I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Howick Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 17 February 2020

6:00pm

Howick Local Board Meeting Room
Pakuranga Library Complex
7 Aylesbury Street
Pakuranga

 

Howick Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Adele White

 

Deputy Chairperson

John Spiller

 

Members

Katrina Bungard

 

 

Bo Burns

 

 

David Collings

 

 

Bruce Kendall

 

 

Mike Turinsky

 

 

Bob Wichman

 

 

Peter Young, JP

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Vanessa Phillips

Democracy Advisor

 

10 February 2020

 

Contact Telephone: 021 891 378

Email: vanessa.phillips@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Disability Connect, Fully accessible aquatic centre at Barry Curtis Park                                                                                                                        5

8.2     Deputation - Residents from Huntington Park and MP of Botany Jami-Lee Ross, Road safety in the Huntington Park and Golflands community          6

8.3     Deputation - Friends of Mangemangeroa, Mangemangeroa Reserves Development Plan                                                                                                6

8.4     Deputation - Howick Tourism Inc, East Auckland Tourism update to the Howick Local Board                                                                                             7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

9.1     Public Forum - Dale Smith, Parks maintenance and upgrade schedule       7

9.2     Public Forum - Sandra McGill and Neal Holt, Issues at Eastern Beach        7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

11        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                    9

12        Governing Body Member update                                                                               11

13        Auckland Transport February 2020 update to the Howick Local Board               13

14        Regional Facilities Auckland Quarterly Performance Report for the period ending 30 September 2019                                                                                                           23

15        Howick Local Board Open Space Network Plan                                                      35

16        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Howick Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020                                                                                                               41

17        Appointment of LGNZ Lead and nominee for LGNZ Conference 2020                 47

18        Approval for a new road name at 179 Botany Road, Howick                                 53

19        Approval for two new road names at 86 Argento Ave, Flat Bush                          61

20        Approval for 11 new road names within stages 10A & 10B at the Donegal Glen development in Flat Bush                                                                                           69

21        Urgent Decision - Howick Local Board to grant land owner approval for works at 159 Murphys Road and 231 Flat Bush School Road (future Ostrich Farm Sports Fields), including the construction of a stormwater line and outfall                     81

22        Urgent Decision - Howick Local Board to provide feedback on the Auckland Council draft submission Ministry for the Environment's review of the effectiveness of the waste levy                                                                                                                   103

23        Governance forward work calendar                                                                        111

24        Workshop records                                                                                                     115  

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

26        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               119

16        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Howick Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020

b.      Financial Performance Report                                                                        119  

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Howick Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 9 December 2019, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Howick Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Disability Connect, Fully accessible aquatic centre at Barry Curtis Park

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.         Mike Potter on behalf of Disability Connect will be in attendance to present to the board with the need for a fully accessible pool at Barry Curtis Park.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.         Mike Potter on behalf of Disability Connect will be in attendance to present to the board with the need for a fully accessible pool at Barry Curtis Park.

3.         Mike Potter, Chief Executive of Disability Connect will be speaking on behalf of Auckland based members and local residents with disabilities.

4.         The presentation Mike Potter will be presenting to the board is included in this report as Attachment A.

5.         A new aquatic and leisure centre is being built at Barry Curtis Park and the community has been asked to have their say on the services it wants to see at the facility.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Mike Potter on behalf of Disability Connect and thank him for his presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Ormiston Aquatic and Recreation Centre presentation............................... 123

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Residents from Huntington Park and MP of Botany Jami-Lee Ross, Road safety in the Huntington Park and Golflands community

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Residents from Huntington Park with support from their local MP, Jami-Lee Ross will be in attendance to address their concerns to the local board on road safety in the Huntington Park and Golflands community.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Residents from Huntington Park will be in attendance to present their concerns on road safety in the Huntington Park and Golflands community.

3.       In particular, addressing with the local board their issue of speeding vehicles and road safety in the Huntington Park and Golflands community.

4.       The residents from Huntington Park will be supported by their local MP Jami-Lee Ross.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from the Huntington Park residents and Jami-Lee Ross and thank them for their presentation.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Friends of Mangemangeroa, Mangemangeroa Reserves Development Plan

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Friends of Mangemangeroa will be in attendance to present to the local board their suggestions on the Mangemangeroa Reserves Development Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Friends of Mangemangeroa will be in attendance to present to the local board their suggestions on priorities for the board to consider on the Mangemangeroa Reserves Development Plan.

3.       The Mangemangeroa Valley Reserves Development Plan and the Mangemangeroa Reserves Restoration Plan 2019 was adopted by the Howick Local Board at their meeting on 16 September 2019.

4.       An extract of the Mangemangeroa Reserves Development Plan the Friends of Mangemangeroa will be referring to in their presentation is included in this report as Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from the Friends of Mangemangeroa and thank them for their presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Mangemangeroa Valley Reserves Development Plan - Design Recommendation Enlargement Plans......................................................... 129

 

 

8.4       Deputation - Howick Tourism Inc, East Auckland Tourism update to the Howick Local Board

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Members of Howick Tourism Inc will be in attendance to provide an update on East Auckland Tourism to the Howick Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Howick Tourism Inc and thank them for their presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Dale Smith, Parks maintenance and upgrade schedule

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Dale Smith, a resident in the Howick Local Board area, will be in attendance to highlight recent online reporting on parks in the Howick Local Board area and to make comment on the quality of work being undertaken.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      thank Dale Smith for his attendance.

 

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Sandra McGill and Neal Holt, Issues at Eastern Beach

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Sandra McGill and Neal Holt, residents from the Eastern Beach area will be in attendance to highlight Eastern Beach matters, particularly in relation to dog incidents.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      thank Sandra McGill and Neal Holt for their attendance.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2020/00135

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the Chairperson an opportunity to update the local board on any announcements and note the Chairperson’s report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the Chairperson’s report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

Governing Body Member update

File No.: CP2020/00174

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Howick Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the local board on regional matters.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Howick Ward Councillors with an opportunity to update the local board on regional matters they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from Cr Paul Young and Cr Sharon Stewart.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport February 2020 update to the Howick Local Board

File No.: CP2020/00817

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update for the Howick Local Board on transport related matters in their area, including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund and the Community Safety Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A decision is not required this month. This report is the first of the year and provides an opportunity to highlight Auckland Transport activities in the Howick Local Board area.

3.       The report contains information about the following:

·   the wider context involving a summary of the strategic projects delivered in the Howick Local Board area in the last electoral term

·   information about the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) including projects delivered in the last electoral term

·   an update on the Community Safety Fund (CSF)

·   an update on recent matters raised by the Howick Local Board

·   a summary of consultation about future Auckland Transport activities (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport February 2020 monthly update report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. Auckland Transport reports monthly to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. Monthly reporting acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

5.       Auckland Transport is currently delivering several key strategic projects in Howick, discussed below.

Airport to Botany - Rapid Transport Network (RTN)

6.       The Airport to Botany – Rapid Transport Network (RTN) project is a strategically important project. The aim is to create a RTN linking the Airport and Botany.

7.       A RTN is a public transport route that has very frequent services, separate from road traffic at least every 15 minutes and more frequently during peak hours. Some examples of RTNs are the rail network and the Northern Busway. 

8.       The Airport to Botany - RTN is a key project progressed significantly during the last electoral term. At this stage, engagement regarding the overall plan is finished. Auckland Transport briefed Howick Local Board on the proposed route, to be used in the business case to get money to fund more detailed design and then later construction.

9.       In March 2020 the local board will be provided a project update, including the early work that has begun, at Puhinui Station and on State Highway 20B.

10.     The Central Rail Link, AMETI-Eastern Busway, Airport to Botany and electrification to Pukekohe are all part of an overall strategic plan to create a RTN able to move people efficiently north to south and east to west across the southern part of Auckland.

AMETI - Eastern Busway

11.     AMETI – Eastern Busway, Auckland Transport’s biggest project, is a $1.4 billion project and is New Zealand’s first urban busway. It provides congestion free ‘bus only’ lanes for commuters from Panmure to Botany. In the previous electoral term Auckland Transport contractors started working on Stage one while work continues planning the second, third and fourth stages that in time will:

·   complete a flyover for commuter traffic linking Reeves Road to the South Eastern Arterial

·   build a Rapid Transit Network from Pakuranga to Botany

·   build a large transport hub at Botany where the Airport to Botany project will terminate at. 

12.     Stage one work continues to progress both on time and within budget. Key milestones approaching over the next three months include:

·   opening the new Kerswill Avenue and Pakuranga Road intersection

·   building the Eastern Busway across Williams Avenue and Pakuranga Road intersection

·   permanently closing Tamaki Bay Road, making it a cul de sac as part of the final busway

·   begin upgrading the Ti Rakau Drive and Pakuranga Road intersection

·   completing the connection of Latham Avenue and Dillimore Avenue, and then permanently closing Latham Avenue, making it a cul de sac as part of final busway

·   building Pier 1 of new busway bridge on the western side of Tamaki River (Pier 2 was completed at the end of 2019)

·   building the full bridge offsite and then moving it into position once both piers are in place.

13.     The updated delivery strategy for Stages two and three of the project is being finalised and will be made public in April 2020. This plan will outline the procurement approach, key timelines including the design, consent and construction principles for the project.

Community Safety Fund (CSF)

14.     The CSF will deliver a total of $20 million over two years distributed across all 21 local boards. It is strictly for road safety initiatives. It is designed to deliver safety projects identified by the local board.

15.     A local board’s share of the fund is based on a formula that assesses the number of deaths and serious injuries in that area. The Howick Local Board’s share of the CSF is $985,896. 

16.     Howick Local Board has two CSF projects and progress is reported below:

·   Botany Downs Secondary College Crossing Point – Improving the crossing facilities for Botany Downs Secondary College students who need to cross Chapel Road is progressing and the initial investigation is completed with a design planned to be ready this month.

·   Flatbush School Road Temporary Pedestrian Bridge – Building a temporary bridge over the Flat Bush Culvert (on Flatbush School Road) allowing pedestrians to cross the culvert more safely is progressing and negotiations are underway for a ‘design and build’ contract.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     This section of the report contains information about local projects, issues and initiative. It provides summaries of the detailed advice and analysis provided to the local board during workshops and briefings. 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

18.     The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·   be safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks may be considered if they support a transport outcome).

19.     The fund is designed to allow local boards to build transport focused local improvements in their areas.

20.     In this electoral term, the local board has approximately $7.8 million of LBTCF to spend.

21.     Auckland Transport encourages all local boards to maximise the use of their allocated funding and has established a timeline for the board to use for identification, investigation and delivery of projects.

22.     The timeline is listed below:

·   on 20 February 2020, Auckland Transport will workshop an initial list of potential projects with the local board providing an opportunity to identify possible projects

·   during March 2020, the local board will have an opportunity to workshop the projects identified and confirm a list for further investigation and an assessment of costs

·   at their March 2020 meeting, Auckland Transport will request the Howick Local Board to formally resolve on requesting development of a scope and/or a rough order of cost (ROC) for the projects the local board have identified

·   during May and June 2020, Auckland Transport will provide costs and feedback on the requested projects. This information can be used by the local board to prioritise the projects and to allocate funds based on quality advice. Workshops will be scheduled to discuss this information and support the local board’s decision-making

·   in June 2020, the local board will able to either:

o approve construction of projects costing less than $300,000; or

o approve detailed design for complex projects costing more than $300,000.

23.     The aim is to enable the local board to identify projects and start work on using their Local Board Transport Capital Fund. The above process will allow projects to be progressed or delivered inside the board’s current term. 

24.     Auckland Transports’ aim is to synchronise this process with development of the board’s Local Board Plan. This will ensure that transport projects are linked to the board’s priorities maximising efficiency and minimising the risk that transport funds are spent on unplanned or poorly evaluated projects.

25.     In the second year of the local board’s electoral term, this cycle will be repeated if the board does not allocate their funds in their first year. 

Flatbush School Road Safety

26.     Howick Local Board has raised concerns about the 100 km/hr speed limit on Flatbush School Road and about the safety of the Flatbush Culvert Bridge. The area is developing quickly and changing from rural to urban road conditions and two schools have recently opened on it.

27.     Last year the issues with this stretch of road were raised by the local board, school, community and NZ Police. The issues are being addressed in two ways:

·   the road’s speed limit was reduced to 50 km/hr using a temporary speed limit that will be confirmed in the new Auckland Speed Bylaw in June 2020

·   the Community Safety Fund is being used to build a pedestrian bridge over the Flatbush Culvert. Auckland Transport is negotiating with potential contractors and will update the local board on any progress such as when a contractor is appointed and delivery dates are confirmed.

Eastern Beach

28.     Howick Local Board received a petition from residents of Eastern Beach regarding the behaviour of people visiting the area. It mentions dangerous driving and other anti-social behaviour and asks for CCTV to be installed.

29.     Auckland Transport has considered this matter and can provide some advice to the local board and community. Auckland Transport has a legislated role focused on providing a network that is safe (i.e. in terms of road safety) and in which traffic flows smoothly. The Esplanade at Eastern Beach has speed control devices installed, creating a low speed environment. This petition request seeks a response to anti-social behavior, and it should be highlighted that Auckland Transport is not funded to install, maintain and monitor CCTV, as this is not part of Auckland Transport’s legislative role.

Huntington Park and Golflands Speed

30.     Local elected representatives asked Auckland Transport to investigate reports of dangerous speeds in Huntington Park and Golflands. Specifically, Howick Local Board was asked for an opinion about whether an issue with speeding existed in this area. The local board Chair requested an expert opinion from Auckland Transport.

31.     Auckland Transport engineers have reviewed the roads in the Huntington Park area and can provide the following advice:

·   in the last five years, three crashes were reported where speed was a contributing factor in Golflands and Huntington Park

·   all residential streets in these two areas are considered to have a low risk rating based on the number of reported crashes

·   recent speed data is available for Matarangi Road – which has an 85th percentile speed of 40 km/hr. This means that 85 per cent of cars are travelling slower than 40km/hr in that road. The lack of speed data in other roads is because there have not been many reports of speeding in this area

·   Auckland Transport plan to build a raised zebra crossing in front of the school on Golflands Drive, which will contribute to reducing speeds in that area.

32.     In summary, there may be localised issues with speeding vehicles, however the crash record, risk rating and speed data indicates that speeding is not a significant issue in these areas. Neither area has been prioritised for speed calming measures within Auckland Transport’s regional residential speed management programme.

33.     Although, Auckland Transport’s prioritisation of the risk in this area is low, the Howick Local Board could decide to use its transport capital fund to complete work in these areas.

Point View Drive

34.     Residents from Point View Drive have issues around driver behaviour on their narrow, uneven, winding rural road reporting that speed is a contributing factor to crashes on this road.

35.     Howick Local Board has requested investigation of a number of ideas by resolution (HW/2019/93) and through communication from the Chair.

36.     Auckland Transport recently investigated the road in detail commissioning a study by an independent contractor in early 2017. This produced a report with recommendations and has been circulated to the local board and Point View Drive resident’s group representatives. As per the report’s recommendation, Auckland Transport installed signs along the road and non-slip surfaces at the southern end of the road.

37.     A range of other improvements have since been suggested and Auckland Transport can provide the following advice about these suggested improvements:

·   General points – In 2017, Auckland Transport paid for an independent review of the road. The review identified a range of improvements that the independent engineers felt represented effective safety improvements and good value for money. Auckland Transport installed the recommended measures (turn, chevrons, slow down signs, road markings and non-slip surfacing at the south end of the road) during early 2018. All cost-effective changes have been made and any further investment (while having some safety benefits) would not be a cost-effective return on investment from Auckland Transport’s perspective. The local board’s considerations are different and having a more local focus, they may choose to fund improvements.

·   Speeding on Point View Drive tends to be residents – NZ Police have conducted speed enforcement on Point View Drive on a number of occasions motivated by reports from residents and the Howick Local Board. Police consistently report that the largest group of people ticketed are residents. This information changes the potential approach that Auckland Transport suggests the local board take. Education and community leadership may be a better way to solve this problem than building physical infrastructure.

·   Installation of electronic speed indicators - The narrowness of the route limits options for where these can be placed. Auckland Transport identified some possible locations in both directions that may be suitable. The signs cost roughly $20,000-$25,000 per sign.

·   Installation of mobile electronic speed indicators (i.e. purchasing a small number of signs and moving them around) – Speed indicator signs can be moved but Auckland Transport does not recommend this course of action. Small signs can be moved, each time a sign is moved it incurs costs that would quickly escalate. Larger signs towed on trailers are more expensive, it is harder to find suitable sites for this on a narrow road and is prone to vandalism. Although easy to move trailer-mounted signs still incur costs for movement and maintenance (i.e. WOFs and registration) it is Auckland Transport’s preference to permanently locate smaller signs.

·   Is Point View Drive a ‘high crash risk area’ and if so could signs be put up to warn people? Point View Drive has a collective risk rating of medium or lower depending on the section of road. ‘High Crash Risk Area’ signs are only used on roads with high collective risk ratings and where the speed limit is greater than 50 km/hr.

38.     The other significant issue in Point View Drive that has been raised relates to anti-social behaviour on the section that overlooks the city roughly between numbers 184 and 224. People park their cars in this area and make noise at night. The local board has asked Auckland Transport to investigate installing lane markers to stop parking on the berm, CCTV and a parking restriction in this area and these requests are discussed below:

·   Parking restrictions – Legally, parking restrictions are used to ensure safe operation of the road and efficient use of car parking in town centres. Auckland Transport has considered this request and does not support a parking restriction in this location.

·   Using lane dividers to mark the berm so people do not park on it – Auckland Transport has considered this suggestion and does not support it. Plastic lane markers will not physically stop a vehicle parking and are susceptible to damage requiring frequent replacement.

·   CCTV - Auckland Transport has discussed this option with the local board however Auckland Transport is not funded to install, maintain and monitor CCTV that does not contribute to the organisation’s legal role. 

39.     In summary, the issues with anti-social behaviour in Point View Drive fall outside the remit of Auckland Transport and this organisation’s advice is to address them with NZ Police and Auckland Council.

40.     With regards to complaints about speed in Point View Drive, the Howick Local Board has financial resources available and Auckland Transport can support installation of speed indicator signs at the board’s cost. Auckland Transport can also work with the local board to develop strategies for educating residents and working with local people to reduce the number of people speeding in this area. 

Griggs Road

41.     Howick Local Board has reported that there is an empty subdivision where anti-social behaviour occurs at night. Police suggest the installation of a raised area on the road that will deter youths taking their modified cars into the road.

42.     Auckland Transport has investigated this suggestion and the speed limit of the road precludes use of a traffic – calming measure. It is dangerous to put a speed bump or table on a road with speed limit higher than 50km/hr.

Pakuranga and Howick Bus Services

43.     The Howick Local Board raised this matter that the bus routes currently do not serve Farm Cove and Cockle Bay.

44.     This is certainly a matter that the local board can address with Auckland Transport either through:

·   Auckland Transport’s regular operational reviews. The matter has been raised and Auckland Transport’s planners are aware of it. Whether there is sufficient public demand and transport funding to extend services are the key questions, however at this time there is not enough funding

·   the local board plan process, by advocating to Auckland Council for sufficient transport funding to enable Auckland Transport to test new routes in these areas

·   alternatively, by advocating for a new-targeted rate to pay for the routes to be tested. In the last electoral term, Rodney Local Board struck a targeted rate to raise money that was used to establish and test new bus services. The services are being tested. If they prove to be financially viable Auckland Transport has committed to taking them over at the end of the trial. 

45.     In summary, the Howick Local Board has a number of good options that can be explored to extend bus services within its area. Auckland Transport staff will support this process and help the board while they discuss these options.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

46.     Auckland Transport are committed to minimising the negative effects that transport operations have on climate change. This includes the encouragement of emission neutral (walking and cycling) and low emission (public transport and ride sharing) methods of transportation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

47.     During this reporting period Auckland Transport has been working with Auckland Council to help identify unfunded council projects that may be considered for LBTCF funding.  Examples include walking and cycling paths that run through parks. By working together in this manner Auckland Transport, Auckland Council and Howick Local Board can maximise their impact in this community.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Auckland Transport consultations

48.     Over the last reporting period, Auckland Transport invited the local board to provide feedback on one proposal. More detailed information is available in Attachment A. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

49.     In this reporting period no new projects required iwi liaison.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

50.     This report does not have any financial implications that have not already been reported.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

51.     The proposed decision to receive the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all of its projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

52.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board next month.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of consultation about future Auckland Transport activities

21

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben Stallworthy, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

Regional Facilities Auckland Quarterly Performance Report for the period ending 30 September 2019

File No.: CP2020/00444

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Howick Local Board on the performance of Regional Facilities Auckland for the quarter ending 30 September 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the Regional Facilities Auckland Quarterly Performance Report for the quarter ending 30 September 2019.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Facilities Auckland Quarterly Performance Report for quarter ending 30 September 2019

25

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

Howick Local Board Open Space Network Plan

File No.: CP2020/00121

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for the development of an Open Space Network Plan for the Howick Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An open space network plan (network plan) will allow the local board to plan and respond to population growth and climate change.

3.       Staff recommend the local board approve the development of an open space network to guide parks and open space development over the next ten years.

4.       The network plan informs local board open space planning, resource allocation and advocacy. It will assist the local board to progressively improve the quality of parks and open space.

5.       There are limited risks in developing the network plan. It may raise community expectations that all projects are fully funded. No additional budget is provided for the implementation.

6.       If approved, staff will organise a series of workshops to develop the network plan. There is a three-stage process. The first workshop, scheduled for 26 March 2020, will assess the current state of the open space network.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)     approve the development of an open space network plan for the Howick Local Board area.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The open space network plan will help guide parks and open space development over the next ten years.

8.       An open space network plan is a key mechanism for implementing the Auckland Plan and the Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan 2013 at a local level.

9.       The network plan is strategically aligned to three Auckland Plan focus areas:

·   Belonging and Participation

o focus area one - create safe opportunities for people to meet, connect, participate in, and enjoy community and civic life

o focus area seven – recognize the value of arts, culture, sport and recreation to quality of life.

·   Homes and Places

o focus area five – create urban places for the future.

10.     The Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan is a strategic document that sets out high level objectives and activities for Auckland’s parks and open spaces in order to achieve Auckland Plan outcomes.

11.     It promotes four focus areas: (1) treasuring, (2) enjoying, (3) connecting; and (4) utilising parks and open spaces. These will guide the development of the network plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The open space network plan is developed in three stages and includes a current state, key moves and prioritised actions.

13.     The network plan will allow the local board to plan and respond to future demand given both population growth and climate change.

14.     The process for developing a network plan involves research, collaboration and planning phases.

15.     The scope of work is illustrated in figure one below, and includes:

·   identifying and analysing the current performance of the open space network, incorporating the work of existing local park development plans

·   identifying the aspirations and key moves required to improve performance of the open space network

·   identifying and prioritising local place-based actions to achieve the key moves.

Figure One: Three main sections of the open space network plan

16.     Staff will workshop each stage with the local board. The completion date for the network plan is scheduled for mid-2020.

17.     There is a clearly defined scope that will help prioritise the outcomes of the plan.

18.     The scope of the network plan includes all open space that is controlled and managed by the local board, including parks, sports fields, greenways and outdoor civic areas.

19.     Regional Facilities Auckland manage some parks and open spaces. These contribute to the overall network of open space but will not have any direct actions in the network plan.

20.     Reserve management plans, regional parks, maunga and recreation facilities (including stadia, pools, indoor courts and cemeteries) are out of scope.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Parks and open space serve as ecological and biodiversity corridors. They promote and protect native plants and animals. Vegetation and woodland process carbon to help slow the accumulation of greenhouse gases.

22.     Grassed areas help reduce maximum temperature ranges in urban and suburban areas. Parks and open space also act as collection points for surface and run-off water, reducing flood risks during storms.

23.     Parks and open space must be managed in environmentally sensitive ways to achieve these benefits. This includes energy and waste reduction and conserving water resources.

24.     The network plan will reflect the effects of predicted climate change. It will consider such impacts as increasing temperatures. Rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the open space network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     network plan will be developed in consultation with relevant council departments.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     Parks and open spaces provide access to a range of activities and experiences for people which lead to improved health and wellbeing.

27.     The local board can use the plan to help inform prioritisation of its locally driven initiative capital budgets and advocate for increased funding through Annual and Long-term Plan processes.

28.     The network plan can also be used to help the Howick Local Board illustrate their parks and open space priorities and direction across council.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Māori identity and well-being is an important outcome in the Auckland Plan. The implementation of a network plan responds to and supports the following focus areas:

·   focus area one – meet the needs and support the aspirations of tamariki and their whānau

·   focus area seven – reflect mana whenua mātauranga and Māori design principles throughout Auckland.

30.     Quality parks and open spaces help facilitate Māori participation in sport and recreation.

31.     Based on the 2018 Census, there are 8052 people in the Howick Local Board area who identify as Māori. The median age of the Māori population in Howick is 24.3 years of age, compared with 37.8 years of age in Howick overall.

32.     Māori have high engagement in parks and open space in childhood and adolescence, after which rates decrease. The network plan will seek to develop activities that engage Māori throughout their lives.

33.     Mana whenua will be engaged throughout the process of developing the network plan. This will involve seeking advice on their views and values in relation to open space.

34.     There are 12 iwi groups with interests in the area:

·      Ngāi Tai ki Tamaki

·     Ngāti Maru

·       Ngāti Paoa

·      Ngāti Tamaoho

·     Ngāti Tamaterā

·       Ngāti Te Ata

·      Ngaati Whanaunga

·     Te Ahiwaru

·       Te Ākitai Waiohua

·      Te Kawerau a Maki

·     Te Patukirikiri

·       Waikato-Tainui.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     Development of the network plan is funded by Community and Social Policy.

36.     No funding has been allocated for public consultation, as the open space network plan informs local board decision-making. Public consultation is undertaken on particular park developments.

37.     No additional budget is provided for the implementation of the network plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     There are limited risks in developing the open space network plan. The plan may raise community expectations that all projects are fully funded. However, no additional budget is provided.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Once development of the open space network plan has been approved, staff will engage with the local board as outlined in figure two below:

Figure Two: Open space network plan process

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dillon O'Brien - Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Howick Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/00395

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Howick Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter two, 1 October – 31 December 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2019/2020 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with the Howick Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·   activation of parks, places and open spaces

·   the delivery of seasonal events

·   the delivery of a capacity building workshop with a number of community organisations

·   the inaugural youth awards

·   the instillation of a solar powered light at Tarnica Park

·   waste minimisation in schools

·   Botany Library relocation opening.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery (Attachment A). Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). There are no activities with a red status this quarter.

6.       The 2019/2020 financial performance report for 31 December 2019 is attached but under confidential cover (Attachment B). This is due to restrictions on releasing interim report (half year) results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – expected to be made public from 28 February 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)         receive the performance report for quarter two ending 31 December 2019.

b)         note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group interim report (half year) are released to the NZX which are expected to be made public on 28 February 2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Howick Local Board has an approved 2019/2020 work programme for the following operating departments:

·   Arts, Community and Events;

·   Parks, Sport and Recreation;

·   Libraries and Information;

·   Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration;

·   Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew;

·   Community Facilities: Community Leases;

·   External Partnerships;

·   Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·   Plans and Places;

·   ATEED.

8.       Work programmes are produced annually, to meet the Howick Local Board outcomes identified in the three-year Howick Local Board Plan. The local board plan outcomes are:

·   involved and connected communities

·   our future growth is managed effectively

·   valuing our cultural diversity

·   a treasured environment

·   our people are active and healthy

·   a prosperous local economy.

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet local board plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

10.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

 

11.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter two

12.     Key activities in quarter two that align with the local board plan are as follows:

·   the successful delivery of a number of activation events in parks, places and open spaces such as Girls Wellness Skate Clinic at Barry Curtis Park, Wild Child event at Murphy's Bush and a waterslide event at Lloyd Elsmore Park, that saw over 300 children and families participate

·   the annual lighting of the Christmas tree at Stockade Hill, which included musical entertainment from the local community

·   a number of community organisations attended a capacity building workshop where staff supported LEAD to deliver their leadership programme that consisted of three workshops with 24 participants from 15 organisations

·   the Youth Council delivered the inaugural youth awards event recognising leadership, initiative and talent

·   in response to a request from the community, the instillation of a solar power light at Tarnica Park was completed

·   in quarter two, all 25 of the schools that registered for the Waste Minimisation in schools project completed an initial waste audit, with 14 submitting a waste action plan

·   Botany Library opened in its new relocated space at Botany Mall on 10 October 2019, with a significant increase in visitor numbers over the following weeks and very positive feedback received.

Activities with significant issues

13.     There are no activities that raise significant issues in quarter two.

Activities on hold

14.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·   Ti Rakau Park - renew playground

·   Barry Curtis Park - develop existing Culture Lawn Chapel Road metal carpark

·   Howick: Tree and green asset planting programme for the 2017/2018 financial year.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

15.     There are no activities that have been deferred in quarter two.

Cancelled activities

16.     There are no activities that have been cancelled in quarter two.

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

17.     There are no activities that have been merged with other activities in quarter two.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

19.     Work programmes were approved in June 2019 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

20      The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:  

·   Industrial Pollution Prevention programme

·   Para Kore programme for business waste minimization

·   Waste minimisation in schools.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This report informs the Howick Local Board of the performance for quarter two ending 31 December 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     In quarter two, staff continued to support Te Tahawai Marae to achieve their aspirations and to seek opportunities that will enhance kaupapa Māori initiatives in the local board area, as identified through the development of their strategic plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     This report is provided to enable the Howick Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2019/2020 work programmes and to report this to the public.

Financial Performance

25.     Auckland Council currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – expected to be made public from 28 February.

26.    Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is under confidential cover.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

28.     The approved Community Facilities 2019/2020 work programme and 2020-2022 indicative work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the 2019/2020 financial year, by ensuring that if projects intended for delivery in the 2019/2020 financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances, that other projects can be progressed while the causes for delays are addressed.

29.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter three (31 March 2020).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Howick Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Financial Performance Report (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nichola Painter - Local Board Advisor - Howick

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

Appointment of LGNZ Lead and nominee for LGNZ Conference 2020

File No.: CP2020/01043

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To appoint a lead for Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) matters and nominate a representative to attend the 2020 LGNZ Annual Conference and General Meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards are invited to appoint a lead (and alternate) on Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) matters. The lead will be the main contact for all LGNZ issues and will represent the local board at meetings of Auckland/LGNZ zone and any related meetings.

3.       The LGNZ Annual Conference and General Meeting (AGM) takes place at the ASB Theatre Malborough in Waiharakeke Blenheim from 8am Thursday 16 July to 3pm Saturday 18 July 2020.

4.       Local boards are invited to nominate a representative to attend the LGNZ conference. This can be the local board appointed LGNZ lead or another member of the local board. Given the cost of and overall numbers of elected member attendance, staff recommend that one member per local board attend.

5.       In addition to the official delegates, LGNZ requires prior notice of which local board members plan to attend the AGM. Members wishing to attend are asked to register their intention with the Kura Kāwana programme by Friday 17 April 2020 so that this information can be provided to LGNZ.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      appoint a lead and alternate for LGNZ related matters for the 2019-2022 triennium and task these members with representing the local board at Auckland/LGNZ meetings.

b)      nominate one elected member per local board to attend the Local Government New Zealand 2020 Conference and Annual General Meeting in Waiharakeke Blenheim, Thursday 16 July to Saturday 18 July 2020.

c)      confirm that conference attendance including travel and accommodation will be paid for in accordance with the current Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy.

d)      note that any members who wish to attend the AGM must provide their names to the Democracy Services Business Hub team by Friday 17 April 2020 to ensure that they are registered with Local Government New Zealand.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       LGNZ is an incorporated society of local government organisations whose primary objective is to represent and advocate for the interests of local authorities in New Zealand. LGNZ champions policy positions on key issues that are of interest to local government and holds regular meetings and events throughout the year for members. The schedule of meetings includes an annual conference and meetings of local government geographical clusters (known as LGNZ zones) and sectors.

7.       LGNZ is governed by a National Council made up of representatives from member authorities as outlined in the constitution. Some of its work is conducted through committees and working groups which include representatives from member auhorities.

8.       Elected members who have been formally appointed to LGNZ roles are:

Elected Member

Appointed role

Mayor Phil Goff

National Council representative for Auckland

Auckland Council representative on the Metropolitan Sector Group

Councillor Pippa Coom

Local Board Member Richard Northey

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by Governing Body)

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by local boards)

Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore

Auckland Council representative on Regional Sector

 

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

9.       As part of recent changes to the LGNZ Rules, Auckland Council is no longer part of LGNZ Zone 1 but is expected to organise itself, with its multiple local boards and Governing Body, as an informal LGNZ zone.

10.     Meetings of the Auckland/LGNZ zone have been scheduled on a biannual basis. These meetings will be co-chaired by the two Auckland representatives appointed to the LGNZ National Council by the Governing Body (Councillor Pippa Coom) and local boards’ (Member Richard Northey).

11.     Meetings of the Auckland/LGNZ zone will be open to all elected members but formal representation will sit with the nominated leads.

LGNZ Annual conference and AGM 2020

12.     This year the LGNZ conference and AGM will be held at the ASB Theatre Marlborough, Waiharakeke Blenheim, Thursday 16 July to Saturday 18 July 2020.

13.     The conference takes place over the first two days commencing at 9.30am on Thursday 16 July 2020 and closing with the LGNZ Excellence Awards on the evening of Friday 17 July 2020.

14.     The conference programme has the theme “Natural Capital”. The final programme will be publicly available at the end of February however we have had indication from LGNZ that the programme is expected to include addresses from the Prime Minister, various political leaders and President of LGNZ as well as sessions on the following topics

·   natural capital - the Marlborough story

·   fishes in the river, fishes in the sea (Water, aquaculture and the Resource Management Act)

·   tourism – working together to care for people, place and culture

·   building towards sustainable supply (housing)

·   resilience in the face of natural hazards (infrastructure and communities)

·   cultural wellbeing plenary session

·   interactive workshops on cultural, economic, environmental and social well-being

·   tours, showcases and dinners.

15.     The AGM takes place on the last day of the conference from 9.30am to 12.30pm. The LGNZ constitution permits the Auckland Council to appoint four delegates to represent it at the AGM, with one of the delegates being appointed as presiding delegate.

16.     Traditionally the four AGM delegates have been the Mayor, the Chief Executive and two Governing Body members who hold LGNZ roles. Delegates in 2019 were Mayor Phil Goff, Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore, Councillor Penny Hulse and Local board Chair Pippa Coom.

17.     The Governing Body will consider an item on AGM attendance at its meeting on 27 March 2020 which includes the recommendation that Mayor Phil Goff be the presiding delegate and the other three delegates be comprised of either:

a)  two members of the Governing Body who hold a formal representation role with LGNZ and the Chief Executive; or

b)  one member of the Governing Body who holds a formal representation role with LGNZ and the Chief Executive, and a local board member; or

c)  two members of the Governing Body who hold a formal representation role with LGNZ and a local board member.

18.     In addition to the official delegates, LGNZ requires prior notice of which local board members plan to attend the AGM. Attendance at the AGM is not compulsory for conference participants.

Pre-conference meetings

19.     On Wednesday 15 July there will be a pre-conference meeting of the National Council as well as a Te Maruata Hui. Elected members that are on these two groups and wish to attend these meetings would need to arrive earlier than other meeting participants.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

20.     Local boards are requested to appoint a lead for the 2019-2022 triennium. The lead’s responsibilities include:

·   attend and represent the local board at meetings of Auckland/LGNZ zone and other LGNZ meetings, as appropriate

·   be the main contact for the local board on all LGNZ matters

·   share information from Auckland/LGNZ and other LGNZ-related meetings attended with the local board.

LGNZ Annual conference and AGM 2020

21.     In 2020, with the venue in Waiharakeke, Blenheim and given the cost and overall numbers of elected member attendance, it is recommended that one member per local board attend. Having one attendee per local board means a maximum of 21 Auckland Council local board members would attend the conference.

22.     The annual conference and AGM are two separate meeting sessions.

23.     Local board members are invited to attend and take part in the conference.

24.     For the AGM, member authorities will be represented by officially appointed delegates. Members who are not appointed delegates can attend as observers provided they are included in the AGM registration form. Local board members who wish to attend the AGM as observers must register their intention with the Democracy Services Business Hub team by Friday 17 April 2020 so that their names can be included on the AGM registration form.

25.     Local board members who attend the conference and/or AGM are strongly encouraged to report back to their local boards on proceedings at the conference. This ensures members who do not attend can still benefit from this opportunity.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     Conferences and events involving multiple participants especially those requiring long distance travel can generate a sizable carbon footprint. This is due to emissions associated with flights, car and taxi travel, hotel and event site emissions.

27.     Estimates for emissions associated with travel to Blenheim or travel within Auckland for local meetings have not been calculated at the time of writing this report. Emissions, when known, can be offset through a verified carbon offset programme at a small cost.

28.     Other opportunities to reduce emissions include:

a)      reducing the number of delegates to the Blenheim conference as recommended

b)      encouraging participants to opt for public transport options when attending meetings in Auckland

c)      encouraging delegates to provide updates to their local boards, including the option of daily updates from the conference and meetings via the local board facebook pages, so that non-attendance does not disadvantage other members

d)      ensuring elected members are aware of the session recordings that LGNZ will make available after the conference. LGNZ have advised that they don’t webcast or live stream any parts of the conference as they try to encourage as many people as possible to attend in person.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     There are no impacts for CCOs or departments of council as the focus is on elected members attendance at meetings including the LGNZ conference.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     LGNZ advocates for issues that are important to local government. Many of these issues are aligned with local board priorities e.g. climate change. As such, there is interest at local board level in staying across the work of LGNZ and in identifying and harnessing opportunities to progress other advocacy areas that local boards may have.

31.     Having a dedicated lead who can attend Auckland meetings on LGNZ matters and who can be part of future discussions about remits and other topics, will enable local boards and their communities to continue to be informed and give considered input to work being led by LGNZ.

32.     The LGNZ Annual conference is always of interest to local board members. They provide a unique networking opportunity for local government leaders from around the country and the agenda of these meetings are designed to support local leaders in their roles and responsibilities. This is in line with the purpose of the elected member development programme which is to support elected members as governors and decision-makers.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     The work of LGNZ is expected to impact positively on Māori. LGNZ advocates on a variety of issues that are important to Māori including Māori housing, various environmental issues and Council-Māori participation/relationship arrangements. In addition, LGNZ provides advice including published guidance to assist local authorities in understanding values, aspirations and interest of Māori.

34.     The LGNZ National Council has a sub-committee, Te Maruata, which has the role of promoting increased representation of Māori as elected members of local government, and of enhancing Māori participation in local government processes. It also provides support for councils in building relationships with iwi, hapu and Māori groups. Te Maruata provides Māori input on development of future policies or legislation relating to local government. In the previous term Councillor Alf Filipaina was a member of the sub-committee. Te Maruata will hold a hui on Wednesday 15 July 2020 from 10am to 4.30pm.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

35.     Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ are a new initiative being introduced this triennium following amendments to LGNZ zones. The two meetings for 2020 are scheduled for 13 March and 11 September and are not currently budgeted for. Staff will use existing resources and liaise with Kura Kāwana to identify combined opportunities for these meetings dates.

36.     Managing attendance numbers by only requiring attendance of leads, with others as optional attendees if they wish, should contribute towards keeping meeting costs down.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

37.     The normal registration rate for the LGNZ Conference and AGM is $1,410 (early bird) or $1,510 (standard). The total cost for early bird registration for 21 local board members is $29,610, with flights and accommodation additional.

38.     Costs of attendance for one member from each local board are to be met from the elected members’ development budget as managed centrally by the Kura Kāwana Programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

39.     The inaugural meeting of the Auckland Zone is planned for 13 March 2020. If a local board has not chosen an LGNZ lead by this date, they would need to select a member to attend this meeting as their official representative.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

40.     The key risk is of delayed decision-making which can impact costs and registration choices. The sooner the registration for the nominated local board member can be made, the more likely it is that Auckland Council can take advantage of early bird pricing for the conference and flights, all done via bulk booking. Delayed information may also impact registration into preferred conference streams or events.

41.     There is always a level of reputational risk associated with any financial expenditure. Large delegations to conferences can be costly hence the advice that only one per local board attend.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

42.     There are two planned meetings for the Auckland Zone in 2020. The inaugural meeting is scheduled for 13 March 2020 and the second meeting is on 11 September 2020.

43.     Preparations for the inaugural meeting are being made by staff with guidance from the co-chairs. The agenda will include a report from LGNZ Executive and will also include an update on the Localism project. The agenda will be made available to members closer to the time of the meeting.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

44.     Once members are confirmed to attend, the Democracy Services Business Hub team will co-ordinate and book all conference registrations, as well as requests to attend the AGM.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Shirley Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Linda Gifford, Programme Manager – Elected Member Development

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

Approval for a new road name at 179 Botany Road, Howick

File No.: CP2020/01225

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from Howick Local Board to name a new private road, being a jointly owned access lot, created by way of a subdivision development at 179 Botany Road, Howick

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has Road Naming Guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

3.       The applicant, Gemscott Botany Limited, has proposed the following names for consideration by the local board:

·   Cabaret Way (preferred)

·   Omihi Way (first alternative)

·   Aratapu Way (second alternative).

4.       Following consultation with the relevant ten iwi, no further names were suggested. Ngāti Paoa did however recommend either Omihi or Aratapu Way.

5.       The proposed road names have been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. Mana whenua were also consulted.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve Omihi Way for the new private road created by way of subdivision at 179 Botany Road, Howick in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent reference BUN60344644 and varied by LUC60344645-A).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent BUN60344644 was issued 10 October 2019, with a variation (LUC60344645-A) issued 27 November 2019 for the construction of 34 dwellings, 31 carparks and one jointly owned access lot (JOAL).

7.       The JOAL will serve 34 townhouses.

8.       In accordance with the National Addressing Standards for road naming (the AS/NZS 4819-2011 standard), the JOAL requires a road name because it serves more than five lots.

9.       Site and location plans of the development are included as Attachment A and Attachment B respectively.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow when a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

11.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically requires road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     The proposed development is to provide for the social housing needs in the area. The theme proposed for the road names relates to creating welcoming and homely places for the community to live and creating a path to a prosperous future while recognising the past. Consideration has been given to the local area and we have tried to represent the local and cultural significance to mana whenua. The Research and Publishing Group, Ministry for Culture and Heritage website has been used to find the names and their meanings (please follow the link for more details:

13.     The Applicant’s proposed names and meanings are set out in the table below:

Table one: Proposed names and meaning

Proposed Names & Preferences

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Cabaret Way

(applicant’s preferred name)

Developer’s surname

Omihi Way

(first alternative)

Place of greeting

Aratapu Way

(second alternative)

Sacred path

14.     The names proposed by the Applicant have been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming.

15.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

16.     ‘Way’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the road, as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

17.     All relevant local iwi were written to (via email) and invited to comment. Those consulted for their input on the road naming were;

·   Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

·   Ngāti Maru,

·   Ngāti Paoa

·   Ngāti Tamatera,

·   Ngāti Te Ata

·   Ngāti Whanaunga

·   Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua

·   Te Akitai Waiohua

·   Te Patukirikiri

·   Waikato – Tainui.

   Of the ten iwi contacted, only Ngāti Paoa and Te Ahiwaru responded. Te Ahiwaru were content to recommend any suggestions by Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, whereas Ngāti Paoa preferred either Omihi or Aratapu be utilised.

18.     No objections or additional comments were raised by mana whenua for any of the other proposed names.

19.     No local community groups or associations have been identified in this area. While researching potential groups or associations to consult with, consideration was given to a number of online organisations such as https://www.times.co.nz/ (which is a newsletter for Howick, Pakuranga, Botany and Ormiston) and https://fencible.org.nz/ (Historical village and museum located in the subject area that provide relevant activities and program for visitors). These organisations are not considered to be local community groups or associations, so no consultation has been undertaken.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome “A Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Māori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Māori identity.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road name.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan

57

b

Location Plan

59

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dean Dickson - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

Approval for two new road names at 86 Argento Ave, Flat Bush

File No.: CP2020/00661

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from Howick Local Board to name two new private roads, being jointly owned access lots, created by way of a subdivision development at 86 Argento Ave, Flat Bush.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has Road Naming Guidelines that set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       The Applicant, Kenny Li (Wila Developments (Ormiston) LP), has proposed the following names for consideration by the local board:

Table One: Proposed names

 

Road two

Road three

Applicant preferred

Pumau Place

Ki Roto Way

First alternative

Puruatanga Place

Wao Way

Second alternative

Pararahi Place

Puihi Way

4.       Following consultation with all relevant iwi, Ngāi Tai ki Tamaki and Ngāti Whatua O Kaipara were supportive of both the applicants preferred names. No other iwi replied or suggested any alternatives.

5.       The proposed road names have been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. Mana whenua were also consulted.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve Pumau Place and Ki Roto Way for the two new private roads created by way of subdivision at 86 Argento Ave, Flat Bush in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent reference BUN60304643).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent BUN60304643 was issued 10 August 2018 for the construction of 24 residential units, two reserves and two private JOALs (Jointly owned access lots)/ roads.

7.       In accordance with the National Addressing Standards for road naming (the AS/NZS 4819-2011 standard), the JOAL requires a road name because it serves more than five lots.

8.       Site and location plans of the development are included as Attachment A and Attachment B respectively.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

10.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

11.     The applicant selected Māori names which reflected the area of the development, in particular the surrounding stream & nature.

12.     The Applicant’s proposed names and meanings are set out in the table below:

Table two: Proposed names and meaning

Proposed Names & Preferences

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Pumau Place

(Applicant preferred name) (ROAD 2)

Maori for “fixed or unchanging, steady”

Puruatanga Place

(first alternative) (ROAD 2)

Maori for “junction of two streams”

Pararahi Place

(second alternative) (ROAD 2)

Maori for “flat”, as this reflects the general lot shape of the development

Ki Roto Way

(Applicant preferred name) (ROAD 3)

Maori for “into stream”, as this short road links into the small local stream

Wao Way

(first alternative) (ROAD 3)

Maori for “forest”

Puihi Way

(second alternative) (ROAD 3)

Maori for “wild, uncultivated, bush forest”

13.     The names proposed by the Applicant have been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming.

14.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

15.     ‘Place’ and ‘Road’ are acceptable road types for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the road, as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

16.     All relevant local iwi were written to (via email) and invited to comment. Those consulted for their input on the road naming’s were;

·   Ngāi Tai ki Tamaki

·   Ngāti Whātua Orakei

·   Ngāti Whatua O Kaipara

·   Ngāti Manuhiri

·   Te Kawerau

·   Ngāti Tamaoho

·   Ngāti Maru

·   Ngāti Paoa

·   Ngāti Tamatera

·   Ngāti Te Ata

·   Ngāti Whanaunga,

·   Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua

·   Te Akitai Waiohua

·   Te Patukirikiri

·   Waikato – Tainui.

Ngāi Tai ki Tamaki and Ngāti Whatua O Kaipara were supportive of both the applicants preferred names. No other iwi replied or suggested any alternatives.

17.     No objections or additional comments were raised by Mana Whenua for any of the other proposed names.

18.     The applicant also contacted the Howick Local Board for recommendations of local community groups to liaise with for this road naming – no organisations were provided by the Local Board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate impact on the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     The decision sought from the Howick Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome “A Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Māori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Māori identity.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on their New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan

65

b

Site Location

67

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dean Dickson - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

Approval for 11 new road names within stages 10A & 10B at the Donegal Glen development in Flat Bush

File No.: CP2020/00788

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from Howick Local Board to name 11 new roads created by way of a subdivision development for stages 10A & 10B at Donegal Glen in Flat Bush. Approval is also sought to use existing names for roads that have been extended from previously approved subdivisions.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council’s road naming guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       Hugh Green Group (the applicant) requests the approval of 11 new road names within stages 10A & 10B of their Flat Bush subdivision, due to the discovery that the names currently being used by the applicant at the Donegal Glen development were not formally approved by the Howick Local Board in 2017. 

4.       As all lots within both stages have since been sold and the addresses and property rates have already been set up in council’s system, this report is being submitted to the Howick Local Board to approve the 11 names as part of the formal road naming process.

5.       Any of the eleven proposed road name options would be acceptable for the local board to approve for use in this location, having been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met and the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region. Therefore, it is up to the local board to decide upon the thematic suitability of the names within the local context.

6.       The developer and applicant, Hugh Green Group has proposed the names presented in the tables below for consideration by the local board:

Table One: Donegal Glen stages 10A & 10B proposed road names

Road Reference

Proposed Name

Road Type 

Road 6 (Extension)

Proposed to retain existing name

Tir Conaill

Avenue

Road 7 (Extension)

Proposed to retain existing name

Cloonlyon

Drive

Road 8 (Extension)

Proposed to retain existing name

Drumbuoy

Drive

 


 

Table Two: Donegal Glen stages 10A & 10B proposed road names

Road Reference

Preferred Names

Road Type

ROAD 1

Ballyliffin

Drive

ROAD 2

Clonmany

Road

ROAD 3

Bushfield

Drive

ROAD 4

Tannaghmore

Drive

ROAD 5

Drumnaconagher

Drive

COAL 1

Corveen

Crescent

COAL 2

Cumber

Lane

COAL 3

Glann

Lane

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      approve the retention of the existing road name ‘Tir Conaill Avenue’ for Road 6 to be extended in the Donegal Glen stage 10A & 10B development site, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references SUB60304960, and stage variation SUB60304960-A).

b)      approve the retention of the existing road name ‘Cloonlyon Drive’ for Road 7 to be extended in the Donegal Glen stage 10A & 10B development site in Flat Bush, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references SUB60304960, and stage variation SUB60304960-A).

c)      approve the retention of the existing road name ‘Drumbuoy Drive’ for Road 8 to be extended in the Donegal Glen stage 10A & 10B development site in Flat Bush, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references SUB60304960, and stage variation SUB60304960-A).

d)      approve 8 names for the following new roads at the Donegal Glen stage 10A & 10B development site in Flat Bush, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references SUB60304960, and stage variation SUB60304960-A):

I)    ROAD 1: Ballyliffin Drive

II)   ROAD 2: Clonmany Road

III)  ROAD 3: Bushfield Drive

IV) ROAD 4: Tannaghmore Drive

V)  ROAD 5: Drumnaconagher Drive

VI) COAL 1: Corveen Crescent

VII) COAL 2: Cumber Lane

VIII)  COAL 3: Glann Lane

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Site and location plans of the development are included as Attachments A and Attachment B respectively.

8.       Resource consent SUB60304960 was issued October 2017 for a two stage (10A & 10B) construction of 153 dwellings. Access to these dwellings is via three commonly owned access lots (COALs), and eight public roads. Three of these public roads are extensions from previously approved subdivisions.

9.       A variation to consent conditions, reference SUB60304960-A, was also approved in April 2018 to enable a third stage, being 10C. The roads constructed in stage 10C will connect stage 9 and stages 10A & 10B, enabling some existing approved road names to extend through the multiple stages. A road layout plan of stage 10C can be found in Attachment A.

10.     A road naming report for Donegal Glen subdivision stage 9 and stage 11 was presented to the local board in April 2017. Included in the report was a list of 21 alternative names to be considered had any of the applicant’s preferred names not been suitable for local board approval. The author of the report also requested these alternative names be checked by the local board to ensure they met the criteria of the road naming guidelines so that they would not be rejected if submitted in a future road naming report for other stages in Donegal Glen.

11.     On 10 April 2017, the Howick Local Board approved 11 road names for stages 9 and 11 at the Donegal Glen development in Flat Bush, while also noting that the 21 alternative names met the road naming criteria. The applicant interpreted this list of 21 names in the resolution to have been formally approved by the local board, and began assigning the names to roads in other stages in their development. Eight of these names were allocated by the applicant to stages 10A & 10B.

12.     In October 2019, Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) contacted council’s subdivision team to query a road name within stages 10A & 10B as the name was not included in LINZ’s database. It was later discovered that the applicant had not submitted a separate road naming application to council for the proposed names within stages 10A &10B, and that the names currently being used by the applicant were not officially approved by the local board.

13.     All lots within stages 10A &10B have since been sold and construction of the properties is underway. As all the property addresses and rates have already been set up in council’s system, this report is being submitted to the Howick Local Board to approve the 11 names as part of the formal road naming process.

14.     LINZ confirmed on 17 January 2020 that the applicant’s proposed names are acceptable for use in the Flat Bush area.

15.     All relevant local iwi were written to (via email) and invited to comment as part of the road naming for Donegal Glen stages 9 and 11. Te Ahiwaru responded, deferring interest to Ngāi Tai ki Tamaki, who in turn did not respond. No other iwi provided responses or comments. It is therefore implied that no iwi were opposed to the use of any of the proposed names.

16.     Council staff has since advised the applicant of the correct road naming process in which the local board must approve all names for each new road within a subdivision. The applicant will be submitting road naming applications for the remaining stages in the Donegal Glen development in the near future.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow when a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

18.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

19.     Background and reason for proposed names (as described by the applicant):

“Greerton Holdings Limited/Hugh Green Limited is wholly owned subsidiaries of the Hugh Green Group. Hugh Green left Ireland in 1949 and created the Green & McCahill Construction Company in Auckland in 1953. The company was responsible for many major New Zealand construction projects from this time through to the 1980’s.

In recent times the company has become more investment focused whilst maintaining its link with the construction industry through development of its land holdings throughout the Auckland region.

A common theme of the company’s land developments is the naming of new roads after places and town lands from Hugh Green’s native Ireland and more specifically County Donegal in Ireland’s northwest.

This is consistent with our recently developed Donegal Glen stage 7 at 40 Hughs Way which was completed in December 2015 and includes the street names Casheltown Way, Banrsmore Road, Ballykerrigan Road, Drumbuoy Drive, Creggan Crescent, Clogfin Place, Drumfad Road and Mullafin Road – all named after places in Donegal. We note the adjacent development has continued this same road name theme.

Donegal Glen Stages 1 - 6 at 89 Flat Bush School Road which was completed in 2014, this development includes the street names Castlederg Drive, Kiltole Drive, Moville Drive and Cranford Drive, Bruckless Drive, Castletown Drive and Dunkineely Drive etc.

Point View Park subdivision at 132 Flat Bush School Road (opposite 89 Flat Bush School Road) which was completed in 2009. This development includes the street names Arranmore Drive, Coolaghy Drive, Clady Drive, Listack Place, Gortnest Place, Greeve Place and Kerrykeel Drive – all named after places in Donegal.

Similarly we have completed developments at the corner of Thomas and Chapel Roads (1998 – 2004). These subdivisions include the street names Donegal Park Drive, Carrick Glen Avenue, Liscooley Drive, Drumbeg Close, Dunaff Place, etc.

As a professional developer, Hugh Green Group wishes to retain an identity with the land long after it has been constructed and communities have been established. The only opportunity to leave an erstwhile mark on the development is by our selection of the street names. The land in this instance has been retained and farmed by the Hugh Green Group of companies since 1996.”

20.     The Applicant’s proposed names and meanings are set out in the tables below:

Table Three: Donegal Glen stages 10A & 10B proposed road names

Road Reference

Proposed Name

Road Type 

Road 6 (Extension)

Proposed to retain existing name

Tir Conaill

Avenue

Road 7 (Extension)

Proposed to retain existing name

Cloonlyon

Drive

Road 8 (Extension)

Proposed to retain existing name

Drumbuoy

Drive

 

Table Four: Donegal Glen stages 10A & 10B proposed road names

Road Reference

Preferred Names

Meaning

ROAD 1

Ballyliffin  Drive

The proposed names come from Hugh Green Limited’s native Ireland and more specifically County Donegal in Ireland’s northwest. The company have developed other sites in the area, with roads which are all also named after towns of County Donegal. The proposed names are in line with this established theme in the local area.

ROAD 2

Clonmany  Road

ROAD 3

Bushfield Drive

ROAD 4

Tannaghmore Drive

ROAD 5

Drumnaconagher Drive

COAL 1

Corveen  Crescent

COAL 2

Cumber  Lane

COAL 3

Glann  Lane

 

21.     The names proposed by the Applicant have been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met and the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region, therefore it is up to the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context.

22.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

23.     All the road types are acceptable for the new private and public roads, suiting the form and layout of the roads, as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

24.     All relevant local iwi were written to (via email) and invited to comment as part of the road naming for Donegal Glen stages 9 and 11. Te Ahiwaru responded, deferring interest to Ngāi Tai ki Tamaki, who in turn did not respond.

25.     No other iwi provided responses or comments. It is therefore implied that no iwi were opposed to the use of any of the proposed names.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     The review sought from the Howick Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome “A Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Māori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand who records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Master and site plan

75

b

Location plans

79

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


 


 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision - Howick Local Board to grant land owner approval for works at 159 Murphys Road and 231 Flat Bush School Road (future Ostrich Farm Sports Fields), including the construction of a stormwater line and outfall

File No.: CP2020/00177

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note that an urgent decision was made to grant land owner approval for works at 159 Murphys Road and 231 Flat Bush School Road (future Ostrich Farm Sports Fields), including the construction of a stormwater line and outfall.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting on 9 December 2019 the Howick Local Board resolved (HW/2019/159) the following in relation to urgent decision-making:

     That the Howick Local Board:

a)      adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirement of a quorum;

b)      delegate authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board;

c)      agree that the relationship manager, chair and deputy chair (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off the authorisation memo;

d)      note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary meeting of the local board.

3.       An urgent decision was required in this instance because the commencement of works was scheduled to take place in January 2020, prior to the next scheduled meeting on Monday 17 February 2020. The memo authorising the use of the urgent decision process is included in this report as Attachment A.

4.       On 17 and 18 December 2019 the chair and deputy chair made an urgent decision on behalf of the board to grant land owner approval for works at 159 Murphys Road and 231 Flat Bush School Road, including the construction of a stormwater line and outfall. The urgent decision is included in this report as Attachment B.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the urgent decision made on 18 December 2019 to grant land owner approval for the proposed stormwater line, batter and tree removals at 159 Murphys Road and 231 Flat Bush School Road.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Authorisation Memo

83

b

Urgent Decision of the Howick Local Board

85

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 



Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision - Howick Local Board to provide feedback on the Auckland Council draft submission Ministry for the Environment's review of the effectiveness of the waste levy

File No.: CP2020/00457

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note that an urgent decision was made to provide local board feedback on the Auckland Council draft submission on the Ministry for the Environment’s review of the effectiveness of the waste levy, to be considered by the political working group delegated the responsibility of approval of the final submission.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting on 9 December 2019 the Howick Local Board resolved (HW/2019/159) the following in relation to urgent decision-making:

     That the Howick Local Board:

a)      adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirement of a quorum;

b)      delegate authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board;

c)      agree that the relationship manager, chair and deputy chair (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off the authorisation memo;

d)      note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary meeting of the local board.

3.       An urgent decision was required in this instance because the feedback needed to be provided by 5pm Wednesday 22 January 2020, prior to the next scheduled meeting on Monday 17 February 2020. Delaying the feedback would mean that it is not considered in the council’s draft submission. The memo authorising the use of the urgent decision process is included in this report as Attachment A.

4.       On 23 January 2020 the chair and deputy chair made an urgent decision on behalf of the board to provide feedback on the Auckland Council draft submission on the Ministry for the Environment’s review of the effectiveness of the waste levy. The urgent decision is included in this report as Attachment B.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the urgent decision made on 23 January 2020 to provide feedback on the Auckland Council draft submission on the Ministry for the Environment’s review of the effectiveness of the waste levy.

b)      note their support for the draft submission on the Ministry for the Environment’s review of the effectiveness of the waste levy and further notes the following:

i.   that council minimise any consequential increase in rates

ii.  further investigation be undertaken to minimise any potential increase in illegal dumping

iii.  council officers investigate alternative methods of waste disposal.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Authorisation Memo

105

b

Urgent Decision of the Howick Local Board

107

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2020/00178

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Howick Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Howick Local Board is in Attachment A.  The calendar is updated monthly, reported to meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities;

·   clarifying what advice is expected and when; and

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar

113

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

Workshop records

File No.: CP2020/00181

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item attaches the workshop records taken for the period stated below.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Order 12.1 workshop records shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed.  No resolutions are passed, or decisions reached but are solely for the provision of information and discussion.

3.       This report attaches the workshop records for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the workshop record for the workshop held on 12 December 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop record 12 December 2019

117

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Vanessa Phillips - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

    

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Howick Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

16        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Howick Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020 - Attachment b - Financial Performance Report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial information that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 31 December 2019 that require final Audit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Ormiston Aquatic and Recreation Centre presentation                                                   Page 123

Item 8.3      Attachment a    Mangemangeroa Valley Reserves Development Plan - Design Recommendation Enlargement Plans Page 129


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 



Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020

 

 


Howick Local Board

17 February 2020