I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waiheke Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 26 February 2020

5.15pm

Local Board Office
10 Belgium Street
Ostend
Waiheke

 

Waiheke Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cath Handley

 

Deputy Chairperson

Bob Upchurch

 

Members

Kylee Matthews

 

 

Robin Tucker

 

 

Paul Walden

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Dileeka Senewiratne

Democracy Advisor Waiheke Local Board

 

20 February 2020

 

Contact Telephone: 021 840 914

Email: dileeka.senewiratne@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum - Vicki Angland - Walking Festival 2020 funding application 5

9.2     Public Forum - Martha Slimm and Julie Cairns - Housing Quality Project   6

9.3     Public Forum - Timothy Moon - Te Rangihoua Heritage Trail                        6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Local Ward Area Councillor's Update                                                                         9

12        E Tipu E Rea: Rangatahi Mentoring Project 2020                                                    33

13        Auckland Transport Report - February 2020                                                            37

14        Improved Public Accessibility to the governance function of Waiheke Local Board                                                                                                                                       43

15        Waiheke Local Board feedback on the Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and Related Legislation                                                                                              57

16        Waiheke Local Board feedback on the proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity                                                                                              59

17        Waiheke Local Board feedback on the inter-regional marine pest pathway management proposal                                                                                                73

18        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Waiheke Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020                                                                                                 75

19        Urgent Decision Report - Lease of Harbourmaster building                                109

20        Appointment of LGNZ Lead and nominee for LGNZ Conference 2020               127

21        Formal feedback from the Waiheke Local Board                                                   133

22        Chairperson's report                                                                                                 143

23        List of resource consents                                                                                         149

24        Waiheke Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar 2019 - 2022           157

25        Waiheke Local Board Workshop Record of Proceedings                                    161  

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

27        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               169

18        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Waiheke Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020

b.      Financial performance report Q2 Confidential                                             169  

 


1          Welcome

 

Kua uru mai a hau kaha, a hau maia, a hau ora, a hau nui,

Ki runga, ki raro, ki roto, ki waho

Rire, rire hau…pai marire

 

Translation (non-literal)  - Rama Ormsby

Let the winds bring us inspiration from beyond,

Invigorate us with determination and courage to achieve our aspirations for abundance and sustainability

Bring the calm, bring all things good, bring peace….good peace.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 29 January 2020, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waiheke Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Vicki Angland - Walking Festival 2020 funding application

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Vicki Angland – will be in attendance to speak under Public Forum on the topic Walking Festival 2020 funding application.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      thank Vicki Angland for her attendance.

 

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Martha Slimm and Julie Cairns - Housing Quality Project

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Martha Slimm and Julie Cairns – will be in attendance to speak under Public Forum on the topic Housing Quality Project.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      thank Martha Slimm and Julie Cairns for their attendance.

 

 

 

9.3       Public Forum - Timothy Moon - Te Rangihoua Heritage Trail

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Timothy Moon – will be in attendance to speak under Public Forum on the topic Te Rangihoua Heritage Trail.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      thank Timothy Moon for his attendance.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

Local Ward Area Councillor's Update

File No.: CP2020/01239

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Councillor Pippa Coom with an opportunity to update the Waiheke Local Board on Governing Body issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         receive Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor, Pippa Coom’s update.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Update from Ward Councillor Coom

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor Waiheke Local Board

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Acting Relationship Manager: Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

E Tipu E Rea: Rangatahi Mentoring Project 2020

File No.: CP2020/01729

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the allocation of $5,000 from the 2019/2020 Māori Responsiveness budget to Waiheke Community Art Gallery: Te Whare Taonga, to deliver E Tipu E Rea: Rangatahi mentoring project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2019/2020 work programme has an available allocated budget of $15,000 for Māori Responsiveness to respond to key aspirations and priorities for Māori.

3.       Māori artists Jeanine Clarkin, Anton Forde and George Kahi have requested funding for year three of E Tipu e Rea, a kaupapa Māori mentoring project, that pairs 20 rangatahi with established Māori artists. The local board funded the three-year project in 2017/2018 and 2018/2019.

4.       The purpose of the project is to support the development of rangatahi skills, confidence, and cultural identity, and to enable rangatahi to exhibit alongside their mentors in the annual Matariki exhibition at Waiheke Community Art Gallery: Te Whare Taonga.

5.       E Tipu e Rea aligns with the objectives of the Māori Responsiveness work programme, to support Māori-led initiatives and social and economic outcomes for Māori. The project also aligns with the local board outcome to support youth-centred initiatives that build engagement, resiliency and transitions to adulthood.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      approve the allocation $5,000 to Waiheke Community Art Gallery: Te Whare Taonga to deliver E Tipu E Rea: Rangatahi mentoring project, from the 2019/2020 Māori Responsiveness work programme.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board has $15,000 allocated to Māori Responsiveness activity in the 2019/2020 work programme, to engage with mana whenua and mataawaka, support Māori aspirations and priorities, and build strong relationships with Māori.

7.       Staff have connected with mana whenua and local Māori organisations to scope opportunities to fund projects from this budget that respond to the Māori Responsiveness objectives.

8.       Local Māori artists Jeanine Clarkin, Anton Forde and George Kahi have requested a third and final year of funding for ‘E Tipu e Rea: Rangatahi mentoring project’ (the project). The three-year project was launched in 2018 and was funded $5,000 by the local board in both 2017/2018 and 2018/2019.

9.       E Tipu e Rea is a collaboration between Māori artists, Waiheke Community Art Gallery: Te Whare Taonga and Waiheke High School. It aims to support rangatahi to develop their skills and identity, leading to improved educational and career opportunities.

10.     The project’s kaupapa is: Mā te tuakana te teina e tōtika, Mā te teina te tuakana e tōtika: The older will lead the younger and the younger will lead the older.

11.     The theme of this year’s Matariki programme is: He mahitahi o ngā whetu: The working as one of the stars. Each star in the Matariki constellation has its own unique attributes, which contributes to the whole.

12.     The project pairs 20 rangatahi from the Waiheke community with established Māori artists in a mentoring relationship leading up to the exhibition at Waiheke Community Art Gallery:Te Whare Taonga.

13.     Mentors provide advice and guidance to rangatahi through an initial group hui, face-to-face, or Skype mentoring sessions, noho (overnight stay) at Piritahi Marae, and visits to Connells Bay Sculpture Park and Auckland Art Gallery: Toi o Tāmaki to learn about the works of contemporary Māori artists.

14.     The artists support each of the young people to develop their own artworks over the weeks leading up to Matariki, culminating in the annual Matariki exhibition at Waiheke Community Art Gallery: Te Whare Taonga, in which rangatahi exhibit their work alongside that of their mentors.

15.     The project leaders, Jeanine Clarkin, Anton Forde and George Kahi, have worked with the Waiheke Community Art Gallery over the last 10 years to develop and curate the Matariki exhibition.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The project is intended to help enhance Māori participation in the arts and to provide pathways for Māori youth to access tertiary study and employment in the arts and related fields.

17.     For the previous years of the programme, rangatahi and mentors have been invited to provide evaluation. The majority of feedback was positive and participant recommendations have been incorporated to improve the project each year.

18.     The project benefits rangatahi by enabling them to develop their artistic skills, leadership and cultural identity in a kaupapa Māori context, with support and guidance from established Māori artists.

19.     In previous years, this has resulted in positive outcomes for rangatahi including pathways to tertiary education, continuation of their art practice, collaborating with established artists to exhibit in Sculpt Oneroa, and selling their artworks during the Matariki exhibition and at Ostend Market.

20.     In addition to individual outcomes, whānau have reported increased involvement and support in their tamariki’s art practice. The relationship between rangatahi and mentors is often kept open beyond the project, encouraging the wider community to be responsible for the growth and success of the rangatahi, giving them confidence to seek assistance beyond their immediate whānau base.

21.     The programme is intended to again be included in Auckland Council’s regional Matariki Festival programme, which closes for submissions on 28 February 2020. Matariki celebrations provide the opportunity for multiple generations to come together to acknowledge the year gone by and make plans for the year ahead. The Gallery’s Matariki exhibition has become an important tradition for the Waiheke community and inclusion within the regional Matariki Festival can increase the recognition that E Tipu E Rea participants receive.  

22.     The project aligns with the objectives of the Māori Responsiveness work programme, to support Māori-led initiatives and social and economic outcomes for Māori. The project also aligns with the local board outcome to support youth-centred initiatives that build engagement, resiliency and transitions to adulthood.

23.     The Waiheke Community Art Gallery: Te Whare Taonga are requesting a portion of $5,000 of the Māori responsiveness budget to deliver E Tipu E Rea. The total cost of delivering E Tipu e Rea is estimated to be $6,000. The project leaders will seek sponsorship to fund the remaining $1,000.

24.     This will leave a remaining budget of $10,000, which can be allocated to support other Māori responsiveness projects within the current financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     There are no identified climate impacts associated with the E Tipu E Rea programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     There are no identified council group impacts associated with the E Tipu E Rea programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     E Tipu e Rea aligns with the 2017 Waiheke Local Board Plan Outcome: Thriving, Strong and Engaged Communities. This outcome also includes the initiative to support youth-centred initiatives that build engagement, resiliency and transitions to adulthood.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The E Tipu E Rea project is designed and delivered by local Māori with the goal of enhancing Māori identity and cultural values.

29.     The project aims to achieve positive outcomes for rangatahi Māori by supporting their development through a kaupapa Māori mentoring programme and through participation in the Matariki Exhibition at Waiheke Community Art Gallery: Te Whare Taonga.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     The Waiheke Community Art Gallery: Te Whare Taonga are requesting $5,000 of the Māori responsiveness budget to deliver E Tipu E Rea.

31.     This will leave a remaining budget of $10,000, which can be allocated to support other Māori responsiveness projects within the current financial year.

32.     The operational costs to Waiheke Community Art Gallery:Te Whare Taonga of curating and staging the Matariki exhibition are separate to this project and not included in the proposed funding.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     E Tipu E Rea is a low risk activity. Identified project risks include lack of engagement from mentor and/or rangatahi participants. However, this risk is mitigated by the provision of a project co-ordinator to identify mentors in advance of the project start date and to identify rangatahi participants through existing networks at Waiheke High School and the wider community. The project is in its third year of delivery and has built an established reputation in the community and has been well attended.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Staff will prepare a funding agreement of $5,000 with Waiheke Community Art Gallery: Te Whare Taonga.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Fiona Gregory – Strategic Broker -  Arts Community and Events

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager -  Arts, Community and Events

Janine Geddes - Acting Relationship Manager: Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport Report - February 2020

File No.: CP2020/01241

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Waiheke Local Board on transport related matters in their area including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An interim response to the January 2020 resolutions is included in this report.

3.       The current status of the local board transport capital fund is noted in the report.

4.       Included are updates on work at Kennedy Point and the bus shelter upgrades for Ostend.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Report February 2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       This report addresses transport related matters on Waiheke and includes information on the status of the local board transport capital fund.

6.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. They report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in their Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

7.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·        be safe

·        not impede network efficiency

·        be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice Resolution WHK/2020/1

 

8.       The public survey to engage the Waiheke community views on the Matiatia Summer Trial is being progressed. See below under Matiatia Trial update.

9.       Other resolutions from January 2020 will be responded to in March 2020.

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

10.     A summary of the Waiheke Local Board Transport Capital Fund is contained in the table below. The Board has held the majority of its Local Board Transport Capital Fund for the major reorganisation of Matiatia and therefore has spent very little of its allocation over the last electoral term.

11.     In the coming months, the Board will consider the results of the Matiatia summer trial and the public survey results and its subsequent plans for Matiatia. 

Waiheke Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$2,323,204

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$50,000

Remaining Budget left

$2,273,204

Kennedy Point Update

12.     The asphalting of the ferry terminal area was successfully completed ahead of schedule and it opened for operations prior to Christmas.

13.     The site portacoms were moved back to their operational locations in mid-January and the project team is working on the final few items on site, with the majority of this work likely completed by the end of February 2020.

14.     The bus infrastructure is also in place ahead of schedule which will allow the Waiheke network team to operate from here when they are ready once the remaining line marking is in place over the next couple of weeks.

15.     The aim has been to make the original fendering design more robust.  This work is taking place in discussion with AT’s maintenance contractor, other wharf and design specialists and the operators. This will protect the asset for a greater period of time against the large vessels that deliver materials to Waiheke. This final item is likely to be completed by April 2020, which will enable full site demobilization and the practical completion of the project.

Matiatia Trial update

Removal of old rental car buildings

16.     Auckland Transport staff are working with a local contractor and Downer’s with the aim of having the buildings removed by the end of February, or very soon after. Once the buildings are removed, the space will be marked out using post & rail fencing to optimize the parking available.

Return to parking of part of bus layover area

17.     The southern side of the current bus layover area is being returned to car parking. Just waiting on signage to be changed.

Change of use of seaward side of Taxi Rank for small tour operators

18.     Signage pointing to small tours in this area going up and resolutions working their way through Auckland Transport approval process to make this area P15.

Survey of Matiatia users

19.     Survey material is being developed and the survey will be carried out as soon as possible. Appropriate publicity will ensure people know about the survey prior to implementation.

 

Ostend Bus Shelter Upgrades

Ostend Bus Stop 1509 (outside Placemakers)

20.     This stop has been constructed to cater for both East and West bound bus routes 50A, 50B and 502. As it is difficult to coordinate timing of services running in both directions, and allowing for increased frequency, it is necessary that this is a two-bay bus stop that can cater for two buses arriving at the same time. Although in approximately the same location as its predecessor, the stop has been moved out of the roadway so that buses don’t block traffic and visibility for bus drivers when turning is improved.

21.     In addition, the roadway has been upgraded and widened so that buses can turn around without having to enter the Waiheke Bus Company yard, which was a significant health and safety risk to people and vehicles in the yard.

22.     There have been some delays finalising the design and completing the stop. Currently although the stop is in service, the stop cannot be completed until a pohutakawa tree at the southern end of the stop has been removed. The tree removal is subject to a resource consent, which has been applied for. If this consent is granted in the next few weeks, it will allow the works to be completed in early March 2020.

23.     A new shelter has been manufactured for this stop and it will be installed before the end of February 2020.

Ostend Village Bus Stop 1542 (Belgium Street)

24.     With the increased frequency of bus services it is apparent that the bus shelter in Belgium Street is too small and does not comply with current accessibility standards. A replacement shelter, matching those recently installed elsewhere on the island, has been ordered and is programmed to be installed at the end of February 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

26.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

27.     To this end, Auckland Transport’s Statement of Intent contains three performance measures:

 

Measure

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Number of buses in the Auckland bus fleet classified as low emission

5

25

55

Reduction in CO2e (emissions) generated annually by Auckland Transport corporate operations (from 2017/18 baseline)

7%

9%

11%

Percentage of Auckland Transport streetlights that are energy efficient LED

56%

66%

76%

 

Vector and AT sign memorandum of understanding

28.     On 20 January 2020 Auckland Transport and Vector announced a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to explore the impacts of a full implementation.

29.     The MoU is a direct response to Auckland Transport’s Low Emission Bus Roadmap, published in late 2018, that outlined its commitment to have all new buses in Auckland being electric from 2025, with the whole fleet fully electric by 2040.

30.     A faster transition to electric buses requires a detailed assessment of the future demand on the electricity network.

31.     Two reports will be produced as part of the MoU, the first exploring a route and service profile, which will model the electricity demand that a fully electrified bus fleet will require. The second report will provide guidance on the electricity network infrastructure upgrades required at each bus depot, as well as likely timings and costs. These two reports are expected to be delivered by June 2020.

32.     Buses make up 87 per cent of the carbon emissions produced from public transport, so converting them from diesel to electric will also be a significant step towards meeting New Zealand’s 2050 zero-carbon emissions goal. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     The impact of information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group. Any engagement with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

 

Consultations

34.     No public consultations were sent to the Board in the last reporting period.

 

Traffic Control Committee

35.     The Traffic Control Committee did not make any decisions that affected the Board area since the last reporting period.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Interactions with mana whenua is done on a project specific basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     There are no financial implications by receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board in March 2020.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Lorna Stewart -  Elected Member Relationship Manager – Auckland Transport

Jonathan Anyon - Elected Member Relationship Manager – Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager -  Local Board Services

Janine Geddes – Acting Relationship Manager - Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

Improved Public Accessibility to the governance function of Waiheke Local Board

File No.: CP2020/01295

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the local board with options to provide greater transparency of deliberations of the Waiheke Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Following the decision by the local board on 4 December 2019 not to adopt the proposal in a Notice of Motion to open access to local board workshops and the request by the local board for staff to provide options for greater transparency on local board deliberations, this report sets out three options for consideration.

3.       The three options are:

·    Option 1: No change to the status quo

·    Option 2: Public access to monthly Community Forums to be held during the morning of the first Wednesday of the month; enhanced publication of selected workshop material

·    Option 3: Public access to workshops, subject to the right to selectively exclude the public

4.       In accordance with the Waiheke Local Board Standing Orders, workshops are informal opportunities for staff of the council group to share information with the local board and obtain guidance from the local board.  No decisions or resolutions are made at workshops and therefore workshops are not deemed to be meetings under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987. Decisions and resolutions are only made at monthly business meetings of the local board that is accessible by the public.

5.       The report does not recommend retaining the status quo as it does not provide for greater transparency. As opening workshops to the public has already been rejected by the local board, this option is not recommended.

6.       Staff recommend that local board establishes a pre-booked monthly Community Forum that allows members of the public to raise issues with the local board. It is proposed that Community Forums be held by the local board on the first Wednesday of each month. This option is supplemented with enhanced transparency of workshop activities by publication of workshop notes and material on the local board’s Facebook page within three days from the workshop, with the redaction of confidential workshop material. The report notes similar arrangements are in place at some other local boards.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)        notes that the definition of a ‘meeting’ as outlined in Part 7 Section 45(2) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) excludes any meeting of a local authority (or any committee or sub-committee of a local authority) at which no resolutions or decisions are made is not a “meeting” as defined by LGOIMA, and as such there is no requirement for the local authority to undertake the following activities as outlined in sections 45 to 54 of LGOIMA for such meetings:

i)                       i)          to publicly notify workshops

ii)                      ii)          to publicly provide agendas and reports for workshops at least two working             days in advance

iii)                     iii)         to provide for public and / or media access to workshops

iv)                     iv)        to provide publicly available minutes of workshop after the fact.

b)        notes that the Standing Orders of the Waiheke Local Board explicitly defines ‘workshop’ as an informal forum held primarily for information or discussion purposes as the case may be, and at which no resolutions or decisions are to be made.

c)        notes that Standing Order 12.1.2 as outlined with the Standing Orders of the Waiheke Local Board explicitly states that:

           i)           workshops are solely for information and discussion purposes

           ii)           workshops are not considered public ‘meetings’ as defined by Section 45(2)              of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987                       (LGOIMA)

           iii)          part 7 of LGOIMA and the requirements contained therein as outlined in                 resolution a) above do not apply to local board workshops.

d)        confirm that the local board holds its workshops, briefings and / or other meetings at which no resolutions or decisions are to be made without members of the public, media and / or stakeholders in attendance, as is allowed for under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987.

e)        request local board services staff, in order to ensure openness and transparency of the content at local board workshops, undertake the following activities:

                         i)          all material and documentation, unless it is considered confidential under             section 7(2) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act             1987  are to be made available on the Waiheke Local Board webpage                   within three working days following the workshop.

            ii)          agenda material and workshop outputs will continue to be included on the             subsequent local board business meeting agenda (e.g. workshop material             from February will be included on the March business meeting agenda).

            iii)         staff have amended and enhanced the content available on the Record of             Workshops report, which will now include an overview of the item, summary             of the discussion and agreed action points, along with the agenda materials             as highlighted in the previous bullet point.

                         iv)        arrange a monthly community forum which will enable the public to be kept             informed on matters relating to the workshop material.  Staff propose that             these sessions will:

o   be held on the first week of the month on Wednesday mornings during the time scheduled for local board workshops, and will run for two hours.

o   be booked in advanced by calling or emailing the local board office and confirming an appointment.

o   have appointments which run for 15 minutes at a time.

o   allow multiple requests as one appointment when considered appropriate.

o   led by the local board chair, assisted by local board staff.

            v)         this process will be outlined on the local board webpage and will also                     include the creation of a dedicated email address for booking an                            appointment.

            vi)        note that these sessions will not be attended by the council staff who                     presented the workshop item to the local board.

            vii)        ongoing engagement between local board staff and interested members of             the public and / or community groups.

            viii)       all workshop material and documentation, unless it is considered                            confidential under section 7(2) of the Local Government Official Information             and Meetings Act 1987, will be made available to local media for their                    information, along with the invitation to meet with local board staff in person             to discuss any of the matters raised in workshops.

            ix)        local media will continue to have the opportunity to proactively work with                council communications staff to discuss workshop items, and to meet with             local board staff to discuss other local matters.

            x)         increase activity on existing communications channels such as Our                        Auckland, social media and local media to inform the public that workshop             material is available to be viewed on the local board webpage.

           xi)         authorize the local board relationship manager, in consultation with the chair              of the local board, to make minor adjustments should this be required to                 enable the practical implementation of the measures in this resolution.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Since the establishment of the Waiheke Local Board when the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 came into effect, provision has been made for public meetings of the local board that are to be held under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987.  Meetings are defined in section 45 as follows:

(1) In this Part, unless the context otherwise requires,—

meeting, in relation to a local authority, means, subject to subsection (2),—

(a) any annual, biennial, triennial, ordinary, or extraordinary meeting of a local authority; and

(b) any meeting of—

(i) any committee or standing committee or special committee or subcommittee of a local authority; and

(ii) any meeting of any joint standing committee or joint special committee appointed by 2 or more local authorities, and any subcommittee of any such committee—

if—

(iii) any function, duty, or power is conferred or imposed on that committee or subcommittee by any enactment; or

(iv) that committee or subcommittee is empowered to exercise or perform, on behalf of any local authority or any committee of any local authority, any function, duty, or power conferred or imposed on any local authority, or on any committee of any local authority, by or under any enactment or bylaw

(1A)  …...

(2) For the avoidance of doubt, it is hereby declared that any meeting of a local authority or of any committee or subcommittee of a local authority, at which no resolutions or decisions are made is not a meeting for the purposes of this Part.

8.       The purpose of these meetings are to enable the local board to give effect to its governance role by enabling it to make resolutions or decisions in the presence of members of the public, media and / or stakeholders.

9.       Continuing the long-established practice of earlier local boards, on 4 December 2019 the Waiheke Local Board resolved as follows to provide for local board governance work management for the 2019-2022 triennium:

Resolution number WHK/2019/222

MOVED by Chairperson C Handley, seconded by Deputy Chairperson B Upchurch:  

That the Waiheke Local Board:

i.      endorse the following approach to effectively and efficiently manage the governance work of the local board for the 2019-2022 triennium:

ii.    maintain a key focus on annual work programmes and their implementation through

quarterly reporting and regular workshops with the whole local board, with decisions made at business meetings.

iii.   appoint nominated local board members who will facilitate consultation with local board members on time sensitive landowner consents and events, and who will provide the local board’s full feedback on liquor licences and resource consents.

iv.   appoint nominated local board members to external organisations.

10.     Clause 9 of the Waiheke Local Board Standing Orders defines a workshop as follows:

Workshop means an informal forum held primarily for information or discussion purposes, as the case may be, and at which no resolutions or decisions are made.

11.     The functioning of workshops are provided for in Appendix C of the Waiheke Standing Orders that provides as follows:

12.1.1 Workshops exempt from provisions of Part VII (Local Government Meetings) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

Only this part of the standing orders apply to workshops of the local board or its committees as these are held solely for information and discussion purposes with no ability for any resolutions or decisions to be made.

Section 45(2) of LGOIMA 1987 (which is included in Part VII of that Act) provides that, for the avoidance of doubt, any meeting of the local board or of any committee or sub-committee of the local board, at which no resolutions or decisions are made is not a meeting for the purposes of this Part of this Act.

Given that workshops will not make any resolutions or decisions they are not subject to the requirements contained in Part VII of LGOIMA 1987 (e.g. public access to the meetings, availability of agenda material to the public and notification of meetings etc.).

 

12.     The agenda of the local board business meeting of 4 December 2019 included a Notice of Motion that proposed the following:

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)  hold all workshops, including for committees, open for the public, subject to the provisions of section 48 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (Right of local authorities to exclude members of the public).

13.     The proposal was not accepted by the local board but the local board thereafter resolved that staff deliver an options paper to explore opportunities for greater transparency of board deliberations (Resolution number WHK/2019/220).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     There are limited opportunities for the community to formally engage with the governance of Waiheke Local Board.  The Waiheke Local Board Standing Orders provides for the public to directly interact with the local board during its business meetings when presenting a petition, or during deputations or at the public forum. No provision is made for attendance of members of the public at workshops.

15.     A petitioner who presents a petition to the local board or a committee may speak for five minutes. Deputations are accepted with at least seven days prior notice, at the discretion of the chair of the local board, the topics are restricted to the scope or functions of that local board and participation is limited to two persons who are allowed a maximum of 10 minutes to address the local board.  Public Forum items are similarly restricted to individuals who may address the local board for a maximum of three minutes on subject within the scope or functions of that local board.  The total allocation of time for public forum items on the agenda is 30 minutes.

16.     Similar concerns to those of the Waiheke Local Board about greater transparency of board deliberations have since the election prompted four North Shore local boards to provide for community forums to enable members of the public to raise issues with the local board in a less formal setting (Attachment A).  Other local boards, for example Howick, Puketapapa and Maungakiekie-Tamaki have informally decided on community forums to engage further with local communities in a regular face to face session. Although workshops of the Governing Body are not open to the public, the Governing Body workshop material is published.

17.     The options to provide for greater transparency are set out in Table 1 below.  Option 2, (Public access to monthly Community Forums; enhanced publication of selected workshop material) is recommended:

 

Option

Advantage

Disadvantage

1

No change to status quo

(Continue current well-established practice)

·      Well-established and tested routine

·      No additional time or resources required

·      Consistency with most other local board

·      Does not provide for improved transparency of local board deliberations

2

Public access to monthly Community Forums to be held during the morning of the first Wednesday of the month; enhanced publication of selected workshop material

(Option adopted by Devonport-Takapuna, with variations adopted by other North Shore Local Boards)

·      Improved transparency of published material presented at workshops with access to more comprehensive workshop notes

·      More opportunity for informal direct interaction of the local board with the public

·      Conforms with intent of Standing Orders that workshops are an informal, access-restricted opportunity for staff to seek guidance and to provide information to the local board.

·      Additional resource and time demand on local board members

·      Additional workload for local board staff

·      Requires members of the public to pro-actively make timely arrangements to attend the community forum

·      Does not provide access to informal discussion between staff and local board members at workshops

·      A risk that council group staff omit useful information from workshop material to protect confidential information which may result in local board members not receiving full free and frank advice from staff.  Alternatively, it may be that material presented to the local board during workshop is not suited for publication due to containing confidential information. These risks can be mitigated by applying the exclusions of section 7(2) of the LGOIMA and redacting confidential information.

·      A risk that the proposed measures may not achieve the objective due to practicalities, for example the allocation of time or the suitability of time and dates. However, the risk will be mitigated by enabling minor adjustments to be made administratively by local board staff in consultation with the chair of the local board.

3

Public access to workshops, subject to the right to selectively exclude the public

(Notice of Motion option rejected by the local board on 4 December 2019)

·      Direct access by members of the public to informal workshops between staff and local board provides improved transparency

·      Less additional resource and time demand than community forum option

 

·      Option already rejected by local board on 4 December 2019

·      Does not conforms with intent of Standing Orders that workshops are an informal, access-restricted opportunity for staff to seek guidance and to provide information to the local board; However, noting that s48 of LGOIMA enables the exclusion of the public for confidential items

·      Compromises the information sharing and discussion of confidential material under section 7(2) of the LGOIMA

·      To achieve greater transparency, it will require advance public notice of workshop agenda items and publication of material, resulting in additional workload for local board staff

 

18.     If the local board accepts the recommendation in this report, local board staff will take the necessary measures to implement the decision in the calendar month following decision, including advising council group staff of the new requirements. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     As this is an administrative decision, there are no anticipated impacts on climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     With the exception of council staff who provide support to the local board, the recommendations do not require additional resources or commitment from the council group.  Local Board Services and the Communications departments will be responsible for giving effect to the expanded communication requirements.

21.     Council group staff (council, Auckland Transport, ATEED etc) who engage with the local board during workshops will be advised of the proposed arrangements and will ensure that workshop material is suited for publication.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The recommendations are in response to a resolution of the Waiheke Local Board on 4 December 2019 that intends to provide improved to ensure openness and transparency of the content of local board workshops of the Waiheke Local Board. 

23.     Although not adopted by the majority of the local boards, the recommendations are similar to some of the measures adopted in the current term by four North Shore local board such as Upper Harbour, Hibiscus and Bays, Kaipatiki and Devonport Takapuna Local Boards. (See attachment A). Other local boards, for example Howick, Puketapapa and Maungakiekie-Tamaki have informally decided on community forums to engage further with local communities in a regular face to face session.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     This decision does not have any specific impact on Māori than the broader community of Waiheke.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     This decision has no financial implications for the local board

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     There is a risk that council group staff omit useful information from workshop material to protect confidential information which may result in local board members not receiving full free and frank advice from staff.  Alternatively it may be that material presented to the local board during workshop is not suited for publication due to containing confidential information. 

27.     It is proposed that the exclusions under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 be applied to the content of the material and confidential information unsuited for publication be redacted.

28.     There is a risk that the proposed measures may not achieve the objective due to practicalities, for example the allocation of time or the suitability of time and dates. However, the risk will be mitigated by enabling minor adjustments to be made administratively by local board staff in consultation with the chair of the local board.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     If the recommendations are accepted by the local board, staff will ensure the arrangements are made operational as soon as practical during the calendar month following approval.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resolution of local boards establishing Community Forums

51

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Helgard Wagener - Relationship Manager - Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager -  Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Acting Relationship Manager: Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

Waiheke Local Board feedback on the Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and Related Legislation

File No.: CP2020/01747

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal local board input into Auckland Council’s submission on the government’s ‘Death, Funerals, Burial and Cremation: a Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and Related Legislation’.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ministry for Health is reviewing New Zealand’s legislation relating to death, burial, cremation and funerals in New Zealand.

3.       The purpose of this review is to update relevant legislation so that it is modernised, fit-for-purpose, reflects general trends in society and is compatible with other legislative documents. The affected legislation includes the Burial and Cremation Act 1964, Cremation Regulations 1973 and the Health (Burial) Regulations 1946.

4.       In November 2019 the Ministry released a consultation document titled: ‘Death, Funerals, Burial and Cremation: a Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and Related Legislation’ https://www.health.govt.nz/publication/death-funerals-burial-and-cremation-review-burial-and-cremation-act-1964-and-related-legislation. Submissions on this consultation are due on 10 April 2020.

5.       Auckland Council is preparing a submission on this review. This submission will be approved under delegation by the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Parks Arts Community and Events Committee in March 2020.

6.       Formal local board feedback on this review is due by 5pm on 28 February 2020 and will be appended to the Auckland Council submission.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      provide input into Auckland Council’s submission on the government’s ‘Death, Funerals, Burial and Cremation: a Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and Related Legislation’.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Inglis - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager - Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Acting Relationship Manager: Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

Waiheke Local Board feedback on the proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity

File No.: CP2020/00954

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal feedback from the Waiheke Local Board into Auckland Council’s submission on the proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ministry for the Environment has released He Kura Koiora i hokia: A discussion document on a proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity, including proposed wording for the national policy statement. 

3.       The National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity provides detailed direction on maintaining indigenous biodiversity, including identification and protection of significant indigenous biodiversity, under the Resource Management Act 1991. 

4.       The proposed National Policy Statement is intended to provide consistency for council’s interpreting and applying the RMA provisions relating to indigenous biodiversity. This includes protecting significant indigenous vegetation and habitats for fauna and to maintain indigenous biodiversity. 

5.       Council staff have prepared a summary of the proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity (Attachment A) and highlighted key themes for the Council submission (Attachment B).

6.       Previously, in September 2019, the board provided feedback on Te Koiroa o te Koiora, the government’s discussion document on proposals for a biodiversity strategy. This feedback supported the vision and outcomes of the statement and noted the urgency to restore and prevent permanent loss of biodiversity.

7.       The deadline for local board feedback is 3 March 2020. Council’s Submission will be approved by the Planning Committee on 5 March and lodged before 13 March 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback to Auckland Council’s submission on the proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity

61

b

Key themes for Council submission

65

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Inglis - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Janine Geddes - Acting Relationship Manager: Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

The following provides a summary of directions proposed by the National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity. Refer to the discussion document and draft wording for the NPSIB for further detail.

1.         Objectives and policies

a.   The primary objective of the NPSIB is to maintain indigenous biodiversity. This has been defined as at least no reduction in certain functions and properties of indigenous biodiversity.

b.   Other objectives include taking into account the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi in the management of indigenous biodiversity, restoring indigenous biodiversity and enhancing ecological integrity of ecosystems, and recognising the role of landowners, communities and tangata whenua as stewards and kaitiaki of indigenous biodiversity.

c.   Policies require councils to adopt a precautionary approach towards proposed activities and their effects on indigenous biodiversity and to recognise the contribution maintenance of indigenous biodiversity makes to social, economic and cultural wellbeing.

d.   Policies also require that councils promote resilience of indigenous biodiversity to climate change, including through considering effects of climate change when making decision on restoration and managing new biosecurity risks, promoting connectivity to enable migration of species.

2.         Recognising te ao Māori and principles of the Treaty of Waitangi

a.   The objectives and policies require recognition of and provision for Hutia te Rito in implementing the NPSIB. Hutia te Rito recognises that the health and wellbeing of indigenous biodiversity in the terrestrial environment is also vital for the health and wellbeing of our freshwater, coastal marine area and all our communities. Hutia te Rito as a fundamental concept to achieve an integrated and holistic approach to maintaining indigenous biodiversity.

b.   Policies require that councils must recognise the role of tangata whenua as kaitiaki within their rohe and provide opportunities for tangata whenua involvement in the management of indigenous biodiversity.

c.   The NPSIB specifies how local authorities are to collaborate with tangata whenua when giving effect to the NPSIB. This includes requirements to take reasonable steps to provide opportunities to exercise kaitiakitanga over indigenous biodiversity, be involved in decision making relating to indigenous biodiversity and incorporate mātauranga Māori. 

3.         Application of NPS

a.   It applies to all land tenures and will mainly be used in relation to new land uses or activities.

b.   The NPSIB does not apply to indigenous biodiversity in the coastal marine area or in waterbodies and freshwater ecosystems, except for the requirements relating to regional biodiversity strategies which can take a broader view, and, wetland enhancement and restoration. Freshwater ecosystems, including effects on wetlands, are otherwise covered by the proposed NPS Freshwater Management 2019.

4.         Identifying important biodiversity and taonga

Identifying significant natural areas

a.   The NPSIB specifies the process councils must take to assess and identify significant natural areas (areas with significant vegetation and habitats of indigenous fauna).  The assessment criteria are identified in the NPSIB.  The Auckland Unitary Plan currently identifies such areas as Significant Ecological Areas (SEAs) – although note that the criteria for identifying such areas proposed in the NPSIB are not identical to those used in the Unitary Plan.

b.   Councils must undertake a district wide assessment to determine whether areas meet defined ecological significance criteria.

c.   A set of principles and approaches must be followed by councils when assessing and classifying SNAs. Principles include partnership, access, consistency and transparency. In relation to access, where access is not voluntarily given then councils must undertake desktop assessments. 

d.   SNAs must also be classified as either high or medium value (based on the criteria specified in the NPSIB). This distinction is used to manage effects. 

e.   For councils that already have identified SNAs in their plans, such as Auckland Council’s SEAs, a qualified ecologist can provide an assessment to demonstrate whether the SEAs meet the NPSIB criteria.

f.    Requires updating of SNA lists every 2 years to allow for additions of SNAs that arise through resource consent applications or designations. A full update is required every 10 years.

Identifying taonga and highly mobile fauna

g.   Requires identification of taonga subject to working together with tangata whenua to determine if they wish to identify taonga and if what is the process and level of detail.

h.   Where identified taonga must be managed to protect their values.

i.    Requires surveying and recording of likely and known locations for highly mobile fauna outside of SNAs

5.         Managing effects on biodiversity

Managing adverse effects on SNAs

a.   Specifies, and defines, what adverse effects on SNAs are to be avoided and the use of the effects management hierarchy is to be applied to all other adverse effects. This is intended to clarify how SNAs should be protected.

b.   For SNAs classified as medium value a more lenient management approach is proposed for specific activities which have locational constraints. This includes nationally significant infrastructure, mineral and aggregate extraction, and Māori land.

c.   Exceptions are provided for adverse effects relating to protecting, restoring or enhancing an SNA, risks to public health and safety, kānuka or mānuka identified because of myrtle rust risk, and indigenous vegetation established for specific uses/ purposes.

d.   The effects management framework includes biodiversity offsetting and biodiversity compensation. A framework of criteria is set out in the NPSIB for the use of biodiversity offsets based around widely accepted principles that must be met and those that should be met to qualify as a biodiversity offset.

e.   Specific direction is given around the management of plantation forests to maintain biodiversity values

Existing activities in SNAs

f.    Plans must specify where, how and when to provide for existing activities in SNAs.

g.   Need to ensure that continuation of the existing activity does not lead to loss or degradation of any SNA and adverse effects do not change character, intensity or scale as at date of NPS

h.   Provides for recognition where pastoral farming is existing activity and indigenous vegetation may regenerate in areas previously cleared and converted to improved pasture

Rules applying outside SNAs

i.    Requires councils to take steps to maintain indigenous biodiversity outside of SNAs through specifying controls on activities, when assessment is required, and apply effects management hierarchy to adverse effects.

6.         Restoration and enhancement

a.   Councils must identify and promote restoration and enhancement (including through reconstruction) opportunities through plan provisions and other methods, including incentives.

b.   This applies to degraded wetlands and SNAs, areas providing important connectivity or buffering functions and former wetlands that could be reconstructed.

c.   Regional councils must assess percentage of urban and rural areas in region that have indigenous vegetation cover, and where less than 10% cover:

A target must be set to increase cover to at least 10% for urban areas;

A target must be set to increase cover for rural areas; and

For areas already with 10% or more cover targets may be set to increase cover.

Targets to be included in regional policy statements along with objectives, policies and methods to achieve it. 

7.         Regional biodiversity strategies & monitoring

a.   Requires regional councils to prepare a regional biodiversity strategy through a collaborative approach with stakeholders, which is specified in the NPSIB.

b.   Strategies are intended to promote landscape-scale restoration and enhancement vision for the region’s indigenous biodiversity.  They must recognise various aspects of the NPSIB including spatially identifying SNAs, identified taonga, areas for restoration and enhancement and other areas for protection.

c.   Regional policy statements and plans must have regard to any regional biodiversity strategy in relation to restoration and enhancement.

d.   For councils with an existing strategy, this must be updated within six years of NPS commencement date.

e.   Regional councils must develop a monitoring plan for indigenous biodiversity, establishing methods and timeframes.

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

Waiheke Local Board feedback on the inter-regional marine pest pathway management proposal

File No.: CP2020/01765

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal input from the Waiheke Local Board into the inter-regional marine pest pathway management proposal.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Pathway management plans allow councils to manage the way pests are transported from one place to another, with an overall goal to avoid or minimise potential wide-ranging negative impacts. A potential pathway management plan will be complementary to existing and proposed marine biosecurity measures under Auckland’s Regional Pest Management Plan and Auckland’s Unitary Plan.

3.       In the marine environment ‘pathway’ often means boats, as movement of hull-fouled boats is the single biggest risk for marine pest transfer. The identified approaches included in the consultation focused on potential rules for hull fouling, which means that boat users will be most affected by any changes proposed through a marine pest pathway management plan.

4.       Informal public consultation on potential approaches for inter-regional marine pest pathway management was undertaken between 18 March and 24 May 2019 in four regions: Northland, Auckland, Waikato and Bay of Plenty.

5.       The consultation results showed:

·        a preference to develop consistent rules for managing boat hull-fouling across the four regions

·        a preference for a requirement to have a clean hull at all times

·        regional differences with the preferences of Northland submitters being notably difference to other regions. Northland submitters wanted alternative management options for managing marine pests

·        nine key feedback themes were identified, with the top three being practicality and compliance issues; allocation and distribution of costs, and the need for a national pathways plan.

6.       During engagement on the Regional Pest Management Plan in 2017 the board provided the following feedback:

“That the Waiheke Local Board:

Support development and timely implementation of Marine Pathway Management Plan for the Hauraki Gulf to control marine pests such as fan worm and sea squirt. Ensure preventative cleaning of boats occurs in contained hardstand areas which has been supported by the Board’s hardstand initiative at Ostend Causeway.”

7.       A workshop with staff is scheduled for 26 February 2020 which will provide background and inform any feedback.

8.       Auckland Council staff are currently analysing options. This will identify a preferred option for marine pest pathway management. Staff will collate further supporting evidence through the Top of the North Marine Biosecurity working group.


 

 

 

9.       Staff will present a report to the Environment and Climate Change Committee at its 12 March 2020 meeting. This will seek approval to start the statutory process for development of an inter-regional marine pest pathway management plan under the Biosecurity Act, including the preferred option.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      provide input into the inter-regional marine pest pathway management proposal.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Inglis - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager -  Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Acting Relationship Manager: Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Waiheke Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/00868

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Waiheke Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter two, 1 October – 31 December 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2019/2020 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with the Waiheke Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        Christmas Event funding:  The Path of Christmas – Te Ara O Te Kirihimete event was held on 30 November 2019.

·        Community and social economic development: A ‘Community Resilience and Emergency Preparedness Hui’ was held in December 2019 to progress the development of community resilience plans for Waiheke and Rākino communities.

·        Bus Shelters: Sally Smith’s design “Tiaki Tīkapa Moana - Nurture the Hauraki Gulf/Tīkapa Moana” was chosen as the design on the new and unique bus shelters on Waiheke.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·        530 Orapui Road, Waiheke – install track (ID 3715):  A section of the track includes Kauri and has been referred to the Kauri Die Back Management team.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter two ending 31 December 2019.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group half year results are released to the NZX which are expected to be made public by 28 February 2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Waiheke Local Board has an approved 2019/2020 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Community Services (Arts, Community and Events; Libraries and Information; Parks, Sport and Recreation; and Service Strategy and Integration) approved on 27 June 2019

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew and Community Leases, approved on 27 June 2019

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services, approved on 23 May 2019

·        Plans and Places, approved on 27 June 2019.

7.       Work programmes are produced annually, to meet the Waiheke Local Board outcomes identified in the three-year Waiheke Local Board Plan. The local board plan outcomes are:

·        Outcome 1: Inclusive planning and placemaking

·        Outcome 2: A sustainable economy and positive visitor experience

·        Outcome 3: Waiheke's environment is treasured

·        Outcome 4: Thriving, strong and engaged communities

·        Outcome 5: Vibrant places for people

·        Outcome 6: Transport and infrastructure

8.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

9.       The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

 

10.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter two

Local Board Plan Outcome 1: Inclusive planning and placemaking

11.     Waiheke Area Plan (ID 1264):  A workshop was held with new board members in November 2019, following election, with an update on progress and discussion of issues. Meetings for the Area Plan working party have been scheduled. Feedback relating to the Area Plan from Local Board Plan engagement will be reported to the working party and used in preparation of the Draft Area Plan in Q3. Dates for consultation on the Draft Area Plan will be confirmed following discussion with the working party in Q3.

12.     Lightscape Management Plan: The Plans and Places team have advised that further budget will be required in order to complete the Lightscape Management Plan. Reallocation of Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) opex budget to the value of approximately $15,000 will be required should the board wish to progress completion of the plan during this financial year.

13.     Local Parks Management Plan (ID 1222):  Local board workshops were held in December to update on additional classification required and site-specific questions.  Mana whenua consultation on the classifications will occur in January followed by workshops and reporting to the board.

14.     Boat ramp and pontoons – improvements (ID 3645) – Parks Sport and Recreation have commenced scoping for this project which will include assessment of boat ramps and access. The first stage will include options to address kayak and dinghy storage on beaches and reserves.

 

15.     Mātiatia (ID 827):  An extended Harbourmaster lease was approved via urgent decision during this period.  Further details are included within the report on this agenda.

 

Local Board Plan Outcome 2: A sustainable economy and positive visitor experience

16.     Waiheke Community Art Gallery (ID 562):  Highlights during this quarter included Jeanine Clarkin and Chermene Pereniko presenting a fashion show with their collections, 'Side by side under the same stars'. Selina Tusitala Marsh gave a reading and book signing of MopHead with 120 attendees. Community classes included Clive Humphreys drawing and Caroline Lark writing workshops. There were 20,047 visitors, 19 programmes with 7 sessions

17.     Artworks Theatre (ID 565):  3,440 guests enjoyed 58 programmes, 8 with Māori outcomes. Highlights included the opening of the Latin American Film Festival, bringing together the community to enjoy live music and food. Artworks hosted a Te Reo Māori workshop designed to help parents teach Māori to their children. The locally produced Wind in the Willows showcased 37 locals of all ages which had great support from the community. A mural depicting mana whenua stories was painted with rangatahi and community members on the side of the theatre

 

Local Board Plan Outcome 3: Waiheke's environment is treasured

18.     Sustainable Schools – Waiheke Marine Education (ID 375): Four teachers from Te Huruhi School, Waiheke High School, Waiheke Primary School, and Waiheke Steiner School (Fossil Bay School) attended a teacher workshop on 14 November 2019. The teachers committed to take part in the project in 2020. Waiheke Resources Trust and Waiheke Dive and Snorkel have been contracted to deliver the project. Delivery of experiential learning such as snorkelling in Enclosure Bay and walking in McKenzie Reserve will commence in quarter three.

19.     Project Little Oneroa and wider Waiheke community engagement (ID 695):  Waiheke Resources Trust held a citizen science Wai Care Have a Go event on 12 October 2019 at the Onetangi Hall. Four new community groups were established including a community restoration group in Omiha, a Steiner Home School of parents and students, and a group of Waiheke High School students. A Wai Care water testing workshop was held at the same venue on 12 October 2019 at Onetangi Hall, followed by a workshop on septic tank maintenance on 13 October 2019. Waiheke Resources Trust hosted a Welcome to Waiheke pot luck dinner on 4 December 2019 to distribute information packs and educate new residents about septic tank care. Water monitoring through Wai Care will continue in quarter three.

20.     Ecological volunteers and environmental programme (ID 773): Shelly Beach and Te Huruhi Reserves are being added to the list of areas being baited. This will add 60 more bait stations to the tally of bait stations. In the joint programme with the Biosecurity team there are now 1260 bait stations in the programme, which is anticipated will bring the number of volunteers participating up to 556. A pulse of bait for rat control was carried out in December.

21.     Ecological restoration community partnership programme (ID 831):  Work to control moth plant and Japanese honeysuckle is the main focus for this quarter on most of the reserve areas and wetlands in the programme. A new software application for Health and Safety is being used to upgrade the records for this item. An application to record the data direct from the field is now being used to monitor bird life as five minute bird counts are carried out in the wetlands and reserves.

 

Local Board Plan Outcome 4: Thriving, strong and engaged communities

22.     Community and social economic development (ID 165): The local board allocated $3,000 towards the development of community resilience plans for Waiheke and Rākino communities to better prepare for emergencies and disasters. A ‘Community Resilience and Emergency Preparedness Hui’ was held in December 2019 with over 50 community members from residents’ groups and community organisations, staff from Auckland Emergency Management and volunteers from Neighbourhood Support and Red Cross. Next steps will include development of local plans, training and supporting the establishment of new neighbourhood groups.

23.     Youth Hub (ID 168):  During this quarter the funding agreement with the Waiheke Youth Centre Trust was completed. Funding will enable activation and programming of Surfdale Hall. Various users have been utilising the hall space and activities have ranged from yoga classes, celebrations youth pizza nights, mindfulness workshops and monthly Family Group Conference meetings.

24.     Community-led housing initiatives (ID 166):  Staff have been supported community members to investigate options for senior care and housing. A community-led steering group has come together following a well-attended public meeting in November 2019 to discuss progress on the 2016 Market Research into Rest-home Care. A strategy meeting is being planned to progress community-based care and housing options for seniors. A number of other housing initiatives are being progressed. Staff will be workshopping with the board funding opportunities for the $10,000 within this budget.

25.     Community Grants (ID 349): The board allocated a total of $28,361 in one local grant round and one quick response round. This leaves a total of $21,639 to be allocated this financial year.

26.     Walking and Cycling Promotion (ID 826): The first Waiheke Cycling Festival was held between 1-3 November and the annual Waiheke Walking Festival was held between 15-22 November 2019. A summary of events delivered and support for the events in 2020 will be discussed with the board at a workshop in quarter three.

27.     Christmas Event funding (ID 311):  The Path of Christmas – Te Ara O Te Kirihimete event on 30 November 2019 was well attended. A discussion on next year’s event was held with the board in February.

 

 

Local Board Plan Outcome 5: Vibrant places for people

28.       Tawaipareira Reserve, replacement of skatepark (ID 2504): Preliminary design works are complete, and consultation was held on playground design options. Works will commence shortly.

29.     Onetangi Sports Park - install lighting & upgrade to sand carpet on field 3 (ID 2075): Concept design work is continuing. Next steps: Consenting, detail design. and aviation approval from Westpac Helicopter.

30.     Onetangi Sports Park - renew - passive area between buildings and fields (ID 2462):

31.     Toilets - open spaces - renew (ID 2516): Additional temporary toilets were installed in Oneroa to cope with increased demand and counters put in place to monitor use/demand. Data will inform the toilet provision analysis and business case.

32.     Walking tracks – General: A Waiheke wide walkway audit is being undertaken to ensure renewal projects on Waiheke are targeting the highest priority tracks. Once the audit is completed, recommendations for walkway renewals to be progressed in financial year 2019/2020 will be presented to the board to review.

33.     Feasibility study for swimming pool (ID 3404): A workshop was held with local board on 11 December summarising findings of the feasibility study with new members and discussing the best way forward. A report will be on the board's agenda in quarter three articulating key findings and outlining next steps for the pool.

34.     Alison Park – renew pathways (ID 2367): This project was completed during this quarter.

 

Local Board Plan Outcome 6:  Transport and Infrastructure

35.     Mātiatia Summer Trial: During this quarter the board agreed to support proposed trial changes to traffic flow in the Matiatia keyhole over the summer period to improve the general safety of the area. Further information is included within this report under the Auckland Transport report included on this agenda.

36.     Bus Network: Waiheke’s new bus network was launched on 13 October. Due to community feedback and a bus driver shortage Auckland Transport made some interim changes which will be monitored over the following months and reported back to the board.

37.     Bus Shelters: Sally Smith’s design “Tiaki Tīkapa Moana - Nurture the Hauraki Gulf/Tīkapa Moana” was chosen as the design on the new and unique bus shelters on Waiheke. Mana  Whenua were also involved with the project and agreed on their design based on a carving by Ngāti Paoa artist Michael Paki.

Activities with significant issues

·        530 Orapui Road, Waiheke – install track (ID 3715):  A section of the track includes Kauri and has been referred to the Kauri Die Back Management team. Next steps: Await information from Kauri Die Back Management team around recommendations for progressing this project.

Activities on hold

38.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        Swimming Pool Development fund (ID 830):  The local board is still working through feasibility and service requirements, so funding is on hold until this work is complete.

·        Church Bay Esplanade Reserve - purchase adjacent land and stabilise (ID 2340): Delays in land/easement purchase mean that delivery in Financial Year 20 is at risk.  This project is still pending advice from the Land Advisory team and Panuku on the decision for the purchase of an easement to enable works.  Next steps: Follow up with Panuku and the Land Advisory teams for an outcome from the easement purchase process and advance the design of the track repair as soon as possible.

·        Onetangi Beach - remediate erosion (ID 2921) – Project on hold. The original scope of works was completed by Operations and Maintenance, early in 2019. There is potential to allocate further funding to address replacement of the existing dune fencing solution. Next steps: Discuss with the local board potential renewal funding for the replacement of the existing dune fencing solution as part of the financial year 2020/2021 work programme discussions.

·        Te Whau Esplanade Reserve - renew Hitapa track (ID 3201): Project is on hold. A walkover of the site with internal geotechnical specialists in October confirmed there is limited works required relating to slip repairs. This will be bundled with a project to renew the walking track in its entirety. Next steps: Leave project on hold until remainder of the track is ready for renewal.

·        Little Oneroa Reserve - renew playground (ID 3621):  The draft concept plan for the carpark and playground has been consulted on with the public via Have your Say and an open day. The landscape architect has updated the plan to reflect some of the feedback regarding the playground and this was workshopped with the board on 19 February. Once the plan is approved the renewal can commence.

·        Catherine Mitchell Cultural Society - install drainage and renew carpark (ID 3642): Full scope is yet to be finalised in consultation with operational team and other stakeholders Next steps: Commence procurement works to appoint a design consultant upon completion of project scope.

·        Waiheke boat ramps and pontoons – improvements (ID 3645):  Project currently sitting with Park, Sports and Recreation staff to provide a strategic assessment to confirm the project scope. This was workshopped with the board on 19 February. Next steps: Confirm scope with all stakeholders and finalise budget requirements.

·        Te Ara Hura - Pearl Bay to Orapiu Road - improve tracks - stage 1 (ID 3714): A Waiheke wide walkway audit is being undertaken to ensure renewal projects on Waiheke are targeting the highest priority tracks. Once the audit is completed, recommendations for walkway renewals to be progressed in financial year 2019/2020 will be presented to the local board to review. Next steps: Complete the audit and provide a summary to the local board to agree priorities for Financial Year 2020.

·        Area Plan for Waiheke (ID 1264): Additional work and discussion with Governing Body appointed working party on fundamental issues has extended timeframe for preparing draft plan. The draft plan is now anticipated to be ready for public consultation in early 2020.

In addition, some difficulty in obtaining clarity on Iwi representation has meant Iwi consultation has been delayed. The preparation of the new Local board Plan has also had to be factored into timing of consultation on a draft area plan in order to avoid confusion. A workshop was held with new board members in November 2019, following election, with an update on progress and discussion of issues. The need to avoid confusion with the new LB Plan consultation has led to combining high level consultation on the Area Plan (30 year focus) and the LB plan (3 year focus) in February / March 2020.The feedback from this consultation will be reported to the working party and used in preparation of the Draft Area Plan in Q3. Dates for consultation on the Draft Area Plan will be confirmed following discussion with the working party in Q3.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

39.     There are no deferred activities.

 

Cancelled activities

40.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as cancelled:

·    Swimming pool development fund (ID 830) - The swimming pool feasibility project currently remains with Parks, Sports and Recreation. Project for Community Facilities to deliver has been cancelled. Refer to Parks, Sports and Recreation work programme line #3404.

·    Waiheke Island Sports Club - play space renewal (ID 2238) - A detailed site investigation has been completed; findings confirmed that the current playground can be safely used. Therefore, the board have decided to defer the renewal of the playground. Next steps: Assess playground in two years to determine if a renewal is required and funding allowed for future years.

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

41.     There are no merged activities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

42.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

43.     Work programmes were approved in June 2019 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

44.     The recommendations on amendments to timelines in the Community Facilities work programmes are unlikely to have climate impacts.

45.     The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

·        Sustainable Schools – Waiheke Marine education

·        Ecological restoration and tree planting

·        Pest management

·        Dune planting and protection

·        Community resilience and emergency preparedness plans

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

47.     This report informs the Waiheke Local Board of the performance for quarter two ending 31 December 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.     The Matiatia planning project aims to prepare a strategic plan for Matiatia which reflects the aspirations of the Waiheke community and respects the interests and rights of mana whenua for the future use of that land. Ngāti Paoa has representation on the project working group and are working to identify their aspirations for the site. 

49.     Korero with Ngāti Paoa representatives continue regarding Tawaipareira Reserve and Mātiatia Reserve.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

50.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

51.     Auckland Council (Council) currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of half year financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX on 28 February. Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is excluded from the public.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

52.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

53.     The approved Community Facilities 2019/2020 work programme and 2020-2022 indicative work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the 2019/2020 financial year, by ensuring that if projects intended for delivery in the 2019/2020 financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances, that other projects can be progressed while the causes for delays are addressed.

54.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter three (31 March 2020).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work programme update Q2

89

b

Financial performance report Q2 Confidential - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Janine Geddes - Acting Relationship Manager: Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

Authoriser

Louise Mason – General Manager -  Local Board Services

 



Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 



Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision Report - Lease of Harbourmaster building

File No.: CP2020/01967

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To advise the Waiheke Local Board of a decision made under the urgent decision process.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       On 16 December 2019 the board received an urgent request to grant a new lease for the Harbourmaster building at Mātiatia in order to activate the building over the summer period.  

2.       The Waiheke Local Board is the delegated authority for non-regulatory land use and development decisions over the land at 10 Ocean View Road, Mātiatia, Waiheke Island. 

3.       Following discussion with board members, the urgent decision was approved on 18 December 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      Note the urgent decision made on 18 December 2019 as follows:

          That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)   revoke its decision of 26 September 2019 (Resolution number WHK/2019/188) delegating to the Head of Stakeholder and Land Advisory, Community Facilities, authority to enter into a lease or leases for a six month period for the Harbourmasters building at 10 Ocean View Road, Waiheke Island.

b)   grant a new lease to Harbourmasters Limited for the Harbourmasters Building and part of the adjoining land comprising of 3,650 square metres (more or less) at 10 Ocean View Road, Mātiatia (Attachment A), legally described as Lot 8 Deposited Plan 146325 on record of title NA12A/130, on the following terms:

a.   Term: initial term of two (2) years with one three (3) year right of renewal

b.   the renewal is contingent on the Waiheke Local Board being satisfied with the overall use, level of investment in the premises, and the extent to which it informs commercial use decisions under the final Mātiatia Plan

c.   inclusion of an early termination clause

d.   permit subletting for part of the premises subject to approval by Auckland Council

e.   all other terms and conditions to be concluded on commercial terms.

c)   grant landlord approval for Harbourmasters Limited to undertake the necessary works to bring the building up to an operational state for its purposes, subject to compliance with the terms of the lease, landlord and regulatory approvals. 

CARRIED”

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Signed urgent decision

111

b

Report - Lease to Harbourmaster building

115

c

Harbourmaster lease site plan

123

d

Climate change impacts

125

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor Waiheke Local Board

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Acting Relationship Manager: Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

Appointment of LGNZ Lead and nominee for LGNZ Conference 2020

File No.: CP2020/01238

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To appoint a lead for Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) matters and nominate a representative to attend the 2020 LGNZ Annual Conference and General Meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards are invited to appoint a lead (and alternate) on Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) matters. The lead will be the main contact for all LGNZ issues and will represent the local board at meetings of Auckland/LGNZ zone and any related meetings.

3.       The LGNZ Annual Conference and General Meeting (AGM) takes place at the ASB Theatre Marlborough in Waiharakeke Blenheim from 8am Thursday 16 July to 3pm Saturday 18 July 2020.

4.       Local boards are invited to nominate a representative to attend the LGNZ conference. This can be the local board appointed LGNZ lead or another member of the local board. Given the cost of and overall numbers of elected member attendance, staff recommend that one member per local board attend.

5.       In addition to the official delegates, LGNZ requires prior notice of which local board members plan to attend the AGM. Members wishing to attend are asked to register their intention with the Kura Kāwana programme by Friday 17 April 2020 so that this information can be provided to LGNZ.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      appoint a lead and alternate for LGNZ related matters for the 2019-2022 triennium and task these members with representing the local board at Auckland/LGNZ meetings.

b)      nominate one elected member per local board to attend the Local Government New Zealand 2020 Conference and Annual General Meeting in Waiharakeke Blenheim, Thursday 16 July to Saturday 18 July 2020.

c)      confirm that conference attendance including travel and accommodation will be paid for in accordance with the current Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy.

d)      note that any members who wish to attend the AGM must provide their names to the Democracy Services Business Hub team by Friday 17 April 2020 to ensure that they are registered with Local Government New Zealand.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       LGNZ is an incorporated society of local government organisations whose primary objective is to represent and advocate for the interests of local authorities in New Zealand. LGNZ champions policy positions on key issues that are of interest to local government and holds regular meetings and events throughout the year for members. The schedule of meetings includes an annual conference and meetings of local government geographical clusters (known as LGNZ zones) and sectors.

7.       LGNZ is governed by a National Council made up of representatives from member authorities as outlined in the constitution. Some of its work is conducted through committees and working groups which include representatives from member auhorities.

8.       Elected members who have been formally appointed to LGNZ roles are:

Elected Member

Appointed role

Mayor Phil Goff

National Council representative for Auckland

Auckland Council representative on the Metropolitan Sector Group

Councillor Pippa Coom

Local Board Member Richard Northey

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by Governing Body)

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by local boards)

Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore

Auckland Council representative on Regional Sector

 

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

9.       As part of recent changes to the LGNZ Rules, Auckland Council is no longer part of LGNZ Zone 1 but is expected to organize itself, with its multiple local boards and Governing Body, as an informal LGNZ zone.

10.     Meetings of the Auckland/LGNZ zone have been scheduled on a biannual basis. These meetings will be co-chaired by the two Auckland representatives appointed to the LGNZ National Council by the Governing Body (Councillor Pippa Coom) and local boards’ (Member Richard Northey).

11.     Meetings of the Auckland/LGNZ zone will be open to all elected members but formal representation will sit with the nominated leads.

LGNZ Annual conference and AGM 2020

12.     This year the LGNZ conference and AGM will be held at the ASB Theatre Marlborough, Waiharakeke Blenheim, Thursday 16 July to Saturday 18 July 2020.

13.     The conference takes place over the first two days commencing at 9.30am on Thursday 16 July 2020 and closing with the LGNZ Excellence Awards on the evening of Friday 17 July 2020.

14.     The conference programme has the theme “Natural Capital”. The final programme will be publicly available at the end of February however we have had indication from LGNZ that the programme is expected to include addresses from the Prime Minister, various political leaders and President of LGNZ as well as sessions on the following topics

·   Natural capital - the Marlborough story

·   Fishes in the river, fishes in the sea (Water, aquaculture and the Resource Management Act)

·   Tourism – working together to care for people, place and culture

·   Building towards sustainable supply (housing)

·   Resilience in the face of natural hazards (infrastructure and communities)

·   Cultural wellbeing plenary session

·   Interactive workshops on cultural, economic, environmental and social well-being

·   Tours, showcases and dinners.

15.     The AGM takes place on the last day of the conference from 9.30am to 12.30pm.  The LGNZ constitution permits the Auckland Council to appoint four delegates to represent it at the AGM, with one of the delegates being appointed as presiding delegate.

16.     Traditionally the four AGM delegates have been the Mayor, the Chief Executive and two Governing Body members who hold LGNZ roles. Delegates in 2019 were Mayor Phil Goff, Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore, Councillor Penny Hulse and Local board Chair Pippa Coom.

17.     The Governing Body will consider an item on AGM attendance at its meeting on 27 March 2020 which includes the recommendation that Mayor Phil Goff be the presiding delegate and the other three delegates be comprised of either:

a)         two members of the Governing Body who hold a formal representation role with LGNZ and the Chief Executive; or

b)         one member of the Governing Body who holds a formal representation role with LGNZ and the Chief Executive, and a local board member; or

c)         two members of the Governing Body who hold a formal representation role with LGNZ and a local board member.

18.     In addition to the official delegates, LGNZ requires prior notice of which local board members plan to attend the AGM. Attendance at the AGM is not compulsory for conference participants.

Pre-conference meetings

19.     On Wednesday 15 July 2020, there will be a pre-conference meeting of the National Council as well as a Te Maruata Hui. Elected members that are on these two groups and wish to attend these meetings would need to arrive earlier than other meeting participants.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

20.     Local boards are requested to appoint a lead for the 2019-2022 triennium. The lead’s responsibilities include:

·   attend and represent the local board at meetings of Auckland/LGNZ zone and other LGNZ meetings, as appropriate

·   be the main contact for the local board on all LGNZ matters

·   share information from Auckland/LGNZ and other LGNZ-related meetings attended with the local board.

    LGNZ Annual conference and AGM 2020

21.     In 2020, with the venue in Waiharakeke, Blenheim and given the cost and overall numbers of elected member attendance, it is recommended that one member per local board attend. Having one attendee per local board means a maximum of 21 Auckland Council local board members would attend the conference.

22.     The annual conference and AGM are two separate meeting sessions.

23.     Local board members are invited to attend and take part in the conference.

24.     For the AGM, member authorities will be represented by officially appointed delegates. Members who are not appointed delegates can attend as observers provided they are included in the AGM registration form. Local board members who wish to attend the AGM as observers must register their intention with the Democracy Services Business Hub team by Friday 17 April 2020 so that their names can be included on the AGM registration form.

25.     Local board members who attend the conference and/or AGM are strongly encouraged to report back to their local boards on proceedings at the conference. This ensures members who do not attend can still benefit from this opportunity.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     Conferences and events involving multiple participants especially those requiring long distance travel can generate a sizable carbon footprint. This is due to emissions associated with flights, car and taxi travel, hotel and event site emissions.

27.     Estimates for emissions associated with travel to Blenheim or travel within Auckland for local meetings have not been calculated at the time of writing this report. Emissions, when known, can be offset through a verified carbon offset programme at a small cost.

28.     Other opportunities to reduce emissions include:

a)      reducing the number of delegates to the Blenheim conference as recommended

b)      encouraging participants to opt for public transport options when attending meetings in Auckland

c)      encouraging delegates to provide updates to their local boards, including the option of daily updates from the conference and meetings via the local board facebook pages, so that non-attendance does not disadvantage other members

d)      ensuring elected members are aware of the session recordings that LGNZ will make available after the conference.  LGNZ have advised that they don’t webcast or live stream any parts of the conference as they try to encourage as many people as possible to attend in person.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     There are no impacts for CCOs or departments of council as the focus is on elected members attendance at meetings including the LGNZ conference.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     LGNZ advocates for issues that are important to local government. Many of these issues are aligned with local board priorities e.g. climate change. As such, there is interest at local board level in staying across the work of LGNZ and in identifying and harnessing opportunities to progress other advocacy areas that local boards may have.

31.     Having a dedicated lead who can attend Auckland meetings on LGNZ matters and who can be part of future discussions about remits and other topics, will enable local boards and their communities to continue to be informed and give considered input to work being led by LGNZ.

32.     The LGNZ Annual conference is always of interest to local board members. They provide a unique networking opportunity for local government leaders from around the country and the agenda of these meetings are designed to support local leaders in their roles and responsibilities. This is in line with the purpose of the elected member development programme which is to support elected members as governors and decision-makers.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     The work of LGNZ is expected to impact positively on Māori. LGNZ advocates on a variety of issues that are important to Māori including Māori housing, various environmental issues and Council-Māori participation/relationship arrangements. In addition, LGNZ provides advice including published guidance to assist local authorities in understanding values, aspirations and interest of Māori.

34.     The LGNZ National Council has a sub-committee, Te Maruata, which has the role of promoting increased representation of Māori as elected members of local government, and of enhancing Māori participation in local government processes.  It also provides support for councils in building relationships with iwi, hapu and Māori groups.  Te Maruata provides Māori input on development of future policies or legislation relating to local government. In the previous term Councillor Alf Filipaina was a member of the sub-committee.  Te Maruata will hold a hui on Wednesday 15 July 2020 from 10am to 4.30pm.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

35.     Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ are a new initiative being introduced this triennium following amendments to LGNZ zones. The two meetings for 2020 are scheduled for 13 March 2020 and 11 September 2020 and are not currently budgeted for. Staff will use existing resources and liaise with Kura Kāwana to identify combined opportunities for these meetings dates.

36.     Managing attendance numbers by only requiring attendance of leads, with others as optional attendees if they wish, should contribute towards keeping meeting costs down.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

37.     The normal registration rate for the LGNZ Conference and AGM is $1,410 (early bird) or $1,510 (standard). The total cost for early bird registration for 21 local board members is $29,610, with flights and accommodation additional.

38.     Costs of attendance for one member from each local board are to be met from the elected members’ development budget as managed centrally by the Kura Kawana Programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

39.     The inaugural meeting of the Auckland Zone is planned for 13 March 2020. If a local board has not chosen an LGNZ lead by this date, they would need to select a member to attend this meeting as their official representative.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

40.     The key risk is of delayed decision-making which can impact costs and registration choices. The sooner the registration for the nominated local board member can be made, the more likely it is that Auckland Council can take advantage of early bird pricing for the conference and flights, all done via bulk booking. Delayed information may also impact registration into preferred conference streams or events.

41.     There is always a level of reputational risk associated with any financial expenditure. Large delegations to conferences can be costly hence the advice that only one per local board attend.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

42.     There are two planned meetings for the Auckland Zone in 2020. The inaugural meeting is scheduled for 13 March 2020 and the second meeting is on 11 September 2020.

43.     Preparations for the inaugural meeting are being made by staff with guidance from the co-chairs. The agenda will include a report from LGNZ Executive and will also include an update on the Localism project. The agenda will be made available to members closer to the time of the meeting.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

44.     Once members are confirmed to attend, the Democracy Services Business Hub team will co-ordinate and book all conference registrations, as well as requests to attend the AGM.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Shirley  Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy – Local Board Services

Linda Gifford – Programme Manager – Elected Member Development

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Acting Relationship Manager: Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

Formal feedback from the Waiheke Local Board

File No.: CP2020/01566

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the formal feedback submitted by the Waiheke Local Board on the following:

·    Reform of the resource management system

·    Reducing waste: a more effective landfill levy – consultation

·    Urban Development Bill

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board provides formal feedback on several government, Auckland Council and Council-Controlled Organisations’ (CCOs) regional plans, strategies and policies.

3.       On 22 January the board submitted its formal feedback on Auckland Council’s submission on the Reform of the Resource Management System and Reducing waste: a more effective landfill levy, following an urgent decision approval process (Attachment A and B respectively).

4.       On 13 February the board submitted its formal feedback on Auckland Council’s submission on the Urban Development Bill (Attachment C).

 

 

Te tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         note the feedback submitted on the Reform of the Resource Management System (Attachment A of the report).

b)         note the input into the government’s ‘Reducing waste: a more effective landfill levy – consultation’ (Attachment B of the report)

c)         note the feedback submitted on the Urban Development Bill (Attachment C of the report).

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board feedback on the reform of the Resource Management System

135

b

Waiheke Local Board feedback on Reducing waste: a more effective landfill levy

139

c

Waiheke Local Board feedback on the Urban Development Bill

141

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Inglis - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Acting Relationship Manager: Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2020/01244

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Chairperson Cath Handley with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues she has been involved with and to draw the board’s attention to any other matters of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the report from Chairperson Cath Handley.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair Cath Handley's Report

145

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor Waiheke Local Board

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Janine Geddes – Acting Relationship Manager: Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


 


 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

List of resource consents

File No.: CP2020/01249

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.             Attached are the lists of resource consent applications related to Waiheke Island received from 19 to 25 January, 26 January to 1 February, 2 to 8 February 2020.

 

Te tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the lists of resource consents lodged related to Waiheke Island from 19 to 25 January, 26 January to 1 February, 2 to 8 February 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resource consent applications received from 19 to 25 January 2020

151

b

Resource consent applications received from 26 January to 1 February 2020

153

c

Resource consent applications received from 2 to 8 February 2020

155

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor Waiheke Local Board

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager -  Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Acting Relationship Manager: Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

Waiheke Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar 2019 - 2022

File No.: CP2020/01245

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waiheke Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar 2019 - 2022 is appended to the report as Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff for reference and information only.

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·        clarifying what advice is expected and when

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Te tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive its Governance Forward Work Calendar for the political term 2019 - 2022 dated February 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

159

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor Waiheke Local Board

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Acting Relationship Manager: Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

Waiheke Local Board Workshop Record of Proceedings

File No.: CP2020/01248

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Waiheke Local Board proceedings taken at the workshops held on 29 January 2020 and 5 and 12 February 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under section 12.1 of the current Standing Orders of the Waiheke Local Board, workshops convened by the local board shall be closed to the public. However, the proceedings of every workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed.

3.       The purpose of the local board’s workshops is for the provision of information and local board members discussion.  No resolutions or formal decisions are made during the local board’s workshops.

4.       The record of proceedings for the local board’s workshops held on 29 January 2020 and 5 and 12 February 2020 are appended to the report.

 

 

Te tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

5.       note the record of proceedings for the local board workshops held on 29 January 2020 and 5 and 12 February 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Record of Workshop Proceedings- 29 January 2020

163

b

Record of Workshop Proceedings - 5 February 2020

165

c

Record of Workshop Proceedings - 12 February 2020

167

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor Waiheke Local Board

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Janine Geddes - Acting Relationship Manager: Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 


 

    

 


Waiheke Local Board

26 February 2020

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Waiheke Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

18        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Waiheke Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020 - Attachment b - Financial performance report Q2 Confidential

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 31 December 2019 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange.
Review Date: 6/03/2020.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.