in consideration of those using the laundromat during the summer months when water tanks are low. Member Fitzgerald also suggested that a limited number of 15 minute parks outside the dairy would be appropriate. No objections to the proposal were received from the local board.

47 Browns Bay Road, Browns Bay

Proposed pedestrian improvements at 47 Browns Bay Road, Browns Bay.

Members were advised on 29 November 2019 about consultation on a proposal to install a raised zebra crossing at 47 Browns Bay Road, Browns Bay, as part of an Auckland-wide programme to improve existing zebra crossings at high-risk locations. The proposal involves construction of a raised zebra crossing and painting of no stopping restrictions (NSAATs) at a nearby bus stop, with the aim of improving safety, accessibility, reducing speeds and allowing buses to safely exit and enter the bus stop. No objections were received to the proposal from the local board.

Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa

Proposed upgrade of pedestrian crossing on Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa.

Documentation explaining the Community Safety Fund project proposed by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to upgrade the mid-point pedestrian island near the Estuary Arts Centre on Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa to a crossing with traffic signals was sent to members on 9 January 2020 with a request for comment no later than 30 January. The proposal is to add signs and traffic lights to the new crossing; widen the footpath on both sides and move the pedestrian islands to accommodate a wider crossing; extend the footpath on the eastern side of the highway to meet the new crossing; add a curb ramp on the northern side of the crossing; add broken yellow lines (NSAATs) near the crossing to ensure visibility of pedestrians and cyclists; and paint green Advanced Stop Boxes (boxes with a bicycle symbol where cyclists can wait at the traffic lights). Member Fitzgerald advised that she was delighted to see the project proceeding to the next stage. No objections were received to the proposal from the local board.

 

Traffic Control Committee Decisions

23.    AT's resolution and approval process ensures the most appropriate controls and restrictions are put in place and can be legally enforced. Decisions made by AT’s Traffic Control Committee in relation to regulatory processes relevant to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board during November are shown below. There were no decisions made during December relevant to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board.

 

 

 

 


Decision

Report Type

Nature of Restriction

Decision

Caldera Drive, Long Bay

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

No Stopping At All Times (NSAATs) restrictions

Carried

Dalmeny Close / Sunrise Avenue / East Coast Road, Mairangi Bay

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

 

NSAATs / P120 Parking / Lane Arrow Marking / Give-Way Control

Carried

Ramsgate Terrace / Beach Road / Sidmouth Street, Mairangi Bay

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Mairangi Bay Santa Parade)

Temporary Traffic and Parking Controls

Carried

Beach Road / Deep Creek Road / Ellangowan Road / Weatherly Road / Hebron Road, Torbay

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Sir Peter Blake Memorial Regatta)

Temporary Traffic and Parking Controls

Carried

Beach Road / County Road / Toroa Street / Deep Creek Road / Auld Street, Torbay

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

 

NSAATs / P30 Parking / Bus Stop / Bus Shelter / Pedestrian Crossing / Road Hump / Traffic Island / Flush Median / Edge Line / Road Markings for Speed Management / Shoulder Marking / Give-Way Control / Roundabout / Footpath

Approved with Conditions

Bute Road / Clyde Road / Anzac Road / Glen Road, Browns Bay

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Browns Bay Santa Parade)

Temporary Traffic and Parking Controls

Carried

Beach Road / Montrose Terrace / Penzance Road / Sidmouth Street / Whitby Crescent / Hastings Road / Ramsgate Terrace, Mairangi Bay

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

 

NSAATs / P60 Parking / Mobile Library Vehicle Parking / P30 Parking / Angle Parking / Bus Stop / Mobility Parking / Lane Arrow Marking / Pedestrian Crossing / Road Hump / Traffic Island / Flush Median / Road Markings For Speed Management / Shoulder Marking / Give-Way Control / Roundabout / No Passing / Edge Line

Approved with Conditions

Bankside Road / Manuel Road / Butler Stoney Crescent, Millwater

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

 

NSAATs / Traffic Island / Road Hump / Pedestrian Crossing / Footpath / Roundabout

Approved with Conditions

 

 

 

 

Grover Street / Davey Crescent / Godfrey Drive, Upper Orewa

Permanent Traffic and Parking Changes Combined

 

Shared Path / Give-Way Control

Approved in Principle

 

Issues Raised by Elected Members

24.    Elected members and local board staff forward a range of issues to AT’s Elected Member Relationship Manager for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board (EMRM) and AT’s specialist Elected Member Response Team. Those received by AT’s EMRM by 31 January 2020 are summarised below:

 

 

Issue

 

Location

Status

1

Glenvar Road, Torbay

Request for safety investigation of The Glade, Glenvar Road, Torbay.

The Office of Erica Stanford MP requested an investigation into pedestrian safety for that area of Glenvar Road, Torbay known locally as The Glade, noting that school children in particular are vulnerable in areas where there are no footpaths. On 12 December 2019 the MP's Office was advised that a footpath had been added to the list of requests held by AT, and currently stood at #219 on that priority list. Given that AT is able to fund the construction of only 10 - 15 footpaths each financial year, it was unlikely that the footpath would be constructed in the near future.

2

East Coast Road and Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale

Request for readjustment of the signals phasing at East Coast Road and Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale.

Councillor John Watson believed the signals phasing at the intersection of East Coast Road and Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale needed adjustment, noting that traffic had been backing up along the Hibiscus Coast Highway from the intersection with East Coast Road. Referred to ATOC for response.

3

17A Waiake Street, Torbay

Request for update on installation of signage at 17A Waiake Street, Torbay.

Following a request for an update on a previous case which advised that the berm area of 17A Waiake Street, Torbay would be added to the list of properties where signage was required and that this would be installed in due course, Cr Watson was advised on 18 November 2019 that, though the location had been added to the list of requests for No Parking signage and the team was working through this list, due to the number of locations it was not possible to provide a definite timeframe for installation. It was noted that an officer had visited the site recently, observing a vehicle parked on the grass berm, but that the vehicle was not causing any safety concerns. The officer's observations were also that the grass berm had not been damaged in any way.

 

 

 

 

4

948 Beach Road, Waiake

Crack in the road bridge in the vicinity of 948 Beach Road, Waiake.

The Office of Erica Stanford MP received advice from a resident about a crack in the underside of the road bridge in the vicinity of the Torbay Sailing Club at 948 Beach Road, Waiake. On 2 December 2019 the MP's Office was advised that an inspection of the bridge had identified that the crack is on the fibrolite cement sheet rather than the bridge deck. These sheets were used as formwork when the deck was poured and were not removed when the construction was completed. They are non-structural and do not provide any structural capacity to the bridge so there is therefore no risk of any failure or need for repair.

5

Glenvar/East Coast Roads Intersection Upgrade / Transit lanes

Request for information on transit lanes, particularly in relation to the Glenvar/East Coast Roads Intersection Upgrade

Member Poppelbaum requested information about transit lanes, in particular in relation to the Glenvar/East Coast Roads Intersection Upgrade project. In response to a query as to whether AT had undertaken a study along East Coast Road in the affected area to determine the number of cars and occupants, she was advised that vehicle occupancy surveys were undertaken during a typical morning and afternoon peak period in March 2019 on the project corridor. The findings indicated for East Coast Road that 81% of vehicles were Single Occupancy Vehicles, the average occupancy (excluding buses) was 1.25 people per vehicle; the percentage of vehicles with two or more occupants (i.e. those permitted to use a T2 lane) in the peak periods was 19%; the percentage of vehicles with three or more occupants (i.e. those permitted to use a T3 lane) in the peak periods was 4%. For Glenvar Road,   74% of vehicles were Single Occupancy Vehicles; the average occupancy (excluding buses) was 1.3 people per vehicle; the percentage of vehicles with two or more occupants (i.e. those permitted to use a T2 lane) in the peak periods was 26%; the percentage of vehicles with three or more occupants (i.e. those permitted to use a T3 lane) in the peak periods was 3%. Bus numbers are currently low along the corridor, with a flow of four buses per hour in the peak direction along most of the corridor. The section between Glamorgan Drive and Oteha Valley Road has eight buses per hour in the peak direction. Based on current occupancy data, the recommendation is to provide a T2 lane. It is considered more appropriate to start with a smaller mode shift change (i.e. T2 compared to T3) to encourage carpooling initially. There is the opportunity to review this once the lane is established and some mode shift has occurred. In response to the request for evidence of any general research or reports that provide evidence that the implementation of transit lanes result in a change in behaviour (people car-pooling) and nearby examples such as Albany, Member Poppelbaum was provided with links to a paper and presentation considered by the AT Board in early 2019. She was advised that the presentation predominantly communicates the positive benefits of behaviour change associated with an existing transit lane. 

6

Beach Road, Mairangi Bay

Concerns regarding Bus Stop 3097, Beach Road, Mairangi Bay.

Member Parfitt raised concerns about Bus Stop 3097 on Beach Road in Mairangi Bay, which is particularly difficult for elderly people to use. Particular concerns were that the bus stop floods in winter; the road is very low (very few buses now kneel); and the bus stop is old. Referred to AT Metro.

7

Bakehouse Lane, Orewa

Request for one-way system for Bakehouse Lane, Orewa.

Member Dunn requested consideration of a one-way system being introduced for Bakehouse Lane, Orewa, stating that the lane is so narrow that vehicles often have difficulty passing each other when travelling in opposite directions. This is especially true with trucks or larger vehicles. Member Dunn’s suggested solution is to make it a one way street for traffic exiting Moana Ave. This would also make it much safer for drivers backing out of parking spaces into traffic, often blindly. Referred to Traffic Operations and Safety.

 

Annual Public Transport Fares Review from 9 February 2020

25.    AT reviews public transport (PT) fares annually, taking into account such factors as contract price indexing (operator cost increases), agreed fare policies and the need to fund any extra services. The AT Board has agreed some modest changes to bus, rail and ferry fares in 2020.

26.    Building on input from councillors at a Planning Committee Workshop on 5 May 2019 and the Mayor’s budget proposal, which was adopted by the Governing Body and provided for targeted fare reductions including ‘Child Fare Free Weekends’ and ‘Ferry Fare Integration’, this fare review will support AT achieving operational financial performance in line with its budget and the Statement of Intent (SOI) Performance Target for the Farebox Recovery Ratio.

27.    Fare increases have been able to be contained through financial support from Auckland Council and NZTA and as a result of efficiency savings made by AT.

28.    Key points to note are:

·    The average fare increase has been held to just 2.34% (or five cents per trip).

·    These modest increases will help fund a portion of AT’s annual cost increases and enable AT to target additional funding on:

Increase peak time frequencies

Expansion into new growth areas

Free child weekend fares.

·    For some journeys, the cost will decrease.

·    There will be no change to cash fares, some longer zone fares and monthly bus and rail passes.

·    Not increasing fares would slow down the rate of future investment in public transport.

·    The changes will see a farebox recovery ratio of 42.14% to 42.71% against a 43-46% SOI target.

·      The fare review quantum was identified in the 2019/2020 budget and was part of deliberations by Council and Governing Body in setting the budget.

 

29.    AT is increasing the ferry monthly passes (inner-harbour; mid-harbour; outer-harbour) by $10 due to the pending implementation of Ferry fare integration, which will provide additional value for money for customers who purchase a ferry monthly pass, with the new fare including free travel in the zone of origin and arrival.

30.    An annual PT fare review is a requirement under the Regional Land Transport Plan. In the SOI, the target of the percentage of PT costs recovered through fares for 2019-2022 is 43-46%. However, the main driver for fare increasing is investing back into public transport and ensuring a safe and reliable public transport system that supports Auckland’s growing population. In the past year AT has grown the public transport system in the following key areas:

·    Timetable changes in July saw additional peak bus services for West Auckland heading into the city centre via the motorway, and a route change from Henderson into the city via Williamson Avenue in Ponsonby. 

·    Timetable changes in October saw several additions across Auckland, e.g.:

 

Central Auckland:

More services for the 101 – Herne Bay across the city to the universities

Additional peak services for the 105 – serving Richmond Road, Ponsonby and Queen Street

Additional peak services on the 75 – Remuera Road and Newmarket into the city centre.

 

North Shore:

More services from Hillcrest, down Lake Road (923/934) into the city centre

Additional services from Beach Haven into the City Centre and return

The extension of the 861 route to service the new residential development in Long Bay.

 

31.    In October, the Waiheke New Network was introduced, bringing five new routes to the island and increasing services by 120% to match frequency principles which are applied across the Auckland Region.

32.    General improvements include:

·    32.5% increase in AT Metro bus kilometres operated since 2015.

·    82.3% increase in rail services since 2013.

·    163% increase in the number of people now living within 500 metres of a frequent and/or rapid public transport stop or station.

 

33.    Public transport fares also provide revenue that allows AT and Auckland Council to provide initiatives such as ‘Home Free’, free public transport after 4pm on the last Friday before Christmas, and fare free days such as the one held in June 2019.

Road Resurfacing

34.    Roads require periodic resurfacing (resealing) to keep the sealed surface waterproof and to maintain good skid resistance.  The bitumen in the surfacing oxidises over time causing it to become brittle and either crack, unravel or lose chip.  Similarly, the chip can become polished and/or the road surface flushed resulting in a loss of skid resistance.

35.    This process is similar to maintenance of a painted house; when this is left too long water penetrates the paint surface, resulting in costlier repairs. If roads are resurfaced at the right time, the surface remains waterproof, skid resistance is maintained and surface water does not penetrate the road pavement.

36.    Roads are resurfaced using either a chip seal or a thin asphaltic concrete surfacing (hotmix).  Generally, chip seals have a life of 8-12 years and cost in the order of $4-8 m2, while hotmix can be expected to last 10-14 years and costs $20-30 m2, depending on the type of mix used.

37.    Chip seals are therefore the most cost-effective method of resurfacing and in many situations are the only method that can practically be used to restore the road surface to a suitable condition.  Hotmix is generally only used on high trafficked roads (those carrying more than 10,000 vehicles per day), or in high stress areas such as at intersections or cul-de-sac heads.

38.    Each resurfacing site is subject to a specific seal design and the choice of surfacing and chip size used is dependent on factors such as the traffic volumes and loading, the existing surface texture and pavement strength, turning stresses etc. Chip seals can be either single or two coat seals, though in most cases two coat seals are used as they are more resistant to turning stresses. Prior to resurfacing, pre-seal repairs such as dig outs, crack sealing and surface levelling are undertaken.

39.    Chip seals also continue to shed excess chip for several months following resurfacing, which is a nuisance for adjoining landowners and can create the mistaken impression that the new chip seal surface is defective.  New chip seals, particularly two-coat seals, can therefore require 4-5 sweeps to remove excess chip from the surface.

40.    It is also usual for the bitumen to soften during warm weather for several years following application, until such time as the kerosene fully evaporates from the bitumen.  At this time it will be susceptible to scuffing from turning vehicles, but these areas can be treated with the application of fresh sealing chip. 

41.    Many of the enquiries AT receives about resurfacing result from existing aged hotmix surfaces being resurfaced with chip seal when they reach the end of their serviceable life. Most hotmix surfaces were constructed by developers at the time of subdivision so when they are resurfaced with chip seal residents complain.  The need to periodically resurface the road to avoid water ingress into the road pavement is often not understood by residents and they consider the rougher chip seal surface to be inferior to that of the smoother hotmix. Residents can be reassured in these circumstances that chip sealing is the most cost-effective use of their ratepayer funds.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

42.    Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

43.    Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

44.    To this end, Auckland Transport’s Statement of Intent contains three performance measures:

Measure

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Number of buses in the Auckland bus fleet classified as low emission

5

25

55

Reduction in CO2e (emissions) generated annually by Auckland Transport corporate operations (from 2017/18 baseline)

7%

9%

11%

Percentage of Auckland Transport streetlights that are energy efficient LED

56%

66%

76%

 

Vector and AT sign memorandum of understanding

45.    On 20 January 2020 Auckland Transport and Vector announced a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to explore the impacts of a full implementation.

46.    The MoU is a direct response to AT’s Low Emission Bus Roadmap, published in late 2018, that outlined its commitment to have all new buses in Auckland being electric from 2025, with the whole fleet fully electric by 2040.

47.    A faster transition to electric buses requires a detailed assessment of the future demand on the electricity network.

48.     Two reports will be produced as part of the MoU, the first exploring a route and service profile, which will model the electricity demand that a fully electrified bus fleet will require. The second report will provide guidance on the electricity network infrastructure upgrades required at each bus depot, as well as likely timings and costs. These two reports are expected to be delivered by June 2020.

49.     Buses make up 87 per cent of the carbon emissions produced from public transport, so converting them from diesel to electric will also be a significant step towards meeting New Zealand’s 2050 zero-carbon emissions goal. 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.    The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is/are confined to AT and do/does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

51.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no local, sub-regional or regional impacts.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

52.    The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

53.    There are no financial implications in receiving this report.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

54.    There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.    AT will provide a further report to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board at its next meeting.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ellen Barrett – Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Local board governance work management for the 2019-2022 triennium

File No.: CP2020/01316

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To outline the options for efficiently and effectively managing the governance work of the local board for 2019-2022 triennium.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the end of each triennium the Local Board Services department delivers a review of local board work practices, including the organisational support they require and how well they support the boards in their governance role. The 2016-2019 triennium review gathered feedback from local board members and staff from Local Board Services and other council departments and Council-Controlled Organisations.

3.       In response to the review, this report outlines a recommended approach for local boards to manage their governance workload as follows:

·   maintain a key focus on annual work programmes and their implementation through quarterly reporting and regular workshops with the whole local board, with decisions made at business meetings

·   appoint nominated local board members who will be consulted on landowner consents and events, and who will provide feedback on liquor licences and resource consents

·   appoint nominated local board members to external organisations.

4.       These practices support the local board to undertake their governance role in an efficient and effective way, reflect the priority work of the local board and help the organisation focus its resources. Some of these practices require a decision of the local board, such as specific appointments of local board members, and separate reports cover these recommendations and associated advice.

5.       Local boards are also able to identify topic area leads who would act as a champion with the local board on specific topic areas. Leads would focus on work programme activities/ projects within their topic areas and understanding relevant community needs and preferences enabling other members to focus their time on other parts of the local board’s workload.

6.       The review feedback suggests the following advantages for having a full local board involved in direction-setting discussions on issues, rather than identifying topic area leads:

·   staff are confident that the direction is the view of the whole board rather than one member

·   knowledge and information is retained by the full local board rather than one member

·   discussions with staff are less likely to enter management or operational level detail

·   it avoids inefficient duplication, when conversations are held between staff and a lead, and then repeated with the full local board.

7.       The feedback from the review highlighted that if a local board does appoint topic area leads, the risks should be mitigated by providing a clear scope for that role and ensuring it does not lead to inefficiency or adversely affect staff receiving clear direction from the full local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      endorse the following approach to effectively and efficiently manage the governance work of the local board for the 2019-2022 triennium:

i)        maintain a key focus on annual work programmes and their implementation through quarterly reporting and regular workshops with the whole local board, with decisions being made at business meetings

ii)       confirm local board member attendance at external community groups and community organisations that are considered to meet the overarching principles of what is considered as council/local board business as stated in the draft Auckland Council Expense Policy 2019

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The governance role of an elected member is to:

·   set direction and policy

·   set priorities

·   make significant decisions

·   test advice

·   monitor performance and risk

·   connect with and represent the community

·   be accountable to the public.

9.       At the end of each triennium the Local Board Services (LBS) department undertakes a review of the work practices of, and organisational support provided for, local boards and how this supports them in their governance role. Previous reviews have noted the progress the organisation has made in supporting the governance role of local boards over the past nine years. Improved support and delivery from the organisation have enabled local board members’ time to be used in a more effective and efficient manner as the governance model has matured.

10.     During the 2016-2019 triennium review, feedback was gathered from local board members and staff from LBS and other council departments and Council-Controlled Organisations (CCOs) who work with local boards.

11.     Key themes from local board members related to having topic area leads. Both positives and negatives were identified.

12.     Key themes from staff were that clear direction is given from the full local board and local board members operate at the governance level. Staff identified both positive and negatives aspects of having topic area leads.

13.     The findings from the review have informed the content of this report.

14.     This report was deferred by request of the local board in November 2019.  The deferral was to provide local board members more time to consider how they would like to meet their governance role and responsibilities and undertake the ongoing governance and business of the local board.

15.     The local board also considered the draft Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy 2019 (Expense Policy) at the December 2019 Business Meeting. As part of the local board confirming its general support for Expense Policy’s overarching principles,with the exception of the section relating to childcare allowances, a copy of the Expenses Policy is attached in Attachment A. A related request was sent to local board members seeking their views on requests for local board member attendance at community groups and community organisation meetings.  This request further seeks clarity and a direction on what constitutes local board business for the purpose of the Expense Policy.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Work practices supporting the governance role of local boards (recommended approach)

16.     There are established work practices in place which support the governance role of local boards as follows:

·   Local boards adopt an annual work programme each June for implementation by the council organisation in the next financial year (July-June). Local boards maintain a key focus on these annual work programmes and their implementation through quarterly reporting and regular workshops with the whole local board, with decisions made at business meetings.

·   Local boards appoint a nominated local board member who will be consulted on landowner consents and events by staff carrying out their delegations. Local boards can also appoint a nominated local board member to provide feedback and attend hearings on liquor licences and notified resource consents to ensure that local board views are considered in these timebound processes. These appointments are made via a separate report.

·   Local boards appoint nominated local board members to external organisations (via separate report) to exercise their role in the external organisation as per the relevant constitution on behalf of the local board.

17.     Together these practices constitute the recommended approach for managing the governance work of the local board for the 2019-2022 triennium, reflect the priority work of the local board and are the focus of the organisation’s staff and resources.

18.     This approach allows all members to have an overview and collective understanding of work programme matters, and for the whole local board to be able to provide direction to staff, track performance and delivery throughout the financial year. It also enables collective discussions that utilise individual member’s skills and knowledge and ensures elected member and staff time are used effectively and efficiently.

19.     Transparency to the public is ensured by local board decisions occurring through the formal business meeting process with associated standing orders.

Optional addition: Topic area leads (not recommended)

20.     An optional addition to the recommended approach is that the local board identifies topic area leads. Leads would:

·   act as a champion for the topic area in full local board conversations

·   focus on work programme activities / projects within their topic area

·   maintain relationships with key stakeholders

·   understand relevant community needs and preferences.

21.     Leads may also:

·   be appointed as the nominated local board member to provide feedback on behalf of the board on relevant matters (e.g. landowner consents) and appointed to related external organisations

·   undertake learning and development opportunities and attend conferences (using their individual development budget provided as part of the Kura Kāwana development programme) relevant to the topic area

·   highlight relevant issues and emerging priorities during local board plan and work programme development

·   act as a key contact for community groups and members of the public on the topic area.

22.     Topic area leads would enable individual local board members to use existing or build new knowledge and expertise in the topic area and enable other members to focus their time on other parts of the governance workload.

23.     Should the local board identify topic area leads, there are the following risks to consider:

·   a member may provide direction or views which do not reflect those of the full local board

·   staff may seek direction from a topic area lead instead of the full local board, or seek direction from a topic area lead prior to the full local board, resulting in duplication of work

·   key knowledge and information on a topic may be retained with the topic area lead and not shared with the whole local board

·   a topic area lead may enter into discussions at the management or operational level if meeting regularly with staff without a clear governance purpose for the discussion.

24.     These risks can be addressed by:

·   using the workshop process as the mechanism for all local board members to receive updates and provide governance direction on approved work programme projects

·   clarifying the limited resources available to any topic area lead.

25.     Staff resourcing is focussed on work programme development and delivery, along with advice to support workshops and business meetings. Topic area leads can be supported by staff to undertake the following responsibilities:

·   when issues arise at a full board workshop, the lead can be directed to meet with staff on that issue and explore solutions; staff would report back to the full board for direction, and the lead can assist with explanation and support during that discussion

·   develop local board feedback on regional policies, plans and strategies relevant to the topic area, for full local board approval

·   respond to constituent enquiries relevant to the topic area

·   report back to the local board at workshops, and publicly via board member reports at business meetings, on the activities undertaken as the topic area lead.

26.     If a local board does want to appoint topic area leads, it may wish to consider identifying alternates. The role of the alternate would be to support the topic area lead in their responsibilities and undertake any roles the lead has been formally appointed by the whole board when the lead is unavailable. Having an alternate means that the information, knowledge, skills and workload can be shared by more than one member, but it could also lead to confusion between the two roles where the alternate acts as a co-lead.

27.     If a local board’s preference is to appoint topic area leads, this will require a local board decision via a resolution to this report.

Local board member attendance at external meetings

28.     Local board members were invited by the Chairperson to consider and provide their feedback on a methodology to formalise attendance at a range of external community group and community organisation meetings.  A list of recognised external community groups and organisations is attached in Attachment B.

29.     In accordance with the Expense Policy, any expenditure is subject to standards of probity and financial prudence.  Attendance at community meetings has resulted in more than one local board member attending a range of meetings.  These external community meetings are not LBS or council meetings.  In focusing on local board governance and effective use of local board member time, the Chairperson has proposed that local board members confirm which external community group meetings in Attachment B, they would like to attend. Once local board members have confirmed their intentions, they would then report to the full local board if any relevant local board related matters are raised.

30.     In some instances, attendance by more than one local board member is desirable and these instances can be confirmed on a case-by-case basis.

31.     In an effort to maintain accurate recording of member attendance for non-local board or non-council meetings, LBS staff would record confirmed attendees in the local board’s fortnightly schedule.  Every effort will be made to keep an accurate record of external community meetings and local board members should confirm their attendance in the normal way.

32.     In those instances when a one-off meeting is proposed and local board member attendance is required, this can be confirmed on a case-by-case basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     This report is procedural in nature so does not have direct climate impacts. However, a key focus for the council in the current term will be how it responds to the climate emergency and this may be a consideration for how local boards manage their governance work.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     Feedback was gathered from staff from LBS  other departments and CCOs who work with local boards, about practices to manage the local board governance work through the 2016-2019 triennium review.

35.     The practices used by a local board to manage their governance work can impact on the efficiency of staff engagement with members. Some variation in practices is required to reflect local differences, but overall large differences in work practices is challenging and consistency is beneficial.

36.     In light of the above, LBS has provided consistent advice and recommendations on work practices to all local boards to consider when making decisions on how they will manage their governance work for the 2019-2022 triennium.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     Feedback was gathered from local board members about practices to manage local board governance work through the 2016-2019 triennium review. This included: a workshop attended by 13 local board members from 10 local boards; and a survey to all members, with responses provided by 29 members, from 13 local boards.  

38.     The practices used by a local board to manage their governance work can impact efficiency and effectiveness of engagement with communities and the opportunities that members have to provide local leadership beyond the formal decision-making process.

39.     The topic of managing the governance work of the local board was discussed at a workshop on 22 October 2019, as part of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board induction programme for the 2019-2022 triennium. At that workshop, members indicated they would like to introduce Community Forums, one per month, which requests for deputations could be referred to and where staff could bring non-confidential items to present to the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     This decision is procedural in nature so does not have immediate impacts on Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     This decision is procedural in nature so does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     The risks and mitigations of having topic area leads are outlined in the ‘Analysis and Advice’ section of this report.

43.     Risks relating to any specific decision required for the work practices that form the recommended approach are outlined in the respective separate reports relating to those decisions.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     Staff from the LBS will work with staff from other departments and CCOs to ensure the practices of the local board are implemented.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Elected Members Expense Policy 2019

33

b

External Community Organisations

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Reed - Local Board Advisor Albert-Eden

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

 

EXPRESSION OF INTEREST

One local board representative per group

Interested

Hibiscus Bays Volunteer Restoration Network (no requirement for a local board member to attend the additional steering group meetings)

 

Silverdale Area Business Association (SABA)

 

Okura Residents & Ratepayers Assoc

 

Long Bay Residents & Ratepayers Assoc

 

Campbell Bay Residents & Ratepayers Assoc

 

Rothesay Bay Residents & Ratepayers Assoc

 

Murrays Bay Residents & Ratepayers Assoc

 

Waipora (Waiwera Property Owners and Residents Assoc)

 

Stillwater Residents & Ratepayers Assoc

 

Men’s Shed

 

Future Whangaparaoa, Whangaparaoa Business Network/Business Hub

 

Torbay Community Association

 

Local board meeting relating to Penlink Project and other projects

 

Friends of Okura Bush

 

Centennial Bush Park Society

 

Auckland Council Committee meetings (depending on items)

 

 

 

Organsations where local board representation won’t be required:

 

Whangaparaoa Family Centre

 

The Sustainable North Trust t/a Hibiscus Coast Zero Waste

 

East Coast Bays League Club

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Local Board Representative on the Auckland Council Hauraki Gulf Political Reference Group

File No.: CP2020/00511

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To appoint a representative from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to the Auckland Council Hauraki Gulf Political Reference Group.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       The Auckland Council Sea Change Political Reference Group was established in late 2017 to provide oversight and guidance to council group staff on progressing shared objectives with the Sea Change – Tai Timu Tai Pari Hauraki Gulf Marine Spatial Plan, which seeks to improve outcomes in Tikapa Moana / the Hauraki Gulf.

2.       Recognising the potential to further integrate council group activities to improve outcomes for the Hauraki Gulf, the Environment and Community Committee agreed at their September 2019 meeting to extend the work of this political reference group. It was also agreed that the group will be renamed to the Auckland Council Hauraki Gulf Political Reference Group. An updated Terms of Reference for the group is attached (Attachment A to the agenda report).

3.       It is important to continue to have local representation from local boards on the Auckland Council Hauraki Gulf Political Reference Group. The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has been asked to provide a representative to this political reference group.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      appoint a member as the representative to the renamed Auckland Council Hauraki Gulf Political Reference Group.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference - Auckland Council Hauraki Gulf Political Reference Group (Sep 2019) (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rebecca Forgesson - Analyst - Strategy

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

Jacques  Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Regional Facilities Auckland: Quarter 1 performance report for the period ending 30 September 2019

File No.: CP2020/00522

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Regional Facilities Auckland quarter 1 performance report, for the period ending 30 September 2019 (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Regional Facilities Auckland quarter 1 performance report, for the period ending 30 September 2019 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Facilities Auckland quarter 1 performance report for the period ending 30 September 2019

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Judy Lawley - Manager, Local Board Engagement

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Appointment of LGNZ Lead and nominee for LGNZ Conference 2020

File No.: CP2020/01261

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To appoint a lead for Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) matters and nominate a representative to attend the 2020 LGNZ Annual Conference and General Meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards are invited to appoint a lead (and alternate) on Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) matters. The lead will be the main contact for all LGNZ issues and will represent the local board at meetings of Auckland/LGNZ zone and any related meetings.

3.       The LGNZ Annual Conference and General Meeting (AGM) takes place at the ASB Theatre Marlborough in Waiharakeke Blenheim from 8am Thursday 16 July to 3pm Saturday 18 July 2020.

4.       Local boards are invited to nominate a representative to attend the LGNZ conference. This can be the local board appointed LGNZ lead or another member of the local board. Given the cost of and overall numbers of elected member attendance, staff recommend that one member per local board attend.

5.       In addition to the official delegates, LGNZ requires prior notice of which local board members plan to attend the AGM. Members wishing to attend are asked to register their intention with the Kura Kāwana programme by Friday 17 April 2020 so that this information can be provided to LGNZ.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      appoint a lead and alternate for LGNZ related matters for the 2019-2022 triennium and task these members with representing the local board at Auckland/LGNZ meetings.

b)      nominate one elected member per local board to attend the Local Government New Zealand 2020 Conference and Annual General Meeting in Waiharakeke Blenheim, Thursday 16 July to Saturday 18 July 2020.

c)      confirm that conference attendance including travel and accommodation will be paid for in accordance with the current Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy.

d)      note that any members who wish to attend the AGM must provide their names to the Democracy Services Business Hub team by Friday 17 April 2020 to ensure that they are registered with Local Government New Zealand.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       LGNZ is an incorporated society of local government organisations whose primary objective is to represent and advocate for the interests of local authorities in New Zealand. LGNZ champions policy positions on key issues that are of interest to local government and holds regular meetings and events throughout the year for members. The schedule of meetings includes an annual conference and meetings of local government geographical clusters (known as LGNZ zones) and sectors.

7.       LGNZ is governed by a National Council made up of representatives from member authorities as outlined in the constitution. Some of its work is conducted through committees and working groups which include representatives from member auhorities.

8.       Elected members who have been formally appointed to LGNZ roles are:

Elected Member

Appointed role

Mayor Phil Goff

National Council representative for Auckland

Auckland Council representative on the Metropolitan Sector Group

Councillor Pippa Coom

Local Board Member Richard Northey

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by Governing Body)

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by local boards)

Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore

Auckland Council representative on Regional Sector

 

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

9.       As part of recent changes to the LGNZ Rules, Auckland Council is no longer part of LGNZ Zone 1 but is expected to organize itself, with its multiple local boards and Governing Body, as an informal LGNZ zone.

10.     Meetings of the Auckland/LGNZ zone have been scheduled on a biannual basis. These meetings will be co-chaired by the two Auckland representatives appointed to the LGNZ National Council by the Governing Body (Councillor Pippa Coom) and local boards’ (Member Richard Northey).

11.     Meetings of the Auckland/LGNZ zone will be open to all elected members but formal representation will sit with the nominated leads.

LGNZ Annual conference and AGM 2020

12.     This year the LGNZ conference and AGM will be held at the ASB Theatre Marlborough, Waiharakeke Blenheim, Thursday 16 July to Saturday 18 July 2020.

13.     The conference takes place over the first two days commencing at 9.30am on Thursday 16 July 2020 and closing with the LGNZ Excellence Awards on the evening of Friday 17 July 2020.

14.     The conference programme has the theme “Natural Capital”. The final programme will be publicly available at the end of February however we have had indication from LGNZ that the programme is expected to include addresses from the Prime Minister, various political leaders and President of LGNZ as well as sessions on the following topics

·   Natural capital - the Marlborough story

·   Fishes in the river, fishes in the sea (Water, aquaculture and the Resource Management Act)

·   Tourism – working together to care for people, place and culture

·   Building towards sustainable supply (housing)

·   Resilience in the face of natural hazards (infrastructure and communities)

·   Cultural wellbeing plenary session

·   Interactive workshops on cultural, economic, environmental and social well-being

·   Tours, showcases and dinners.

15.     The AGM takes place on the last day of the conference from 9.30am to 12.30pm.  The LGNZ constitution permits the Auckland Council to appoint four delegates to represent it at the AGM, with one of the delegates being appointed as presiding delegate.

16.     Traditionally the four AGM delegates have been the Mayor, the Chief Executive and two Governing Body members who hold LGNZ roles. Delegates in 2019 were Mayor Phil Goff, Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore, Councillor Penny Hulse and Local board Chair Pippa Coom.

17.     The Governing Body will consider an item on AGM attendance at its meeting on 27 March 2020 which includes the recommendation that Mayor Phil Goff be the presiding delegate and the other three delegates be comprised of either:

a)         two members of the Governing Body who hold a formal representation role with LGNZ and the Chief Executive; or

b)         one member of the Governing Body who holds a formal representation role with LGNZ and the Chief Executive, and a local board member; or

c)         two members of the Governing Body who hold a formal representation role with LGNZ and a local board member.

18.     In addition to the official delegates, LGNZ requires prior notice of which local board members plan to attend the AGM. Attendance at the AGM is not compulsory for conference participants.

Pre-conference meetings

19.     On Wednesday 15 July 2020, there will be a pre-conference meeting of the National Council as well as a Te Maruata Hui. Elected members that are on these two groups and wish to attend these meetings would need to arrive earlier than other meeting participants.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

20.     Local boards are requested to appoint a lead for the 2019-2022 triennium. The lead’s responsibilities include:

·   attend and represent the local board at meetings of Auckland/LGNZ zone and other LGNZ meetings, as appropriate

·   be the main contact for the local board on all LGNZ matters

·   share information from Auckland/LGNZ and other LGNZ-related meetings attended with the local board.

    LGNZ Annual conference and AGM 2020

21.     In 2020, with the venue in Waiharakeke, Blenheim and given the cost and overall numbers of elected member attendance, it is recommended that one member per local board attend. Having one attendee per local board means a maximum of 21 Auckland Council local board members would attend the conference.

22.     The annual conference and AGM are two separate meeting sessions.

23.     Local board members are invited to attend and take part in the conference.

24.     For the AGM, member authorities will be represented by officially appointed delegates. Members who are not appointed delegates can attend as observers provided they are included in the AGM registration form. Local board members who wish to attend the AGM as observers must register their intention with the Democracy Services Business Hub team by Friday 17 April 2020 so that their names can be included on the AGM registration form.

25.     Local board members who attend the conference and/or AGM are strongly encouraged to report back to their local boards on proceedings at the conference. This ensures members who do not attend can still benefit from this opportunity.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     Conferences and events involving multiple participants especially those requiring long distance travel can generate a sizable carbon footprint. This is due to emissions associated with flights, car and taxi travel, hotel and event site emissions.

27.     Estimates for emissions associated with travel to Blenheim or travel within Auckland for local meetings have not been calculated at the time of writing this report. Emissions, when known, can be offset through a verified carbon offset programme at a small cost.

28.     Other opportunities to reduce emissions include:

a)      reducing the number of delegates to the Blenheim conference as recommended

b)      encouraging participants to opt for public transport options when attending meetings in Auckland

c)      encouraging delegates to provide updates to their local boards, including the option of daily updates from the conference and meetings via the local board facebook pages, so that non-attendance does not disadvantage other members

d)      ensuring elected members are aware of the session recordings that LGNZ will make available after the conference.  LGNZ have advised that they don’t webcast or live stream any parts of the conference as they try to encourage as many people as possible to attend in person.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     There are no impacts for CCOs or departments of council as the focus is on elected members attendance at meetings including the LGNZ conference.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     LGNZ advocates for issues that are important to local government. Many of these issues are aligned with local board priorities e.g. climate change. As such, there is interest at local board level in staying across the work of LGNZ and in identifying and harnessing opportunities to progress other advocacy areas that local boards may have.

31.     Having a dedicated lead who can attend Auckland meetings on LGNZ matters and who can be part of future discussions about remits and other topics, will enable local boards and their communities to continue to be informed and give considered input to work being led by LGNZ.

32.     The LGNZ Annual conference is always of interest to local board members. They provide a unique networking opportunity for local government leaders from around the country and the agenda of these meetings are designed to support local leaders in their roles and responsibilities. This is in line with the purpose of the elected member development programme which is to support elected members as governors and decision-makers.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     The work of LGNZ is expected to impact positively on Māori. LGNZ advocates on a variety of issues that are important to Māori including Māori housing, various environmental issues and Council-Māori participation/relationship arrangements. In addition, LGNZ provides advice including published guidance to assist local authorities in understanding values, aspirations and interest of Māori.

34.     The LGNZ National Council has a sub-committee, Te Maruata, which has the role of promoting increased representation of Māori as elected members of local government, and of enhancing Māori participation in local government processes.  It also provides support for councils in building relationships with iwi, hapu and Māori groups.  Te Maruata provides Māori input on development of future policies or legislation relating to local government. In the previous term Councillor Alf Filipaina was a member of the sub-committee.  Te Maruata will hold a hui on Wednesday 15 July 2020 from 10am to 4.30pm.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

35.     Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ are a new initiative being introduced this triennium following amendments to LGNZ zones. The two meetings for 2020 are scheduled for 13 March 2020 and 11 September 2020 and are not currently budgeted for. Staff will use existing resources and liaise with Kura Kāwana to identify combined opportunities for these meetings dates.

36.     Managing attendance numbers by only requiring attendance of leads, with others as optional attendees if they wish, should contribute towards keeping meeting costs down.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

37.     The normal registration rate for the LGNZ Conference and AGM is $1,410 (early bird) or $1,510 (standard). The total cost for early bird registration for 21 local board members is $29,610, with flights and accommodation additional.

38.     Costs of attendance for one member from each local board are to be met from the elected members’ development budget as managed centrally by the Kura Kawana Programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

39.     The inaugural meeting of the Auckland Zone is planned for 13 March 2020. If a local board has not chosen an LGNZ lead by this date, they would need to select a member to attend this meeting as their official representative.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

40.     The key risk is of delayed decision-making which can impact costs and registration choices. The sooner the registration for the nominated local board member can be made, the more likely it is that Auckland Council can take advantage of early bird pricing for the conference and flights, all done via bulk booking. Delayed information may also impact registration into preferred conference streams or events.

41.     There is always a level of reputational risk associated with any financial expenditure. Large delegations to conferences can be costly hence the advice that only one per local board attend.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

42.     There are two planned meetings for the Auckland Zone in 2020. The inaugural meeting is scheduled for 13 March 2020 and the second meeting is on 11 September 2020.

43.     Preparations for the inaugural meeting are being made by staff with guidance from the co-chairs. The agenda will include a report from LGNZ Executive and will also include an update on the Localism project. The agenda will be made available to members closer to the time of the meeting.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

44.     Once members are confirmed to attend, the Democracy Services Business Hub team will co-ordinate and book all conference registrations, as well as requests to attend the AGM.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shirley  Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Deputations update

File No.: CP2020/01322

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       As part of its monthly community forum, Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has set aside time for deputations/presentations during which time members of the public can address the local board on matters within the local board’s delegated authority.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Orders there is provision for deputations/presentations to the local board. Applications for deputations/presentations must be in writing setting forth the subject and be received by the Relationship Manager at least seven working days before the meeting concerned. Subsequently, requests for deputations are considered and approved by the local board chairperson.

3.       Requests, matters arising and actions from the deputations/presentations are recorded and updated accordingly. The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board deputations/presentations update is attached as attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      note the deputation update for 5 December 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Deputation Update December 2019

63

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gemma Kaldesic - Democracy Advisor for Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

record of deputations/presentations

 

Date

Presenters/Group

Purpose/Issue

05/12/2019

Jenny Hanwell, Pauline Smith

Forest and Bird

To present to the board a summary of their work and achievements to date

05/12/2019

John Davies, Sara Mason, Treena Salthouse

Future Whangaparaoa

To inform the board of their lease situation and seek advice

05/12/2019

Jeff Olufson

Metropark Community Sports Charitable Trust (MCSCT)

 

To deliver an update on the achievements of MCSCT to date and plans for the future.

 

05/12/2019

Belinda Greenwood, Kym Burke, Daphne McKerras

Whangaparaoa Hub Community Trust

 

To inform the board of their lease situation and seek advice

05/12/2019

Janice Haferkamp, Patricia Dallas

Whangaparaoa Community Response Group

 

To offer an understanding to the board of the work they do in emergency management

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2020/00363

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

2.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

· ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

· clarifying what advice is required

· clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work calendar for March 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Governance Forward Work Calendar

67

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gemma Kaldesic - Democracy Advisor for Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Forward Governance Work Calendar – March 2020

Meeting Type

Date

Topic

Week One

 

 

Community Forum (Browns Bay)

Thursday, 5 March 2020

Opportunity for staff and public to present to the local board

Week Two

 

 

Workshop (Orewa)

Thursday, 12 March 2020

Community Facilities: Monthly Update

 

 

AT: Suggested/Potential Projects

 

 

Gateway Project

Week Three

 

 

Business Meeting (Browns Bay)

Thursday, 19 March 2020

AT: LBTCF Projects

 

 

LBPM Report

Week Four

 

 

Workshop (Browns Bay)

Thursday, 26 March 2020

Community Facilities: Monthly Update

 

 

PSR: Monthly Update

 

 

LB Work Programme 20/21 Workshop #3