I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Puketāpapa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 20 February 2020

10:00am

Local Board Office
560 Mt Albert Road
Three Kings

 

Puketāpapa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Harry Doig

 

Deputy Chairperson

Julie Fairey

 

Members

Ella Kumar, JP

 

 

Fiona Lai

 

 

Bobby Shen

 

 

Jon Turner

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Selina Powell

Democracy Advisor - Puketāpapa

 

12 February 2020

 

Contact Telephone: 021 531 686

Email: selina.powell@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Auckland Transport February 2020 Report                                                                7

12        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Puketāpapa Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020                                                                                                 13

13        Submission to the Justice Committee on its Inquiry into the 2019 Local Elections                                                                                                                                       49

14        Puketāpapa Local Board feedback on the Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and Related Legislation                                                                                     63

15        Puketāpapa Local Board feedback on the proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity                                                                                              65

16        Auckland Council’s submission to the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill 79

17        Puketāpapa Local Board feedback on the inter-regional marine pest pathway management proposal                                                                                                83

18        Appointment of LGNZ Lead and nominee for LGNZ Conference 2020                 85

19        Urgent Decision - Local Board feedback on the Ministry for the Environment's review of the effectiveness of the waste levy                                                           91

20        Urgent Decision - Local Board feedback on central government's review of the resource management system.                                                                                  95

21        Urgent Decision - Local Board feedback on the Urban Development Bill          109

22        Urgent Decision - Temporary Park Services Provision Plan for temporary occupation of Keith Hay Park by Watercare Services Limited (Watercare)       133

23        Albert-Eden Roskill Ward Councillor Update                                                         169

24        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                171

25        Board Member Reports                                                                                             175

26        Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar                                                197

27        Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes                                          201  

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

29        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               211

12        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Puketāpapa Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020

b.      Attachment B Puketāpapa  Financial Performance (Q2)                             211  

 


1          Welcome

 

Chair Harry Doig will deliver the welcome message.

 

2          Apologies

 

Member E Kumar.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 5 December 2019, as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Puketāpapa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport February 2020 Report

File No.: CP2020/00897

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Puketāpapa Local Board (the Board) on transport related matters in the local board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report updates the Board on regional and local matters including the Auckland Transport (AT) Accessibility Action Plan, Carlton Street works and safety audit, proposed pedestrian improvements on Frost and Carr Roads and the 66 bus route. There are also updates on safety measures in Beagle Avenue and the Dominion Road improvements.

3.       The board is also advised of the funding available for the Local Board Capital fund this term.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport February 2020 report.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       This report addresses transport related matters in the local board area.

5.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. It reports on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in its Local Board Engagement Plan.

6.       This month’s report provides updates on the Carlton Street, Frost and Carr Roads safety improvements, Dominion Road improvements, further safety measures in Beagle Avenue and the 66 bus route issues.

7.       Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport.  Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·    build a transport asset

·    be within the road corridor or if outside the corridor, where there is a clear benefit in terms of supporting alternative means of transport including walking and cycling (eg, shared paths through parks that provide a better/safe/more direct route, between community facilities)

·    be technically deliverable

·    meet transport safety criteria

·    not impact negatively on transport network efficiency

·    be aligned with local board plans

 

 

8.       The Board’s LBTCF allocation for the 2019-22 term is $2,242,983.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Accessibility Safety Plan

9.       The AT Board at its December 2019 meeting adopted an Accessibility Action Plan for the period 2020 to 2022. The plan details what actions AT will undertake over the next three years to improve accessibility.

10.     The plan is reviewed and updated every three years.

11.     Actions currently underway include:

·        In accordance with the principles set out in the Transport Design Manual, take steps to ensure the transport network is safe and accessible for all users by designing, building and maintaining infrastructure (including roads, footpaths, wharves, stations, interchanges and buildings) to ensure that all transport users have equal opportunities to travel.

·        Conduct an accessibility audit when public transport routes are reviewed or redesigned, to include infrastructure and walking access, to identify any accessibility shortfall and recommend areas for improvement as part of the overall network design, and to ensure that information is provided before changes are implemented.

12.     This years’ programme includes:

·        Explore possible accessibility pilot on Link buses and potential to develop for all modes (bus, train and ferry) with potential external partners e.g. Deaf Foundation and Ministry of Social Development, and ascertain funding requirement.

·        Explore concept and estimated costs and prepare a case – a public transport concession fare to support people starting or returning to work; possible link with trade training schemes; possible liaison with Ministry of Social Development

Carlton Street

13.     The physical works in Carlton Street to modify and shift the traffic calming measures are all but complete and were delivered on schedule. There are still some cones present while minor works are undertaken and issues identified in the “snag” list are resolved.

14.     A residents meeting was held on 21 November and was attended by approximately 20 residents, and by local board member Fairey, Councillor Fletcher and AT staff. The primary concerns of residents related to the safety of running a bus service in the street. The outcome of the meeting has led to the commissioning of a further independent safety audit that covers the street, the intersection with Hillsborough Road and the roundabout at the bottom of the street. The terms and scope of the audit were agreed between all parties.

15.       AT commissioned BECA to undertake a safety Audit of the road and intersections. Beca are currently undertaking this work. BECA will be completing the safety audit in February to allow a representative period for the audit to be undertaken, once schools are back. BECA will be presenting their findings in a public forum once the audit is complete at a date suitable for the community and board.

16.     AT undertook not to introduce any services down the road until the outcome of this process.

Frost and Carr Road Safety Improvements

17.     The aim of the safer communities project in Mount Roskill is to make changes to Carr Road and Frost Road which will improve safety for pedestrians and help ensure walking is a desirable option for people.

18.     This project is on track and the contract has been let for the delivery of the Frost and Carr Roads, footpath and safety Improvements.

19.     AT staff are currently working with the contractor on construction methodology, staging and a Traffic Management Plan (TMP). Once these have been finalised the board will be advised, residents will be informed and AT staff will meet with key stakeholders and businesses and schools in particular.

66 Bus Route Service

20.       The 66 Bus runs from Pt Chevalier, through MT Albert, Mt Roskill, Three Kings, Royal Oak, Penrose to Sylvia Park. It is one of a number of cross town services that were introduced to increase the interconnectivity of the network. Many residents and visitors to the board area use this service. On weekdays the frequency of the service is every 15 minutes.

21.       Toward the end of 2019 residents and bus users began complaining about the 66 Bus terminating before it reached its final stop in Coyle Park. The bus was also commencing its run part way along Pt Chevalier Rd. This led to residents at the end of the peninsula and park visitors having to walk a considerable distance.

22.     The drivers started to do this because of illegally parked cars blocking the buses turning circle in the park. Following complaints and queries from board members Council and AT staff began investigating the issue and increasing enforcement.

23.     Parking Enforcement continues to monitor and enforce cars parking illegally at Coyle Park.  In the long weekend, 8 cars were towed, and 27 infringement tickets were issued.  AT is making an effort to deploy officers to the area at peak times (high tides) but don’t have the resources to have an officer permanently sited there. The bus company has raised concerns about the safety of people, and issues caused by cars parking on yellow lines. These are being investigated. In the meantime, the buses operate through the park when able to do so.

Dominion Road Mt Roskill Village Improvements

24.       This is a local board project delivered by Downer for AT. Following the Christmas New Year temporary halt in works Downer is now working on the eastern side of Dominion Road. All excavation works and laying of concrete bases are completed and paving works are progressing well. Implementation of whāriki artwork on Dominion Road carriageway has started and is anticipated for completion by the end of February.

25.     Auckland Transport’s webpage is being updated to reflect the scheduled completion date. The Central Leader community newspaper is likely to run a story about the project, especially the kōhatu (stone seats), in the week commencing 10 February.

Beagle Avenue Improvements

26.     Early in 2019 AT undertook some safety improvements to improve safety on Beagle Ave. This involved the construction of a courtesy crossing (raised crossing) to reduce speed. It is understood that any further measures were not progressed while property issues between Council and AT were resolved. These properties are now being resolved.

27.       Following a query from board member Fairey, AT traffic engineers undertook further monitoring of the traffic and driver behaviour. They observed that the speeds have decreased but that two signs 1 metre either side of the table should be installed to indicate that there is a speed table, along with a supplementary sign further down the road that recommends a speed of 25km while driving over the table. These visual signals also should change driver behaviour.

 

 

Puketapapa Local Board Transport Capital Fund

28.     The sum available for the 2019/22 term is as below

Puketāpapa Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$3,378,854

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$1,133,957

Remaining Budget left

$2,244,897

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     On 20 January 2020 Auckland Transport and Vector announced a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to explore the impacts of the implementation of a fully electrified bus fleet.  The MoU is a direct response to AT’s Low Emission Bus Roadmap, published in late 2018, that outlined its commitment to have all new buses in Auckland being electric from 2025, with the whole fleet fully electric by 2040.

30.     A faster transition to electric buses requires a detailed assessment of the future demand on the electricity network.

31.     Two reports will be produced as part of the MoU, the first exploring a route and service profile, which will model the electricity demand that a fully electrified bus fleet will require. The second report will provide guidance on the electricity network infrastructure upgrades required at each bus depot, as well as likely timings and costs. These two reports are expected to be delivered by June 2020.

32.     Buses make up 87 per cent of the carbon emissions produced from public transport, so converting them from diesel to electric will also be a significant step towards meeting New Zealand’s 2050 zero-carbon emissions goal. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.       The impact of the information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group. Any engagement with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

34.       AT is delivering the Mt Roskill Streetscape project for the Board, who has been assisted to develop the project by Auckland Council’s Planning and Places team.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.     The Board receives update reports from AT as part of its monthly business meeting agendas.

36.     The Board also holds regular workshops with AT between business meetings, with briefing memos provided as necessary.

37.     Local board members may direct queries on issues via electedmember@at.govt.nz.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     Consideration of impacts and opportunities for engagement will be carried out on an individual project basis.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     There are no financial implications that result from receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     The proposed decision of receiving this report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for the transport projects undertaken in the local board area. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     For a number of these issues further updates via memo or workshop will occur before the next business meeting

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Thomas – Elected Members Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Manager Elected Member Relationship Member Unit

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Puketāpapa Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/00762

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Puketāpapa Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter two, 1 October – 31 December 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2019/2020 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        The Integrated Area Plan project (ID 3817) – a political working party has been established and includes members of the Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Boards

·        The Maori Responsiveness project (ID881) – this has focussed on working with Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ngā Maungarongo in quarter two. A regular monthly meeting schedule has been established with the kura to introduce key Auckland Council project staff

·        Healthy Puketāpapa Action Plan (ID883) – community consultation on priorities is complete

·        Waikowhai boardwalk - stage two (ID1976) has received resource consent. Building consent is required.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery (Attachment A). Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk): 

·        ID 2198 Monte Cecilia Park – restore historic whare

·        ID 3641 Belfast Reserve – renew structures and furniture

6.       The financial performance report for the quarter is attached but is excluded from the public. This is due to restrictions on the release of half year financial information until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX on 28 February 2020.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter two ending 31 December 2019.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group half year results are released to the NZX which are expected to be made public by 28 February 2020.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Puketāpapa Local Board has an approved 2019/2020 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Arts, Community and Events;

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation;

·        Libraries and Information;

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew;

·        Community Leases;

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        Plans and Places;

·        The Southern Initiative (TSI);

·        Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development (ATEED).

8.       Work programmes are produced annually, to meet the Puketāpapa Local Board outcomes identified in the three-year Puketāpapa Local Board Plan. The local board plan outcomes are:

·        Connected communities with a sense of belonging

·        Improved wellbeing and safety

·        Thriving local economy and good job opportunities

·        Transport choices meet our varied travel needs

·        Urban development meets community needs

·        Vibrant and popular parks and facilities

·        Treasured and enhanced natural environment

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

 

10.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

11.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

 

Key activity updates from quarter two

12.     The Integrated Area Plan project (ID 3817) –  a political working party has been established and includes members of the Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Board. In quarter three the working party will meet to consider the consultation needed on the plan, which is anticipated to run in tandem with the local board plan engagement.

13.     The Maori Responsiveness project (ID 881) has focussed on Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ngā Maungarongo. A regular monthly meeting schedule has been established with the kura to introduce key Auckland Council project staff and projects, and to provide the opportunity for the kura to input into the Council.

14.     Work on the Healthy Puketāpapa Action Plan (ID 883) progresses with the community being asked to input into a prioritisation exercise. The results of this will be analysed in quarter three.

15.     The second stage of the Waikowhai boardwalk (ID 1976) has received resource consent. A coastal specialist will be contracted to finalise the tender drawings. The next milestone is the lodging of building consent for the boardwalk and tender the project. Physical works are currently planned for late spring 2020.

Activities with significant issues

16.     Monte Cecilia Park (ID 2198) – restore historic whare. The James Wallace Art Trust (JWAT) received funding from the local board in FY19 to investigate the feasibility of fundraising for the restoration of the Whare building. The board is waiting for the JWAT to advise whether they have a need for the Whare. It anticipates that there will be an update in quarter three. The Whare building was recently vandalised and now has construction fencing surrounding it.

17.     Belfast Reserve (ID 3641) – renew structures and furniture. Works on site have been halted due to extensive unforeseen erosion causing significant structural risk. A temporary make-safe solution has been proposed however the team had encountered machinery access issues. A detailed assessment of options to address this issue needs to be completed.

Activities on hold

18.     No work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold.

Changes to the local board work programme

Cancelled activities

19.     These activities are cancelled:

·        Puketāpapa Christmas event (ID 292). This event was cancelled, due to the weather forecast. Most of the budget, approximately $22,000 was spent in preparation for this event.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

21.     Work programmes were approved in June 2019 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

22.     The local board is currently investing in several sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level.

 

These include:

·        EcoNeighbourhoods Puketāpapa (ID 640) – an EcoNeighbourhood is made up of groups of six or more neighbours within a local board area, with a shared objective to adopt sustainable practices and increase resilience within their homes, lifestyles and neighbourhoods. The EcoNeighbourhood group decides what sustainable living actions they wish to undertake, and the project co-ordinator supports these groups to act. A minimum of four EcoNeighbourhoods will be set up in the local board area.

·        Healthy Rentals Puketāpapa (ID 641) - The healthy rentals project aims to raise housing literacy, support tenants to create warmer, drier homes, and reduce energy use and associated carbon emissions. It is targeted at private rental tenants.

·        Puketāpapa Low Carbon Network (ID 646) - The low carbon network is a collection of individuals, households, groups, businesses, operating within the local board area working together to promote, support and implement community level low carbon activities. Through a low carbon community broker, the network will determine the direction of and priority areas they would like to focus on, in accordance with the low carbon plan.

·        Low Carbon Lifestyles Puketāpapa (ID 649) - The project supports householders to lead low carbon lifestyles, with two objectives: to reduce residential energy use and associated carbon emissions and improve resident health by keeping houses warmer and drier. The project involves a doorstep conversation with residents and may also include the provision of energy saving devices.

23.     The board is also investing in initiatives that respond to climate change, such as:

·        Urban Forest/Ngahere Strategy (ID456) – this seeks to increase the amount of urban forest cover. This is the second year of local board specific implementation of Auckland’s Ngahere Strategy.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     This report informs the Puketāpapa Local Board of the performance for quarter two ending 31 December 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     The Puketāpapa Local Board is committed to strengthening and formalising its relationships with mana whenua and mataawaka. “Māori are recognised and affirmed as mana whenua” is an objective within the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2017.

27.     The local board continues to work with the Ngāti Tamaoho Trust to grow the relationship that was formalised in the Relationship Agreement signed in Manukau in July 2018.

28.     The board has included, in its Local Board Plan and work programme, a number of activities which mana whenua have been engaged in. These include:

·        Te Auaunga Placemaking - Mana whenua have been engaged as a partner throughout the development of Te Auaunga Tohu and design guide. Representatives from Te Akitai Waiohua, Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāti Whātua Orākei, Te Kawerau a Maki, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, and Ngāti Whanaunga provided advice to guide development of the design guide at multiple hui. Capital budget is available to progress this plan.

·        Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori Naming of Reserves and Facilities). Work has continued with mana whenua to identify opportunities for Māori names for local parks to enhance and recognise Auckland’s Māori identity and heritage.

·        Build capacity; Māori responsiveness – this project seeks to respond to the key aspirations and priorities for Maori in the Puketāpapa Local Board area.

29.     The board has several projects that seek to restore the mauri of awa, whanga, ngahere and projects that celebrate Te Ao Maori:

Te Auaunga Weed Control and Volunteer Planting - focusses on plant pest control and riparian planting for Te Auaunga

Increasing local employment through Freeland Reserve stream restoration project – seeks to use a local nursery (Te Whangai Trust) to provide landscaping for this project. This will support local social outcomes and connection to the awa

Community Management Plan for Te Auaunga and Mt Roskill schools – this involves the development of a restoration plan for the pars of Te Auaunga that run through Mt Roskill Primary, Mt Roskill Intermediate and Mt Roskill Grammar

Ecological Volunteers and Environmental Programme – with contractor assistance Friends of Wairaki Stream have cleared areas of persistent weeds and planted 1100 trees at Lynfield Reserve

Manukau Harbour Forum – the board participates in this co-governance forum to restore the mauri of the whanga

Ngahere Strategy – seeks to increase the amount of urban forest cover

Te Manu Aute Kite Day - celebrates Matariki on Puketāpapa/Pukewiwi maunga

Whakatipu i te reo Māori – this libraries programme celebrates Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori.

30.     The local board seeks to acknowledge Te Ao Māori and tikanga through karakia before meal breaks, special meetings/workshops with mana whenua on key projects of mutual interest, and blessings when large local board projects are undertaken or concluded in the community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

32.     Auckland Council (Council) currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of half year financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX on 28 February. Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is excluded from the public.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

34.     The approved Community Facilities 2019/2020 work programme and 2020-2022 indicative work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the 2019/2020 financial year, by ensuring that if projects intended for delivery in the 2019/2020 financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances, that other projects can be progressed while the causes for delays are addressed.

35.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section of this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter three (31 March 2020).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Puketāpapa Work Programme Update (Q2)

21

b

Attachment B Puketāpapa  Financial Performance (Q2)   - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mary Hay - Local Board Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authorisers

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Submission to the Justice Committee on its Inquiry into the 2019 Local Elections

File No.: CP2020/01485

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the local board to provide comment on Auckland Council’s draft submission to the Justice Committee on its inquiry into the 2019 Local Elections, liquor licensing trust elections, and recent energy trust elections. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In December 2019 the Justice Committee notified its inquiry into the 2019 local elections, liquor licensing trust elections, and recent energy trust elections. The closing date for submissions on this matter is 29 February 2020.

3.       The Committee’s terms of reference include matters relating to the 2019 elections, in particular:

·    Low voter turnout

·    Liquor licensing trusts

·    Council staff releasing information that may affect the election outcome

·    Disclosure of candidates having serious criminal convictions

·    Irregularities that could have compromised the fairness of the elections

4.       The Committee also invites feedback on its recommendations arising from the inquiry into the 2016 elections, in particular:

·    Electoral Commission to have responsibility for running local elections

·    Same voting system to be used for all elections

·    Foreign interference

5.       Auckland Council is preparing a submission on this inquiry. The draft submission is attached to this report (Attachment A).

6.       Feedback from the Puketāpapa Local Board is required by 20 February so that it can be considered within the Auckland Council submission. A report will then be provided to the Governing Body on 27 February.

7.       The report to the Governing Body will note the outcome of submissions made to the 2016 inquiry, outlines recommended responses to the Committee’s terms of reference, identifies recommended responses to other recommendations made by 2016 inquiry (disclosure of interests, probity and Māori wards) and adds recommendations in regard to election issues not yet considered by the Committee, namely:

·    a review of representation arrangements and council’s desire to have discretion to review the number of councillors

·    the timing of a poll if one is required as the result of a petition.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on Auckland Council’s draft submission to the Justice Committee on its inquiry into the 2019 Local Elections, liquor licensing trust elections, and recent energy trust elections. 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Council's Draft Submission to Inquiry into 2019 Local Elections

51

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben  Moimoi - Local Board Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

 

The Committee Secretariat

Justice Committee

Parliament Buildings

WELLINGTON

 

 

 

DRAFT SUBMISSION OF THE AUCKLAND COUNCIL TO THE JUSTICE COMMITTEE INQUIRY INTO THE 2019 LOCAL ELECTIONS AND LIQUOR LICENSING TRUST ELECTIONS, AND RECENT ENERGY TRUST ELECTIONS. 

Introduction

1.1         This is the Auckland Council submission to the Justice Committee’s Inquiry into the 2019 Local Elections and Liquor Licensing Trust Elections, and Recent Energy Trust Elections.  Auckland Council welcomes the opportunity to provide comments for consideration by the Committee.

1.2         The address for service is Auckland Council, Private Bag 92300, Victoria Street West, Auckland 1142.

1.3         Please direct any enquiries to Warwick McNaughton, Principal Advisor and Deputy Electoral Officer, Democracy Services , phone 021 191 1009 or email: warwick.mcnaughton@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz.

1.4         Auckland Council wishes to appear before the Justice Select Committee to discuss this submission.

1.5         Auckland Council local boards have provided feedback into this submission and their comments are appended.

2         Background

2.1         Auckland Council is responsible for local government elections in its area, which comprises a total of 1,065,383 electors.  The 2019 elections for Auckland Council involved 170 elected member positions:

·    one mayor

·    20 governing body members, elected on a ward basis

·    149 local board members for 21 local boards

2.2         Elections for three district health boards and four licensing trusts were held at the same time.

2.3         The Council’s submission sets out recommendations in respect of:

(i)          matters raised in the Committee’s terms of reference regarding the 2019 elections:

·    low voter turnout

·    liquor licensing trusts

·    the role of council staff

·    disclosure of candidates or members with serious criminal convictions

·    irregularities

(ii)         matters raised in the Committee’s terms of reference regarding its recommendations arising from its report on the 2016 local elections:

·    Electoral Commission to be responsible for local elections

·    Same electoral system in all elections

·    Foreign interference

(iii)         additional matters for consideration by the Committee:

·    disclosure of interests

·    probity

·    Māori wards

·    Review of representation arrangements

·    Timing of polls for creation of a Māori ward or change of electoral system

3         Low voter turnout

3.1         Auckland Council has undertaken research into voter awareness in conjunction with the 2013, 2016 and 2019 elections.  The following are highlights from the survey results that might be of assistance to the Committee in its investigation into low voter turnout.

3.2         After the 2019 elections a random sample of 1,871 Aucklanders were surveyed online. The survey tested respondents’ awareness of advertising and included questions relating to whether they voted or not. Of those who did not vote (643), the top four reasons given for not voting were:

·    “I didn’t know anything about the candidates” 11%

·    “I forgot to vote” 11%

·    “I did not know when voting finished, missed the deadline” 10%

·    “I was away from home over the voting period” 8%

3.3         Of those who did not vote, 25% had filled in all or part of their voting documents but did not cast their vote.  The top four reasons given were:

·    “I didn’t send it off in time / ran out of time” 29%

·    “I forgot to send / complete it” 21%

·    “I had other commitments during that time” 17%

·    “I didn’t know anything about the candidates” 8%

3.4         Non-voters were asked “What could Auckland Council do to encourage you to vote?”.  The top four (unprompted) replies were:

·    “Have online voting” 19%

·    “It was my own fault” 8%

·    “More advertising” 7%

·    “Send reminders and notifications by post / email / txt” 7%

3.5         All respondents were asked whether they preferred online voting or postal voting if they had the choice. 66% preferred online voting and 26% preferred postal voting.

3.6         Of non-voters, 28% said they would have been more likely to vote if it had been booth voting.

3.7         Research was also undertaken into the impact of different messaging on voter behaviour. The most effective message was a social norm message “74% of Aucklanders are planning to vote. Join them and vote this election!”.  As compared with other messages such as a message of concern about low voter turnout, this had a more positive effect.  This indicates election administrators should be cautious about negative messaging such as highlighting low voter turnout.

3.8         Survey results are being written up for publishing onto the council’s website knowledgeauckland.govt.nz

3.9         Auckland Council held 50 one-stop shop events which provided people the ability to enrol (the Electoral Commission attended) and to cast special votes.  Our experience of these could be described as “social voting”.  A lot of people made use of them, enrolled then sat down to complete their voting documents.  Typically, venues where the one-stop shops were held were packed with people wanting to vote.

3.10       Another project was “Vote Friday” through which business organisations gave staff time to fill out voting documents at work.  60 organisations, representing 55,000 employees, took part.

3.11       One of the answers to lifting turnout might include a multi-modal approach which does not seek to identify just one way for voting but develops options for voters.  For example:

·    Postal voting

·    Booth voting

·    Advance voting

·    One-stop shops

·    Vote Friday

·    Marae-based

·    Ballot boxes at convenient locations such as supermarkets

·    Online voting (once considered secure)    

Recommendations

3.12       Note the research conducted by Auckland Council which is available on knowledgeauckland.govt.nz.

3.13       Note the successful initiatives undertaken by Auckland Council including: Vote Friday and One-stop Shops.

3.14       Consider that the response to low voter turnout may best be through a multi-modal approach which provides voters with options.

4         Liquor licensing trusts

4.1         Licensing trusts are established under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 (or the earlier Sale of Liquor Act 1989 and continued under the 2012 Act). The Law Commission, when it reviewed alcohol legislation prior to the 2012 Act, noted that licensing trusts were well supported by their communities and there was the ability for the community to petition for those trusts with monopoly powers to become competitive.  It recommended no change to the law around licensing trusts.

4.2         Of the licensing trusts in the Auckland area, only the Portage and Waitakere Licensing Trusts have the sole right to establish and operate on-licences in hotels and taverns, and off-licences in their districts.  The other licensing trusts are the Birkenhead, Mt Wellington and Wiri Licensing Trusts.

4.3         The aspect of licensing trusts that impinges on election administration the most relates to trust areas. Because these are not aligned with local government areas there are 26 more permutations of voting packs required in the Auckland Council area.

4.4         An example is the Birkenhead Licensing Trust.  This was constituted in 1967 with its area being the whole of the then borough of Birkenhead.   The area has not changed since then.

4.5         Any change to the western trust boundaries would have implications in terms of existing licences.  However it may be possible to align the boundaries of the other three trusts, say with local board boundaries.  Auckland Council has not considered this in detail.

4.6         Apart from the issues around trust areas, the election of trust members adds complexity to the voting documents used for council elections

Recommendations

4.7         Note that with the passage of time trust boundaries no longer align with local government boundaries in the Auckland area and this creates complexity in terms of the number of different combinations of voting documents that are required.

5         The role of council staff

5.1         The Committee’s terms of reference include the role of council staff during election periods around decisions to release or not release information or any public statements that may be construed to affect the election outcome.

5.2         Auckland Council staff were involved in three types of scenarios regarding requests for information:

(i)         Ordinary requests for information from the public which are dealt with under the procedures in the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA), which clearly states that decisions on requests are made by the chief executive.  There was no change to normal procedures.

(ii)        Requests for information from candidates.  Staff noted that researching information for use by a candidate could be perceived as council resources being used for benefit of an election candidate.  Given that LGOIMA still applied in such situations and requests for information had to be met, responses to requests for information from candidates were published to the website so the information would be available to all candidates.  Staff also considered it was useful for candidates and the electorate to have factual information rather than be misinformed.

(iii)       Proactive media statements of fact.  If a candidate continues to make public statements that are factually incorrect, there may be the need to correct that through the media, particularly if there are incorrect allegations about council operations. However such statements should be the exception - staff should not be involved in political debate.

5.3         Auckland Council considers there is no need for legislative change.

6         Disclosure of candidates or members with serious criminal convictions

6.1         Under the Local Government Act 2002, an elected member will lose their position if convicted of an offence punishable by a term of imprisonment of two years or more.  However, there is no requirement to disclose such offences if standing for election – there is no criminal check undertaken.

6.2         One argument is that all candidates are subject to the ballot box and a candidate who has committed serious crime in the past is unlikely to be elected.

6.3         An alternative approach is to amend the Local Electoral Act 2001 to apply to candidates the provisions in the Local Government Act 2002 for sitting members. So that not only is a sitting member disqualified but a person is prevented from standing if they have had a criminal conviction of the same type of offence (unless their record has been wiped by the clean slate provisions).  If this alternative approach is taken then a candidate would need to declare on their nomination form that they are not prevented from standing by this requirement.

Recommendation

6.4         Amend the Local Electoral Act 2001 to align with the Local Government Act 2002, schedule 7, clause 1, with the effect that a person is not eligible for election if they have been previously convicted of an offence punishable by a term of imprisonment of 2 years or more (unless their record has been wiped by the clean slate provisions).

7         Irregularities

7.1         The Committee’s terms of reference include irregularities that could have compromised the fairness of the elections.

7.2         Auckland Council is not aware of any irregularities in the Auckland Council elections.

8         Inquiry into 2016 local elections

8.1         The Auckland Council made a number of requests of the Committee in its submission to the inquiry into the 2016 local elections and notes that the Committee’s recommendations in its report support many of the council’s recommendations.

8.2         The following comments address the feedback the Committee has requested in terms of its key recommendations arising from the 2016 inquiry.

9         Electoral Commission to be responsible for local elections

9.1         The options for the Electoral Commission (“Commission”) being responsible for local elections range along a spectrum from the Commission being responsible for a few key aspects working collaboratively with local authorities, to the Commission being totally responsible. The Committee’s recommendation is that the Commission should be responsible for running all aspects of local elections.

Centralisation vs decentralisation

9.2         Parliament devolves responsibilities to local government when it is more important for local communities to decide matters than it is to have national consistency. The notions of subsidiarity and localism are important to local government.

9.3         However, these considerations do not apply to the same extent to decision-making about elections.  Local political decision-making around the running of elections should be minimised.  Local politicians should not be too involved in making decisions about elections because they themselves may be candidates.  It is considered best practice for local politicians to be at arms-length from the running of elections.

9.4         However, it is important that local community characteristics are reflected in the administration of local elections (for example translation into languages that are appropriate for a local community).  A “one size fits all” needs careful consideration.

Efficiencies

9.5         There are efficiency benefits from centralising election administration:

9.6         Reduce or eliminate duplication among councils. For example, rather than each council’s web team developing web pages for candidates and voters there might be only one central web-based information portal for the whole country (as for parliamentary elections).  Likewise, there might be just one branding for the whole country.

9.7         Provide a permanent team focussed on elections.  Currently each council has to budget for local elections happening on a three-yearly cycle.  For Auckland Council this has also meant engaging temporary additional staff for the elections who develop expertise in running elections then who leave after the election is over.  Although the Commission also has to engage additional staff for each triennial election, it has a core team which is permanent.

9.8         Those who are responsible for the electoral roll would also be responsible for running local elections. Currently, local elections are run by councils who must use the electoral roll which is administered by the Commission.  For the 2019 elections there was excellent collaboration between the council and the Commission.  However, collaboration needs to be a conscious effort and making the Commission responsible for both the electoral roll and the local elections could create synergies. The Electoral Commission, as part of its responsibility for the electoral roll, undertakes awareness raising in the community to ensure people enrol and update their details. If the commission already has community engagement processes in place, it could use these to raise awareness for local elections as well.

9.9         Consistent development of legislation.  Currently legislation for central and local elections is comprised in two separate statutes and regulations. This is not a problem in itself, but developments of the legislation in order to bring about improvements happens as the result of separate organisations making submissions regarding separate legislation. There have been occasions in the past where the Commission has achieved improvements in its legislation, but these do not flow through to local electoral legislation (one example being the ability to vote from overseas).

Issues

9.10       An issue related to local elections is the review of representation arrangements. For Parliamentary elections a Representation Commission undertakes a review of boundaries.  It would be a significant undertaking for the Representation Commission to undertake the review for all local authorities.  Even though incumbent members might be seen as having an interest in electoral boundaries, local councils are best placed to propose changes to boundaries due to their knowledge of communities of interest in their area. The representation review is a process where representation is decided by a council in conjunction with its community, and if the community appeals, the final determination is made by the Local Government Commission.  The review should be retained as a community-based process led by the community’s council.  The discretion around establishing Māori wards should become part of the representation review (it should be a local consideration rather than decided centrally by a Representation Commission).

9.11       Another issue is the candidate nomination process.  Currently candidates bring in their nominations physically to a council office for processing.  For Parliamentary elections, individual nominations are lodged with electorate returning officers who are employed on a short-term basis for each Parliamentary election and who establish an electorate office for the election. (Alternatively party secretaries send nominations to the Commission in Wellington for processing.) Following an election the electorate office is closed.  Whether the Commission retains returning officers to also cover local elections or appoints a council employee or an election service provider as returning officers just for local elections may be options.  Another alternative is legislative change to allow nominations to be submitted electronically. This is noted as a matter of operational detail.

9.12       One feature of local elections is the candidate profile booklet.  While some voters say this does not tell them much about candidates, it is better than nothing.  Surveys show clearly that lack of information about candidates is a key deterrent for voters – voters do not have meaningful information with which to make voting decisions.  Any move to centralise elections and amalgamate the legislation should retain candidate profile statements.

9.13       There are two providers of election services who have developed considerable expertise and resources for conducting local elections.  Those resources and expertise should be recognised. The Commission may choose to use their services for any local elections for which it is responsible.  A move to centralising the administration of local elections does not necessarily mean the services of these providers will no longer be required. This is noted as a matter of operational detail.

9.14       The Commission is funded out of Vote Justice (the current estimate is $46 million). This is expressed as services purchased by the Minister of Justice.  If the Commission provides additional services to the Minister for conducting local government elections there is a question of whether these additional services result in some form of levy on local government and, if so, how it is calculated.  The fairest form of any levy might be one based on providing minimal core services so that those councils who do not require more value-added services are not charged for something they do not need. If the Commission provides only core services, some councils might wish to supplement what the Commission provides with additional services (for example, council websites providing local information, additional participation campaigns).

9.15       Any centralised arrangement must recognise differences at the local level, particularly in terms of demographics. Branding, collateral, images and translations must be relevant to the local communities.  The Commission should collaborate with local council staff over appropriateness.

Effect on the voter experience

9.16       A decision on centralising local elections should consider its effect on voters and voter turnout.

9.17       There is anecdotal evidence that some voters find the current system confusing. For example, the Commission receives calls from voters who did not know they should be contacting the council’s local electoral officer.  

9.18       A voter who changes residence and forgets to update the electoral roll through the Commission, will blame the council when they do not receive their voting documents.  Voters sometimes do not understand that the electoral roll is not maintained by the council.

9.19       Candidates currently lodge their nominations with the council electoral officer.  However, if there is a problem with the eligibility of nominees then that must be taken up instead with the Commission if the problem relates to the electoral roll.

9.20       Participation campaigns are currently conducted by the Commission and councils separately.  The Commission conducts a campaign to ensure people are enrolled to vote.  Councils conduct campaigns to encourage people to vote. The commission could use its campaigning for enrolment to also encourage people to vote in local elections.

9.21       It is intuitive that a simplification of the process from the voter’s perspective might facilitate greater turnout, though there is no guarantee.  There are no obvious aspects of moving to the commission that would be likely to work the other way – that is, that might lead to lower turnout. 

Recommendation

9.22       Further investigate the Committee’s recommendation for the Electoral Commission to conduct local elections.

10       Same electoral system (FPP or STV) in all elections

10.1       In its submission into the inquiry into the 2016 local elections the council noted the complexity created by holding the District Health Board elections in conjunction with the council elections.

10.2       The council advocated moving these elections to a different year, but the Committee, in its report, noted there are efficiencies in holding these elections together.  Instead, the Committee has recommended requiring all elections to use the same electoral system as a response to this complexity.

10.3       The council also notes that additional complexity is created by the council, district health boards and licensing trusts making different decisions about order of names on voting documents.  This should also be standardised.

Recommendations

10.4       Amend legislation to the effect that all elections run in conjunction with the elections of a territorial authority use the same electoral system and the same order of names on voting documents.

11       Foreign interference

11.1       The council has noted the Committee’s recommendations and supports them.

12       Disclosure of interests

12.1       The Committee’s report notes inconsistencies between the requirements for Parliamentarians and for local authority members in terms of declaring interests and makes recommendations that Government should introduce legislation setting out requirements for local authority members.

12.2       The existing legislation that applies to local authority members is the Local Authorities (Members Interests) Act 1965.  This has been noted for some years as needing a complete review.  In particular, section 3 provides for a person to be ineligible to be an elected member if they have an interest in a contract with the local authority of over $25,000 per annum.   Most contracts of that amount are let by staff under delegated authority and members do not participate in those decisions yet their eligibility for office might be affected. 

12.3       The Committee’s report also notes that maintaining a register of interests is ad hoc – some councils include this in their code of conduct and others do not.

Recommendations

12.4       Review the Local Authorities (Members Interests) Act 1965.

12.5       Provide a consistent framework across all local authorities for registers of interests.

13       Probity

13.1       The Council notes that the Auditor-General is responsible for monitoring the use of public funds and public property and had published guidelines about communications and the use of council resources during the pre-election period but withdrew these guidelines during the 2019 pre-election period.  There is now a lack of guidelines for providing consistent action by councils during this period. 

Recommendation

13.2       Auditor-General to republish guidelines on the use of council resources during the pre-election period.

14       Māori wards

14.1       The Council notes the consideration of the Committee given to the petition of Andrew Judd and records its current resolved position in regard to Māori wards:

That the Governing Body:

a)       … reiterate to government the position adopted by Council in 2015 supporting the need for legislative change to allow Auckland to determine the number of members on the Governing Body and subject to that, agree in principle to establish a Māori ward and request for a consistent policy regarding Māori representation in line with legislation governing the composition of Parliament.

15       Review of representation arrangements

15.1       As part of the election process, councils are required to conduct a review of representation arrangements at least every six years.

15.2       Every other council can review the number of its councillors but the number of councillors on the Auckland Council governing body is set at 20 in the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009.

15.3       Problems relating to this came to light in the review of representation arrangements for the 2019 elections. A workable option to address the under-representation in the Waitemata and Gulf ward would have been to increase the number of councillors but this option was not available.

15.4       As noted above, this restriction also affects decisions around the creation of Māori wards.

Recommendation

15.5       Amend the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 to remove the specification that Auckland Council’s governing body will comprise 20 members in addition to the mayor so that Auckland Council has the same discretion as any other council to review its membership.

16       Timing of polls for creation of a Māori ward or change of electoral system

16.1       The current provisions in the Local Electoral Act 2001 for the council to resolve to change the electoral system (for example from FPP to STV) or to establish a Māori ward, allow for a petition for a poll of the community to be conducted.  The Local Electoral Act requires the chief executive to advise the electoral officer as soon as practicable once a valid petition is received.  If notice is received by 21 February in the year prior to the election, the electoral officer must conduct the poll within 89 days of receiving notice from the chief executive.

16.2       In the case of Auckland Council, conducting a standalone poll of over 1 million electors costs over $1 million.

16.3       By contrast, the council has the discretion to initiate its own poll and may choose to hold a poll in conjunction with an election, which would lower the cost.

Recommendation

16.4       Amend the Local Electoral Act 2001 so that if a petition for a poll in respect of a resolution relating to Maori wards or change of electoral system is received by 21 February in the year prior to an election, a council has the discretion to conduct a poll in conjunction with the next triennial elections.

17       Conclusion

17.1       The Council looks forward to appearing before the committee to speak to its recommendations.

17.2       Some of the Auckland Council local boards asked for their comments to be forwarded in to the committee and these are attached.


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Puketāpapa Local Board feedback on the Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and Related Legislation

File No.: CP2020/00389

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal local board input into Auckland Council’s submission on the government’s ‘Death, Funerals, Burial and Cremation: a Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and Related Legislation’.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ministry for Health is reviewing New Zealand’s legislation relating to death, burial, cremation and funerals in New Zealand.

3.       The purpose of this review is to update relevant legislation so that it is modernised, fit-for-purpose, reflects general trends in society and is compatible with other legislative documents. The affected legislation includes the Burial and Cremation Act 1964, Cremation Regulations 1973 and the Health (Burial) Regulations 1946.

4.       In November 2019 the Ministry released a consultation document titled: ‘Death, Funerals, Burial and Cremation: a Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and Related Legislation’ (Attachment A). Submissions on this consultation are due on 10 April 2020.

5.       Auckland Council is preparing a submission on this review. This submission will be approved under delegation by the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Parks Arts Community and Events Committee in March 2020.

6.       Formal local board feedback on this review is due by 5pm on 28 February 2020 and will be appended to the Auckland Council submission.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      provide input into Auckland Council’s submission on the government’s ‘Death, Funerals, Burial and Cremation: a Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and Related Legislation’.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and related legislation (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben  Moimoi - Local Board Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Puketāpapa Local Board feedback on the proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity

File No.: CP2020/00334

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal input from the Puketāpapa Local Board into Auckland Council’s submission on the proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ministry for the Environment has released He Kura Koiora i hokia: A discussion document on a proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity, including proposed wording for the national policy statement. 

3.       The National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity provides detailed direction on maintaining indigenous biodiversity, including identification and protection of significant indigenous biodiversity, under the Resource Management Act 1991. 

4.       The proposed National Policy Statement is intended to provide consistency for council’s interpreting and applying the RMA provisions relating to indigenous biodiversity. This includes protecting significant indigenous vegetation and habitats for fauna and to maintain indigenous biodiversity. 

5.       Council staff have prepared a summary of the proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity (Attachment A) and highlighted key themes for the Council submission (Attachment B).

6.       Previously, in September 2019, the board provided feedback on Te Koiroa o te Koiora, the government’s discussion document on proposals for a biodiversity strategy. This feedback supported the vision and outcomes and noted the urgency to restore and prevent permanent loss of biodiversity.

7.       The deadline for local board feedback is 3 March 2020. Council’s Submission will be approved by the Planning Committee on 5 March and lodged before 13 March 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      Provide input into Auckland Council’s submission on the proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2020 Summary of the proposed National Policy Statement of Indigenous Biodviversity

67

b

2020 Key themes of NPS Indegenous Biodiversity AC draft submission

71

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mary Hay - Local Board Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Auckland Council’s submission to the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill

File No.: CP2020/00758

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal input from the Puketāpapa Local Board into Auckland Council’s submission to the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill is a new way of funding and financing local infrastructure by providing a tool that is independent of local authorities.  The Bill proposes that finance is raised for infrastructure projects (or bundles of projects) through a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV), which is a stand-alone entity.

3.       The SVP will support urban development projects to begin sooner than council funding for infrastructure allows. It will also help to make the cost of new infrastructure more transparent and will spread the costs by way of a levy so the cost falls primarily on the landowners who benefit, including over time and across generations. 

4.       The levy would be in place until the infrastructure is paid off by those who are expected to benefit. When a property is sold, the new owner would pay the levy. This levy would be collected by councils via their normal rates collection mechanisms on behalf of the SPV. 

5.       All infrastructure assets built using the tool would transfer to the relevant public body.  In most circumstances this will be a council, who will be responsible for the ongoing operation and maintenance of the new assets.  Prior to an agreement on an SPV proposal, endorsement will be sought from the council. 

6.       This tool will work alongside other related central government initiatives such as the Urban Development Bill. 

7.       A summary document on the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill can be found in Attachment A.

8.       Council’s submission will be approved by the Planning Committee on 5 March and submitted before 9 March 2020. Local board feedback will be appended to the Council submission.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      provide input into Auckland Council’s submission to the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Summary of document on the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill

81

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mary Hay - Local Board Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Puketāpapa Local Board feedback on the inter-regional marine pest pathway management proposal

File No.: CP2020/01420

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal input from the Puketāpapa Local Board into the inter-regional marine pest pathway management proposal.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Pathway management plans allow councils to manage the way pests are transported from one place to another, with an overall goal to avoid or minimise potential wide-ranging negative impacts. A potential pathway management plan will be complementary to existing and proposed marine biosecurity measures under Auckland’s Regional Pest Management Plan and Auckland’s Unitary Plan.

3.       In the marine environment ‘pathway’ often means boats, as movement of hull-fouled boats is the single biggest risk for marine pest transfer. The identified approaches included in the consultation focused on potential rules for hull fouling, which means that boat users will be most affected by any changes proposed through a marine pest pathway management plan.

4.       Informal public consultation on potential approaches for inter-regional marine pest pathway management was undertaken between 18 March and 24 May 2019 in four regions: Northland, Auckland, Waikato and Bay of Plenty.

5.       The consultation results showed:

·        a preference to develop consistent rules for managing boat hull-fouling across the four regions

·        a preference for a requirement to have a clean hull at all times

·        regional differences with the preferences of Northland submitters being notably difference to other regions. Northland submitters wanted alternative management options for managing marine pests

·        nine key feedback themes were identified, with the top three being practicality and compliance issues; allocation and distribution of costs, and the need for a national pathways plan.

6.       Auckland Council staff are currently analysing options. This will identify a preferred option for marine pest pathway management. Staff will collate further supporting evidence through the Top of the North Marine Biosecurity working group.

7.       Staff will workshop this proposal with the local board on 13 February 2020 to provide an overview and seek informal feedback. This report provides an opportunity to formalise that feedback.

8.       Staff will present a report to the Environment and Climate Change Committee at its 12 March 2020 meeting. This will seek approval to start the statutory process for development of an inter-regional marine pest pathway management plan under the Biosecurity Act, including the preferred option.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      provide input into the inter-regional marine pest pathway management proposal.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mary Hay - Local Board Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Appointment of LGNZ Lead and nominee for LGNZ Conference 2020

File No.: CP2020/01111

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To appoint a lead for Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) matters and nominate a representative to attend the 2020 LGNZ Annual Conference and General Meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards are invited to appoint a lead (and alternate) on Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) matters. The lead will be the main contact for all LGNZ issues and will represent the local board at meetings of Auckland/LGNZ zone and any related meetings.

3.       The LGNZ Annual Conference and General Meeting (AGM) takes place at the ASB Theatre Marlborough in Waiharakeke Blenheim from 8am Thursday 16 July to 3pm Saturday 18 July 2020.

4.       Local boards are invited to nominate a representative to attend the LGNZ conference. This can be the local board appointed LGNZ lead or another member of the local board. Given the cost of and overall numbers of elected member attendance, staff recommend that one member per local board attend.

a)      In addition to the official delegates, LGNZ requires prior notice of which local board members plan to attend the AGM.  Members who wish to attend the AGM must provide their names to the Democracy Services Business Hub team by Friday 17 April 2020 to ensure that they are registered with Local Government New Zealand.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

b)      appoint a lead and alternate for LGNZ related matters for the 2019-2022 triennium and task these members with representing the local board at Auckland/LGNZ meetings.

c)      nominate one elected member per local board to attend the Local Government New Zealand 2020 Conference and Annual General Meeting in Waiharakeke Blenheim, Thursday 16 July to Saturday 18 July 2020.

d)      confirm that conference attendance including travel and accommodation will be paid for in accordance with the current Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy.

e)      note that any members who wish to attend the AGM must provide their names to the Democracy Services Business Hub team by Friday 17 April 2020 to ensure that they are registered with Local Government New Zealand.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       LGNZ is an incorporated society of local government organisations whose primary objective is to represent and advocate for the interests of local authorities in New Zealand. LGNZ champions policy positions on key issues that are of interest to local government and holds regular meetings and events throughout the year for members. The schedule of meetings includes an annual conference and meetings of local government geographical clusters (known as LGNZ zones) and sectors.

6.       LGNZ is governed by a National Council made up of representatives from member authorities as outlined in the constitution. Some of its work is conducted through committees and working groups which include representatives from member auhorities.

7.       Elected members who have been formally appointed to LGNZ roles are:

Elected Member

Appointed role

Mayor Phil Goff

National Council representative for Auckland

Auckland Council representative on the Metropolitan Sector Group

Councillor Pippa Coom

Local Board Member Richard Northey

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by Governing Body)

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by local boards)

Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore

Auckland Council representative on Regional Sector

 

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

8.       As part of recent changes to the LGNZ Rules, Auckland Council is no longer part of LGNZ Zone 1 but is expected to organize itself, with its multiple local boards and Governing Body, as an informal LGNZ zone.

9.       Meetings of the Auckland/LGNZ zone have been scheduled on a biannual basis. These meetings will be co-chaired by the two Auckland representatives appointed to the LGNZ National Council by the Governing Body (Councillor Pippa Coom) and local boards’ (Member Richard Northey).

10.     Meetings of the Auckland/LGNZ zone will be open to all elected members but formal representation will sit with the nominated leads.

LGNZ Annual conference and AGM 2020

11.     This year the LGNZ conference and AGM will be held at the ASB Theatre Marlborough, Waiharakeke Blenheim, Thursday 16 July to Saturday 18 July 2020.

12.     The conference takes place over the first two days commencing at 9.30am on Thursday 16 July 2020 and closing with the LGNZ Excellence Awards on the evening of Friday 17 July 2020.

13.     The conference programme has the theme “Natural Capital”. The final programme will be publicly available at the end of February however we have had indication from LGNZ that the programme is expected to include addresses from the Prime Minister, various political leaders and President of LGNZ as well as sessions on the following topics

·   Natural capital - the Marlborough story

·   Fishes in the river, fishes in the sea (Water, aquaculture and the Resource Management Act)

·   Tourism – working together to care for people, place and culture

·   Building towards sustainable supply (housing)

·   Resilience in the face of natural hazards (infrastructure and communities)

·   Cultural wellbeing plenary session

·   Interactive workshops on cultural, economic, environmental and social well-being

·   Tours, showcases and dinners.

14.     The AGM takes place on the last day of the conference from 9.30am to 12.30pm.  The LGNZ constitution permits the Auckland Council to appoint four delegates to represent it at the AGM, with one of the delegates being appointed as presiding delegate.

15.     Traditionally the four AGM delegates have been the Mayor, the Chief Executive and two Governing Body members who hold LGNZ roles. Delegates in 2019 were Mayor Phil Goff, Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore, Councillor Penny Hulse and Local board Chair Pippa Coom.

16.     The Governing Body will consider an item on AGM attendance at its meeting on 27 March 2020 which includes the recommendation that Mayor Phil Goff be the presiding delegate and the other three delegates be comprised of either:

a)         two members of the Governing Body who hold a formal representation role with LGNZ and the Chief Executive; or

b)         one member of the Governing Body who holds a formal representation role with LGNZ and the Chief Executive, and a local board member; or

c)         two members of the Governing Body who hold a formal representation role with LGNZ and a local board member.

17.     In addition to the official delegates, LGNZ requires prior notice of which local board members plan to attend the AGM. Attendance at the AGM is not compulsory for conference participants.

Pre-conference meetings

18.     On Wednesday 15 July 2020, there will be a pre-conference meeting of the National Council as well as a Te Maruata Hui. Elected members that are on these two groups and wish to attend these meetings would need to arrive earlier than other meeting participants.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

19.     Local boards are requested to appoint a lead for the 2019-2022 triennium. The lead’s responsibilities include:

·   attend and represent the local board at meetings of Auckland/LGNZ zone and other LGNZ meetings, as appropriate

·   be the main contact for the local board on all LGNZ matters

·   share information from Auckland/LGNZ and other LGNZ-related meetings attended with the local board.

LGNZ Annual conference and AGM 2020

20.     In 2020, with the venue in Waiharakeke, Blenheim and given the cost and overall numbers of elected member attendance, it is recommended that one member per local board attend. Having one attendee per local board means a maximum of 21 Auckland Council local board members would attend the conference.

21.     The annual conference and AGM are two separate meeting sessions.

22.     Local board members are invited to attend and take part in the conference.

23.     For the AGM, member authorities will be represented by officially appointed delegates. Members who are not appointed delegates can attend as observers provided they are included in the AGM registration form. Local board members who wish to attend the AGM as observers must register their intention with the Democracy Services Business Hub team by Friday 17 April 2020 so that their names can be included on the AGM registration form.

24.     Local board members who attend the conference and/or AGM are strongly encouraged to report back to their local boards on proceedings at the conference. This ensures members who do not attend can still benefit from this opportunity.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     Conferences and events involving multiple participants especially those requiring long distance travel can generate a sizable carbon footprint. This is due to emissions associated with flights, car and taxi travel, hotel and event site emissions.

26.     Estimates for emissions associated with travel to Blenheim or travel within Auckland for local meetings have not been calculated at the time of writing this report. Emissions, when known, can be offset through a verified carbon offset programme at a small cost.

27.     Other opportunities to reduce emissions include:

a)      reducing the number of delegates to the Blenheim conference as recommended

b)      encouraging participants to opt for public transport options when attending meetings in Auckland

c)      encouraging delegates to provide updates to their local boards, including the option of daily updates from the conference and meetings via the local board facebook pages, so that non-attendance does not disadvantage other members

d)      ensuring elected members are aware of the session recordings that LGNZ will make available after the conference.  LGNZ have advised that they don’t webcast or live stream any parts of the conference as they try to encourage as many people as possible to attend in person.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     There are no impacts for CCOs or departments of council as the focus is on elected members attendance at meetings including the LGNZ conference.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     LGNZ advocates for issues that are important to local government. Many of these issues are aligned with local board priorities e.g. climate change. As such, there is interest at local board level in staying across the work of LGNZ and in identifying and harnessing opportunities to progress other advocacy areas that local boards may have.

30.     Having a dedicated lead who can attend Auckland meetings on LGNZ matters and who can be part of future discussions about remits and other topics, will enable local boards and their communities to continue to be informed and give considered input to work being led by LGNZ.

31.     The LGNZ Annual conference is always of interest to local board members. They provide a unique networking opportunity for local government leaders from around the country and the agenda of these meetings are designed to support local leaders in their roles and responsibilities. This is in line with the purpose of the elected member development programme which is to support elected members as governors and decision-makers.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     The work of LGNZ is expected to impact positively on Māori. LGNZ advocates on a variety of issues that are important to Māori including Māori housing, various environmental issues and Council-Māori participation/relationship arrangements. In addition, LGNZ provides advice including published guidance to assist local authorities in understanding values, aspirations and interest of Māori.

33.     The LGNZ National Council has a sub-committee, Te Maruata, which has the role of promoting increased representation of Māori as elected members of local government, and of enhancing Māori participation in local government processes.  It also provides support for councils in building relationships with iwi, hapu and Māori groups.  Te Maruata provides Māori input on development of future policies or legislation relating to local government. In the previous term Councillor Alf Filipaina was a member of the sub-committee.  Te Maruata will hold a hui on Wednesday 15 July 2020 from 10am to 4.30pm.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

34.     Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ are a new initiative being introduced this triennium following amendments to LGNZ zones. The two meetings for 2020 are scheduled for 13 March 2020 and 11 September 2020 and are not currently budgeted for. Staff will use existing resources and liaise with Kura Kāwana to identify combined opportunities for these meetings dates.

35.     Managing attendance numbers by only requiring attendance of leads, with others as optional attendees if they wish, should contribute towards keeping meeting costs down.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

36.     The normal registration rate for the LGNZ Conference and AGM is $1,410 (early bird) or $1,510 (standard). The total cost for early bird registration for 21 local board members is $29,610, with flights and accommodation additional.

37.     Costs of attendance for one member from each local board are to be met from the elected members’ development budget as managed centrally by the Kura Kawana Programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

38.     The inaugural meeting of the Auckland Zone is planned for 13 March 2020. If a local board has not chosen an LGNZ lead by this date, they would need to select a member to attend this meeting as their official representative.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

39.     The key risk is of delayed decision-making which can impact costs and registration choices. The sooner the registration for the nominated local board member can be made, the more likely it is that Auckland Council can take advantage of early bird pricing for the conference and flights, all done via bulk booking. Delayed information may also impact registration into preferred conference streams or events.

40.     There is always a level of reputational risk associated with any financial expenditure. Large delegations to conferences can be costly hence the advice that only one per local board attend.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

41.     There are two planned meetings for the Auckland Zone in 2020. The inaugural meeting is scheduled for 13 March 2020 and the second meeting is on 11 September 2020.

42.     Preparations for the inaugural meeting are being made by staff with guidance from the co-chairs. The agenda will include a report from LGNZ Executive and will also include an update on the Localism project. The agenda will be made available to members closer to the time of the meeting.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

43.     Once members are confirmed to attend, the Democracy Services Business Hub team will co-ordinate and book all conference registrations, as well as requests to attend the AGM.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shirley  Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Linda Gifford – Programme Manager – Elected Member Development

Authoriser

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision - Local Board feedback on the Ministry for the Environment's review of the effectiveness of the waste levy

File No.: CP2020/00373

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the local board of a decision made under urgency to provide local board input into Auckland Council’s submission on the Ministry for the Environment’s review of the effectiveness of the waste levy.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ministry for the Environment is currently consulting on proposals to reduce waste through a more effective landfill levy with submissions closing on 3 February 2020.

3.       The consultation was based on a document titled “Reducing waste: a more effective landfill levy cconsultation document” which was released in November 2019. This document discusses increasing the levy rate on municipal landfills, applying the landfill levy to more landfills and applying different levies for different landfill types.

4.       Auckland Council is preparing a submission on this topic and has requested formal local board input by 22 January 2020 so that local board views can be considered by a political working group before the Auckland Council submission is finalised.

5.       The Puketāpapa Local Board provided feedback into council’s submission on 14 January by utilising the urgent decision-making process approved by the local board on 5 December 2019 (resolution number PKTPP/2019/239).

6.       The urgent decision-making process enables the local board to make decisions to manage unforeseen and urgent circumstances when it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirements of a quorum.

7.       This decision was made under urgency as the next scheduled local board business meeting on 20 February 2020 is after the due date for local board input into the council submission.

8.       This decision was authorised by the relationship manager, local board chair and deputy chair through the authorisation memo attached to this report (Attachment A). This memo provides more information on the review and includes the local board’s formalised.

9.       For ease of reference, the local board’s formalised feedback has also been provided as Attachment B of this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the local board feedback on the review of the effectiveness of the waste levy, as approved under urgency on 14 January 2020 (Attachment B of this agenda report).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent Decision Authorisation Memo - Puketapapa Local Board Feedback on proposed changes to the Waste Levy (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Puketāpapa Local Board Feedback on changes to the waste levy

93

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben  Moimoi - Local Board Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision - Local Board feedback on central government's review of the resource management system.

File No.: CP2020/00273

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the local board of a decision made under urgency to provide local board input into Auckland Council’s submission on central government’s review of the resource management system.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Central government is undertaking a comprehensive review of the resource management system with a primary focus on the Resource Management Act 1991. The review’s aim is to improve environmental outcomes and better enable urban and other development within environmental limits.

3.       As part of the review, an issues and options document was released for consultation by the Resource Management Review Panel on 13 November 2019 with submissions closing 3 February 2020.

4.       Local boards were asked to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission on this review by 24 January.

5.       The Puketāpapa Local Board provided feedback into council’s submission on 14 January by utilising the urgent decision-making process approved by the local board on 5 December 2019 (resolution number PKTPP/2019/239).

6.       The urgent decision-making process enables the local board to make decisions to manage unforeseen and urgent circumstances when it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirements of a quorum.

7.       This decision was made under urgency as the next scheduled local board business meeting on 20 February 2020 is after the due date for local board input into the council submission.

8.       This decision was authorised by the relationship manager, local board chair and deputy chair through the authorisation memo attached to this report (Attachment A). This memo provides more information on the review and includes the local board’s formalised feedback.

9.       For ease of reference, the local board’s formalised feedback has also been provided as Attachment B of this report.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the local board feedback on the review of the resource management system as approved under urgency on 14 January 2020 (Attachment B of this agenda report).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent Decision Authorisation Memo - Puketapapa Local Board Feedback on the Review of the Resource Mangement System

97

b

Puketapapa Local Board Feedback - Review of the Resource Management System

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben  Moimoi - Local Board Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision - Local Board feedback on the Urban Development Bill

File No.: CP2020/01122

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the local board of a decision made under urgency to provide local board input into the Auckland Council’s submission on the Urban Development Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Urban Development Bill was published on 13 December 2019 for public consultation with submissions open until 14 February 2020.

3.       This bill follows on from the Kāinga Ora-Homes and Communities Bill, which disestablished Housing New Zealand and set up a new Crown Entity: Kāinga Ora-Homes and Communities.

4.       The Urban Development Bill sets out the functions, powers, rights and duties of Kāinga Ora to enable it to undertake urban development functions. A summary of the powers available to Kāinga Ora is attached to this report (Attachment A).

5.       Local boards were asked to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission on this consultation by 7 February 2020. This input will be appended to the Auckland Council submission.

6.       The Puketāpapa Local Board provided feedback on 4 February 2020 by utilising the urgent decision-making process approved by the local board on 5 December 2019 (resolution number PKTPP/2019/239).

7.       The urgent decision-making process enables the local board to make decisions to manage unforeseen and urgent circumstances when it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirements of a quorum.

8.       This decision was made under urgency as the next scheduled local board business meeting on 20 February 2020 is after the due date for local board input into the council submission.

9.          This decision was authorised by the relationship manager, local board chair and deputy chair through the authorisation memo attached to this report (Attachment B). This memo provides more information on the bill and includes the local board’s formalised feedback.

10.        For ease of reference, the local board’s formalised feedback has also been provided as Attachment C of this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the local board feedback on the Urban Development Bill, as approved under urgency on 4 February 2020 (Attachment C of this agenda report).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of Powers available to Kāinga Ora

111

b

Urgent Decision Authorisation Memo - Puketāpapa Local Board Feedback on the Urban Development Bill

113

c

Puketāpapa Local Board Feedback onthe Urban Development Bill

115

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben  Moimoi - Local Board Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision - Temporary Park Services Provision Plan for temporary occupation of Keith Hay Park by Watercare Services Limited (Watercare)

File No.: CP2020/01402

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the local board of a decision made under urgency seeking approval from the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve the Temporary Services Provision Plan for the temporary occupation of Keith Hay Park.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Watercare will be occupying Keith Hay Park during construction of the Central Inceptor Wastewater Project.

3.       In 2017 the Puketāpapa Local Board approved the grant of a licence for temporary occupation of Keith Hay Park and easement for permanent infrastructure and access.  A condition of it was for Watercare to submit a Temporary Services Provision Plan, for approval by the local board. 

4.       A Temporary Services Provision Plan has been developed and was workshopped with the board on 12 December 2019.  Board members were comfortable with the plan.

5.       As there is no business meeting between 06 December 2019 and 19 February 2020 of the Puketāpapa Local Board before the Central Interceptor works are due to commence in Keith Hay Park in January 2020 it was necessary to seek an urgent decision.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      note the Temporary Services Provision Plan for the temporary occupation of Keith Hay Park, as noted in Attachment A.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21091217 Urgent decision request and supporting information Temporary Services Provision Plan - Keith Hay Park

135

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Albert-Eden Roskill Ward Councillor Update

File No.: CP2020/00898

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the Albert-Eden Roskill Ward Councillors to verbally update the Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

The ward councillors provide an verbal update.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      thank Albert-Eden-Roskill Ward Councillors Cathy Casey and Christine Fletcher for their update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Chairperson's Report

 

File No.: CP2020/01394

 

  

 

Te take mō te p,ūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Chairperson, Harry Doig, with an opportunity to update board members on the activities he has been involved with since the last meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       It is anticipated that the Chairperson will speak to the report at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive Chair Harry Doig’s report for February 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair, Harry Doig's Report - 31 October 2019 - 19 December 2020

173

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Board Member Reports

 

File No.: CP2020/01395

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the local board members on the activities they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       It is anticipated that Board members will speak to their reports at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the member reports for February 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Julie Fairey's report, 6 September - 9 February 2020

177

b

Ella Kumar's report, October 2019 - January 2020

181

c

Fiona Lai's report, October 2019 - 31 January 2020

183

d

Bobby Shen's report, 19 October 2019 - 10 February 2020

189

e

Jonathan Turner's report, 1 November 2019 - 10 February 2020

193

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar

File No.: CP2020/00899

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Puketāpapa Local Board with its updated governance forward work programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Puketāpapa Local Board is in Attachment A.  The calendar is updated monthly reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work programme calendar for February 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar, February

199

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2020/00900

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of Puketāpapa Local Board (the Board) workshop notes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The attached summary of workshop notes provides a record of the Board’s workshops held in December 2019 and January 2020.

3.       These sessions are held to give informal opportunity for board members and officers to discuss issues and projects and note that no binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the Puketāpapa Local Board workshop notes for: 05 December 2019, 12 December 2019 and 30 January 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 05 December 2019

203

b

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 12 December 2019

205

c

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 30 January 2020

209

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor - Puketāpapa

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketāpapa

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 


 

    

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

20 February 2020

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Puketāpapa Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

12        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Puketāpapa Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020 - Attachment b - Attachment B Puketāpapa  Financial Performance (Q2) 

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 31 December 2019 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.