I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitematā Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 18 February 2020

1:00pm

Waitematā Local Board Office
Ground Floor
52 Swanson Street
Auckland

 

Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Richard Northey (ONZM)

 

Deputy Chairperson

Kerrin Leoni

 

Members

Adriana Avendaño Christie

 

 

Alexandra Bonham

 

 

Graeme Gunthorp

 

 

Julie  Sandilands

 

 

Sarah Trotman (ONZM)

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Liz Clemm

Democracy Advisor - Waitematā

 

14 February 2020

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 353 9654

Email: liz.clemm@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Gael Baldock - AT Pt Chevalier Cycleway /
NZTA St Lukes Rd Cycleway and changes to Motorway Overbridge Consultation                                                                                                         
5

8.2     Bob Tait - Closure of Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium                        6

8.3     Penelope Hansen - Newmarket Stream Restoration                                        6

8.4     Bruce Sommerville - Parks Mowing                                                                   6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Public Forum                                                                                                        6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

11        Councillor's report                                                                                                         9

12        Western Springs Park Pine Tree Removal                                                                11

13        254 Ponsonby Road, Ponsonby Park Detailed Business Case and Concept Design                                                                                                                                       19

14        City Centre Masterplan refresh response                                                                 31

15        Auckland Transport February 2020 Update                                                              41

16        Regional Facilities Auckland Quarter One Performance Report for the period ending 30 September 2019                                                                                                      55

17        Appointment of LGNZ Lead and nominee for LGNZ Conference 2020                 57

18        Appointment of local board memebrs to additional identified external and internal organisations and boards                                                                                           63

19        Auckland Council’s submission to the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill 67

20        Waitematā Local Board feedback on the proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity                                                                                              69

21        Waitematā Local Board feedback on the Inquiry into the 2019 Local Elections and Liquor Licensing Trust Elections, and Recent Energy Trust Elections                71

22        Waitematā Local Board feedback on Taumata Arowai - Water Services Regulator Bill                                                                                                                                  73

23        Urgent Decision - Approval of a Temporary Premise for Leys Institute Library  75

24        Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback on the Urban Development Bill                                                                                                                                       77

25        Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback on the Resource Management Review Panel’s Issues and Options paper                                                               79

26        Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback to Auckland Council's submission on the Reducing waste: a more effective landfill levy                       81

27        Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback to LGNZ discussion paper “Localism”                                                                                                                    83

28        Chair's Report                                                                                                              85

29        Board member reports                                                                                                87

30        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                        89

31        Waitematā Local Board Workshop Records                                                            91  

32        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 3 December 2019 as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

The local board would like to acknowledge Gerry Hill at the meeting.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Gael Baldock - AT Pt Chevalier Cycleway /
NZTA St Lukes Rd Cycleway and changes to Motorway Overbridge Consultation

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To present on Auckland Transport’s project Pt Chevalier Cycleway and NZTA’s projects St Lukes Rd Cycleway and changes to Motorway Overbridge Consultation.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Gael Baldock for the presentation and attendance at the business meeting.

 

 

 

8.2       Bob Tait - Closure of Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To inform the local board of residents’ concerns over the recent sudden closure of Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Bob Tait for attendance at the business meeting.

 

 

 

8.3       Penelope Hansen - Newmarket Stream Restoration

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To present a brief summary of the history of work on Newmarket Stream to date and plans for the future.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Penelope Hansen for attendance at the business meeting.

 

 

 

8.4       Bruce Sommerville - Parks Mowing

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To present concerns about the frequency of mowing of parks and road congestion.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Bruce Sommerville for the presentation and attendance at the business meeting.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.


 

 

9.1       Public Forum

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Public forum provides an opportunity for a member of the public to address a meeting and share an opinion to elected representatives.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Formal approval from the Chairperson is not required to speak during the public forum item.

Time

3.       A period of up to 30 minutes, or such other time as the local board or any of its committees may determine, will be set aside for a public forum at the commencement of meetings of the local board which are open to the public.

4.       Each speaker during the public forum section of a meeting may speak for three minutes.

5.       Standing orders may be suspended on a vote of not less than 75 per cent of those present to extend the period of public participation or the period any speaker is allowed to speak.

6.       This Standing Order does not apply to inaugural meetings and, where not appropriate, extraordinary meetings or a special consultative procedure.

Subjects of public forum

7.       The public forum is to be confined to those items falling within the scope or functions of that local board or committee. Speakers must not speak about a matter that is under judicial consideration or subject to a quasi-judicial process.

Questions of speakers during public forum

8.       With the permission of the chairperson, members may ask questions of speakers during the period reserved for public forum. Questions by members, if permitted, are to be confined to obtaining information or clarification on matters raised by the speaker.

9.       Members may not debate any matter raised during the public forum session that is not on the agenda for the meeting, or take any action in relation to it, other than through the usual procedures for extraordinary business if the matter is urgent.

10.     The meeting may not make any resolution on issues raised in public forum except to refer the matter to a future meeting, or to another committee, or to the chief executive for investigation.

[Note: s 76 – 81, LGA 2002, regarding decision-making]

Language for speeches

A member of the public may address a meeting in English, Māori or New Zealand Sign Language. However, the person should advise the chairperson of their intention to speak in a language other than English at least two clear working days before the meeting.

11.     Where practical, Auckland Council will arrange for a translator to be present at the meeting. The chairperson may also order the speech and any accompanying documents to be translated and printed in English or Māori or another language.

Chairperson’s discretion

The chairperson may:

·    direct a speaker to a different committee if they consider this more appropriate, given the proposed subject matter

·    prohibit a speaker from speaking if they are offensive, repetitious or vexatious, or otherwise breach these standing orders.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank all those who presented for their attendance at the meeting.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Councillor's report

 

File No.: CP2020/00595

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor Pippa Coom, Ōrākei Ward Councillor Desley Simpson and Albert-Eden Roskill Ward Councillors Christine Fletcher and Cathy Casey with an opportunity to update the Waitematā Local Board on regional issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written report update from the Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Pippa Coom and the verbal or tabled Ward Councillor reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Councillor P Coom report for February 2020

 

      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Pippa Coom – Councillor Waitematā and Gulf Ward

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Western Springs Park Pine Tree Removal

File No.: CP2020/01713

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board approval for the removal of a whole stand of pine trees at Western Springs Lakeside Park in accordance with the recently granted resource consent obtained for the purposes of delivering the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration’ project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Since 2005 Council has been monitoring a stand of approximately 95 year old radiata pine trees in Western Springs Lakeside Park. The stand has reduced in size from approximately 700 pines in 1988 to approximately 177 live standing trees and approximately 23 dead standing trees as at 22 August 2019.

3.       In October 2015 the Waitematā Local Board approved the commencement of the ‘Western Springs Native Bush Restoration’ project with the aim of restoring the area to native bush and achieving the long-term aspiration of returning the area to native podocarp forest as described in the Western Springs Lakeside Park Plan 1995.

4.       The stand was closed to the public in April 2018 due to concerns for the safety of Council’s workers and to members of the public from falling trees. 

5.       In May 2019, following a publicly notified process, Council was granted resource consent to remove the remaining pine trees and restore the area with native vegetation.

6.       The decision to grant resource consent was appealed to the Environment Court.  The parties subsequently engaged in mediation. 

7.       The parties agreed to dispose of the appeal proceeding by way of consent and agreed that the resource consent should be granted with conditions.  On 27 September 2019, the Environment Court formalised the settlement and the resource consent was granted (refer Attachment A – 279(1)(b) of the Resource management Act 1991).

8.       Staff are seeking approval to commence work at the earliest opportunity to progress the restoration project.

9.       The estimated cost of the works is $760,000, including contingency. The local board’s budget allocation for the current financial year will be increased as required to meet the costs associated with the works.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the removal of the whole stand of pine trees at Western Springs Lakeside Park in accordance with the approved resource consent to deliver the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration Project.

 


 

Horopaki

Context

10.     In the late 1920s, an extensive stand of radiata pine was planted on the northern slopes of Western Springs Lakeside Reserve.

11.     Over the past twenty years the stand has progressively reduced from approximately 700 trees in 1988, to approximately 177 live standing trees and approximately 23 dead standing trees as at 22 August 2019.

12.     Discussion on the future management of the trees and the restoration of the site to native bush has been progressing for a number of years. In 2015, the Waitematā Local Board resolved to approve the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration Project and the recommended work programme for pine management, to commence 3rd quarter financial year 2016 following community engagement. (Resolution number WTM/2015/161).

13.     Following the removal, a major planting and restoration effort will follow. Up to 15,000 plants will be planted (the exact number will depend on the amount of bare land available for planting) and the plants will be looked after in the years to follow. It is estimated the planting will take around three weeks. The maintenance will include control of pest plants and replacement of plants that do not survive.

14.     Planting will turn the site into a healthy podocarp-broadleaf forest dominated by kauri, puriri, taraire and tanekaha, along with a native understorey. The project’s native bush objectives also provide the chance to expand the track network through the area bordered by West View Rd, the zoo, stadium and Western Springs Lakeside Park.

15.     The reserve has been closed to the public since April 2018 due to concerns over the safety of reserve users from possible falling limbs or trees.

16.     In early June 2018, a resource consent application for the removal of the trees in order to proceed with the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration Project was submitted.

17.     The application was publicly notified, with hearings held in December 2018, and further submissions of information required in early 2019.

18.     Resource consent was granted in May 2019 and appealed to the Environment Court in June 2019.

19.     Court assisted mediation was undertaken over a number of months.  As part of the mediation between the parties to the appeal, on 22 August 2019, five expert arborists took part in an expert conference and agreed a Joint Expert Witness Statement which recorded agreement amongst the experts that:

·        tree numbers had reduced from an estimated 700 in 1988 to 177 standing live trees;

·        as tree density reduces to the extent that remaining live trees lose the protection afforded by other trees, the remaining trees have an increased likelihood of failure;

·        there are 5 types of targets that could potentially be affected by trees if they were to fall in an uncontrolled way:

o   10 dwellings/studios on West View Road;

o   Key infrastructure, including wastewater sewer, footbridge, powerlines and zoo fence;

o   Other structures, e.g. fences, walls, garden sheds, zoo buildings, stadium grandstand and stormwater pipes;

o   Anywhere people may be present including backyards, in the SEA (on and off track), stadium open space and depot area.

20.     The experts agreed that further information would be required before an informed decision could be made on the most appropriate way to proceed but they did not agree on the extent of the further assessment that would be required.

21.     They did agree that:

·        Some trees need to be removed;

·        Further assessment of many trees through the stand is required, in addition to further assessment of some of the 17 trees;

·        Natural attrition and tree failure are likely to continue within the stand; and

·        Canopy health of some trees is likely to deteriorate and the extent to which this occurs depends on the timeframe to be considered.

22.     As a result of the mediation, the parties agreed to dispose of the appeal by consent and agreed that the resource consent should be granted.  On 27 September 2019, the Environment Court formalised the settlement and ordered that the resource consent was granted. 

23.     The consent order issued by the Environment Court on 27 September 2019 granting consent to the whole stand removal has comprehensive conditions such as:

·    Establishing a Community Liaison Group - represented by all interested parties with two meetings already been held on the 5 November 2019 and 10 December 2019.

·    Project Website – specific project website for the project.

·    Updated Ecological Management Plan – prior to works commencing the consent holder shall provide the Council Team Leader Monitoring the updated plan for certification.

·    Updated Geotechnical Report – provided to the Council Team Leader Monitoring prior to commencing work

·    Independent Arborist and Ecologist – consent holder to employ suitably qualified independent ecologist and arborist to monitor project.

·    Project Management Contract – a contract has been awarded to undertake and deliver the required plans for the consent. Plans will be made available to the Community Liaison Group simultaneously when submitting to consent authority.

·    Conditions of consent provide for greater community input into the consent implementation process and are designed to achieve improved ecological outcomes.

24.     Staff are now seeking the board’s approval to implement the resource consent to deliver of the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration project.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

25.     The objective of the decision is to give effect to the decision of the Local Board to deliver the Western Springs native Bush Restoration Project. We have identified three options open to the board below.  

Fully implement the consent

26.     Fully implementing the consent enables the council to proceed with the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration Project as planned without further delay and is therefore the recommended option. 

27.     This option also completely addresses the health and safety concerns outlined below. Given the information Council now holds on fall targets, Council would need to review the exclusion zones if a decision was taken not to fully implement the consent.

28.     As agreed in the Ecologists Joint Witness Statement of 28 August 2019, whole stand removal will provide greater certainty of ecological outcomes through management. Further, the adverse effects caused by whole stand removal will be short lived and the removal will allow rapid growth of native vegetation and faster transition to a native forest ecosystem.  Against these advantages, the ecologists agreed that whole stand removal would cause a high magnitude of disturbance to and the sudden transition from pine forest to high light/open shrubland could have consequences to the fauna.  It is noted that while the ecologists agreed on the substance of these advantages and disadvantages of whole stand removal, they differed on the weighting and significance of them.  

29.     Implementing the consent and removing the trees will allow the site to be opened up to the public sooner.

30.     This option is fully consented and no further approvals are required.

31.     The costs of fully implementing the consent at this stage are known and can be appropriately budgeted for.

Do not implement the consent

32.     The council could choose not to implement the consent and take no further action at this stage.

33.     Not implementing the consent would not enable the delivery of the Western Springs Native Bush Project and may result in the area remaining closed to the public indefinitely.

34.     It would also result in the health and safety risks outlined below remaining for the foreseeable future. Given the information we now hold on fall targets, we would need to review the exclusion zones around the stand.

35.     As agreed in the Ecologists Joint Witness Statement of 28 August 2019, maintaining the status quo would allow a gradual change in structure, habitat and micro-climate which would be more akin to the natural forest dynamics.  It would also result in a more localised and lower magnitude of disturbance.  Further, the mature pines would continue to provide a habitat for birds and invertebrates.  Against these advantages, the ecologists agreed that management of at status quo would be more complex than whole stand removal.  It would also provide uncertainty of long-term ecological outcome.  They also noted that the pine trees suppress native canopy components.  Again, it should be noted that while the ecologists agreed on the substance of these advantages and disadvantages of whole stand removal, they differed on the weighting and significance of them.  

Further assessment and delayed partial implementation of the consent

36.     The Society for the Protection of Western Springs Forest Incorporated (the Society) has suggested that the local board consider delaying the implementation of the resource consent to undertake further assessment of trees in the stand. Further assessment may result in partial or staged implementation of the resource consent.

37.     This would delay delivery of the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration Project.   

38.     The Society has estimated that further investigations will cost approximately $20,000-30,000. Council has not independently assessed the Society’s cost estimate. The costs of undertaking partial or staged implementation of the consent are also unknown.

39.     Due to ecological impacts the removal of the pines needs to take place between March to May in a given year. If further assessment is undertaken this window will likely be missed for 2020 and the reserve will remain closed to the public for the next 12 months.

40.     If this option was adopted, further advice would be needed to determine whether the conditions of consent can be complied with or whether a variation is required.

41.     This approach does not immediately alleviate the health and safety concerns outlined below.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

42.     Staff have sought advice on the potential climate impacts from Nick Goldwater, a principal ecologist at Wildland Consultants Ltd and council’s ecological expert in the mediation. Mr Goldwater has provided the following information:

43.     There is general consensus that the stand of pine trees is approximately 100 years old. Mature pines that aren’t growing anymore may store a lot of carbon, however, they continue to sequester only small amounts given that they only require carbon to maintain metabolic processes.

44.     Once the pines are felled, it is likely that most of the below ground biomass/roots decomposes into the soil carbon pool with not much atmospheric exchange (unless soils are disturbed). Above the ground (i.e. where logs are left to decay), it is likely that most carbon is actually cycled back to the atmosphere albeit very slowly through decomposition by insects and microbes and released via respiration. Some fraction of the carbon from felled logs may enter the soil carbon pool, although soil accumulation rates are natural low in most terrestrial forests. The felled logs will provide habitat and food resources for indigenous fauna, plants, lichens, and fungi.

45.     It is acknowledged that the indigenous plantings will sequester nominal amounts of carbon for the first decade or so. However, over the medium term of 30 – 40 years, the quantity of carbon stored in high productivity manuka/kanuka forests can exceed the quantity of carbon stored in harvested Pinus radiata forests (Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment. Seeding the carbon storage opportunity in indigenous forests Comments on the draft Climate Change (Forestry Sector) Regulations 2008. 26 June 2008).

46.     The same report also suggests that if a landowner was to fence off one hectare of land having optimal soil fertility and rainfall, and allow it to revert to manuka / kanuka, the site could accumulate 200 tons of carbon in a 20-year period.

47.     Given that the proposed revegetation plantings at Western Springs will contain a high proportion of kanuka and other fast-growing species such as karamu (Coprosma robusta) and kohuhu (Pittosporum tenuifolium), it is reasonable to assume that a similar amount of carbon will be sequestered at the site after 20 years, as long as post-planting maintenance is properly implemented.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

48.     Staff from the Auckland Zoo, Auckland Stadiums, the Museum for Transport and Technology, and Auckland Councils Parks Sport and Recreation Department have been consulted and are supportive of the approved consent for the whole stand removal of the radiata pines.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

49.     The Western Springs Native Bush Restoration project was consulted on as part of the development of the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan, as a priority project of the local board.  Consultation was undertaken between 23 January 2015 to 16 March 2015 to inform the Long-term Plan 2015-2025.  In general, there was strong support for environmental projects, which included the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration project.  Of the 73 responses received, 89 percent supported the Western Springs proposal. 

50.     Council subsequently engaged with the community in relation to the project in the following ways:

·    Presentation of the project at Mana Whenua Parks Hui in November 2017;

·    Discussions with MOTAT, Auckland Zoo and Western Springs Stadium in December 2017;

·    Listing the project information listed on Our Auckland and Facebook, in April 2018

·    Delivering a letter outlining the project including frequently asked questions to all immediate neighbours, in April 2018.

51.     Mana Whenua, Auckland Zoo, Auckland Stadiums, and Museum for Transport and Technology were supportive of the removal of the trees.

52.     Further engagement with the public was undertaken through the publicly notified resource consent application in 2018 and 2019.  There were approximately 50 individual responses from the public on the resource consent application. The responses opposed the removal of the trees.

53.     The local board has heard the views of part of the community represented by the Society for Protection of Western Springs Forest Incorporated and Friends of Western Springs.  The preferred approach by those in opposition is for further assessment of the trees and if necessary, partial or staged removal.

54.     The potential for impacts on residents, particularly the potential impacts of noise and vibration during the removal works, have been recognised and addressed through the resource consent conditions.

55.     Mitigation measures are set out in the Construction Noise and Vibration Management Plan which forms part of the consented documentation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

56.     In November 2017 council presented the project at the Mana Whenua Parks.

57.     Representatives of six iwi attended the hui and supported the proposal to remove the pines.

58.     In June 2018, project information was sent to nine iwi who were not able to attend the hui.  Seven of the iwi responded that either they supported the removal proposal, or deferred to another iwi. Two iwi did not attend the hui or respond to the June 2018 letter.

59.     Attachment B provides a full schedule of responses.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

60.     Table 1 below provides a summary of the estimated cost.

 

Table 1 – Estimated cost

Description

Estimated cost

Conditions of consent, consultant services, and community liaison person under condition 8 of the Resource Consent

$250,000

Arboricultural contractor

$370,000

Restoration – plants and planting

$80,000

Contingency

$60,000

 

61.     The proposed removal of the pine trees at Western Springs currently requires budget allocation of $760,000, including contingency.

62.     The local boards budget allocation for the current financial year will be increased as required to meet the costs associated with the works.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

64.     Council has obligations under the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 (HSWA) to take all reasonable steps to prevent harm to the public.  If Council breaches its key duties under the HSWA it could be fined up to $3,000,000.

65.     In terms of the health and safety risk, council’s risk assessment completed in November 2019, took into account its obligations under the HSWA and followed the Corporate Standard 3 (Attachment C - CSTD3 Risk Assessment) protocols.

66.     In carrying out its risk assessment, Council had available to it expert reports over a number of years detailing the condition of the Western Springs’ pine trees.  Also before Council was the Joint Expert Witness Statement dated 22 August 2019.

67.     The Council has now also had the benefit of Craig Webb’s December 2019 report. This report has used a different methodology for assessing risk and has assessed the risk in relation to individual trees (based on a visual inspection) whereas Council has assessed the overall risk posed by all of the pine trees in the stand. This adopts a different methodology from that used by Council. Having reviewed the report, staff remain concerned about the ongoing health and safety risk arising from the pines.

68.     At present Council has taken action to isolate and mitigate the risk by closing the stand to members of the public, and controlling the access of workers accessing the park for monitoring and other work by requiring that workers obtain approval from Community Facilities before commencing work in the stand and requiring the use of personal protective equipment. However, despite imposing these controls the residual risk remains. It is noted that these controls do not prevent the risk of trees falling onto neighboring property or onto people in those properties.  If a decision is taken not to implement the consent and eliminate the risk then Council will need to reconsider whether it is appropriate to expand the exclusion zone. We also note that people have continued to climb over the barriers even while the track has been closed, therefore the risk of trees falling on people in the stand. 

69.     The November 2019 Council risk assessment records that Council must first consider elimination of the risk, and that to do this it recommends removal of the whole stand of pines as soon as possible. The council has adopted a risk-based approach with the aim of eliminating the risk.

70.     Council also has obligations outside of the HSWA.  As a landowner, Council owes a duty of care to its neighbours to ensure that no hazards occurring on its land cause foreseeable loss or harm, therefore the council is required to take reasonable steps to remove or reduce these hazards.

71.     If council does not fully implement the consent then the risk will not be eliminated.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

72.     Subject to local board approval, staff propose to implement the tree removal and restoration works as soon as possible, in accordance with the granted resource consent conditions. As outlined above, the resource consent conditions require plans to be made available to the Community Liaison Group simultaneously when submitting to the consent authority. Staff will provide these plans to the local board at the same time as they are provided to the Community Liaison Group.

73.     Once the pine trees have been felled and it is deemed safe enough for contractors to work in the area, pest plant and animal control will be reinstated, and planting will be undertaken to achieve 90 percent cover of woody vegetation within five years, as per an approved final Ecological Management Plan set out in the approved consent conditions. The native plantings will be maintained on a regular basis in order to maximise survival.

74.     The proposed revegetation with indigenous plant species, together with the control of pest plants and animals will, in the medium to long-term, substantially improve the current ecological values of the site and provide important local habitat for indigenous birds, lizards, invertebrates, and plants. In addition, the felled pine material to remain on site will provide useful habitat for invertebrates, epiphytic vascular plants, lichens, and fungi, as well as return nutrients to the soil.

75.     It is anticipated that works will commence on site in March 2020.

Public Communication Plan

76.     A specific website for the project will be established which will contain daily project information for the initial part of the works and thereafter on a weekly basis. The website will include access to all the updated plans.

77.     An interested parties’ database will be created. Prior to the works commencing an email database of submitters, interested stakeholders and residents will be established and notifications and project updates will be sent daily for the initial part of the works and thereafter weekly.

78.     Staff will engage a community liaison contact who will be a readily accessible point of contact and available from 8am to 8pm on each workday for the duration of the project.

79.     There will be letter drops prior to the commencement of works to local residents.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Environmental Court Consent (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Mana Whenua Engagement (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Risk Assessment - Corporate Standard (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Risk Assessment of Western Springs pine trees as at November 2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Paul Amaral – Area Manager - Regional Specialist

Authorisers

Rob Cairns – Head of Investigation and Design

Rod Sheridan – General Manager Community Facilities

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

254 Ponsonby Road, Ponsonby Park Detailed Business Case and Concept Design

File No.: CP2020/01702

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement and approval from the Waitematā Local Board to progress a funding request to the Finance and Performance Committee for $5.5 million to enable development of the full site at 254 Ponsonby Road, Ponsonby.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The detailed business case has confirmed a strong case for change and delivery of the Ponsonby Park development from a strategic, commercial, financial and management perspective.

3.       The project budget of $11 million is to be obtained from the below two sources:

·    $5.5 million has been allocated to the Ponsonby Park project in the 2018-2028 LTP but is contingent on business case processes and obtaining funding approval from the Finance and Performance Committee.

 

·    $5.5 million has been allocated to the Ponsonby Park project from the sale of an endowment property at 200 Victoria Street West but is contingent on confirmation by the Auckland Council Legal Services team that the Ponsonby Park project is consistent with the purpose of the original endowment in accordance with sections 140 and 141 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

4.       The Ponsonby Park project at 254 Ponsonby Road aligns strongly with the strategic goals of Auckland Council and the Waitematā Local Board. An investment of $11 million is recommended to realise the project goals whilst providing value for money and internal rate of return for capital and operational investment.

5.       The Ponsonby Park project has a strong economic case due to the availability of the $11 million required to deliver the project and the offset to annual maintenance costs resulting from the rental of the onsite commercial space.

6.       254 Ponsonby Road was acquired by the former Auckland City Council in 2006 to address the need for more civic space within the Ponsonby precinct that had been strategically identified in 2000.

7.       The need for more civic space has been consistently confirmed as a high priority through extensive local community consultations. It has also been represented through the local community’s sustained passion, involvement and interest in the delivery of the Ponsonby Park project, the parallel support by the Waitematā Local Board for the project and the selection of the project as the local board’s key advocacy project and subsequently as a One Local Initiative.

8.       The preferred concept identified for Ponsonby Park:

·    provides value for money due to onsite commercial revenue generation and the significant improved social, environmental and cultural benefits that will be realised

·    will meet the needs and expectations of the local community and local board

·    will be deliverable within the $11 million budget envelope

·    can be delivered in FY20-21 in alignment with One Local Initiative funding timeframes and the proposed project schedule with minimal risk to time or cost. This has been largely due to the local community and local board giving their support for a final development option that is most appropriate from a cost, design, construction and end outcomes perspective.

 

9.       The preferred development Option 5 includes:

·    the Park (a grassed lawn and gardens, 1410 m2)

·    the Pavilion (outdoor sheltered area, 222 m2)

·    the Plaza and lane (outdoor paved area, 807 m2)

·    O’Neil Street upgrade (734 m2)

·    refurbished building (190 m2 including a 130m2 retail / commercial space)

·    public toilet block (60 m2)

·    refurbished lighthouse (1st storey structure, 120 m2)

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      endorse the Ponsonby Park detailed business case (Attachment B)

b)      approve the LandLAB concept design Option 5 27 November 2019 as the preferred development option for 254 Ponsonby Road (Attachment A)

c)      support a report being progressed to the Finance and Performance Committee requesting $5.5 million from the One Local Initiative 10 Year Programme to enable the development of the whole site at 254 Ponsonby Road as per Option 5 27 November 2019 (Attachment A) and the detailed business case.

d)      request, subject to approval of funding, a review of the design team brief and scope prior to procurement and a workshop with the design team prior to commencement of preliminary design processes.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The One Local Initiative 10 Year Programme (OLI) process was initiated through the 2018-2028 Long-term Plan in order to improve the local board advocacy process, including providing more comprehensive advice on local board advocacy projects. Whilst there was no guarantee of funding, the process was designed to give local board projects a better opportunity to be progressed through investigation, business cases and to be considered for funding.

11.     The former Auckland City Council acquired 254 Ponsonby Road in 2006 for $7.7 million to create an urban square. Since 2006 the site has been tenanted, delivering a commercial return to council while various plans have been developed for the space.

12.     In 2007 preliminary design options were provided for a mixed-use site which incorporated a civic square and public open space. The project was deferred by the former Auckland City Council Strategy and Finance Committee for three years.

13.     In 2011 the Waitematā Local Board requested that options for the development of 254 Ponsonby Road to be re-investigated. Auckland Council’s in-house landscape architects created a new set of potential design options for the site.

14.     In 2013, as a part of the Ponsonby Road Plan development, two development options were consulted upon. Due to the diverse views that were received, the board resolved to uncouple the project from the Ponsonby Road Plan and to progress the project independently.

15.     In 2016 there were several consultations and exhibitions to further define the community’s vision for the site. Through these public consultations the local community showed that they wanted:

·    an inclusive space that would encourage and foster social connections

·    a place to sit and relax

·    an urban green space

·    a place to hold markets and events

·    a play-space

·    an area to host public art

·    a place which demonstrates sustainable design.

16.     A design brief was created and taken to professional designers and the local community to submit a pro bono concept design for the site. A community vote was held on the concept designs received for the 254 Ponsonby Road site. The concept design developed by LandLAB received the highest percentage of the final votes (30 per cent) and was selected as the community preferred option in February 2017. The concept was presented to the Waitematā Local Board in April 2017 and received the board’s endorsement

Resolution number WTM/2017/40

a)      thank Chris Bailey, Keith Maddison and Jennifer Ward for their attendance and presentation about 254 Ponsonby Road

b)      receive the tabled 254 Ponsonby Road: Community Led Design Project report

c)      thank the 254 Ponsonby Road Facilitation Group for their contribution and work to achieve a community-led design outcome

d)      refer the chosen design to Parks, Sports and Recreation officers and request that they progress a development design and report back to the board on costs and funding options for completion of the development.

17.     The design involved the development of the full site as a civic space, re-use of existing buildings and structures as well as a village green.  Development of 254 Ponsonby Road, in accordance with the preferred design, was then selected in 2017 by the Waitematā Local Board as their OLI for funding as part of the Long-Term Plan 2018-2028.

Resolution number WTM/2018/42

h) approve its advocacy initiatives, including its key advocacy project, for inclusion as an appendix to its 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement as set out in the tabled Attachment D to this report.

Figure 1 Attachment D to Waitematā Local Board meeting WTM/2018/42

 

18.     The original LandLAB concepts proposed opportunities to re-use the existing buildings and structures on the site to enable the creation of new spaces to foster opportunities for cafés, retail, art galleries and community buildings. The Pavilion was identified as the intended focal point to support a diverse range of informal and programmed activities from meetings to markets.

19.     Investigations were undertaken into disposal of a portion of the site to offset the initial purchase costs but in December 2018 the Environment and Community Committee approved the retention and development of the whole site (2326m2).

Resolution number ENV/2018/167

a)  support the retention of the whole site located at 254 Ponsonby Road (2326m2), Ponsonby, currently held by Auckland Council in fee simple under the Local Government Act 2002, for the purpose of developing a civic space.

20.     The estimated cost to deliver the project was $11 million and the Waitematā Local Board originally proposed the development of the civic space in two phases:

·    Phase 1: $5.5 million - Deliver the essential elements of the civic space, including landscaping, repurposing the existing structure, and toilet facilities.

 

·    Phase 2: $5.5 million – Repurpose existing building and improve streetscape.

21.     In August 2019 the Finance and Performance Committee approved, subject to due legal process, allocation of funding up to $5.5 million from the sale of 200 Victoria Street West to the project which enables the delivery of both stages together.

Resolution number FIN/2019/88

b)  approve the allocation of the proceeds of sale from 200 Victoria Street West, Auckland Central to the following projects, subject to confirmation by the Auckland Council Legal Services team that the projects identified are consistent with the purpose of the endowment pursuant to which this property was vested and are is in accordance with sections 140 and 141 of the Local Government Act 2002:

i)   up to $5.5 million to the development of a civic space at 254 Ponsonby Road, Ponsonby.

22.     The findings of the LandLAB concept analysis were presented to the Waitematā Local Board, Ponsonby Park Community Led Design group (CLD) and other interested members of the community in August 2019.  At this meeting the decision was made to progress with the development of refined concept options in partnership with LandLAB. The Waitematā Local Board gave direction to remove the Tole Street entry from the project and this was supported by the CLD group members.

23.     A Project Control Steering Group (PCSG) meeting consisting of representatives from the Waitematā Local Board, Community Led Design group, LandLAB and council officers in attendance was held during October 2019. At this meeting LandLAB proposed five refined design options.

24.     Each option was analysed and ranked based on a Quadruple Bottom Line (QBL) assessment analysing the options performance against 14 metrics.

-      Economic 1 - OPEX

-      Economic 2 - CAPEX

-      Economic 3 - Risk

-      Economic 4 - Complexity

-      Environmental 1 - Reuse / Waste minimisation in construction

-      Environmental 2 - Sustainable design - Low Impact Design / Best Practice

-      Environmental 3 - Sustainable materials & products

-      Social 1 - On-time delivery / Timeline impact

-      Social 2 - Similarity to original concept selected by public

-      Social 3 - Sense of place / heritage retention

-      Cultural 1 - Māori identity / presence

-      Cultural 2 - Involvement of Mana Whenua in the process

-      Cultural 3 - Ecological outcomes

-      A project cost estimate based on guidance received from quantity surveyors.

 

25.     Three final preferred options were selected for further community and local board consideration. During November and December 2019, the CLD initiated a community consultation process to select a final preferred design solution. 171 responses were received with Option 5 receiving 61 per cent of the community vote.

26.     A summary of the options is provided below:

 

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

Option 001

Retain existing building, lighthouse, canopy and refurbish

 

·      Original concept delivered

·      Retention of the site’s heritage

·      Reduced construction waste

·      Estimates exceed budget available

·      Increased risk and complexity

·      Higher ongoing maintenance costs due to age of buildings

Option 001A

Demolish 40% of existing building and lighthouse and refurbish remaining 60%

·      Original concept largely retained

·      Delivered within budget available

·      Increased park and plaza area

·      Retention of the site’s heritage

·      Reduced construction waste

·      Reduced indoor and covered building space

·      Increased risk and complexity to improve existing buildings

·      Higher ongoing maintenance costs due to age of buildings

Option 5

Demolish existing building and rebuild new within 60% footprint.  New lighthouse positioned toward Ponsonby Road

·      New building enables better fit for purpose approach

·      Delivered within budget available

·      Increased park and plaza area

·      Improved building frontage Ponsonby Road

·      Original concept changed

·      No building re-use

·      Reduced indoor and covered building space

 

Figure 1 – 2019 shortlisted design options advantages / disadvantages

27.     The three options and the community survey results were subsequently presented to the Waitematā Local Board at a workshop held on 12 December 2019. Support was given by the local board for the consultation process and to progress the business case on the basis of the new building Option 5.

28.     A further local board workshop was held on 28 January 2020 to present a summary of the detailed business case and outline the recommended next steps.  On the basis of the findings and recommendations the local board provided support to progress a formal report to the business meeting 18 February 2020 and a subsequent report to the Finance and Performance Committee seeking the remaining funding of $5.5 million.  The local board also requested, subject to approval of funding, a review of the design team brief and scope prior to procurement and a workshop with the design team prior to commencement of preliminary design processes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

29.     The proposed civic space responds to two Auckland Plan focus areas:

Belonging and Participation - Focus area 1

Create safe opportunities for people to meet, connect, participate in and enjoy community and civic life

Homes and Places - Focus area 5

Create urban places for the future.

The open space provision policy sets out the requirements for civic spaces

30.     The Open Space Provision Policy 2016 informs decision-making on the type, size and location of parks and open space.

31.     Civic spaces are a specific type of open space with a range of amenity values, including:

· meeting and socialising opportunities

· event space

· landscaping and gardens

· public artworks.

32.     The extent of the network and sizes of civic space should reflect the urban centres in which they are located.

33.     Ponsonby is defined as a ‘Town Centre’. It will be well served by one or more small civic spaces (<1000m2) and one medium civic space (1500m2 to 2000m2).

34.     Staff have undertaken an assessment of 254 Ponsonby Road against the policy (see Attachment B). The assessment concludes that:

·        there is a shortfall of civic space in Ponsonby

·        the site and proposed community design can deliver the desired amenity values

·        development of the full site would meet the policy provision target

·        the retention of the site is a high priority as it would meet current and future community needs.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     Subject to funding approval, climate impacts will be assessed and addressed for the Ponsonby Park development through planning, design and implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     Collaboration across staff within Community Facilities, Parks Sports and Recreation, Panuku Development Auckland Limited and Auckland Transport will be ongoing to ensure that the Ponsonby Park project will be appropriately developed and integrated into operational maintenance and asset management systems once completed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     The OLI is the Waitematā Local Board’s key advocacy project identified through the 2018-2028 Long-term Plan and the development will deliver multiple benefits for the Ponsonby precinct.

38.     Development of the civic space will enhance amenity and recreational opportunities in Ponsonby. The community has anticipated the achievement of this outcome since 2006.

39.     Multiple rounds of public consultation have created a high degree of public engagement in the development of 254 Ponsonby Road. Public feedback has consistently found majority support the development of the whole site.

40.     A community-led design process that has then resulted in a high sense of local ownership of the proposed civic space design.

41.     The Waitematā Local Board has confirmed that development of 254 Ponsonby Road aligns with community aspirations and is a key priority in the 2017 Local Board Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.     In 2015 Auckland Council commissioned a report on Māori heritage values and opportunities to better engage with relevant mana whenua for the Ponsonby Road master plan and this report has informed the concept designs being prepared for the site.

43.     The delivery of Ponsonby Park will provide spaces to highlight Māori heritage, stories and exhibit Māori art to future users and visitors of the civic open space.

Māori Outcomes

Marae development

Rangatahi - Youth

Te Reo Māori

Māori Housing and Papakāinga

Economic development

Organisational Effectiveness

Kaitiakitanga - Water

Māori Participation

Māori Identity and Culture

 

 

 

44.     In June 2016 engagement was undertaken with representatives of the Ngati Whatua Ōrākei Trust Ltd in relation to the development of the Ponsonby Road Masterplan Māori Heritage Report.

45.     In July 2016 correspondence was sent to representatives of 16 iwi with an interest in the Waitematā area. Responses were received from Ngati Whatua o Ōrākei and Ngati te Ata to be kept informed of the Ponsonby Park project through meeting minutes and press releases.

46.     Since the initial notification in 2016, the CLD group have sent all meeting minutes and event invitations to the interested iwi groups.

47.     In September 2019 correspondence was sent to Ngati Whatua o Ōrākei and Ngati te Ata to provide an update on the project progress and offer the availability of a workshop to further engage on the project.

48.     Subject to Finance and Performance Committee funding approval of the OLI there will be early engagement with Ngati Whatua o Ōrākei and Ngati te Ata as preliminary designs are developed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

49.     LandLAB provided an earlier high-level cost estimate for their Ponsonby Park concept based on their experience with similar projects. They had not been provided any supplementary information or building details from any other party and were not aware of any specific site details or previously identified issues.

50.     In 2017, Auckland Council adjusted the LandLAB estimates to consider additional issues (such as asbestos removal and seismic strengthening costs) and applied building rates which were aligned with actual build costs recorded by Panuku for similar projects. The difference in project cost estimates are shown below. Auckland Council cost adjustment details and alternative options analysed are detailed in Jafarzadeh, R. (2017)

 

 

LandLAB Concept Cost Estimate

(Feb 2017)

Estimate Revision by Auckland Council

(Nov 2017)

The Park

$1,486,498

$1,572,239

The Pavilion

$1,647,710

$1,740,640

The Plaza + Lane

$1,577,760

$1,623,360

Tole Street entry

$704,900

$704,900

O’Neil Street upgrade

$1,345,800

$1,345,800

Buildings

$4,276,250

$6,423,132

Total

$11,038,918

$13,410,071

Figure 2 – 2017 Project cost estimates by LandLAB and revised by Auckland Council

51.     Funding for the delivery of Ponsonby Park is derived from $5.5 million which has been allocated from the proceeds of sale from an endowment property owned by Auckland Council at 200 Victoria Street West and a funding provision of $5.5 million allocated in the 2018-2028 LTP OLI programme for the Ponsonby Park project.

52.     Through refinement of the Ponsonby Park design, Option 5 was reviewed by Millard Construction Cost Consultants Ltd.

Option 5

The Park (1410 m2)

$1,744,000

The Pavilion (222 m2)

$1,408,000

The Plaza and Lane (807 m2)

$1,560,000

O’Neil Street Upgrade (734 m2)

$1,152,000

New building, including toilets (250 m2) and new lighthouse (120m2)

$2,936,000

20% Contingency

$2,200,000

Total

$11,000,000

Figure 3 – 2019 Option 5 shortlisted design cost estimates

53.     A commercial rental revenue of $60,000 per annum and an operational cost of $50,000-$70,000 per annum have been estimated in the financial analysis for the project.  These estimates do not include:

·    potential revenue that may be realised from the site as a result of other uses of the space (such as a weekly market)

·    maintenance cost-savings resulting from the local community taking ownership of some maintenance aspects.

54.     A rental revenue estimate is based on the market rate research shown below:

·    Colliers 2009 rental rates: A-grade rental rate of $435/m2. Using this rate an onsite revenue generation of $56,550 is reasonable.

·    Rental comparisons with nearby properties[1]

14 Jervois Road - $80,000 for 114 m2 of retail space

273 Ponsonby Road - $154,000 for 154 m2 of retail space (and 103 m2 of storage and other space)

 

55.     The proposed whole of life cost of the project is $11,524,300 over the 50 years of the expected lifetime of the asset at a public sector discount rate of 6%. This is based on a project implementation cost of $11 million in FY 2020-2021, an annual OPEX cost of $50,000-$70,000 and an annual rental revenue of $60,000 starting in FY2020-2022.

56.     The change of 254 Ponsonby Road from a carpark and liquor store to Ponsonby Park will significantly increase the desirability of the area for residents and visitors. The development will also attract further commercial activity and development in the area. Auckland Council will be the benefactor of any further increases in commercial rental rates and land value. In 2006, the land and existing building were purchased for $7.7 million. By 2019, the property valuation had increased to $15 million (Land Value comprising of $13.75 million).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

57.     The following risks and mitigation have been identified.

Risk Description

Mitigation

Date Identified

Owner

Project may run over time or budget if project management of the project is poor and / or if value management processes are not carried out.

 

   Ensure there is an adequately experienced project manager involved.

   Ensure a project schedule is regularly updated.

   Ensure project documentation and correspondence is recorded.

July 2019

Project Manager

Lack of support / engagement from key stakeholders and community groups if consultation and engagement is not implemented appropriately.

 

   Ensure stakeholders and community groups are identified early.

   Communicate with stakeholders and community groups on a regular basis though a reliable medium.

   Set up a PCSG as a decision making and consultation body.

July 2019

Project Manager

Project scope is limited due to the already allocated budget.

 

   Refer to the local board resolution made in 2018 to identify and align the scope of work

   Avoid scope creep and endeavour to progress the project as per the delivery timeline agreed with the Waitematā Local Board

July 2019

Project Manager

Potential negative public / media reaction for the project, particularly if the communication is ineffective.

   Ensure communication is clear and well timed with the project.

   Communicate effectively via the established PCSG.

August 2019

Project Manager

Delayed delivery of the project due to project history and high expectations from the stakeholders and community.

   Ensure communication is clear and well timed with the project.

   Communicate effectively via the established PCSG.

   Ensure project team communicates and meets project milestones.

August 2019

Project Manager

Expectation that the ‘chosen’ LandLAB design will progress. A revision / refinement of the concept design may be objected to by stakeholders and community groups.

   Ensure communication is clear regarding project decisions.

   Engage a Quantity Surveyor to justify the project costs.

   Refer to the local board resolution made in 2018 to deliver the project in 2 phases / stages.

   Re-consult with the local community for any significant concept changes

August 2019

Project Manager

Quantity Surveyor

The project budget has been allocated and fixed before the design has been developed / completed so actual costs are not yet defined.

 

   Engage a Quantity Surveyor to ensure project element budgets are accurate.

   Refer to the local board resolution made in 2018 to identify and align the scope of work for stage 1 and stage 2.

   Avoid scope creep and manage the budget closely.

TBC

Project Manager

Quantity Surveyor

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

58.     Subject to the Waitematā Local Board’s decision, the next steps in the development of 254 Ponsonby Road as a civic space are outlined below.

Figure 2 – Next Steps

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ponsonby Park+ Option 5

 

b

Ponsonby Park Detailed Business Case

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Roscoe Webb - Programme Principal

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

City Centre Masterplan refresh response

File No.: CP2020/01705

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a detailed overview of the engagement process undertaken from July 2019 to February 2020 to refresh the City Centre Masterplan (CCMP).

2.       To request formal feedback on the draft CCMP 2020 from the Waitematā Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report is an overview of an eight-month period of consultation and targeted engagement, undertaken with Council group and the public. This in turn represents the culmination of almost three years of CCMP and Waterfront Plan refresh work.

4.       On 2 July 2019, Planning Committee unanimously approved a plan to seek public input on the high-level outcomes, transformational moves and content of the CCMP.

5.       Between July 2019 and February 2020, more than fifty presentations, workshops, targeted meetings and other engagements were undertaken across Council family and with external audiences. This informed the subsequent public consultation.

6.       During public consultation, 542 public submissions were made on the CCMP from individuals and organisations. 76 per cent of the submissions supported the CCMP. Themes arising from this feedback, along with that already gathered, have helped to refine the masterplan.

7.       A detailed submission on the CCMP was provided by Auckland Transport (AT). It identifies that Access for Everyone (A4E) – a fundamentally different way of managing transport within the city centre - aligns with AT’s existing mode shift plans and can be achieved if new enabling programmes are funded and implemented. The New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) also identified A4E as a flagship opportunity to shape travel within the city centre.

8.       Four workshops took place with Waitematā Local Board in 2019 to develop and refine the revised vision for the city centre and waterfront.

9.       A summary of the public feedback has been communicated widely to all submitters and stakeholder groups involved in the process. The full feedback report is available on request.

10.     The CCMP engagement process, results and changes will be presented and discussed at a Planning Committee Workshop on 19 February 2020 to provide Planning Committee with an update, prior to the following month’s Planning Committee meeting

11.     The intention is to seek an endorsement of the refreshed CCMP at the 5 March Planning Committee, thus marking the completion of the 2012 CCMP refresh.

12.     The CCMP is a high-level vision. The completion of the CCMP refresh will enable and inform subsequent projects, programmes and interventions to deliver the vision for Auckland city centre and waterfront.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the draft CCMP refresh by 21 February 2020

b)      note the engagement process undertaken as part of this refresh

 

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     Since July 2019, the CCMP refresh team has acted on the instructions of Planning Committee to undertake engagement on the CCMP refresh. The purpose of this report is to show:

a)   how we have engaged with subject matter experts (SMEs), stakeholders and partners via targeted and public consultation

b)   the themes emerging from the consultation and how this material has informed and refined the CCMP material

c)   how completion of the CCMP refresh will inform Council group actions to continue to deliver the vision for Auckland city centre

Progress of update

14.     At a Planning Committee meeting on 28 March 2017, elected members reiterated support for the CCMP vision and resolved (PLA/2017/31) to support a refresh to the CCMP implementation strategy. The targeted refresh of the Waterfront Plan was also noted (PLA/2017/32).

15.     At the Planning Committee meeting on 27 November 2018, elected members gave unanimous support to the CCMP refresh as a light-touch digital document, integrating the Waterfront Plan into the CCMP and incorporating rolling updates. (PLA/2018/121).

16.     At the above meeting, the key focus areas for rolling updates were agreed to be:

§ Māori Outcomes

§ Grafton Gully Boulevard

§ Queen Street - Access for Everyone

17.     The resolution (PLA/2018/121) also emphasised the importance of collaboration in the CCMP refresh and instructed Auckland Council to develop material for public consultation, to begin in mid-2019.

18.     A series of workshops with Planning Committee on 26 March, 16 May and 12 June 2019 informed the development of a consultation approach that incorporated these new updates into a light-touch update of the 2012 CCMP’s guiding factors and transformational moves.

19.     At a Planning Committee meeting on 2 July 2019, Council was instructed (PLA/2019/62) to develop consultation material, undertake targeted and public engagement, and report back to Planning Committee in early 2020. 

Overview of CCMP consultation and engagement

20.     From March 2019, the CCMP refresh team worked closely with Auckland Council’s Citizen and Customer Engagement representatives to develop a consultation and engagement plan. The Planning Committee approved this plan at its meeting on 2 July 2019. The plan was developed to be consistent with equivalent non-statutory consultations.

Targeted engagement

21.     The first stage of the CCMP consultation occurred between July and August 2019. It centred on a programme of targeted engagement. This included, but was not limited to engagement with:

i.    Elected members

ii.    Partners

iii.   Council internal audiences

iv.  Council-Controlled Organisations (CCOs)

v.   Advisory panels

vi.  City centre reference groups

vii.  Parties directly affected by upcoming changes

22.     This targeted engagement was intended to update partners and stakeholders with the Planning Committee decision. It provided consistent knowledge of the CCMP refresh process across the Council whanau and enabled the CCMP refresh team to develop and refine the public consultation material.

23.     Targeted engagement ensured that the consultation material was consistent with statutory planning guidance for the whole city: the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Unitary Plan and also the Auckland Transport Alignment Plan.

24.     A city centre reference group ran throughout 2019, consisting of membership organisations, such as the NZ Automobile Association (NZAA) and Heart of the City. During the targeted engagement, the refence group members were also invited to shape the consultation material and to canvass opinions from their members in providing feedback to the public consultation.

25.     Targeted engagement was completed in the first half of August 2019. Findings from this process helped to shape the public consultation material.

Public engagement

26.     The second stage of CCMP engagement was public consultation. Members of the public were invited to review the city centre proposals and provide feedback online via the council’s ‘Have Your Say’ website. This ran from 9 September to 18 October 2019.

27.     All relevant information and documentation was available online at https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/have-your-say. Hard copies of the relevant information were made available in libraries, local board offices and service centres. Written feedback was gathered through forms (online and hard copy), emails, letters and proformas.

28.     The decision to consult on the revised CCMP received widespread coverage in the national press, including Scoop, Stuff and the New Zealand Herald. In order to raise awareness of the engagement process and opportunity to participate, the CCMP consultation was advertised via Auckland Council digital platforms, with articles published on OurAuckland and the Auckland Council Facebook and Twitter pages.

29.     E-mails were sent to the stakeholders and partners who had already contributed, as well as the thousands of members of the Auckland Council People’s Panel, via the People’s Panel Newsletter.

30.     The consultation was also picked up by membership groups, including (but not limited to) Architecture Now, Property Council NZ, the City Centre Residents’ Group (CCRG) and Greater Auckland. All of these resources provided links to the CCMP consultation and urged people to respond.

31.     Public feedback was independently assessed by the consultancy Buzz Channel. The results and the subsequent changes are set out in the next section.

Public engagement v2

32.     A second round of targeted engagement took place in December 2019 and January 2020 in response to detailed submissions from major city centre stakeholders. These included Auckland Museum and Art Gallery, Ports of Auckland Ltd, Cooper & Co and others. This allowed their submissions and the CCMP to be discussed in greater detail.

33.     The CCMP has thus been subject to an extensive programme of consultation and engagement, designed to develop a coordinated high-level vision for the heart of Auckland. The next section summarises the themes emerging in the public consultation and how this has shaped the CCMP.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

34.     Public consultation on the CCMP refresh ended on 18 October 2019, attracting 542 submissions from individuals and organisations. Feedback was sought on five documents – all had been refined and finalised in July and August 2019 via targeted engagement.

1

Outcomes

2 & 3

Transformational Moves (summary and full text)

4 & 5

Access for Everyone (summary and full text)

 

35.     Every submission on the CCMP was read and recorded by the Auckland Design Office. Responses requiring further advice were forwarded to subject matter experts. Over 3,000 line items were entered into the consultation database for record-keeping and further consideration. Submissions were received from every local board area.

36.     Independent analysis provided further insight. A public consultation feedback report was produced by Buzz Channel. This report analysed the responses to determine the levels of support for the CCMP vision and identify the main themes emerging from the consultation.

Themes – overall CCMP vision.

37.     Among the 542 respondents, 76 per cent supported the general direction of the CCMP, with 10 per cent opposing and 14 per cent neutral. Throughout the feedback there was a general desire for urgency, tangible action and progress towards the goals and direction expressed in the CCMP.

38.     Among the 76 per cent of responses in support of the CCMP, the most frequently mentioned theme was its direction towards greater pedestrian friendliness in the city centre.

39.     The plan’s environmental focus was also well-received, with participants supporting moves to make the city centre a more human-focused and environmentally friendly space. Improved air quality and plans to combat the effects of climate change were a particular focus.

40.     The need to improve Auckland’s public transport was also mentioned throughout the feedback, and many felt this would be essential to deliver the CCMP’s goals.

41.     Among those who did not support the CCMP, the primary reasons related to a general dislike of the direction or potential costs of the proposals, a desire to focus on other areas of Auckland rather than the city centre, and a sense that the plan under-emphasised vehicular access.

42.     There were no fundamental or overwhelming issues arising from the CCMP consultation. The general direction, outcomes and transformational moves outlined in the CCMP were generally supported by a large majority of respondents. This feedback has allowed us to make improvements to the CCMP material while having confidence in the overall vision.

43.     When considering comments for inclusion, the scope of the CCMP (i.e. as a high-level urban design vision) was used to determine the extent to which they were appropriate for incorporation.

Themes emerging – Outcomes

44.     Ten city centre-wide outcomes were consulted on:

            CCMP Outcomes as consulted: August-September 2019

1)        Tāmaki Makaurau: Our place in the world

2)        Accessible city centre

3)        Inclusive, engaging and child-friendly city centre

4)        Green city centre

5)        Public life

6)        Liveable city centre

7)        Quality built form

8)        Heritage-defined city centre

9)        Sustainable city centre

10)      Prosperous city centre

 

45.     All ten Outcomes were supported by at least two thirds of the participants. The highest support was for Accessible City Centre (90 per cent), Green City Centre (88 per cent) and Liveable City Centre (87 per cent).

46.     While people talked in detail about various additions and requirements for the CCMP, the main general theme about the outcomes was that they covered the important aspirations for the city centre and were important goals to focus on.

47.     Some felt that the plans sounded good but wanted to see progress on actual tangible outcomes and improvement to the city centre. Others asked what, specifically, the outcomes meant and what actions and proposals they would trigger. They felt the outcomes were too vague / open to interpretation and possibly overlapped.

48.     Some felt the CCMP could have more focus on creating a city that values people and the public, with amenities and facilities for public, cultural and recreational use (as well as commercial). This related to a theme of inclusivity: to make the city centre welcoming and accessible for people on lower incomes and from all Auckland suburbs.

49.     A small proportion of participants felt the CCMP proposals went too far in prioritising pedestrian access over vehicle / driver access. They felt that prioritisation of car access was critical for the city centre.

Changes in emphasis to Outcomes

50.     Based on these themes, alterations were made to emphasis the following four Outcomes to make them clearer and more focused.

Outcome 2: Accessible City Centre was renamed as Connected City Centre. This was because the term "accessible" led respondents to expect this Outcome to address universal design. This was and is covered in Outcome 3. The new title "Connected" emphasises this move’s focus on transport at a local, regional and national scale, particularly the city centre's relationship with the rest of Auckland.

Cities are places of connectivity and this is particularly so in the city centre. It also addresses the use of urban design to create streets and public spaces that enable people to connect with one another, enabling connectivity at a person-to-person level.

The messaging on this Outcome emphasises that the city centre is well-connected within itself, with the rest of Auckland, to the rest of the country and the rest of the world.

Outcome 3: Inclusive, Engaging and Child-Friendly City Centre was renamed to be: Accessible and Inclusive City Centre. This centred the outcome on universal design and diversity. Sub-sections cover child-friendliness and healthy ageing. Content on cultural activation was moved to Outcome 5: Public Life.

The messaging with outcome 3 is one of inclusivity. Everyone is invited to Auckland city centre. All are is welcome and it will work for everyone.

Outcome 5: Public Life now contains the “engaging” material previously in Outcome 3. As a whole, this Outcome covers the contribution that public buildings and spaces make to public life. Urban design can help enhance public life through better streets, better spaces, new connections and new destinations.

Outcome 6: Liveable City Centre was renamed Residential City Centre Neighbourhoods. The new title emphasises that this Outcome is specifically about improving the experience of living in the city centre. It focuses on the importance of safe streets, well-defined neighbourhoods and the ‘good ordinary’ streets that are essential for successful residential neighbourhoods, plus the associated design of buildings and their relationship with the street.

51.     Feedback on the Outcomes also shaped the Transformational Moves and A4E text, particularly around inclusion, accessibility and safety.

Themes emerging – Transformational Moves

52.     CCMP Transformational Moves as consulted: August – September 2019
1)	Māori Outcomes
2)	East and West Stitch
3)	Waihorotiu Queen Street Valley 
4)	Innovation Cradle
5)	Rapid Transit-Oriented Development
6)	Green Link
7)	City to the Villages
8)	Harbour Edge Stitch
Eight Transformational Moves were consulted on:

53.     All eight Transformational Moves were supported by the majority of respondents. The highest support was for Move 5 - Rapid Transit Oriented Development (86 per cent) and Move 6 - Green Link (86 per cent). There was relatively less support for Moves 4 (Innovation Cradle) and 1 (Māori Outcomes).

54.     Among the highest-supported moves, the most consistent theme was one of impatience. Respondents overwhelmingly support the idea of a pedestrian-priority Queen Street, a Victoria Street Linear Park, with people able to access the whole city through well-connected rapid transit.

55.     The responses to Move 4 highlighted confusion around its purpose. As consulted, it was the only non-spatial Move, with a specific emphasis on supporting start-up businesses. Responses highlighted support for the spatial elements: integrating the universities into the fabric of the city centre and enriching the city’s social, economic and cultural offer. 

Changes in emphasis to Transformational Moves

56.     Based on these themes, changes were made to one Transformational Move:

Transformational Move 4: Learning Quarter was renamed City as Campus. It has been edited with input from the University of Auckland and Auckland University of Technology, plus Regional Facilities Auckland (RFA) and other city centre stakeholders and partners. It now has a purely spatial focus, consistent with the other seven Moves and will strengthen the relationship between the city centre and the universities.

Themes emerging – Access for Everyone (A4E)

57.     A4E received 82 per cent support. In line with feedback on move 5 (Rapid Transit Oriented Development), a significant theme for the A4E proposal was that this was critical for Auckland’s future, and should be an urgent priority. A4E enables a pedestrian-priority Queen Street. Some expressed frustration that this plan had seemingly been so long in the making, and that the council needed to fully support it, quickly.

58.     A4E submissions included a detailed and supportive submission from Auckland Transport (AT). This noted that A4E aligns with AT’s existing mode shift plans and could be achieved if new enabling programmes are funded and implemented. It also acknowledged that “a greater modal balance in the way people across the region” would be fundamental in achieving the CCMP’s goals.

59.     The New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) also supported A4E in its submission and cited A4E as a flagship programme in traffic management in its submission: Keeping Cities Moving, published in December 2019.

60.     A submission from the New Zealand Automobile Association (NZAA) contained results of a membership survey. From 762 respondents 64 per cent supported or strongly supported the vision of Queen Street as a transit street, as envisaged by A4E.

61.     A common theme among supporters and detractors of A4E was the need for deep and meaningful engagement with city centre stakeholders, particularly those involved with movement of people and goods in the city centre.

Changes in emphasis to A4E

62.     In light of this feedback, the A4E material was changed to emphasise that the next stage is to develop the A4E concept into a detailed plan. This will require a well-resourced, long-term process for engagement, analysis and design. The text also places more emphasis on the use of transition planning to create early wins in support of a longer term vision for A4E.

Summary of consultation themes and changes

63.     The public consultation identified themes to inform the CCMP, while showing a majority consensus among respondents in favour of the overall vision. This work is thus the latest step in a continuous thread of Planning Committee-endorsed engagement over the past three years. It has received considerable input from around 50 representative bodies via targeted engagement and 542 public submissions.

64.     With endorsement from Planning Committee of the changes, council whanau will be able to proceed with delivering the plans, programmes and projects that make up the CCMP vision.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

65.     The direction of the CCMP with regard to climate change has been welcomed by respondents. The plan’s environmental focus was also well-received. 19 per cent of participants supported the CCMP based on the vision of a more human-focused and environmentally friendly space. 17 per cent of responses supported the CCMP’s focus on improved air quality and plans to combat the effects of climate change.

66.     The largest greenhouse gas emitting sector in the Auckland region is road transport (30 per cent). To address carbon emissions from transport, Auckland Council has committed to the C40 Fossil Fuel Free Streets Declaration to procure only zero-emission buses from 2025; and crucially creating a Zero-Emissions Area (ZEA) in the city centre by 2030.

67.     This would be principally delivered via Access for Everyone (A4E) which plays a key role in delivering a ZEA by establishing the physical street changes required to reduce the impacts of road transport on the city centre.

68.     The CCMP aims to reduce emissions by enabling mode shift towards public transport and active travel as part of the city centre vision. The CCMP envisages the delivery of a ZEA in the Waihorotiu Queen Street valley. This delivers an expansive pedestrian priority zone through the heart of the city centre, significantly reducing motorised through-traffic. It is consistent with CCMP Transformational Moves 3 and 5 as well as A4E.

69.     The need for mode shift is also identified by AT in their submission which stipulated a requirement for a 30 per cent reduction in private motor vehicle traffic. NZTA also supports A4E as a flagship traffic management programme.

70.     The CCMP also addresses climate change adaptation. TM6 envisages green links through the city centre, concentrated in Victoria Street Linear Park. As well as providing high-quality amenity space, this intervention would provide shade and shelter, enabling city centre streets to cope with projected hotter temperatures and heavier rainfall.  Climate change adaptation is also addressed in CCMP Outcome 4 (Green City Centre) and Outcome 9 (Sustainable City Centre).

71.     The CCMP enables activity to be concentrated in the area of Auckland that is most accessible by foot, cycle or public transport. This addresses the single biggest cause of carbon emissions in Auckland. Mode shift, as part of A4E, is expected to reduce emissions further.

72.     The CCMP is thus consistent with Auckland’s high-level vision for climate action. Working within its remit, it sets out a clear vision addressing climate mitigation and adaptation within the city centre.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

73.     This work has entailed constant input from CCOs, particularly Panuku and AT.

74.     Panuku’s input has delivered a consistent high-level vision for the City Centre and Waterfront. The 2012 Waterfront Plan goals and ideas for delivery were captured in Transformational Move 8 Waterfront and Harbour Edge Stitch. This summarised future moves along the waterfront such as the updated Wynyard Point planning and Central Wharves Strategy. This was supported by 82 per cent of submitters, many of whom commented on the waterfront as Auckland’s greatest asset and the need to improve connections and public access.

75.     The work currently underway to update planning for Wynyard Point, based on Council decisions in 2017, will be discussed with this Committee later this year.  This will form an update to the Wynyard Precinct of the Waterfront Plan and a pre-cursor to a plan change.  This work will be reported back to the Panuku board later this year

76.     AT’s submission on the CCMP identified a series of workstreams necessary to deliver the transport outcomes of the new city centre vision. In particular, AT identified that the full implementation of the Access for Everyone concept would likely require a 30 per cent reduction in general traffic during the two-hour morning peak and an increase in peak public transport capacity of 11,000 over that which is already planned for. It also identified the need for

a)   a well-resourced and clear communications around the city centre transition to a new transport system

b)   significant ongoing stakeholder engagement (led by council) on the changes

c)   LTP and RLTP bids for new projects and initiatives to support the necessary mode shift

d)   significant ongoing work on developing, assessing and implementing the new projects and initiatives

e)   a range of travel behaviour change efforts to support and enable the mode shift.

77.     Delivery of the CCMP vision will entail close working with AT. A staff working group with cross-AT disciplines relevant to city centre matters was established in October 2019. It includes representatives from across council and several teams from the NZTA. This group, led by AT’s Planning and Investment team, will report through established city centre governance mechanisms and progress will also be reported to the Planning Committee. The group will provide input into established budgeting processes, business case development and ongoing operational programmes.

78.     This group is now commencing a comprehensive investigation into the implementation of the A4E concept, including the opportunity to develop pilot projects as part of a transition plan.  AT has noted that substantial future funding for A4E initiatives and projects will be required (e.g. additional public transport capacity, modifications to the strategic network, etc.) and this upcoming work will identify this in more detail.

79.     Regional Facilities Auckland (RFA) has been involved throughout the CCMP development. In its submission to the consultation, RFA commended the work done to date on the CCMP and is very keen to be involved in assisting Auckland Council to achieve the outcomes of the CCMP. Particular areas of interest include:

a)   Aotea Quarter - entrenching the Aotea Quarter as the civic, arts and cultural heart of the City.

b)   the Harbour Edge Stitch - RFA is very keen to be involved in understanding how we can contribute to improving the experiences of visitors to the waterfront

c)   the East West Stitch - RFA supports the concept of the boulevard for the Grafton Gully/The Strand as an important part of activating the eastern part of the City Centre

d)   Māori Outcomes – RFA fully supports the inclusion of the Māori outcomes in the refresh.

80.     A policy mapping exercise in 2019 identified the considerable synergies between the CCMP and the Auckland Plan 2050. The CCMP is thus in effect the non-statutory area-based plan for delivering the Auckland Plan Outcomes in the city centre.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

81.     In November 2018, a memo was sent to local boards which provided information on the Auckland Design Office (ADO) work programme for updating the 2012 CCMP. Local boards were invited to provide their feedback on the concepts through workshops and business meetings. Ōrākei and Waitematā Local Boards provided feedback on the concepts. A further update was circulated to all Local Boards in July 2019.

82.     Four CCMP refresh workshops took place with Waitematā Local Board in 2019. A workshop on 12 February 2019 provided an update on the CCMP refresh process and components. Further engagement took place at a second workshop on 28 May. On 23 July, a third workshop invited feedback on the draft consultation material, prior to the start of public consultation. The fourth workshop occurred on 10 December. It provided a high-level summary of the CCMP consultation results.

83.     Waitematā Local Board welcomed regular engagement with the CCMP refresh team. Feedback at the workshops was supportive overall. Many recommendations centred on messaging and communications – this has been reflected in the work of Auckland’s Future in Progress (AFIP).

84.     Waitematā Local Board suggested engagement with other stakeholders, particularly Parnell Business Association. This was undertaken and it has informed the vision for the East and West Stitch.

85.     This feedback was incorporated in addition to submissions from other city centre stakeholder representatives, including the City Centre Residents’ Group, Heart of the City and others.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

86.     The CCMP refresh team has actively supported the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum (MWKF) Culture and Identity pou over the past year in developing this content.

87.     The Auckland Plan Māori Identity and Wellbeing outcome identifies that: “A thriving Māori identity is Auckland’s point of difference in the world – it advances prosperity for Māori and benefits all Aucklanders.” The objective is that the city centre reflects this aspiration. This has shaped the CCMP refresh.

88.     The greatest changes around the CCMP are centred on the Māori Identify and Wellbeing outcome in the Auckland Plan 2050. This resulted in both a new outcome and a new transformational move in the CCMP.

89.     Outcome 1 Tāmaki Makaurau: Our place in the world envisages contemporary Māori life and culture and mana whenua having a prominent, authentic and active presence in the city centre.

90.     Transformational Move 1 Māori Outcomes: This new move proposes a series of place-based interventions through the city centre and waterfront.

91.     In support of the goals expressed above, the MWKF has approved text and mapped preliminary concepts for further development over the next six months.

92.     The CCMP refresh team has also engaged with non-mana whenua iwi. Mataawaka were invited to participate as part of the targeted engagement. Ngāti Whātua Orākei contributed to the development of transformational move 2 and provided a detailed submission on the CCMP.

93.     CCMP content will continue to be developed in partnership with the MWKF. It will also be informed by the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Schedule of Issues of Significance. Additional advice has been provided by Auckland Council Māori Design subject matter experts and by the Māori Outcomes Advisor.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

94.     The CCMP will shape future inputs and submissions to the Long-Term Plan (LTP) and Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) starting from March 2020.

95.     AT has noted that substantial future funding for A4E initiatives and projects will be required (e.g. additional public transport capacity, modifications to the strategic network, etc).

96.     The CCMP will provide the high-level vision and inform the strategic case for future projects and initiatives in the city centre and waterfront.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

97.     Timing: The CCMP refresh has been intended for sign-off by 5 March 2020 in order to inform the 2021-24 LTP process. A delay to the CCMP refresh process would thus have knock-on effects on the funding of city centre and waterfront programmes and projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

98.     Planning Committee workshop 19 February - discuss CCMP content.

99.     Planning Committee Meeting 5 March – endorse CCMP content.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

CCMP Transformational Moves - Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

CCMP A4E and ZEA - Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

CCMP Outcomes (Under Separate Cover)

 

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

George Weeks - Principal Urban Design

Authorisers

Vanessa  Blakelock - Executive Officer - Chief Planning Office

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport February 2020 Update

File No.: CP2020/01112

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on Auckland Transport activities in the Waitematā Local Board area and a summary on the local board transport funds.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report covers:

·    a summary of Auckland Transport (AT) projects and operations in the local board area

·    a summary of the local board’s Transport Capital Fund and Community Safety Fund

·    a summary of general information items sent to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport February 2020 report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       AT is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. As set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan, we report on a monthly basis to local boards. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important role local boards play within the governance of Auckland Council on behalf of their local communities. 

4.       This report updates the Waitematā Local Board on AT projects and operations in the local board area, it updates the local board on their advocacy and consultations and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and Community Safety Fund (CSF).

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme.

6.       The CSF is a capital budget established by Auckland Transport for use by local boards to fund local road safety initiatives. The purpose of this fund is to allow elected members to address long-standing local road safety issues that are not regional priorities and are therefore not being addressed by the Auckland Transport programme.


 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area

7.       The table below has a general summary of projects and activities of interest to the local board with their current status. Please note that all timings are indicative and are subject to change:

Item

Update

City Gateway Treatments – works to signal to drivers as they enter the City that they are entering a slower speed zone.

Consultation with those directly affected by the works will be undertaken for the treatments requiring raised speed table and pedestrian crossing. This is currently scheduled for Feb 2020.

Connected Communities Great North Road (between Ponsonby and Crummer Road) – project to improve travel choice by providing an enhanced street environment, dedicated bus priority measures, separated cycle lanes, and improved road and pedestrian safety on Great North Road

The project team updated the previous design to a draft level and then engaged with the local board in late 2019. This was followed by wider engagement with the key stakeholders such as local businesses, schools etc.

A follow up meeting with the local board will be organised at the boards earliest convenience to show any new ideas and then wider public consultation will follow this.

Grafton Road – midblock pedestrian signal outside of University of Auckland.

The construction contract has been awarded to Traffic Systems Ltd (TSL). TSL are currently in the process of seeking approval for their Traffic Management Plan. It is intended that construction will commence in mid-February 2020 upon approval of the Traffic Management Plan.

Grey Lynn parking scheme extension - proposed extension to the existing parking scheme.

Occupancy surveys have been completed and results were analysed to establish if new areas need to be included in the current zone.

Survey analysis revealed that average peak occupancy in the remaining streets to be 70 per cent.

Based on these utilisation levels AT are unable to justify extension of the zone to cover all the remaining streets.

The utilisation on Prime Road and Elgin Street did exceed the 85 per cent threshold. These two streets are neighbouring streets to the existing residential zone. AT is proposing to extend the Grey Lynn Residential Parking Zone to include these two streets. Internal consultation on this proposal are complete and external stakeholder consultation starts early Feb 2020.

Herne Bay cycling and walking improvements – proposed changes to encourage slower driving speeds and improve routes for people walking and cycling.

Construction has begun on the traffic calming and speed reduction devices (speed tables). The contractor is continuing liaison with the Auckland Council Healthy Waters project at St Mary’s Bay and Masefield Beach to coordinate Temporary Traffic Management requirements between these two adjacent projects.

Karangahape Road Enhancements Project – streetscape upgrade.

Construction is progressing well. The bus shelters on the motorway over bridge have been removed. Section G (between Upper Queen Street and Mercury Lane) is expected to be completed by mid-March 2020.

Detailed pilot trenching and CCTV investigation is continuing to be carried out for future sections for early identification of any potential clashes with underground services.

Regular meetings are being held with the CRL team and key stakeholders including the K Road Business Association.

Nelson Street Phase 3 - a cycling facility linking Nelson Street via Market Place into the Viaduct.

The concept design on Market Place has been completed. Public consultation is to take place between February and March 2020. Detailed design to be completed by July and construction to complete by December 2020.

Newmarket and Remuera Residential Parking Zone (RPZ)- proposed permit scheme for residents and businesses

Consultation has closed on the project. The team are currently reviewing the responses and will summarise the feedback. This report is expected to be completed in the next 6-8 weeks.

Parnell East Residential Parking Zone (RPZ) – project to install a residential parking zone and safety improvements on St Stephens Avenue, Lichfield Road and Crescent Road.

The consultation report on the project has been published and the parking resolution report has been submitted to the Traffic Control Committee for consideration. Subject to the report being approved by mid-February we are aiming to have the zone installed in March.

Princes Street and Eden Crescent intersection - upgrade including raised zebra crossings.

Construction is 70 per cent complete and has been temporarily placed on hold to accommodate road closures for the Laneways Festival. Construction will re-commence in early-February 2020, with the crossings being open for use prior to the commencement of semester 1 at the University of Auckland.

Pt Chevalier to Westmere cycleway - A dedicated cycle route along Pt Chevalier Road and Meola Road ending near the Westmere Shops. 

Public consultation ended on 20 December 2019. This included three drop-in sessions at the Pt Chev library.

The project team are currently working through public feedback and intent to workshop the results with the local board at the earliest opportunity.

St Georges Bay Road - pedestrian crossing facility.

Construction of this project has been moved to 2020/2021 financial year to align with planned maintenance work.

Tamaki Drive cycle route (Quay Street to Ngapipi Bridge)

Construction for the section between Solent Street and Ngapipi Bridge has started. Karakia and sod turning events will be held on 5 and 16 February 2020.

The scheme design for the section between The Strand and Solent Street has been completed and is on track to issue for construction in May 2020. Discussions with Ports of Auckland on the Solent Street intersection is ongoing.

The Strand intersection – road safety improvements to the intersections at Tamaki Drive and Gladstone Road

Currently in discussion with NZTA to start the public consultation. once agreed, public consultation is expected to take place in March/April 2020.

Victoria Street East-West cycleway - dedicated cycle route along Victoria Street West, from the Beaumont Street intersection to the Hobson Street intersection.

Works are mostly completed. Currently resealing work is being done on Victoria Street from Beaumont Street to Nelson Street and on some of the side roads.

Waitematā Safe Routes project, the two routes open for feedback are Route 1: Surrey Crescent to Garnet Road and Route 2: Richmond Road.

The public feedback report is available to view on the AT project website.

The consultation design is currently being updated with consideration to the feedback received. It is anticipated that the revised design will be presented back to the community in March 2020.  

The project team wishes to workshop the design with the local board at the boards earliest convenient time.

Regarding remedial works in West Lynn village, AT has concluded the consultation for the drainage and footpath remedial works and preferred solutions have been agreed with the GLBA and other invested stakeholders. The detail design for those works is underway.

Wellesley Street and Sale Street – new intersection signals.

Detailed Design is now in the final stages however it is proposed to coordinate this project with an Auckland Council Healthy Waters Stormwater Diversion project at the same location.

It is intended that the two projects will be constructed at the same time and by the same contractor in order to minimise disruption (i.e. risks due to either party subsequently excavating carriageway after the other).

Both projects are currently in the final stages of Detailed Design, which will be followed by a tender phase. Construction of the projects will then likely start in April/May 2020.

Wellesley Street Bus Improvement Project (formerly Midtown bus route) – Improving how city centre buses operate.

The project team is currently refining options for a staged delivery of the Wellesley Street bus improvements project. An update will be brought to the local board ahead of public consultation, which is expected in the middle of the year.

Wynyard Quarter street and park upgrades – central construction package.

Work on Daldy Street continues. Final planting is being installed and Daldy Street will be reopened to traffic mid-February.

Work on the north side of Gaunt Street and within the Wynyard Common continues to progress well.

 


 

 

8.       The table below has an update on the Downtown Infrastructure programme.

Item

Update

Downtown Infrastructure Improvement Programme

This includes:

·    Quay Street Strengthening 

·    Quay Street Enhancement

·    Britomart East

·    Lower Albert

·    Downtown Ferry

·    Waterfront Park

·    Mooring dolphin

·    Galway Street Enhancement

 

All major projects have had consents granted. Currently the programme is tracking for completion of all major works by December 2020.

This positive news comes as an intensive period of work over the summer holiday is coming to an end, with a number of key milestones on target to be met in the first quarter of 2020:

·    The first of three sections of the Quay Street Seismic Strengthening programme is now complete with 104 palisade wall piles in place between Queens Wharf and Marsden Wharf.

·    Lower Albert Street’s eastern footpath will open at the end of March, coinciding with the opening of the Commercial Bay development.

·    On the southern side of Quay Street, the new footpath between Lower Hobson Street and Lower Queen Street is also due for completion and opening in late March

·    In the Ferry Basin, the first pontoon has arrived and will be installed and commissioned during February. This means berth 6 will be up and running for services from late February.

The Mooring Dolphin has an Environment Court hearing scheduled in March 2020. However, the outcome of this appeal will have no impact to the remaining projects in the Downtown programme.

Te Wananga (Downtown Public Space)

 

Works on Te Wananga began on 2 December 2019, targeted for completion in December 2020.

A 250-tonne jack-up-barge (JUB) has moved to the Ferry Basin, where it will remain until August 2020. Over the next seven months there will be 41 new piles installed. These works have commenced with 3 of 41 piles complete. We expect the new public space to be complete in late December 2020.

Seawall strengthening:

The first of three sections of the Quay Street Seismic Strengthening programme are now complete with 104 palisade wall piles in place between Queens Wharf and Marsden Wharf.

Princes Wharf to Ferry Basin: Jet grout column construction

31 out of 153 columns are now complete. Works are continuing on the eastern side of Princess Wharf. We expect this section to be complete late July 2020.

Ferry Basin – Anchoring the seawall:

134 vertical anchors are being constructed to strengthen existing seawall. We expect this section to be complete in late August 2020.

Quay Street Enhancements: (Southern Side):

 

Work continues on the southern side on the construction of the pavement and kerb lines between Lower Hobson and Lower Queen Streets.

Southern side programmed completion is March 2020 and the northern side is expected to be complete is December 2020.

Lower Hobson Street intersection

 

Works on the new carriageway are progressing well and on track to be complete and re-opened to traffic on 10 February 2020. The existing pavement under the intersection is being removed and replaced with stronger concrete as part of the Quay Street streetscape works.

Lower Hobson Street to Lower Albert Street

 

The concrete pours for the new carriageway are complete and pedestrian pavements are now opening up. Works have commenced on the bus stop installations. The cycle lane has been relocated to run along the new road surface on the Southern side. The bus stops are now returning in front of PWC building ready for operation on 10 February.

Lower Albert Street to Lower Queen Street

 

The newly paved areas are being completed and opened for public use. The rain gardens are being covered to allow for traffic to be shifted to allow for the expansion of the Downtown Public Space site on the northern side of Quay Street

Lower Queen Street to Commerce Street

 

Multiple shallow high voltage services have been lowered. Concrete pours have recommenced, and the new paving concrete slabs are now being poured. Paving of new footpath will commence in February with the footpath along the buildings facades to reopen in mid-February.

Lower Albert Street

 

Closed to general vehicles until Mid-2020. From February 10 it will open to bus thoroughfare for the Birkenhead Bus (departure stop will return to Quay Street). The Northern Express (NX1) service will continue to depart from Customs Street East.

Works are well underway on the new carriageway and kerbs. The Eastern footpath is expected to be opened late March 2020 to coincide with the Commercial Bay development opening. Pedestrian access has been maintained along Western footpath.

Ferry Basin Redevelopment:

 

Work continues to progress well on the Ferry Basin Redevelopment Programme.

The second stage pour of the Gangway Wharf Landing is now complete. The gangway main structure is also completed with the utilities and architectural finishes progressing well. Fabrication of berth 6 and the gangway landing pontoon have been completed and have arrived at Ports of Auckland for fit out and installation. The Pontoon is expected to arrive on site on February 3.

·      203 of 220 breakwater piles are complete.

·      32 of 39 wharf side canopy piles are complete.

·      All 21 sea side canopy piles are complete.

·      6 of the 12 pontoon piles are complete.

·      All 300 of the horizontal anchors under Ferry Basin are complete.

·      Fabrication of berth 5 is underway.

·      The aluminium gangway is expected to arrive on site on 11 February.

Galway Street Upgrade:

 

Gore Street is currently running with one-way traffic. Galway Street will remain closed between Gore Street & Commerce Street. The pavement slab pours continue and surfacing works will soon be commencing with new paving being installed late February.

Traffic Restrictions:

To progress the programme as much as possible over the summer holiday / new year’s period, several traffic restrictions were introduced in December 2019. These were staged so the most disruptive works would take place when the least traffic was on the road. The restrictions, including closure of the Lower Hobson Street flyer over and slip lane, are due to be removed by 10 February 2020. Traffic flow is expected to return to November 2019 levels.

 

9.       Downtown Infrastructure Improvement Programme, consent updates:

Project Consent

Consent Status

Next Steps

Ferry Basin Redevelopment - Stage 1

Approved

Construction commenced

Queens Wharf Mooring Dolphin

Approved – currently appealed through the Environment Court

Hearing – March 2020

Downtown Public Space – Stage 1

Approved

Construction commenced

Quay Street Enhancement

Approved

Construction commenced

Quay Street Strengthening - Princes Wharf

Approved

Construction commenced

Quay Street Strengthening - Ferry Basin

Approved

Construction commenced

Quay Street Strengthening - Ferry Building

Approved

Construction commenced

Quay Street Strengthening - Queens Wharf to Marsden Wharf

Approved

Construction commenced

Galway Street Enhancement – central block

Approved

Construction commenced

Community Transport – Quarterly Update

10.     The Travelwise programme is an innovative programme run by Auckland Transport’s Community Transport’s team. The programme works with primary, intermediate and secondary schools to:

·    encourage and increase use of active travel modes and public transport

·    provide safer facilities for all road users

·    reduce congestion around schools.

 

11.     More information about this programme can be found at: https://at.govt.nz/cycling-walking/travelwise-school-programme/about-the-travelwise-programme/

12.     Please see below for an update on activities in the Waitematā Local Board area:

School

Travelwise Status

Update

Auckland Girls Grammar School

Active

Auckland Transport is regularly in contact with school to provide updates about proposed changes to infrastructure. 

Bayfield School

Active

Auckland Transport is trying to start a Walking School Bus culture at Bayfield.

ACG Parnell

Active

ACG Parnell have just completed a Baseline Travel Survey and will use the results to plan some road safety initiatives in Term 1. They also took part in a trial HOP Card promotion to increase Public Transport use as part of the Newmarket Westfield Development.

Freemans Bay School

Active

The school is planning to do some activities for Bike Month in February.

Grey Lynn School

Active

Grey Lynn School has completed extensive building construction and are planning to promote active modes in Term 1, 2020.

Kadimah School

Active

Auckland Transport met with the Principal to discuss the Travelwise programme.  Kadimah is committed to reducing congestion at the school gate and promoting the Kiss and Drop approach in the mornings. 

Marist Catholic School (Herne Bay)

Active

The school are very grateful for the new Kelmarna Ave crossing, as it has increased pedestrian safety for their parents and children.

Newmarket School

Active

Students created posters with messaging about road safety for parents. Auckland Transport also offered Teachers a free 28 Day trial HOP Card as part of the Newmarket Westfield Development.

Newton Central School

Active

Newton Central completed a cooter Training Day with 100 students in December and are planning activities for Bike Month in February.

Richmond Road School

Active

This school ran a pedestrian crossing campaign in Term 4 and are planning to participate in Bike Month in February.

St Peter's College

Active

Auckland Transport offered Teachers a free 28 Day trial HOP Card as part of the Newmarket Westfield Development. The school is looking at Young Drive Programme options in 2020.

Ponsonby Primary

Active

A self-sufficient Walking School Bus. School has potential to start a second. 

Western Springs College

Active

Western Springs ran a Public Transport promotion in Term 4 to increase the number of students travelling sustainably. 

Waiorea

(Unit attached to Western Springs College)

Active

Waiorea is planning a Hui (meeting) with the Te Ara Haepapa Team at the beginning of Term 1. They plan to do a Baseline Survey to record travel modes and behaviour.

Westmere School

Active

Westmere ran a big walking promotion in December to encourage more students to travel actively to and from school.

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

13.     Please see Attachment A which outlines decisions made in the Waitematā Local Board area in November to December 2019 and January 2020. Auckland Transport's resolution and approval process ensures the most appropriate controls and restrictions are put in place and can be legally enforced.

Community Safety Fund

14.     All local boards have finalised their prioritised lists of projects, received rough orders of cost, and approved the allocation of funds. The programme in total now stands at just under 100 projects.

15.     The table below has a general summary of Waitematā Local Board Community Safety Fund projects with their current status. Please note that all timings are indicative and are subject to change:

Project

Approved funding

Update

Safe Schools Toolbox - Newton Central School 

$615,000

Concepts are at an early stage, meeting with school stakeholders is anticipated prior to Christmas with consultation in early 2020.

Pedestrian Crossings - on West End Road / Fife St by the bus stops next to the Westend tennis club

$300,000

Being investigated.

Pedestrian crossings formalised on Lower Domain Drive at Lovers Lane and at Domain Drive

$75,000

Improvements are in design phase, works are being coordinated with the street lighting upgrade.

Pedestrian crossing outside ACG Campus on Davis Cres to Olympic Reserve

$260,000

Pedestrian crossing facility at investigation stage.

Hopetoun Street Improvements

$200,000

Proposed improvements include a speed table on Hereford Street at its intersection with Hopetoun Street and a raised zebra crossing on Hopetoun Street replacing the existing refuge outside no 7. This is currently being planned for implementation with the maintenance renewal works in early 2020.

Total

$1,450,000

 

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

16.     The previous local board had a total allocation of $3,073,725 for the 2016-2019 electoral period. From this sum they approved:


 

Project Name

Allocation

Status

Greenway connection through Cox’s Bay Reserve to Wharf Road via Bayfield Park

$825,000

Being delivered by Community Facilities.

Current status is that the draft concept option will be shared publicly for consultation purposes.  Once complete, feedback will be used to refine the concept option and advance the recommended concept plan.

Next steps:  Once consultation is complete and the draft concept plan is refined, a recommended concept plan will be presented to the local board at the next available workshop.

Auckland Domain:

·    connection from the Titoki Street carpark to Football Road footpath.

·    connection from the corner of the Winter Garden through to The Crescent.

·    connection from Centennial Path to Grafton Mews.

·    connection from Parnell Station to Lovers Lane.

 

 

$198,275

 

 

$160,485

 

$88,484

 

$518,215

Being delivered by Community Facilities. Current status: Auckland Council staff have initiated the procurement process for a lead consultant.  Once awarded, the site investigation and design effort will commence.  

Next steps:  The Project Manager will award the contract to a lead consultant and site investigations will begin.

Western Springs Greenway Project - Motions Road: Option 2

$690,000

Currently in procurement for design consultant.

Western Springs Greenway – MOTAT2 walking and cycling connection

$130,000

Funding Agreement has been set up with Regional Facilities Auckland who are delivering the project.

Newmarket wayfinding and signage enhancements

$50,000

Funding Agreement has been set up with Scentre Group Ltd who are delivering the project.

Improvements to wayfinding and signage throughout the Waitematā Local Board

$80,000

Assessment and design work is currently underway.

Total

$3,097,759

 

 

17.     The current Local Board has a total budget of $3,896,643 for the 2019 – 2022 electoral period that is available for allocation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

19.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

20.     To this end, Auckland Transport’s Statement of Intent contains three performance measures:

Measure

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Number of buses in the Auckland bus fleet classified as low emission

5

25

55

Reduction in CO2e (emissions) generated annually by Auckland Transport corporate operations (from 2017/18 baseline)

7%

9%

11%

Percentage of Auckland Transport streetlights that are energy efficient LED

56%

66%

76%

Vector and AT sign memorandum of understanding

21.     On 20 January 2020 Auckland Transport and Vector announced a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU).

22.     The MoU is a direct response to AT’s Low Emission Bus Roadmap, published in late 2018, that outlined its commitment to have all new buses in Auckland being electric from 2025, with the whole fleet fully electric by 2040.

23.     A faster transition to electric buses requires a detailed assessment of the future demand on the electricity network.

24.     Two reports will be produced as part of the MoU, the first exploring a route and service profile, which will model the electricity demand that a fully electrified bus fleet will require. The second report will provide guidance on the electricity network infrastructure upgrades required at each bus depot, as well as likely timings and costs. These two reports are expected to be delivered by June 2020.

25.     Buses make up 87 per cent of the carbon emissions produced from public transport, so converting them from diesel to electric will also be a significant step towards meeting New Zealand’s 2050 zero-carbon emissions goal. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     The impact of the information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

27.     Any engagement with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no local, sub-regional or regional impacts.

Local Board Workshops

29.     Auckland Transport attended workshops with the local board on:

·    10 December 2019 with an update on Great North Road and the proposed City Centre thresholds.

·    4 February 2020 with an update on the City Centre and the Nelson Street phase 3 project.

General information items sent to the board:

30.     Please see below for a summary of items sent to the local board for their information or feedback:


 

Item

Date sent to Board

Herne Bay walking and cycling improvements

22/11/19

FYI: Bus Stops on Victoria Street West and East

25/11/19

Update: Bus priority measures for CRLL works

28/11/19

FYI: Campaign for Quay St/Downtown disruption

03/12/19

FYI: Karangahape Road - unexpected drainage connection

03/12/19

FYI: Community Safety Fund: Hopetoun Street

04/12/19

FYI: Aotea Square lift upgrade project

06/12/19

Outcome: Hardinge Street - Change of Parking Restrictions

11/12/19

Update: Waitematā Safe Routes

11/12/19

Update: Victoria Street Cycleway

16/12/19

Outcome: Greys Avenue - Raised Pedestrian Crossings

18/12/19

Update: Community Safety Fund - Hopetoun Street

19/12/19

FYI: Parnell RPZ - Public Feedback

19/12/19

FYI: Downtown Programme - Xmas Works update

20/12/19

FYI: AT Bus Priority Measures to support CRL works - project outcome

17/01/20

FYI: Disruptions to some ferry services

21/01/20

Update: Tamaki Drive cycleway

22/01/20

Update: Grafton Road Mid-Block Crossing

24/01/20

FYI: Nelson Street cycleway phase 3 - Market Place

31/01/20

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The proposed decision of receiving this report has financial implications as outlined in the resolutions, analysis and advice.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board next month.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport decisions of the Traffic Control Committee November 2019 - January 2020

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ben Halliwell – Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Team Manager

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Regional Facilities Auckland Quarter One Performance Report for the period ending 30 September 2019

File No.: CP2020/01205

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Waitematā Local Board on the performance of Regional Facilities Auckland, for the period ending 30 September 2019.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Regional Facilities Auckland Quarter One Performance Report, for the period ending 30 September 2019.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Facilities Auckland Quarter One Performance Report for the period ending 30 September 2019

 

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Judy Lawley – Manager Local Board Engagement

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Appointment of LGNZ Lead and nominee for LGNZ Conference 2020

File No.: CP2020/01013

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To appoint a lead for Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) matters and nominate a representative to attend the 2020 LGNZ Annual Conference and General Meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local boards are invited to appoint a lead (and alternate) on Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) matters. The lead will be the main contact for all LGNZ issues and will represent the local board at meetings of Auckland/LGNZ zone and any related meetings.

3.       The LGNZ Annual Conference and General Meeting (AGM) takes place at the ASB Theatre Malborough in Waiharakeke Blenheim from 8am Thursday 16 July to 3pm Saturday 18 July 2020.

4.       Local boards are invited to nominate a representative to attend the LGNZ conference. This can be the local board appointed LGNZ lead or another member of the local board. Given the cost of and overall numbers of elected member attendance, staff recommend that one member per local board attend.

5.       In addition to the official delegates, LGNZ requires prior notice of which local board members plan to attend the AGM. Members wishing to attend are asked to register their intention with the Kura Kāwana programme by Friday 17 April so that this information can be provided to LGNZ.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      appoint a lead and alternate for LGNZ related matters for the 2019-2022 triennium and task these members with representing the local board at Auckland/LGNZ meetings.

b)      nominates one elected member per local board to attend the Local Government New Zealand 2020 Conference and Annual General Meeting (AGM) in Waiharakeke Blenheim, Thursday 16 July to Saturday 18 July 2020.

c)      confirms that conference attendance including travel and accommodation will be paid for in accordance with the current Auckland Council Elected Member Expense Policy.

d)      notes that any members who wish to attend the AGM must provide their names to the Democracy Services Business Hub team by Friday 17 April to ensure that they are registered with Local Government New Zealand.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       LGNZ is an incorporated society of local government organisations whose primary objective is to represent and advocate for the interests of local authorities in New Zealand. LGNZ champions policy positions on key issues that are of interest to local government and holds regular meetings and events throughout the year for members. The schedule of meetings includes an annual conference and meetings of local government geographical clusters (known as LGNZ zones) and sectors.

7.       LGNZ is governed by a National Council made up of representatives from member authorities as outlined in the constitution. Some of its work is conducted through committees and working groups which include representatives from member authorities.

8.       Elected members who have been formally appointed to LGNZ roles are:

Mayor Phil Goff

National Council representative for Auckland

Auckland Council representative on the Metropolitan Sector Group

Councillor Pippa Coom

Local Board Member Richard Northey

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by Governing Body)

National Council representative for Auckland (appointed by local boards)

Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore

Auckland Council representative on Regional Sector

 

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

9.       As part of recent changes to the LGNZ Rules, Auckland Council is no longer part of LGNZ Zone 1 but is expected to organize itself, with its multiple local boards and Governing Body, as an informal LGNZ zone.

10.     Meetings of the Auckland/LGNZ zone have been scheduled on a biannual basis. These meetings will be co-chaired by the two Auckland representatives appointed to the LGNZ National Council by the Governing Body (Councillor Pippa Coom) and local boards’ (Member Richard Northey).

11.     Meetings of the Auckland/LGNZ zone will be open to all elected members but formal representation will sit with the nominated leads.

LGNZ Annual conference and AGM 2020

12.     This year the LGNZ conference and AGM will be held at the ASB Theatre Marlborough, Waiharakeke Blenheim, Thursday 16 July to Saturday 18 July 2020.

13.     The conference takes place over the first two days commencing at 9.30am on Thursday 16 July and closing with the LGNZ Excellence Awards on the evening of Friday 17 July.

14.     The conference programme has the theme “Natural Capital”. The final programme will be publicly available at the end of February however we have had indication from LGNZ that the programme is expected to include addresses from the Prime Minister, various political leaders and President of LGNZ as well as sessions on the following topics

·          Natural capital - the Marlborough story

·          Fishes in the river, fishes in the sea (Water, aquaculture and the Resource Management Act)

·          Tourism – working together to care for people, place and culture

·          Building towards sustainable supply (housing)

·          Resilience in the face of natural hazards (infrastructure and communities)

·          Cultural wellbeing plenary session

·          Interactive workshops on cultural, economic, environmental and social well-being

·          Tours, showcases and dinners

15.     The AGM takes place on the last day of the conference from 9.30am to 12.30pm.  The LGNZ constitution permits Auckland Council to appoint four delegates to represent it at the AGM, with one of the delegates being appointed as presiding delegate.

16.     Traditionally the four AGM delegates have been the Mayor, the Chief Executive and two Governing Body members who hold LGNZ roles. Delegates in 2019 were Mayor Phil Goff, Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore, Councillor Penny Hulse and Local Board Chair Pippa Coom.

17.     The Governing Body will consider an item on AGM attendance at its meeting on 27 March 2020 which includes the recommendation that Mayor Phil Goff be the presiding delegate and the other three delegates be comprised of either:

a)         two members of the Governing Body who hold a formal representation role with LGNZ and the Chief Executive; or

b)         one member of the Governing Body who holds a formal representation role with LGNZ and the Chief Executive, and a local board member; or

c)         two members of the Governing Body who hold a formal representation role with LGNZ and a local board member.

18.     In addition to the official delegates, LGNZ requires prior notice of which local board members plan to attend the AGM. Attendance at the AGM is not compulsory for conference participants.

Pre-conference meetings

19.     On Wednesday 15 July there will be a pre-conference meeting of the National Council as well as a Te Maruata Hui. Elected members that are on these two groups and wish to attend these meetings would need to arrive earlier than other meeting participants.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

20.     Local boards are requested to appoint a lead for the 2019-2022 triennium. The lead’s responsibilities include:

·        attend and represent the local board at meetings of Auckland/LGNZ zone and other LGNZ meetings, as appropriate

·        be the main contact for the local board on all LGNZ matters

·        share information from Auckland/LGNZ and other LGNZ-related meetings attended with the local board

    LGNZ Annual conference and AGM 2020

21.     In 2020, with the venue in Waiharakeke, Blenheim and given the cost and overall numbers of elected member attendance, it is recommended that one member per local board attend.

22.     The annual conference and AGM are two separate meeting sessions.

23.     Local board members are invited to attend and take part in the conference.

24.     For the AGM, member authorities will be represented by officially appointed delegates. Members who are not appointed delegates can attend as observers provided they are included in the AGM registration form. Local board members who wish to attend the AGM as observers must register their intention with the Democracy Services Business Hub team by Friday 17 April so that their names can be included on the AGM registration form.

25.     Local board members who attend the conference and/or AGM are strongly encouraged to report back to their local boards on proceedings at the conference. This ensures members who do not attend can still benefit from this opportunity.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     Conferences and events involving multiple participants especially those requiring long distance travel can generate a sizable carbon footprint. This is due to emissions associated with flights, car and taxi travel, hotel and event site emissions.

27.     Estimates for emissions associated with travel to Blenheim or travel within Auckland for local meetings have not been calculated at the time of writing this report. Emissions, when known, can be offset through a verified carbon offset programme at a small cost.

28.     Other opportunities to reduce emissions include:

a)      reducing the number of delegates to the Blenheim conference as recommended

b)      encouraging participants to opt for public transport options when attending meetings in Auckland

c)      encouraging delegates to provide updates to their local boards, including the option of daily updates from the conference and meetings via the local board facebook pages, so that non-attendance does not disadvantage other members

d)      ensuring elected members are aware of the session recordings that LGNZ will make available after the conference.  LGNZ have advised that they don’t webcast or live stream any parts of the conference as they try to encourage as many people as possible to attend in person.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     There are no impacts for CCOs or departments of council as the focus is on elected members attendance at meetings including the LGNZ conference.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     LGNZ advocates for issues that are important to local government. Many of these issues are aligned with local board priorities e.g. climate change. As such, there is interest at local board level in staying across the work of LGNZ and in identifying and harnessing opportunities to progress other advocacy areas that local boards may have.

31.     Having a dedicated lead who can attend Auckland meetings on LGNZ matters and who can be part of future discussions about remits and other topics, will enable local boards and their communities to continue to be informed and give considered input to work being led by LGNZ.

32.     The LGNZ Annual conference is always of interest to local board members. They provide a unique networking opportunity for local government leaders from around the country and the agenda of these meetings are designed to support local leaders in their roles and responsibilities. This is in line with the purpose of the elected member development programme which is to support elected members as governors and decision-makers.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     The work of LGNZ is expected to impact positively on Māori. LGNZ advocates on a variety of issues that are important to Māori including Māori housing, various environmental issues and Council-Māori participation/relationship arrangements. In addition, LGNZ provides advice including published guidance to assist local authorities in understanding values, aspirations and interest of Māori.

34.     The LGNZ National Council has a sub-committee, Te Maruata, which has the role of promoting increased representation of Māori as elected members of local government, and of enhancing Māori participation in local government processes.  It also provides support for councils in building relationships with iwi, hapu and Māori groups.  Te Maruata provides Māori input on development of future policies or legislation relating to local government. In the previous term Councillor Alf Filipaina was a member of the sub-committee.  Te Maruata will hold a hui on Wednesday 15 July 2020 from 10am to 4.30pm.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

35.     Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ are a new initiative being introduced this triennium following amendments to LGNZ zones. The two meetings for 2020 are scheduled for 13 March and 11 September and are not currently budgeted for. Staff will use existing resources and liaise with Kura Kāwana to identify combined opportunities for these meetings dates.

36.     Managing attendance numbers by only requiring attendance of leads, with others as optional attendees if they wish, should contribute towards keeping meeting costs down.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

37.     The normal registration rate for the LGNZ Conference and AGM is $1,410 (early bird) or $1,510 (standard). The total cost for early bird registration for 21 local board members is $29,610, with flights and accommodation additional.

38.     Costs of attendance for one member from each local board are to be met from the elected members’ development budget as managed centrally by the Kura Kawana Programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

39.     The inaugural meeting of the Auckland Zone is planned for 13 March 2020. If a local board has not chosen an LGNZ lead by this date, they would need to select a member to attend this meeting as their official representative.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

40.     The key risk is of delayed decision-making which can impact costs and registration choices. The sooner the registration for the nominated local board member can be made, the more likely it is that Auckland Council can take advantage of early bird pricing for the conference and flights, all done via bulk booking. Delayed information may also impact registration into preferred conference streams or events.

41.     There is always a level of reputational risk associated with any financial expenditure. Large delegations to conferences can be costly hence the advice that only one per local board attend.


 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

Meetings of Auckland/LGNZ (Auckland Zone)

42.     There are two planned meetings for the Auckland Zone in 2020. The inaugural meeting is scheduled for 13 March and the second meeting is on 11 September.

43.     Preparations for the inaugural meeting are being made by staff with guidance from the co-chairs. The agenda will include a report from LGNZ Executive and will also include an update on the Localism project. The agenda will be made available to members closer to the time of the meeting.

Annual conference and AGM 2020

44.     Once members are confirmed to attend, the Democracy Services Business Hub team will co-ordinate and book all conference registrations, as well as requests to attend the AGM.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Shirley  Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Linda Gifford - Programme Manager - Elected Member Development

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Appointment of local board memebrs to additional identified external and internal organisations and boards

File No.: CP2020/01283

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek appointment of local members to external and internal organisations and boards relevant to the Waitematā Local Board area. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Elected members participate as representatives of the local board on several external community organisations.

3.       At the beginning of this electoral term (2019 – 2022) the local board appointed board members to several organisations, Resolution number WTM/2019/257. Since this time further groups and organisations have been identified as relevant to the local board.

4.       This report provides details of three additional groups that have been identified and requests that the local board nominates a lead and alternate member to represent the board for the 2019-2022 triennium.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      appoint a local board member lead and alternate to the additional below groups as listed for the 2019-2022 triennium:

External organisation

 

Lead

Alternate

Ports of Auckland Community Reference Group

 

 

Meola Stream Community Liaison Group

 

 

Taskforce on Alcohol and Community Safety in the Central City

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       A number of external organisations provide for the formal participation of Auckland Council elected members in their affairs. Elected member appointees will have a variety of duties and liabilities depending on the individual organisation.

6.       As local board representatives, the nominated members represent the board, and do not attend in a personal capacity.  Nominated local board members will provide updates at local board meetings to regularly inform all local board members of discussions and decisions made of their activities, unless good reasons exist for confidentiality. These updates are in the form of business meeting reports which maintain public transparency.

7.       The reasons for elected member participation in external organisations can be described in a number of ways:

·   a trust deed, that requires Auckland Council to make an appointment to an organisation

·   an organisation of interest to the local board is inviting elected member representation at its meetings

·   associations entered into by the council which provide for elected member representation

·   organisation governance, or project or programme oversight, such as regional or local parks management groups

·   a statutory or regulatory provision (for example a regulation providing for a community liaison committee) or

·   a resource consent requiring the formation of a committee or hearing panel.

8.       In making decisions about these appointments, it is suggested that local boards are mindful of:

·   the elected member’s availability

·   any conflict of interests, including whether the local board provides funding to the entity

·   relevance

·   historical relationship with the organisation and Auckland Council.

9.       Members are delegated in their capacity as elected local board members. Should they no longer be a local board member, their nominations would be automatically repealed.

10.     Local board members may be part of any organisation in their private capacity and personal interests. They are encouraged to disclose memberships of external organisations in the conflict of interest register.

11.     Information about the organisations relevant to the local board are detailed below.

Ports of Auckland Community Reference group 

12.     Ports of Auckland Community Reference Group, is an established community reference group that provide a forum for dialogue and discussion with neighbours and community representatives, with meetings held quarterly at the port.

13.     Membership of the group includes representatives from Auckland City Centre Residents Group, Parnell Community Committee, Mirage Apartments, as well as representatives from other agencies and organisations.

 

Meola Stream Community Liaison Group 

14.     Schedule A Section 12A of the Designated Conditions as agreed on 3 October 2014 before the Environment Court states the role of the Meola Stream Community Liaison Group as:

Facilitate communication and dialogue between Watercare, landowners and organisations with an interest in the Meola Stream

Provide input into the development of Reinstatement and Open Space Restoration Plans for the Meola Stream Central Interceptor construction sites

Discuss and review the scope of post construction monitoring of selected sites in the Meola Stream and at the stream mouth.

15.     The Meola Stream Community Liaison Group is set up and supported by Watercare.  The group provide a forum to share updates about the Central Interceptor project and other relevant information.

16.     The group membership includes representatives from Albert-Eden Local Board, Mt Albert Residents Association, Auckland Council Parks, Watercare, and other organisations.

Taskforce on Alcohol and Community Safety in the Central City

17.     A Mayoral Taskforce on Alcohol and Community Safety in the Central City was initiated by Mayor Len Brown in 2012 to address alcohol and safety issues within Auckland’s central city.

18.     The Taskforce is made up of a cross section of stakeholders who discuss and initiate work to improve alcohol management and safety in the central city.

19.     Membership of the taskforce includes representatives from Auckland Council elected members, Auckland Council departments such as Community Empowerment Unit, Licensing and Compliance, Auckland Transport and Social Policy and other agencies and businesses. Attachment A.

20.     Roles and functions of the Taskforce members:

·    attend regular meetings and actively participate in these meetings

·    have a genuine interest in supporting community safety in the central city

·    identify and share risks around central city safety

·    share information and develop shared solutions to safety issues in the central city

·    inform the Lead Officer if they are no longer able to attend and recommend a replacement representative from their organisation/department

·    declare any conflicts of interest

·    Identify specific hot-spot areas for complementary initiatives.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     These decisions are procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     This report enables Auckland Council to meet its requirements or duties to have representation on external community organisations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     This report seeks the local board’s decision on representatives to external community organisations and other groups relevant to the local board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     This report has no specific impact on Māori. It covers appointments of local board members to external organisations and community networks to represent the view of local communities, including Māori communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     There are no financial implications as a result of this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Local Board Services staff will inform each external and internal organisation/group of the name of the local board appointment. They will also inform the local board representative of the meeting time, date and location.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Terms of Reference
Taskforce on Alcohol and Community Safety in the Central City

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Carlos Rahman – Local Board Senior Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Auckland Council’s submission to the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill

File No.: CP2020/00761

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal input from the Waitematā Local Board to Auckland Council’s submission on the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill is a new way of funding and financing local infrastructure by providing a tool that is independent of local authorities.  The Bill proposes that finance is raised for infrastructure projects (or bundles of projects) through a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV), which is a stand-alone entity.

3.       The SVP will support urban development projects to begin sooner than council funding for infrastructure allows. It will also help to make the cost of new infrastructure more transparent and will spread the costs by way of a levy so the cost falls primarily on the landowners who benefit, including over time and across generations.

4.       The levy would be in place until the infrastructure is paid off by those who are expected to benefit. When a property is sold, the new owner would pay the levy. This levy would be collected by councils via their normal rates collection mechanisms on behalf of the SPV.

5.       All infrastructure assets built using the tool would transfer to the relevant public body.  In most circumstances this will be a council, who will be responsible for the ongoing operation and maintenance of the new assets.  Prior to an agreement on an SPV proposal, endorsement will be sought from the council.

6.       This tool will work alongside other related central government initiatives such as the Urban Development Bill.

7.       A summary document on the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill can be found in Attachment A.

8.       Council’s submission will be approved by the Planning Committee on 5 March and submitted before 9 March 2020. Local board feedback will be appended to the council submission.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      provide input into Auckland Council’s submission to the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Infrastructure Funding and Financing

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Carlos Rahman – Local Board Senior Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Waitematā Local Board feedback on the proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity

File No.: CP2020/00760

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal input from the Waitematā Local Board into Auckland Council’s submission on the proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ministry for the Environment has released He Kura Koiora i hokia: A discussion document on a proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity, including proposed wording for the national policy statement. 

3.       The National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity provides detailed direction on maintaining indigenous biodiversity, including identification and protection of significant indigenous biodiversity, under the Resource Management Act 1991. 

4.       The proposed National Policy Statement is intended to provide consistency for council’s interpreting and applying the RMA provisions relating to indigenous biodiversity. This includes protecting significant indigenous vegetation and habitats for fauna and to maintain indigenous biodiversity. 

5.       Council staff have prepared a summary of the proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity (Attachment A) and highlighted key themes for the Council submission (Attachment B).

6.       Previously, in September 2019, the board provided feedback on Te Koiroa o te Koiora, the government’s discussion document on proposals for a biodiversity strategy. This feedback supported the vision and outcomes and noted the urgency to restore and prevent permanent loss of biodiversity.

7.       A memo outlining the opportunity for local boards to provide input into the National Policy Statement was circulated to all members in December. 

8.       The Environment portfolio holders have led the development of draft feedback on the proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity for consideration and approval of the local board (Attachment C).

9.       The deadline for local board feedback is 3 March 2020. Council’s Submission will be approved by the Planning Committee on 5 March and lodged before 13 March 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the Waitematā Local Board feedback on the National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity (Attachment C).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity

 

b

Key themes for Council submission

 

c

Draft Waitematā feedback on National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Waitematā Local Board feedback on the Inquiry into the 2019 Local Elections and Liquor Licensing Trust Elections, and Recent Energy Trust Elections

File No.: CP2020/01314

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal local board input into the Justice Committee inquiry into the 2019 local elections and liquor licensing trust and recent energy trust elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Justice Select Committee conducts an inquiry following each election to inform recommendations to government for changes to legislation or procedures.

3.       Auckland Council previously provided a submission into the 2016 inquiry which was extended to also include the 2017 general elections and to consider foreign interference.

4.       The committees report on the 2016 inquiry was published in December 2019 and the committee supported many of the council’s recommendations for change including:

·    non-mayoral vacancy within 12 months of elections to be filled by the next highest-polling candidate

·    shift election day to avoid school holidays

·    align overseas voting processes with those for general elections

·    allow electronic receipt of nominations

·    local authorities to have access to supplementary electoral roll and deletions file .

5.       Some of council’s recommendations were enacted:

·    online voting pilots

·    mandate to promote elections.

6.       The inquiry into the 2019 elections was notified in December 2019 with submissions closing 29 February 2020.

7.       Its terms of reference include matters relating to the 2019 elections, in particular:

a.     Examine the law and administrative procedures for the conduct of the 2019 local elections with particular reference to:

i)   low voter turnout at local elections

ii)  liquor licensing trusts

iii)      council staff releasing information that may affect the election outcome

iv)       the issue of disclosure in respect of candidates or elected members with serious criminal convictions

v)       any irregularities or problems that could have compromised the fairness of elections

8.       The Committee also invites feedback on its recommendations arising from the inquiry into the 2016 elections, in particular:

i.    the recommendation that the Government consider giving responsibility for running all aspects of local elections to the Electoral Commission

ii.    the recommendation that the Government consider encouraging or requiring the same voting system to be used in all local elections

iii.   feedback on the committee’s recommendations on foreign interference.

9.         Auckland Council’s draft submission to the Justice Committee inquiry into the 2019 local elections (attachment A) will be reported to the Governing Body on 27 February 2020.

10.     Local Board feedback is due by 19 February for consideration as part of the Auckland Council submission.  Formal feedback will be appended in its entirety to the approved council submission.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      provide input into the Justice Selection Committee Inquiry into the 2019 elections by the 19 February 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Council Draft Submission to inquiry into 2019 local elections

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Waitematā Local Board feedback on Taumata Arowai - Water Services Regulator Bill

File No.: CP2020/01046

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal input from the Waitematā Local Board into Auckland Council’s submission on Taumata Arowai – the Water Services Regulator Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Taumata Arowai – the Water Services Regulator Bill (Taumata Arowai) was introduced to Parliament on 17 December 2019. It is expected this will be followed by the introduction of the Water Services Bill in the coming months. These bills build on the government’s work to date on the Three Waters review.  Submissions on Taumata Arowai close on 4 March 2020; the submission period for the Water Services Bill has not yet been announced.

3.       Taumata Arowai will establish a stand-alone regulatory body with responsibilities relating to drinking water safety and administration of the drinking water regulatory system, along with improving the environmental performance and transparency of stormwater and wastewater networks.

4.       While Auckland Council’s role in the delivery of drinking water, wastewater and stormwater services will not be significantly affected by the establishment of the regulator, the details within the Water Services Bill are expected to have implications for how the council delivers these services, and how council’s planning and regulatory functions are carried out. Further detail and analysis of the implications of the Water Services Bill for Auckland Council will be provided following its release.

5.       The deadline for local board feedback to feed into the council’s submission is 24 February.  The Health Select Committee Secretariat has permitted an extension for the Auckland Council submission to 17 March 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      provide input into Auckland Council’s submission on Taumata Arowai – the Water Services Regulator Bill.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Taumata Arowai - Water Services Regulator Bill and Water Services Bill memo

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision - Approval of a Temporary Premise for Leys Institute Library

File No.: CP2020/01009

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the local board to receive the decision made under urgency to approve the lease of a retail space at 14 Jervois Road Ponsonby for a three-year period to provide temporary library services, while a plan for the restoration of Leys Institute is being developed.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An assessment of the Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium identified that there was a significant health and safety risk to staff and the public.

3.       The Executive Leadership Team made an operational decision to cease services at Leys Institute Library from 5pm Friday 20 December following a recommendation from the Council’s Chief Engineer.

4.       Options for a temporary library premises in the near vicinity to provide library services for the affected community were explored by staff.

5.       Several options were considered including the use of the mobile library on a limited number of days, a container type pop up solution, other council buildings and provision of a semi-permanent pop up library.

6.       It was recommended that a semi-permanent library in a retail space within reasonable proximity to Leys Institute would provide the best level of service.

7.       Seven sites were considered, and it was recommended to the local board that council enter a lease for the premises at 14 Jervois Road for a three-year lease.

8.       A local board decision for leasing the temporary premises was required by the 6 January 2019 to secure the site for commencement of library services at the beginning of 2020. 

9.       The Waitematā Local Board’s next business meeting was not scheduled until the 18 February 2020 meaning the local board could not wait until then to resolve.  For this reason, the adopted urgent decision process was followed.

10.     Additional budget will be added to the Waitematā Local Board’s budget to cover the leasing costs.  The amount has been withheld from the public agenda on the basis of Section 7 of the Local Government Official Information Meetings Act 1987 clause 2b (ii) “project information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information”. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the urgent decision “Approve Temporary Premises for Leys Institute Library” dated 20 December 2019

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent Decision - Approval of a Temporary Premise for Leys Institute Library

 

b

Memo - Temporary Premises for Leys Library

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Carlos Rahman – Local Board Senior Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback on the Urban Development Bill

File No.: CP2020/01710

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the local board to receive the decision made under urgency to provide feedback on Auckland Council’s submission to the government's Urban Development Bill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Urban Development Bill is the second piece of legislation for Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities. The Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Bill established it as a new Crown entity on 1 October 2019. The entity has two key functions, being a public landlord and leading and coordinating urban development.

3.       The Urban Development Bill provides details about the establishment of ‘specified development projects’ and powers that will include the ability to:

·    override, add to, or suspend provisions in Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) plans or policy statements in the development plan that applies to an area

·    act as a consent authority (city/district level) and requiring authority under the RMA

·    use funding and financing tools for infrastructure and development activities

·    build and change infrastructure

·    reconfigure and change reserves.

4.       Local boards have the opportunity to provide input into Auckland Council submissions on other agencies documents.

5.       The bill was released on 13 December 2019 and submissions are due on 14 February 2020.

6.       Views were sought from all board members to develop the board feedback. 

7.       As the local board’s next scheduled business meeting was not until the 18 February 2020, the local board could not resolve on their feedback by the deadline therefore, the agreed urgent decision process was followed (WTM/2019/259). Attachment B.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Urgent Decision – Waitematā Local Board feedback on the Urban Development Bill dated 7 February 2020.

b)      note that the Waitematā Local Board feedback will be attached verbatim to the Auckland Council submission on the ‘Urban Development Bill’.

 

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Board Submission on the Urban Development Bill

 

b

Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback on the Urban Development Bill

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Carlos Rahman – Local Board Senior Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback on the Resource Management Review Panel’s Issues and Options paper

 

File No.: CP2020/00828

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the local board to receive the decision made under urgency to provide feedback on the Resource Management Review Panel’s Issues and Options paper.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The government is undertaking a comprehensive review of the resource management system with a primary focus on the Resource Management Act 1991.

3.       The review is being led by the Resource Management Review Panel. The panel has just released an issues and options paper that starts a conversation about issues to be considered and addressed by the review and sets out some initial thoughts on possible options.

4.       The review’s aim is to improve environmental outcomes and better enable urban and other development within environmental limits.

5.       The memo to highlight the release of the Resource Management Review Panel’s release of its issues and options paper was circulated, and views were sought from all board members to develop the board feedback.

6.       An email was sent to Local Board Services staff on 6 December confirming the deadline for local board formal submission.

7.       Local boards were able to provide formal feedback on the Issues and Options paper that were then included verbatim as part of council’s submission before submissions closed on 3 February 2020.

8.       As the Waitematā Local Board’s next scheduled business meeting was not until the 18 February 2020, the local board could not resolve on their feedback by the deadline therefore, the agreed urgent decision process was followed (WTM/2019/259).

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Urgent decision – Approve feedback on the Resource Management Review Panel’s Issues and Options paper dated 24 January 2020 (Attachment A).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent decision - Approve feedback on the Resource Management Review Panel's Issues and Options paper

 

b

Waitematā Local Board feedback on the Resource Management Review Panel’s Issues and Options paper

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback to Auckland Council's submission on the Reducing waste: a more effective landfill levy

 

File No.: CP2020/00353

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the local board to receive the decision made under urgency to provide feedback on Auckland Council’s submission to the government's 'Reducing waste: a more effective landfill levy- consultation'.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Ministry for the Environment is consulting on proposed changes to the landfill levy and waste data collection methodologies.

3.       The waste levy, applied under the Waste Minimisation Act 2008, is intended to raise revenue for waste minimisation and diversion opportunities while increasing the cost of waste disposal to recognise the costs of disposal on the environment, society and economy.

4.       The consultation document proposes to progressively increase the landfill levy to higher rates, expanding the levy to apply to more types of landfills and making improvements to waste data collections.

5.       A memo was circulated to local board members on 20 December 2019 with the opportunity for local boards to provide feedback to be included in the council’s submission. 

6.       The final deadline to receive local board feedback to be considered by the political working group and the Environment and Climate Change Committee was 22 January 2020.

7.       Views were sought from all board members to develop the board feedback. 

8.       As the Waitematā Local Board’s next scheduled business meeting was not until the 18 February 2020, the local board could not resolve on their feedback by the deadline therefore, the agreed urgent decision process was followed (WTM/2019/259).

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the urgent decision – Approve feedback on Reducing waste: a more effective landfill levy dated 20 January 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent decision - Approve feedback on Reducing waste: a more effective landfill levy

 

b

Waitematā Local Board’s feedback to the government’s ‘Reducing waste: a more effective landfill levy – consultation’

 

     


 

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision - Waitematā Local Board feedback to LGNZ discussion paper “Localism”

 

File No.: CP2020/00830

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the local board to receive the decision made under urgency to approve feedback on the LGNZ discussion paper – Reinvigorating local democracy: The case for localising power and decision-making to councils and communities

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       In 2019, LGNZ released its discussion paper “Reinvigorating local democracy: The case for localising power and decision-making to councils and communities”.

3.       The discussion paper seeks to refine LGNZ’s advocacy position on ‘localism’ and calls for an active programme of devolution and decentralisation of services.  The paper argues that decentralisation will be more efficient and effective in meeting community needs, be more relevant and able to respond to growing diversity, increase voter interest and participation and spur innovation.

4.       There is no official Auckland Council position on this proposal and local boards interested in giving their views on the discussion have been encouraged to submit directly to LGNZ.

5.       The paper was discussed at the Chair’s forum on 9 December.  A memo was then circulated to elected members on 17 December advising that the deadline for feedback was extended to the end of January 2020.  

6.       As the Waitematā Local Board’s next scheduled business meeting was not until the 18 February 2020, the local board could not resolve on their feedback by the deadline therefore, the agreed urgent decision process was followed (WTM/2019/259).

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the urgent decision dated 29 January 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent decision - Approve feedback to LGNZ issues and options paper - "Localism"

 

b

Waitematā feedback to LGNZ discussion paper - "Localism"

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Chair's Report

 

File No.: CP2020/00618

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Chair’s report for the period December 2019 – February 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair R Northey February report

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Richard Northey – Chair Waitematā Local Board

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Board member reports

 

File No.: CP2020/00629

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for board members to update the board on projects/issues they have been involved with since the last business meeting.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written report from member G Gunthorp, and the verbal board member reports for the period 20 November 2019 – February 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Member G Gunthorp report for February 2020

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Graeme Gunthorp – Member Waitematā Local Board

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2020/00658

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waitematā Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Attached is a copy of the governance forward work calendar for the Waitematā Local Board which is a schedule of items that will come before the local board at future business meetings.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Governance Forward Work Calendar February 2020 attached to the agenda.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar at February 2020

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Liz Clemm - Democracy Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 February 2020

 

 

Waitematā Local Board Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2020/00672

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to present the Waitematā Local Board workshop records to the board.  Attached are copies of the proceeding records taken from the workshops held on:

·        10 December 2019

·        17 December 2019

·        28 January 2020

·        4 February 2020

·        11 February 2020

         

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

·        receive the workshop proceeding records for the meetings held on 10 and 17 December 2019, 28 January 2020, 4 and 11 February 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20191210 Waitematā Local Board workshop record

 

b

20191217 Waitematā Local Board workshop record

 

c

20200128 Waitematā Local Board workshop record

 

d

20200204 Waitematā Local Board workshop record

 

e

20200211 Waitematā Local Board workshop record

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Liz Clemm - Democracy Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

     

    



[1] Rental Evidence Schedule around 254 Ponsonby Road by Telfer Young Auckland (15 Jan 2020)