E

 

I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 24 March 2020

9.30am

Local Board Chambers
Pukekohe Service Centre
82 Manukau Road
Pukekohe

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

NOTE: THIS MEETING WAS CANCELLED DUE TO COVID-19

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Deputy Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Lance Gedge

 

 

Amanda Kinzett

 

 

Matthew Murphy

 

 

Logan Soole

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Denise  Gunn

Democracy Advisor - Franklin

 

13 March 2020

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 237 1310

Email: denise.gunn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                          PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                          5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                         5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                    5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                                5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                           5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                        5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                           5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                     5

8.1     Deputation: Waiuku Business & Development Association                           5

8.2     Deputation: Rising Foundation Trust                                                                 6

8.3     Deputation: Bombay School and Community Pool Committee                     6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                   6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                 7

11        Karaka Sports Park One Local Initiative, Detailed Business Case                          9

12        Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan - allocation of funding for projects in 2019/2020.                                                                                                  21

13        Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund - applications from sports groups in the Franklin Local Board area.                                                                               37

14        Auckland Transport monthly update to the Franklin Local Board - March 2020 49

15        Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes                                                                                                                                         61

16        Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review                                                                                                                            77

17        Public feedback on proposed new Food Safety Information Bylaw 2020            83

18        McNicol Homestead Reserve - Classification as Historic Reserve                     295

19        Prospect Terrace foot path extension concept design                                         303

20        Correction to a road type (Suffix) at the new subdivision within Stage 6 of the Auranga development in Drury.                                                                                309

21        Franklin Local Board Grants Programme 2020/2021                                             317

22        Governance Forward Work Calendar March 2020                                                 327

23        Franklin Local Board workshop records                                                                 331  

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 25 February 2020, including the confidential section, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.


 

 

8.1       Deputation: Waiuku Business & Development Association

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Waiuku Business & Development Association will attend to discuss their annual report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Deborah Andrew and Julie Powell, the new Chair, will be in attendance to present and discuss the annual report of the Waiuku Business and Development Association.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      thank Deborah Andrew and Julie Powell, Chair, from the Waiuku Business & Development Association, for their attendance and presentation of their annual report.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation: Rising Foundation Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Alex Tarrant, General Manager, and Billie Paterson, Programme Coordinator, from the Rising Foundation Trust, will be in attendance to address the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Rising Foundation Trust wish to address the board to explain the work of this charity within the Pukekohe community and the benefits and outcomes of the programme for local youth and wider whānau members.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      thank Alex Tarrant, General Manager, and Billie Paterson, Programme Coordinator, of the Rising Foundation Trust for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation: Bombay School and Community Pool Committee

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Members of the Bombay School and Community Pool Committee will be in attendance to address the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Becky Causebrook, Chair, and Andrew Dickinson, Technical Design and Procurement Lead, from the Bombay School and Community Pool Committee, will address the board in relation to a request to funding.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      thank Becky Causebrook, Chair, and Andrew Dickinson, Technical Design and Procurement Lead from the Bombay School and Community Pool Committee for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 

Karaka Sports Park One Local Initiative, Detailed Business Case

File No.: CP2020/02586

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement and approval from the Franklin Local Board to progress a funding request to the Finance and Performance Committee for $28.3 million to enable the development of Karaka Sports Park on the basis of the outcomes of the Karaka Sports Park Detailed Business Case (DBC).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The DBC has confirmed a strong case for change, investment and delivery of the Karaka Sports Park field improvements and multisport facility with a dedicated community space from a strategic, economic and financial perspective.

3.       The proposed investment comprises upgrading eight sports fields, the construction of a new facility with eight changing rooms and redevelopment of associated ancillary infrastructure.

4.       The 2019 Indicative Business Case (IBC) for the project established a strong case for sports field improvements but not for a new community facility. Three options were assessed as part of the indicative business case.

·    Option One: No changes to services or facilities (status quo)

·    Option Two: Full implementation of the Karaka Sports Park master plan alongside sport field and park upgrades (One Local Initiative)

·    Option Three: Partial implementation of the Karaka Sports Park master plan alongside sport field and park upgrades (preferred option).

5.       While the IBC noted that a larger redevelopment of the park had a mixed case for change and mixed alignment with Council objectives, the investment recommendation in the DBC combines current levels of changing room provision with the items which were considered cost-beneficial by the IBC and those which are well-aligned with Council’s objectives.

6.       A review of assumptions and the analysis presented in the IBC resulted in an upward revision of the project benefits. The change resulted predominately from the following points:

·    A reduced original preferred option scope with inclusion of only cost beneficial components of the proposed facility and sports field upgrades

·    Reducing the overall delivery cost to $28.3m as opposed to the original preferred option estimated cost of $40m

·    The population projections based on extrapolations from the 2013 Census figures (by StatsNZ) were shown to be overly conservative. The 2018 Census results and high numbers of new building consents issued over the past three years (2017 to present) showed the population and growth of Franklin to be higher than has been forecast over the next 30 years.  As a result, the usage forecasts which underlie the expected benefits may be conservative.

7.       In partnership with the Karaka Sports Park Trust (The Trust) resident clubs and the local board, a multi option identification and analysis process was completed and the preferred option identified.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      endorse the Karaka Sports Park detailed business case

b)      approve the sports field layout (Attachment A of the agenda report) and multisport facility concept plans and location as the preferred development options for the Karaka Sports Park development

c)      support a report being progressed to the Finance and Performance Committee in May 2020 requesting $28.3 million from the One Local Initiative 10 Year Programme to enable the development of Karaka Sports Park as outlined in the detailed business case

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The One Local Initiative 10 Year Programme (OLI) process was initiated through the 2018-2028 Long-term Plan in order to improve the local board advocacy process, including providing more comprehensive advice on local board advocacy projects. Whilst there was no guarantee of funding, the process was designed to give local board projects a better opportunity to be progressed through investigation, business cases and to be considered for funding.

9.       Through the development of the OLI programme local boards submitted their key advocacy project for inclusion.  The Franklin Local Board resolved through decisions and input into the 10-year budget 2018-2018:

Resolution number FR/2018/3

c) approves its advocacy initiatives, including the key advocacy project, for

inclusion as an appendix to the Franklin 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement, as

detailed in the tabled attached document entitled “Franklin Local Board Key

Advocacy Issues 2018/2019” and summarised at points i) to vi) below:

 

i) key advocacy project – up to $30 million for Karaka Sports Park improvement and enhancement

 

10.     During 2019 an Indicative Business Case was prepared on the basis of three options:

·            Option one: No changes to services or facilities (status quo)

·            Option two: Full implementation of the Karaka Sports Park master plan alongside sport field and park upgrades (One Local Initiative). Cost $40m.

·            Option three: Partial implementation of the Karaka Sports Park master plan alongside sport field and park upgrades (recommended option). Cost $20.2m.

11.     Option Two, the local board’s preferred option was assessed on the basis of:

 

12.     The IBC concluded that the quantifiable economic and social benefits of Option Two would be significantly below costs. Option Two had an estimated total cost of $40.4 million and estimated benefits of $26 million for a net cost of $14.4 million.  The report recommended implementation of a reduced scope, Option Three, concluding that the quantifiable economic and social benefits of this option would be slightly above costs. The proposal has an estimated total cost of $20.2 million and estimated benefits of $22.3 million for a net benefit of $2.1 million.

In June 2019 the Franklin Local Board requested the development of a DBC and consideration of a number of factors and options.

Resolution number FR/2019/77

b) endorse that the development of the full multi-sport facility at Karaka Sports Park and wider park upgrades (One Local Initiative) has a mixed case for change and strategic alignment with council objectives and does not currently deliver community benefits to justify full capital and operational investment by council.

c) endorse the development of a DBC for the partial implementation of the Karaka Sports Park master plan alongside sports field and park upgrades (including parking) commencing in 2019/20 based on:

i) development of Part A (1400m²) of the multi-sport facility alongside park upgrades

ii) indicative funding of $20.2 million of up to $30 million earmarked as part of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

13.     In July 2019 the development of a DBC was endorsed by the Environment and Community Committee.

Resolution ENV/2019/97

b) agree that the development of a multi-sport facility at Karaka Sports Park and wider park upgrades (One Local Initiative) has a mixed case for change and strategic alignment with council objectives and would not deliver community benefits comparable to the capital and operational investment required.

c) approve the development of a DBC for the partial implementation of the Karaka Sports Park master plan alongside sport field and park upgrades commencing in 2019/20 based on:

i)       development of Part A (1400m²) of the multi-sport facility alongside park upgrades

ii)      indicative funding of $20.2 million of up to $30 million earmarked as part of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

14.     In September 2019 the Franklin Local Board endorsed updates to the Karaka Sports Park concept plan which reflected changes made during the design process and the new elements added as a result of the indicative business case.

Resolution number FR/2019/137

a)   approve the revised Karaka Sports Park Concept Plan dated 3 September 2019 in Attachment A including relocated bowls facilities, additional field lighting, sand carpeting and the re-orientation of an additional cricket net.

b)   note that resource consent will be lodged for all elements of the concept plan excluding the proposed building and toilet blocks.

c)   note that the approved indicative business case includes sand carpeting six playing fields, netball and tennis courts, cricket nets, cycle and pedestrian routes, lighting on courts, lighting on five sports fields, carparking and a 1400 square metre building.

d)   note that the preparation of a DBC is underway for the development of the proposed building and the sport field and park upgrades.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The Karaka Sports Park is an outdoor multi-sport facility in north Karaka. Its fields cover approximately 17.5ha. The park provides a home ground for a number of sports, including rugby, cricket, baseball, tennis, netball and lawn bowls.

16.     The area around the Karaka Sports Park is not currently densely populated, but Franklin is expected to undergo considerable urban redevelopment and regeneration over the coming decades.

•     The population in the immediate catchment of the park is forecast to grow from around 6,000 to 63,000 in the next 30 years.

•     The population within a 15-minute drive time of the park is forecast to grow from around 300,000 to 470,000 in 30 years (a faster growth rate than the Auckland average).

17.     There is a current shortfall of lit weekday field time for winter sports of 40 hours per week and a significant expected increase in demand for the playing fields, with winter demand expected to reach 130 hours per week by 2035 (current effective capacity is 70 hours).

18.     The current facility is relatively old and small. There are eight changing rooms; however this includes makeshift temporary changing rooms in shipping containers, and the overall condition of the facility is poor. The current facility does not currently meet the Auckland Council changing room design specifications. The associated toilets and storage facilities are similarly in a poor condition.

19.     Between August 2019 and February 2020 there has been a programme of engagement with stakeholders and the local board to refine the scope of the DBC.  The outcomes of the engagement have clearly identified the need for a similar level of provision of at least eight changing rooms, delivering a facility that can accommodate future extensions and upgrades to all eight sports fields.  The comparison of the scope is summarised below and in Attachments 1 and 2.

 

IBC Preferred Option

DBC Proposed Investment

Field development

 

·    Sand carpeting for six fields

·    All weather playing/practice surface

·    Cricket nets and score keeping pavilion

·    New netball and tennis courts

·    Cycle and pedestrian facilities

·    Lighting for courts and five fields

·    Car parking

 

 

·    Sand carpeting for all fields

·    All weather playing/practice surface

·    Cricket nets

·    New netball and tennis courts

·    Cycle and pedestrian facilities

·    Lighting for all courts and fields

·    Car parking

 

Clubroom building

New ~1,400m2 building

·    4 changing rooms

·    Multifunction space

·    Kitchen/bar

·    Kiosk

·    Storage areas

·    Outdoor play area

 

New ~1,600m2 building

·    8 changing rooms

·    Multifunction space

·    Kitchen/bar

·    Kiosk

·    Storage areas

·    Outdoor play area

 

 

20.     The IBC deemed that the most cost-beneficial investment was that which focussed on providing for core local sports, and the users of the playing fields. Some additional facilities including a proposed gym and indoor training areas were not considered cost-beneficial. It was also noted that the larger investment with a greater focus on high performance facilities did not align as well with Council strategies and were not core community needs.

21.     The IBC effectively determined:

·    the preferred method of addressing the soil drainage issues, and redeveloping the park; and

·    the type and scale of clubroom building that is appropriate.

22.     The options analysis in the DBC focused on sports field upgrades and the detailed elements of the clubroom building, including the specific number of changing rooms and their type, the method of accessing the changing rooms, and the types of multi-function and kitchen/bar spaces.

23.     Selecting a preferred building option largely involved weighing up additional benefit against additional cost.

24.     Based upon current minimum levels of provision, the delivery of eight changing rooms with an internal access is preferred to the IBC reduced scope (Part A 1400m²) for the following reasons:

·    A decrease in the number of changing rooms, from the current level of eight, will not deliver an operationally functional facility. It would reduce the level of service, at a time when the capacity of the fields (and hence their expected usage) is being significantly increased

·    Eight changing rooms is broadly in-line with the level of service provided for other recently-developed sports parks in Auckland

·    A larger option is more cost-effective, since the per-room capital cost decreases as additional rooms are added

·    Building eight changing rooms now is also more cost-effective than building less and adding more later

·    Not having internal access was generally discounted due to lessons learnt at other facilities, health and safety risk, security and best design principles.

25.     A multi-criteria analysis (MCA) was undertaken to asses four building options based on changing room provision and internal / external access.   Each of the four options was assessed against the following five critical success factors determined for this project:

·    Strategic fit and need – Meets the project objectives: 

provides sufficient changing room capacity for the amount of playing fields and its expected usage

significantly increases the quality of the changing rooms and minimises health and safety issues.

·    Potential value for money – optimises value for money, including being preferable to the status quo.

·    Potential affordability – can be met through likely funding.

·    Ability to implement – can be delivered by Auckland Council and the Karaka Sports Park Trust in a reasonable timeframe.


 

26.     A summary of the assessment is provided below.

 

Option 1

 

4 room, internal

Option 2

 

6 rooms internal

Option 3

 

8 rooms external

Option 4

 

8 rooms internal

Comment

Strategic fit and need

Appropriate capacity

x

x

Checkmark

Checkmark

Smaller options risk being insufficient for future park usage.

Increased quality

Checkmark

Checkmark

xCheckmark

Checkmark

All options provide good quality facilities.

Value for money

x

xCheckmark

Checkmark

Checkmark

Larger options are more cost-effective.

Affordability

Checkmark

Checkmark

xCheckmark

xCheckmark

Funding may be more difficult for larger options.

Ability to implement

Checkmark

Checkmark

Checkmark

Checkmark

All options considered implementable.

 

27.     A number of other proposed ancillary concept plan improvements were also included in the DBC, including:

·    Moving and expanding the carparking

·    Improving the concrete pathways around the park

·    Improving the stormwater drainage outside the playing fields

·    Adding new cricket nets

·    Moving the tennis courts

·    Installing new baseball backstop fencing and upgrading cricket pitches

·    Additional landscaping and street furniture.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     Subject to funding approval, climate impacts will be fully assessed and addressed for the Karaka Sports Park development through planning, design and implementation.

29.     This will include due consideration of the usage of green building materials in the project and alternatives for and/or mitigation of any proposed activities that will use a lot of fossil fuels. Demolition materials will be recycled wherever possible and construction debris disposal will also be streamlined by careful site management and the use of materials that are quickly and efficiently recycled.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     Collaboration across staff within Community Facilities and Parks Sports and Recreation will be ongoing to ensure that the Karaka Sports Park project will be appropriately developed and integrated into operational maintenance and asset management systems once completed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     The OLI is the Franklin Local Board’s key advocacy project identified through the 2018-2028 Long-term Plan and the development will deliver multiple benefits for the Franklin community.

32.     Development of Karaka Sports Park will address a shortfall of lit weekday field time for winter sports of 40 hours per week, which is forecast to grow to a shortfall of 105 hours per week by 2028.

33.     During May and June 2017 the Franklin Local Board consulted on a draft Local Board Plan for feedback. Over the consultation period, a total of 181 submissions were received on the draft plan. In addition, 421 people provided feedback at eight informal engagement events and there were 14 pieces of feedback gathered through Facebook. The responses showed that most people supported the outcomes in the draft plan and highlighted the support for multi-purpose sports facilities at Karaka and Clarks Beach.

34.     The Franklin Local Board has confirmed that development of Karaka Sports Park aligns with community aspirations, is a key priority in the 2017 Local Board Plan and meets objectives:

·      make full use of existing outdoor space and community facilities before developing new

·      support community participation in helping to shape people’s quality of life, creativity, health and wellbeing.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     The multisport facility will be designed in accordance with the Te Aranga design principles. This will require mana whenua input and involvement during the design process and enable Māori cultural expression within the building form and exterior.

36.     It is recommended that early engagement with mana whenua should occur during the initial stages of preliminary design.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     The redevelopment is currently expected to cost around $28.3m.

Capital Cost ($000)

Field drainage & lighting

6,152

Clubroom building

14,416

Other items

7,737

TOTAL

28,305

 

38.     The funding for the delivery of the Karaka Sports Park development project will be sought be from the 2018-2028 LTP OLI funds with the potential of additional funding from the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund.

39.     The Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund targets investment to increase the level of community sport and recreation participation in three areas:

·    Enabling participation of low participant communities

·    Increasing participation in emerging sports with high growth potential

·    Sustaining or increasing participation in high participation sports

40.     To access the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund applicants go through an initial Expression of Interest process before final proposals are submitted. A panel of council and sector specialists assess the proposals against a set of criteria and make funding recommendations to the council’s governing body.

41.     An amount of $200m was provisioned in the draft 10-year Budget to provide additional financial capacity over and above existing budgets to progress the OLIs.  The estimated cost of the combined OLIs exceeds the $200m additional funding capacity to help progress the OLIs in the draft 10-year Budget; however there were a number of potential other funding sources, including the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund.

42.     The Karaka Sports Park Trust is confident that with a clear council commitment in place, it can attract a significant amount of external funding and there is an assumption that the Karaka Sports Park Trust will actively work to facilitate donor contributions toward the proposed development.  It is noted that any independent investment contribution will strengthen the DBC and reduce potential burden on the 2018-2028 LTP OLI and Sports and Recreation Facilities Investment funds.

43.     The multiuse facility is forecast to be financially self-sufficient, with annual operating revenues and costs both expected to be around $230,000 excluding any potential annual contribution from the Local Board.

The maintenance and renewal costs for the sport fields will be provided for from operational budgets and are not included as a part of the operating costs of the multiuse facility.

 

 

Karaka Sports Park Fields

Annual Maintenance

Annual Renovations

M&R cost / Annum

Current

Soil turf (8 FSE)

$15,000/field

$2-6,000/field

$150-168,000

Proposed

Sand carpeted turf (8 FSE)

$25-$30,000/field

 

$15-$30,000/field

$360-480,000

Increased cost to operating budget

$210-312,000

 

44.     A cost-benefit analysis (CBA) was undertaken as part of the IBC.  The preferred option had a benefit-cost ratio (BCR) of 1.10, indicating that the expected benefits were larger than the estimated costs (although by a relatively small amount).  The options considered as part of the DBC largely adhered to the IBC preferred option, and hence the BCR should be broadly unchanged.  It is considered reasonable to assume that the proposed investment from the DBC remains cost-beneficial, or at least that the expected benefits are of a similar order of magnitude to the estimated costs. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

45.     The following table provides an overview of the main risks associated with the proposal.

Risks Identified

Mitigation

Risk of delays with the consenting process and additional costs.

Investigate any possible constraints with developing the site at the start of the project, and incorporate these within the design and resource consent process

Potential for project delays and cost increases.

Ensure a programme schedule is established and agreed upon early and the project manager manages the process closely, with regular reporting requirements and clearly defined lines of communication.

Budget allocated and fixed before the design has been developed / completed.

Appoint a QS to review costs at each stage of the design process.

Specifications and details of design are not clearly communicated to all parties prior to design contract commencement.

Limit bespoke elements and if they are required ensure communication of these elements are fully understood prior to engaging contractor.

Potential for both design and construction tenders to be lower than estimate, leading to under-pricing of the project and requirements, increasing the need for Council input.

Address through the tender process. Potentially procure as a fixed price element, or through weighting of attributes focussed on relevant experience, team proposed etc.

Risks Identified

Mitigation

Potential for both design and construction tenders to be higher than estimated, resulting in escalated costs.

Address through the tender process. Potentially procure as a fixed price element.

 

As a result of undefined OPEX costs, the ongoing OPEX costs are greater than anticipated. This will result in maintenance being below the expected level of service or additional OPEX funding required to top up maintenance.

Ensure assets selected and constructed are compliant with Auckland Council standards and do not have high ongoing maintenance costs.

Surrounding residents and the resident clubs are unsupportive of the project.

Engage with the surrounding stakeholders and site tenants early in the project. Understand and manage their expectations.

Stakeholder and local board expectations for the project are high. Stakeholder and resident expectations might not be completely met.

Agree a communications strategy for engaging with stakeholders and the local board. Understand approval and sign off process and timeframes.

Maintain regular communication through a reliable medium.

The multiuse facility is not well used by the local community.

 

Ensure there is effective communication and advertising to the public. Throughout the design process, provide updates as appropriate through social media channels and local community boards and shops.

There will be an increase in reputational risk if there is a further delay to the project.

Ensure there is transparency in communication with stakeholders to define why the decisions have been made. Maintain regular communication through a reliable medium.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     The next steps are outlined below:

Gateway

 

Indicative milestone date (for completion)

Report to Finance and Performance Committee

May 2020

Design Team Procurement

June 2020

Preliminary design, Mana whenua and community engagement

October 2020

Detailed design

November 2020

Resource consent

November 2020

Building consent

February 2021

Construction (Staged)

Mid 2021 onwards*

Handover and completion

Late 2022

*Field upgrades can be staged and could start earlier than the multiuse facility

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment 1 Sports Fields Layout

19

b

Attachment 2 Detailed Business Case Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Roscoe Webb - Programme Principal

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 



Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 

Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan - allocation of funding for projects in 2019/2020.

File No.: CP2020/02713

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To allocate grants to projects identified and prioritised in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Franklin Local Board adopted the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan (the plan) in August 2016.  The purpose of the plan is to provide local strategic guidance for investment into facility development projects within the local board area.

3.       The local board has budgeted $100,000 operational funding in its 2019/2020 Locally Driven Initiatives budget for grants to implement the plan.  This is line item 1256 in the work programme.

4.       During a workshop on 4 February 2020, four projects were identified to consider for funding.  The projects have been assessed against key criteria and a summary of the assessment is included in this report. 

5.       The four projects that are eligible and ready to proceed in 2019/2020 are high, medium high or medium priority projects, as follows:

i)     Counties Manukau Hockey Association: Renew a hockey turf at Rosa Birch Park, Pukekohe (high priority)

ii)     Franklin Gymsports Incorporated: Update the feasibility study and prepare a business case for a gymsports facility (high priority)

iii)    Karaka Sports Park Trust: Develop Karaka Sports Park.  This is Franklin Local Board’s One Local Initiative (medium high priority)

iv)   Bombay School: Complete engineering surveys, seek approval for an outline plan of works and apply for building consent for a new swimming pool at Bombay School (medium priority). 

6.      Following assessment of the above projects against the criteria in Attachment A, staff recommend funding is allocated to options 1 and 2.  They are both identified as high priorities in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan and meet six of the seven criteria.

7.       Options 3 and 4 are not recommended for funding support in 2019/2020 as they are lower priorities in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That Franklin Local Board approve the following grants from line item 1256 of the 2019/2020 local board work programme:

a)      $50,000 to Counties Manukau Hockey Association towards renewal of a hockey turf at Rosa Birch Park, Pukekohe

b)      $50,000 to Franklin Gymsports Incorporated towards updating its feasibility study and preparing a business case for a gymsports facility.

 

Horopaki

Context

2019/2020 Franklin Local Board work programme: Work programme item No. 1256

Sport and active recreation facilities plan - grants for implementation 

8.       Franklin Local Board has budgeted $100,000 in its 2019/2020 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operations budget for grants.  This is line item number 1256 in the work programme.

9.       The activity description for line number 1256 is:

“Provide grants to groups providing facilities which are identified as high or medium-high priority in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan”.

10.     The purpose of the budget is to support a strategic approach to achieving sport and recreation outcomes through the development of sport facilities. 

Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan

11.     Franklin Local Board adopted the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan (the plan) in August 2016.  The plan provides a strategic approach to achieving sport and recreation outcomes through the development of sports facilities in the local board area.  In 2019, the list of projects within the plan was updated and adopted by the local board. 

12.     Projects are prioritised from high to low, based on the criteria in Attachment A.  The criteria reflect the outcomes the local board is seeking from investment.  The list of projects was reviewed in 2019 and adopted by the local board in March 2019.

13.     Local board support for projects can be achieved via grants in non-council owned assets.  Franklin Local Board has provided grants for facility development projects over the last four years and these are summarised in Attachment B.

Franklin Local Board Plan (2017)

14.     Outcome 4 in the Franklin Local Board Plan is “Growth is dealt with effectively”.  For sport and recreation, the objective and associated key initiative is:

Objective

·       Outdoor space and community facilities that support growth.

Key Initiative

·       Plan the development of new facilities to support growth, where needed.

Projects to be considered for grant funding in 2019/2020

15.    Staff have identified four options that are eligible and ready to proceed in 2019/2020, subject to securing funding.  The priority level reflects the priority in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.  The four projects are:

High Priority

Option 1: Counties Manukau Hockey Association Incorporated: Renew a hockey turf (cost: $668,250).

Option 2: Franklin Gymsports Incorporated: Update the feasibility study and complete a business case for a new gymsports facility (cost: $56,000).

Medium High Priority

Option 3: Karaka Sports Park Trust.  Develop Karaka Sports Park (cost: $30,000,000 estimate). 


 

Medium Priority

Option 4: Bombay School.  Complete engineering surveys, seek approval for an outline plan of works and apply for building consent for a new swimming pool at Bombay School ($15,000 estimate). 

Projects above that were considered by Franklin Local Board in 2017/2018 and 2018/2019

16.     Three of the four projects were considered by Franklin Local Board for grant funding in 2017/2018 and 2018/2019.  They were not supported as other projects met more of the criteria at the time and were ready to proceed.  The projects are:

·      Counties Manukau Hockey Incorporated - turf replacement.

·      Franklin Gymsports Club Incorporated - business case.

·      Karaka Sports Park Trust - development of Karaka Sports Park.

Projects not considered in 2019/2020 (High, Medium High and Medium priority)

17.     Projects listed in the plan that are not recommended for consideration in 2019/2020 are:

Indoor court expansion planning in Pukekohe.  The project aims to identify options to locate future indoor courts in the wider Pukekohe area.  Community and Social Policy will consider including this in the scope of its investigation into the long-term location of indoor court and aquatic facilities in Pukekohe. 

Waiuku Netball Centre.  The centre is planning to cover two netball courts with a canopy.  This project is not ready to proceed as the centre is focusing on another project; resealing two netball courts with a rubber surface.

Pukekohe Softball Club.  The project is to install three batters’ boxes at Colin Lawrie Fields, Pukekohe.  This will require capital funding as the batters’ boxes will be council owned.  An assessment of options to relocate two diamonds is required first.  

Bombay Multisport Project.  The needs assessment and feasibility study for this project is being updated.  Once completed, the next stage will be preparing a business case for the facility developments required.

Counties Baseball Club.  This project requires capital funding and the fence will be owned by council.  Development at Karaka Sports Park will be considered as part of the local board’s One Local Initiative project.

Kawakawa Bay Boat Ramp expansionThis project requires capital funding.  The boat ramp is a council asset. 

Pohutukawa Coast Mountain Bike Club tracks.  The club is focusing on winterproofing tracks constructed in 2019 and the construction of two tracks in the Maraetai / Waiho block of Whitford Forest.  It also plans to construct new tracks in the northern section of privately-owned Whitford Forest however the area is closed at present for logging.  The has club applied to the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund for funding for this project.

Pukekohe Rugby League Club changing rooms/toilet upgrade.  The club is based at Nga Hau E Wha marae.  Ngati Tamaoho own the two fields and community use has not been guaranteed.  There have been historical issues with vandalism at the site.  The club wishes to be relocated however a suitable location is not available.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Options for consideration in 2019/2020 were assessed against the criteria in the Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan and Attachment A which are summarised below:

i)     willingness to operate under a shared facility/multisport arrangement / partnership with other codes

ii)     current active participation / membership and membership trend in the last three years

iii)    projected participation / membership

iv)   alignment with strategic documents

v)    scale of the facility

vi)   sustainability of the facility

vii)   capital funding contribution.

Options considered

Option 1: Counties Manukau Hockey Association.  Renew a hockey turf at Rosa Birch Park, Pukekohe.  High priority.

19.     Option 1 is to renew the No. 1 hockey turf at Rosa Birch Park at a cost of $668,250.  The association owns the turf and has requested a contribution of $50,000.  The association has been fund raising to secure the balance required.

20.     Franklin Local Board considered this project in 2017/2018.  The board did not allocate grant funding at this time as there were other projects which met more of the criteria for funding and were ready to proceed.

21.     Seven hockey clubs are based at Rosa Birch Park with a combined membership of 1,200 members.  Over the last three years, membership has increased. 

22.     The hockey turf is used on average 60 hours a week in winter and 35 – 40 hours a week in summer.  It is also used three times a week by a local group for boot camp.

23.     The project involves lifting the artificial turf and rubber pad, patching the asphalt, and installing a new rubber pad and turf.  Provision has been made to lay new asphalt in case this is required.

24.     Hockey turf priorities identified in the Auckland Sport Sector Facilities Priorities Plan (2017) include two new hockey turfs at Colin Maiden Park.  This is the main asset development priority for Auckland Hockey Association.  The main asset renewal project is the No. 1 turf at Rosa Birch Park.

25.     Council has previously invested in hockey turfs via grant funding from the Sports Infrastructure Development (SiDs) Programme.  Council’s priority for investment via grant funding is for the turfs at Colin Maiden Park.  For other hockey turfs that require funding, such as Rosa Birch Park, there is no grant funding available from the SiDs budget for several years due to other priorities for new turfs that have been identified in Auckland. 

Table 1: Advantages and disadvantages of Option 1

Option 1

Renew a hockey turf Rosa Birch Park, Pukekohe.

Advantages

Disadvantages

Current membership is 1,200 members.  Membership has increased over the last three years

Participation will be maintained (will not decrease).

Alignment with i) Auckland Sport Sector Facilities Priorities Plan (2017) and ii) Auckland Regional Hockey Facilities Report (2014)

The turf is the size/scale required by the association

The turf is a renewal and the operation will not lead to additional operational costs

Counties Manukau Hockey can contribute funds to the project ($188,000).  New Zealand Community Trust granted $200,000 in November 2019.  

There is very limited use of the hockey turf by other codes.  The likelihood of sharing with another code is minimal. 

 

Recommendation

26.     This project is recommended for funding support as it aligns closely with the objectives of the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan; the project is a high priority in the plan.  There is risk of project costs escalating whilst additional fundraising is carried out.

Option 2: Franklin Gymsports, Pukekohe.  Update the feasibility study and prepare a business case for a gymsports facility.  High priority.

27.     Franklin Gymsports currently leases a building at Pukekohe Showgrounds for its 605 members.  The building is not fit-for-purpose and is inadequate to meet the future needs of the wider Pukekohe area. 

28.     Option 2 involves updating Franklin Gymsports Club’s feasibility study and preparing a business case for a new purpose-built gymnastics facility.  The cost is $56,000; this includes $33,000 to update the feasibility study and $23,000 for the business case.

29.     A needs assessment was completed in 2015 followed by a feasibility study in 2017.  The feasibility study requires updating and expanding as the existing study is based on one site.  Other potential sites have been identified, such as Pukekohe High School and the premises of the Pukekohe Indian Association.

30.     Franklin Local Board considered the business case part of Option 2 in 2017/2018 and did not support it; the local board had previously granted $30,000 for a needs assessment in 2014/2015 and wanted to see the club to contribute to the cost.

31.     The club has applied for funding to the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund to update its feasibility study and prepare a business case.  This has increased awareness about the gymsports facility development project.

Table 2: Advantages and disadvantages of Option 2

Option 2

Update the feasibility study and prepare a business case for a new gymsports facility in Pukekohe.

Advantages

Disadvantages

Franklin Gymsports is willing to operate under a shared facility model

Current membership is 605 members.  Membership has increased over the last three years

Participation is likely to increase due to the forecast population increase

The 2019 Auckland Gymsports Facility Plan lists Franklin Gymsports Incorporated as a future a sub-regional facility. The project is the third highest priority for gymnastics in the Auckland Sport Sector Facilities Priorities Plan (2017)

The proposed scale of the facility has been designed to meet future demand.

Franklin Gymsports has $6,000 to contribute to the project.    

Once a preferred site has been confirmed, evidence is required to confirm whether a facility will be sustainable. 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

32.     This project is recommended for funding support as it aligns closely with the outcomes the local board is seeking.  The feasibility study and business case will provide the evidence the club requires to complete an assessment for the Auckland Sport Sector Facilities Priorities Plan.  This will be a critical step to be eligible for non-council funding.


 

Option 3:  Karaka Sports Park Trust.  Develop Karaka Sports Park, Karaka.   Medium high priority.

33.     Option 3 is the development of Karaka Sports Park at an expected cost of $30,000,000.  

34.     A master plan has been adopted for the park which includes facilities for several codes including netball, rugby, cricket, tennis and baseball. 

35.     Franklin Local Board’s One Local Initiative for advocacy through the 2018 – 2028 long term plan is the development of Karaka Sports Park.  Community Facilities will arrange a workshop to present the draft business case in the next few months.

Table 3: Advantages and disadvantages of Option 3

Option 3

Develop Karaka Sports Park.

Advantages

Disadvantages

Groups already operate under a shared facility/multisport arrangement.

980 members.

Participation is forecast to increase to 3,000 by 2031 from the existing codes

The scale of the development will meet future needs

The project aligns with Outcomes 4 and 5 in the Franklin Local Board Plan (2017) and is the board’s One Local Initiative

Karaka Sports Park Trust will fund raise to contribute to the capital cost.

The sustainability of non-council assets has not been confirmed.  A draft business case will be presented to the local board in the next few months and this will provide details on sustainability.

 

 

 

Recommendation

36.     This project is not recommended for funding support until decisions have been made on the One Local Initiative.  

Option 4: Bombay School Pool.  Complete engineering surveys, seek approval for an outline plan of works and apply for building consent for a new swimming pool at Bombay School.  Medium priority.

37.     Option 4 is for planning work that is required to replace the school swimming pool with a new 25m x 7.5m pool.  The services are estimated to cost $15,000. 

38.     Bombay School will complete a feasibility study and business case in March 2020 for a new pool which is expected to cost $950,000.  The next stage in the planning process is to complete the surveys required, seek approval of an outline plan of works and apply for building consent.  The school intends to raise the funds to construct the pool.

39.     Provision of aquatic facilities in the Bombay area is a low priority in council’s Community Facilities Network Plan.  Currently, the local board provides grant funding toward school swimming pool operational costs rather than capital development costs.  This enables community access to school swimming pools over the summer holiday period. 


 

Table 4: Advantages and disadvantages of Option 4

Option 4

Bombay School – replacement of swimming pool.

Advantages

Disadvantages

The pool will be available for community use outside school hours via a key system.

The school role is 327.

Participation will increase with a larger pool and a proposed learn to swim provider

The scale / size has been designed to meet future needs of the school

The operational model indicates the pool will be sustainable (revenue will cover partial depreciation)

The school will raise the funds for capital expenses; the Ministry of Education will not contribute financially to the project.

Low priority - no demand identified in the Community Facilities Network Plan in this part of Auckland.

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

40.     This project is not recommended for funding support at this time.  Although the school is following best practice project planning, other recommended projects are a higher priority in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

Recommendations for investment in 2019/2020

41.     It is recommended that Franklin Local Board allocate funding to the following projects in 2019/2020.

Table 5: Summary of recommendations for 2019/2020

Option

Name of group

Description

Project cost

Group contribution

Recommended grant

1

Counties Manukau Hockey Association

Renew hockey turf No 1 at Rosa Birch Park.

$668,250

$618,250

$50,000

2

Franklin Gymsports Incorporated

Update the feasibility study and prepare a business case for a gymsports facility.

$56,000

$6,000

 

$50,000

 

 

TOTAL

 

 

$100,000

 

42.     Should the local board support the projects above which total $100,000, there will be $0 remaining in work programme item No.1256 in 2019/2020. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

How the proposed decision could impact on direct greenhouse gas emissions and the approach to reduce emissions

43.     The potential to increase in greenhouse gas emissions is summarised below.

 

Table 6: How the decision could impact green-house gas emissions

Description

How decision could impact on direct greenhouse gas emissions

Potential for mitigation

Approach to reduce emissions

Option 1 - Renewal of hockey turf at Rosa Birch Park.

Potential increase from transporting a new astro-turf to Rosa Birch Park.

Low as the turf will need to be delivered to the park.

Include in funding agreement that consideration be given to how emissions could be minimised.

Option 2 - Update the feasibility study and prepare a business case for a gymsports facility

No impact

NA

NA

Option 3 - Development at Karaka Sports Park.

Potential increase from transporting materials for park development.

Low as materials will need to be delivered to the park.

Tree planting is intended on the park master plan

Unknown as project priorities have yet to be confirmed.

Option 4 - Complete engineering surveys, seek approval for an outline plan of works and apply for building consent for a new swimming pool at Bombay School

No impact from this part of the project.

 

NA

 

 

NA

 

 

 

44.     The decision has the potential to increase emissions for options 1 and 3.

45.     The projects are not council led therefore emission reduction falls to the asset owner.  Funding agreements can specify that the recipient consider how emissions can be reduced throughout the project.

Effect climate change could have over the lifetime of the proposed decision and how these effects are being addressed

46.     The effect that climate change could have over the lifetime of the proposed decision and how these effects are being addressed are summarised below. 


 

Table 7: Effects of climate change and how these are being addressed

Description

Effect climate change could have over the lifetime of the proposed decision

How effects are being addressed

Option 1 - Renewal of hockey turf at Rosa Birch Park.

 

A new hockey turf will last, on average, 10 years.

Rosa Birch Park is identified as a flood plain in the Auckland Hazard viewer.  It is predicted to be covered by flood water as a result of a 1-in-100-year rainstorm event.

Higher temperatures and more hot days could result in the need for more frequent watering of the proposed water-based turf.  This could result in more water vapour in the air.

The park has been designed as part of the storm water system for Pukekohe.

 

Option 2 - Franklin Gymsports Update the feasibility study and prepare a business case for a gymsports facility

The timeframe for the lifetime of the decision is approximately 6 months.

Climate change will not affect updating the feasibility study and preparing a business case. 

The hazards in the Auckland Hazard Viewer will be considered for each site assessed.

Option 3 - Development at Karaka Sports Park

This is unknown at present although higher temperatures and more hot days could result in the need to provide water for club activities associated with club owned assets.

Provision will need to be made for water shortages in the design of facilities.

Option 4 - Complete engineering surveys, seek approval for an outline plan of works and apply for building consent for a new swimming pool at Bombay School

The timeframe for the lifetime of the decision is approximately 6 months.

For the continuation of planning for the pool, warmer weather could:

-   Increase water temperature

-   increase water evaporation requiring more water than expected.

 

The school is considering the collection of rainwater to supplement water supply. 

Pool covers will be used to reduce the loss of heat from the water and assist with reducing water evaporation when the pool is not in operation.

Solar panels will be used to heat the pool water to reduce the energy consumption.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

Franklin Gymsports Project

47.     Franklin Gymsports has also applied to the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund for Option 2.  The project is one of 17 projects that will be considered by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in April 2020. 

48.     Franklin Local Board has been asked for its views on Option 1, prior to consideration for funding by the committee.

49.     In the future, significant funding will be required to construct the gymsports facility. Local boards that provide grants toward the early planning stages are likely to improve the chance of projects securing larger amounts of funding for design and construction.

50.     The sport and recreation team recommend that the construction cost for the gymsports facility be considered for a grant from the fund rather than the feasibility and business case.  

Karaka Sports Park Project

51.     The Community Facilities team is leading the preparation of a detailed business case for the development of Karaka Sports Park.  The team recommends the local board defers a decision on funding through work programme item 1256 until decisions have been made on funding through the long-term plan.

Council Controlled Organisations

52.     The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     The input and views of the local board were received at a workshop held on 4 February 2020.  Options presented to the local board focused on the high, medium high and medium priorities.

54.     The board was supportive of allocating funding to the Counties Manukau Hockey Association turf renewal project and the Franklin Gymsports project. 

55.     In regard to the gymsports project, the local board recommends that the proposed facility is multi-use. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

56.     The Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan guides decision making to increase community participation in sport and recreation, including an increase in participation for Māori. 

57.     Within the Franklin Local Board area, 15 per cent of the population is Maori. 

58.     Less than 2 per cent of Maori residing in Franklin participate in hockey and gymnastics.  Investment in these activities will have minimal impact on Maori participation.

59.     Engagement with Mana Whenua will be a key part of the implementation of the Karaka Sports Park Master Plan.  This will be ongoing throughout the planning and development stages.

60.     Eleven percent of Maori participate in swimming which is lower than the general population at 14 per cent.  Investment in planning for a swimming pool will not have a direct impact on Maori participation.  However, it is likely that if a swimming pool is constructed at Bombay School, the impact on Maori participation will be greater than for hockey and gymnastics.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

61.     Franklin Local Board has budgeted $100,000 in line item 1256 within its 2019/2020 work programme.   

62.     Recommendations for grant funding total $100,000.

63.     The recommendations do not give rise to any major financial risks.

64.     The economic return on investment from renewing the hockey turf at Rosa Birch Park includes reducing the potential for injuries from dips in the turf.  The turf will be safer to use.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Counties Manukau Hockey Association Project

65.     The risk of unknown costs associated with the hockey turf drainage will be mitigated by ensuring that Counties Manukau Hockey Association has funds to renew the asphalt under the hockey turf, prior to the start of the project.

Other risks and mitigation

66.     Potential risks from investment will be mitigated by having a signed funding agreement with each of the organisations recommended for grant funding.  The funding agreement will state how the funding is to be used.  Where a grantee requires additional funds to complete a project, such as Counties Manukau Hockey Association, the grant will be released once the grantee provides confirmation that the balance to complete a project has been secured.

67.     The sport and recreation team has prepared and managed many similar funding agreements.  The risk of not achieving the expected outcomes from the recommended grant funding is expected to be low.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

68.     The successful organisation/s will be required to enter into a funding agreement which includes the terms and conditions of the grant funding.

69.     Staff from the Sport and Recreation Team will keep the local board informed on the project’s progress through local board reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Criteria used to assess sport and recreation facility development

33

b

Recipients of grant funding from Franklin Local Board to develop

35

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rose Ward - Sport and Recreation Advisor

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

Dave Stewart - Manager Sport & Recreation

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 

Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund - applications from sports groups in the Franklin Local Board area.

File No.: CP2020/03174

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse applications from Pohutukawa Coast Mountain Bike Club, Franklin Mountain Bike Club and Bombay Rugby Club, to the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund is a $120 million contestable fund allocated through the Long-Term Plan 2018-2028.  It supports the development of regional and sub-regional community sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

3.       In 2019/2020, $7 million has been budgeted for projects that align with priorities identified in the Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019 – 2039. 

4.       The Franklin Gymsports Club, Pohutukawa Coast Mountain Bike Club, Franklin Mountain Bike Club and Bombay Rugby Club applied for funding in the 2019/20.  An overview of each project is included in this report.

5.       At a workshop on 3 March 2020, Franklin Local Board considered the projects.  Three align with the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.  The project led by Bombay Rugby Club is a sports field upgrade project which is outside the scope of the plan.

6.       The local board raised concern that there will be no consequential operational funding to maintain the proposed mountain bike track extension at Puni Recreation Reserve.

7.       Following assessment of the projects, staff recommend that the local board endorses the applications from Pohutukawa Coast Mountain Bike Club, Franklin Mountain Bike Club and Bombay Rugby Club for consideration for funding by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee. 

8.       The application from Franklin Gymsports Club is not recommended for endorsement at this time.  It is recommended that the updating of the club’s feasibility study and business case for a new gymsports facility be funded at the local level.  Once this is complete, the club can apply to the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund for the significant funding it will require for future stages of the project.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      does not endorse a Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund application from Franklin Gymsports for $56,000 to the 2019/2020 grant fund to update its feasibility study and prepare a business case for a new purpose built gymsports facility, but rather that the local board agrees to fund this from the Franklin Local Board work programme item 1256 in 2019/2020 instead.

b)      endorse an application from the Pohutukawa Coast Mountain Bike Club for $150,000, to the 2019/2020 Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund, to winterproof mountain bike tracks in the Maraetai/Waiho block of Whitford Forest and construct new tracks in Whitford Forest.

c)      endorse an application from Franklin Mountain Bike Club for $50,000, to the 2019/2020 Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund, to winterproof mountain bike tracks and extend a track at Puni Recreation Reserve

d)      endorse an application from Bombay Rugby Club for $52,500, to the 2019/2020 Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund, to complete a needs assessment, feasibility and business case to upgrade sports fields and field lights at Bombay Rugby Club.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund is a contestable fund that supports development of regional and sub-regional community sport and recreation facilities.

10.     The purpose of the fund is to support the implementation of Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 which aims to make Aucklanders more active, more often. 

11.     Council’s Long Term Plan 2018-2028 has $120 million allocated for this fund.  This includes $7 million in 2019/2020, $7 million in 2020/2021, $13.4 million in 2021/2022 and 13.6 million in 2022/2023.

Funding priorities

12.     The priorities for the allocation of funds are as follows:

Table 1: Priorities for investment

Priority

Description

Examples

High

Core infrastructure

 

Projects over $500,000

Partnerships

Courts, fields, playing surfaces and lighting are high priorities for investment

 

Indoor courts

 

Partnerships that enable a group to leverage additional investment  

Medium

Ancillary infrastructure

Toilets, changing rooms, equipment storage and car parking for sport facilities

Low

Incidental infrastructure

Clubrooms and administration facilities not directly linked to sports participation but whereby they exist for social and management purposes

 

13.     Further details about the funding priorities are in the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund Guidelines SRFIF Guidelines.

Application process

14.     The 2019/2020 grant application process was a two-stage process, as follows:

Stage 1: Expressions of interest were received from 59 sports groups, by 1 November 2019.  Twenty-one applications aligned with the purpose of the fund. 

Stage 2:  Seventeen groups from Stage 1 applied in Stage 2.  Applications included supplementary documents such as a needs assessment, feasibility study and business case if these had been completed.  

Assessment of projects

15.     A panel that included staff from Sport New Zealand and council assessed the projects.

16.     Auckland Sport (Aktive) did not participate in the assessment process as it applied for funding on behalf of the multi-code Regional Indoor Court Leadership Group.  

17.     Projects were assessed against criteria linked to the following principles stated in Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039.  The principles are summarised in Table 1 and were used during the decision-making process to ensure investments are well balanced.

Table 2:  Investment principles for prioritising investment

 

Principle

Description

%

 

 % of

Total

1

Equity

Ensures equity of outcomes across the population regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status or location

40%

 

 

 

 

80%

2

Outcome-focused

There is a clear ’line of sight’ between the investment and the outcomes it delivers

30%

3

Financial sustainability

Projects need to be financially viable and affordable for the public

20%

4

Accountability

Investment should be efficient, effective, transparent and consistent

10%

 

In addition to the above, the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund considers two principles that specifically relate to facility development considerations as follows:

Table 2a: Investment principles related to facility developments

 

Principle

Description

%

 

%

of Total

 

5

Fit-for-purpose

Ensures the proposal aligns with best practice, is flexible to meet future / changing needs and meets design standards to deliver the intended outcomes

 

10%

 

 

 

 

20%

 

6

Deliverability

Ensures the capital fundraising plan is realistic, the complexity of the project is achievable and the capability of the group leading the project is sufficient to deliver the intended outcomes 

 

10%

 

18.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee will consider applications from the 17 groups at its meeting in April 2020.  

Franklin Local Board Plan

19.     The Franklin Local Board Plan has two outcomes that align with sports facility projects.  They are:

Outcome 4: Growth is dealt with effectively. 

Objective: Outdoor space and community facilities that support growth.

Key Initiatives:

-     ensure we are making the best possible use of existing outdoor space and community facilities

-     plan the development of new facilities to support growth, where needed.

Outcome 5:  Franklin Communities feel ownership and connection to their area.

Objective: Community-led action is enabled.

Key Initiative:

-     support local placemaking activities to create quality places for people to live, work, play and learn in.

Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan

20.     Three of the four projects located in the Franklin Local Board area are prioritised in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.  One project, the upgrade of playing surfaces and field lighting at Bombay Rugby Club, is not included as a priority in the plan as sports field and lighting upgrades are outside the scope.  Projects listed in the plan and their priority are:

·    Franklin Gymsports Club facility development:  High priority

 

·    Pohutukawa Coast Mountain Bike Club: Development of new tracks in the Maraetai block of Whitford Forest and in the northern half of Whitford Forest.  Medium priority.

·    Franklin Mountain Bike Club:  Track extension at Puni Recreation Reserve.  Low priority.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options considered

Option 1:  Application for $56,000 from Franklin Gymsports to update its feasibility study and prepare a business case for a gymsports facility.

21.     Option 1 involves updating the club’s feasibility study and preparing a business case for a new purpose-built gymsports facility in Pukekohe.  The total cost of the project is $56,000.

22.     Franklin Gymsports currently leases a building at Pukekohe Showgrounds for its 605 members.  The building is not fit-for-purpose and is inadequate to meet the future needs of the club.  There is a waiting list for classes.

23.     The Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan includes Facility Partnership initiatives.  This project aligns with “Continue to support collaborative partnerships to provide sustainable delivery of recreation and sport facilities”.

24.     Franklin Gymsport’s facility is listed in the Auckland Gymsports Facility Plan as a future sub regional facility. 

25.     The project is the third priority for gymnastics in the Auckland Sport Sector Facilities Priorities Plan (2017).  This plan lists the top five facility development priorities, for each sports code. 

26.     This project is a high priority in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

27.     At a local board workshop on 4 February 2020, the local board supported contributing $50,000 toward this project via work programme item 1256 from its local discretionary operational budget.


 

 

Table 3: Advantages and disadvantages of Option 1

Option 1

Update feasibility study and prepare a business case

Advantages

Disadvantages

-   Aligns with a key initiative in the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan to support collaborative partnerships

-   Aligns with the Auckland Gymsports Facility Plan.  Franklin Gymsports is identified as a sub-regional facility

-   Aligns with the Auckland Sport Sector Facilities Priorities Plan (3rd priority)

-   Aligns with a key initiative in the Franklin Local Board Plan to plan new facilities to support growth

-   Aligns with the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan (high priority)

-   Information will be out of date 

 

-   A delay in compiling the evidence the club requires to complete an assessment for the Auckland Sport Sector Facilities Priorities Plan.  This will be a critical step to be eligible for non-council funding

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

28.     Staff do not recommend local board endorsement of Option 1, for consideration by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.  It is recommended that Option 1 be funded from work programme item 1256 in 2019/2020, which is part of the Franklin Local Board work programme and funding.  Franklin Gymsports will require significant funding for future project stages and local level grant funding to the club for planning purposes will signal that the local board supports this project.  

Option 2:  Application for $150,000 from Pohutukawa Coast Mountain Bike Club, to winterproof tracks in the Maraetai/Waiho block of Whitford Forest and construct new tracks in Whitford Forest.

29.     Option 2 is to winterproof mountain bike tracks and construct new tracks in Whitford Forest.  The application was part of a multi-board application to develop mountain bike tracks in Auckland and includes applications to Rodney and Manurewa local boards.  Pohutukawa Coast Mountain Bike Club is seeking $150,000.

30.     The club advised the project will cost $254,000 and the club will contribute $104,000.

31.     Strategic partnership initiatives in The Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan include:

-     support public access to recreation and sport facilities on private land.  Whitford Forest is privately owned; the forest owner supports public access for outdoor recreation in areas that are not being logged.

-     continue to provide, maintain and develop the network of parks and open spaces.  Winterproofing tracks at Whitford Forest will mean the tracks can be used all-year round.

32.     The Bike Facility Plan for the Auckland Region refers to Whitford Forest as a sub-regional destination for mountain biking.  The plan identifies ongoing mountain bike track development to extend the range of tracks available.

33.     The Franklin Local Board Plan includes a key initiative to ensure we are making the best possible use of existing outdoor space and community facilities

34.     The Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan lists the development of tracks in Maraetai block of Whitford Forest and the northern section of Whitford Forest as a medium priority.  The local board granted $40,000 toward track construction in 2018/2019.  The grant contributed to the cost of constructing seven tracks between June and October 2019 at a total cost of $137,000. 

Table 4: Advantages and disadvantages of Option 2

Option 2

Winterproof tracks in the Maraetai/Waiho block of Whitford Forest and construct new tracks in Whitford Forest

Advantages

Disadvantages

-   Aligns with a key initiative in the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan; to support public access on private land

-   Aligns with the Bike Facility Plan for the Auckland Region

-   Aligns with a key initiative in the Franklin Local Board Plan which is to ensure we are making the best use of existing outdoor space

-   Aligns with the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan (medium priority)

-   Increased use of existing tracks

No disadvantages

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

35.     Staff recommend endorsing Pohutukawa Coast Mountain Bike Club’s application for investment of $150,000 to winter tracks in the Maraetai/Waiho block of Whitford forest and construct new tracks in Whitford Forest.  The project aligns with regional strategic documents and the outcomes the local board is seeking for sports facilities.

Option 3: Application for $50,000 from Franklin Mountain Bike Club to winterproof existing tracks and extend a track in Puni Recreation Reserve.

36.     Option 3 is to winterproof mountain bike tracks and extend a track at Puni Recreation Reserve.  The application was part of the multi-board application to develop mountain bike tracks in Auckland and includes applications to Rodney and Manurewa local boards.  The club is seeking $50,000 which is the total cost of the project.

37.     An initiative to encourage accessible and activity-friendly environments in the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan is that council continue to provide, maintain and develop the network of parks and open-spaces.  Winterproofing tracks at Puni Recreation Reserve will mean the tracks can be used all-year round.

38.     Franklin Local Board Plan includes a key initiative which is to ensure we are making the best possible use of existing outdoor space and community facilities.

39.     The Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan includes a project to extend the length of tracks in Puni Recreation Reserve and resurface the pump track.  The project is a low priority.

Table 5: Advantages and disadvantages of Option 3

Option 3

Winterproof tracks and construct a new track at Puni Recreation Reserve

Advantages

Disadvantages

-   Aligns with a key initiative in the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan; to maintain and develop the network of parks

-   Aligns with a key initiative in the Franklin Local Board Plan which is to ensure we are making the best use of existing outdoor space

-   Aligns with the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan (low priority)

No disadvantages

 

 

 

 

 


 

Recommendation

40.     Staff recommend endorsing Franklin Mountain Bike Club’s application for investment of $50,000 to winterproof tracks and extend a track in Puni Recreation Reserve.  The project aligns with the outcomes the local board is seeking for sports facilities.  It will provide year-round access to tracks for riders from the west and central Franklin areas; there are no other mountain bike tracks in these areas on public land. 

Option 4: Application for $52,500 from Bombay Rugby Club to complete a needs assessment, feasibility and business case for upgrading sports fields and lighting.

41.     Option 4 involves completing a needs assessment, feasibility study and business case to upgrade the two rugby fields and field lights at Bombay Rugby Club grounds.  The club is seeking $52,500 which is the cost of the project.  The fields are owned by the club and it is a local level club.

42.     The club’s annual revenue will fund maintenance of the fields but not field development.

43.     A strategic partnership initiative in The Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan is to support public access to recreation and sport facilities on private land.  The rugby fields are privately owned and are part of the network of sports fields for rugby.

44.     The Wider Auckland Rugby Facility Plan (2018) identifies that there will be a shortage of lit space for rugby in Franklin.  The plan does not provide the detail for different areas within Franklin.

45.     The project aligns with a key initiative in the Franklin Local Board Plan which is to ensure that we are making the best possible use of existing outdoor space. 

46.     A 2019 assessment by council staff of demand and supply for rugby field space shows that there is a shortfall in both lit and unlit space at Bombay.  The assessment was undertaken as part of council’s Sports Infrastructure Development Project.

Table 6: Advantages and disadvantages of Option 4

Option 4

Complete a needs assessment, feasibility and business case for upgrading sports fields and lighting

Advantages

Disadvantages

-   Aligns with a key initiative in the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan; to support public access to recreation and sport facilities on private land

-   Aligns with a key initiative in the Franklin Local Board Plan which is to ensure we are making the best use of existing outdoor space

-   Additional capacity at Bombay will reduce pressure on council sports fields

No disadvantages

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

47.     Staff recommend endorsing Bombay Rugby Club’s application for investment of $52,500 into completing a needs assessment, feasibility study and business case.  Should the planning work identify this project is achievable, the additional capacity will take pressure off council owned sports park assets.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

How the proposed decision could impact on direct greenhouse gas emissions and the approach to reduce emissions

48.     The potential to increase in greenhouse gas emissions is summarised below for all options in Table 7.

Table 7:  How the decision could impact green-house gas emissions

Option

Description

How decision could impact on direct greenhouse gas emissions

Potential for mitigation

Approach to reduce emissions

Option 1 – Franklin Gymsports: Update the feasibility study and prepare a business case for a gymsports facility.

No impact

Not applicable

Not applicable

Option 2 - Pohutukawa Coast Mountain Bike Club:  Winterproof tracks in the Maraetai/Waiho block of Whitford Forest and construct new tracks in Whitford Forest

Potential increase from a diesel vehicle to deliver gravel and from equipment used for track construction.

Winterproofing tracks will encourage riders to drive to the forest more often.

Low as this is the most efficient and effective method.

Low as the improved tracks will encourage participation.

Include in funding agreement that consideration be given to how emissions could be minimised.

 

Option 3 - Franklin Mountain Bike Club: Winterproof existing tracks and extend a track in Puni Recreation Reserve

Potential increase from a diesel vehicle to deliver gravel and from equipment used for track construction.

Winterproofing tracks will encourage riders to drive to the reserve more often.

Low as this is the most efficient and effective method.

Low as the improved tracks will encourage participation

Include in funding agreement that consideration be given to how emissions could be minimised.

Option 4 - Bombay Rugby Club: Complete a needs assessment, feasibility and business case for upgrading sports fields and lighting

No impact

Not applicable

Not applicable

 

49.     The decision has the potential to increase emissions for options 2 and 3.

50.     Projects are not council led therefore responsibility for emission reduction for Options 2 and 3 will fall to the club and contractor.  The funding agreement can specify that the recipient considers how emissions can be reduced throughout the project.

Effect climate change could have over the lifetime of the proposed decision and how these effects are being addressed

51.     The effect that climate change could have over the lifetime of the proposed decision and how these effects are being addressed are summarised below. 


 

Table 8:  Effects of climate change and how these are being addressed

Option

Description

Effect climate change could have over the lifetime of the proposed decision

How effects are being addressed

Option 1 - Franklin Gymsports: Update the feasibility study and prepare a business case for a gymsports facility

The timeframe for the lifetime of the decision is approximately six months.

Climate change will not affect updating the feasibility study and preparing a business case. 

The hazards in the Auckland Hazard Viewer will be considered for each site assessed.

Option 2 - Pohutukawa Coast Mountain Bike Club:  Winterproof tracks in the Maraetai/Waiho block of Whitford Forest and construct new tracks in Whitford Forest

In the northern part of Whitford Forest, higher temperatures could make tracks dry and dusty in first few years after tree planting.

New tree plantings by the forest owner will assist in keeping moisture in the ground.  As trees grow, the tracks will be shaded.

Option 3 - Franklin Mountain Bike Club: Winterproof existing tracks and extend a track in Puni Recreation Reserve

Higher temperatures could make the new track dry and dusty

Community Facilities can close the track should it become rutted and not safe for mountain biking.

Option 4 Bombay Rugby Club: Complete a needs assessment, feasibility and business case for upgrading sports fields and lighting

The timeframe for the lifetime of the decision is approximately nine months.

Climate change will not affect the preparation of a needs assessment, feasibility study or business case. 

Not applicable

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

52.     Council’s contractor, Citycare, maintains mountain bike tracks in Puni Recreation Reserve.  Should this project be funded by the committee, the Community Facilities team will be tasked with the maintenance of more tracks.  Maintenance and renewals will need to be undertaken within existing budgets.

Council Controlled Organisations

53.     The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

54.     Input and views of the local board were received at a workshop held on 3 March 2020.

55.     The board would like to see the mountain bike tracks at Puni Recreation Reserve promoted so more people know about them.

56.     The board wishes to ensure that consequential operational funding is included if there is capital investment in council-owned facilities from a regional budget.  The local board does not have capacity to fund additional operational costs associated with new capital expenditure.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.     The assessment criteria developed for this fund has a stronger weighting for projects that are Māori-led, have high collaboration with Māori organisations, prioritises strategically increased participation by Māori and/or involves activities with the likelihood of high Māori participation.

58.     Within the Franklin Local Board area, 15% of the population is Māori. 

59.     The impact on Māori is likely to be greater than that of general participants for rugby.  Māori are 65% more likely to play rugby than other Franklin residents.

60.     The impact on Māori is likely to be less than that of general participants for gymnastics and cycling/biking.  Māori are 66% less likely to do gymnastics and 60% less likely to participate in cycling/biking than other Franklin residents

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

61.     Should the two mountain bike track projects be funded by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, there will be no consequential operational funding to maintain new tracks.

62.     The economic return on investment in new mountain bike tracks includes fitter and healthier community members.  This is due to the increased opportunity to provide a more extensive track network and tracks that can be used all year round.

63.     Two projects will require funding for future stages.  The Franklin Gymsports project will require approximately $700,000 for the detailed design stage.  Bombay Rugby Club’s project, if feasible and achievable, will require significant funding of $300,000 to $400,000 per field and $500,000 per field for lighting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

64.     Potential risks from supporting the projects, should they be granted funds by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, will be mitigated by having a signed funding agreement with the clubs.  The funding agreement will state how the funding is to be used.  For the Pohutukawa Coast Mountain Bike Club, who will require additional funds to complete a project, the grant will be released once it provides confirmation that the balance has been secured to complete the project.

65.     The sport and recreation team has prepared and managed many similar funding agreements.  The risk of not achieving the expected outcomes from the recommended grant funding is expected to be low.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

66.     In April 2020, the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee will consider 17 funding applications and allocate funding. 

67.     The successful organisations will be required to enter into a funding agreement which includes the terms and conditions of the grant funding.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rose Ward - Sport and Recreation Advisor

Authorisers

Dave Stewart - Manager Sport & Recreation

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport monthly update to the Franklin Local Board - March 2020

File No.: CP2020/01989

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Franklin Local Board (FLB) about transport related matters in this area including its Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A decision is not required this month but the report contains information about the following matters:

·    Responses to resolutions;

·    a summary of Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area;

·    a summary of the board’s Transport Capital Fund and Community Safety Fund projects;

·    a summary of general information items.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the March 2020 Auckland Transport monthly update.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play in the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

4.       This report updates the local board on AT projects and operations in the Franklin Local Board area. It summarises consultations and Traffic Control Committee decisions and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and Community Safety Fund (CSF).

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT.  Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects they believe are important to their communities but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·    be safe

·    not impede network efficiency

·    be in the road corridor (although projects in parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

6.       AT’s Community Safety Fund (CSF) comprises $20 million in total allocated across all 21 local boards, with $5 million to be allocated during the 2019/2020 financial year and the balance of $15 million over the 2020/2021 financial year. This is a safety fund that sits within AT’s safety budget, so the major component of the funding allocation formula is the number of Deaths and Serious Injuries (DSI) in a local board area. The purpose of the fund is to allow local communities to address long-standing road safety issues that have yet to become regional priorities and have not been addressed by AT.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

7.       Through Auckland Council’s Long-Term Plan 2018-2028, LBTCF funding has increased to a total of $20.8 million per annum across all 21 local boards.

8.       The allocation for the Franklin Local Board has also increased. The updated figures for this electoral term are reflected in the table below:

Table 1: Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction including the previous electoral term

$2,855,965

Current 2019-2022 LBTCF allocation

$3,278,661

Total funds available in current political term

$3,278,661

 

9.       Updates on projects approved for design and/or construction are provided below. A series of workshops have been scheduled to discuss projects the local board may wish to nominate using the balance of funding available this electoral term. The first of these was held on the 28 January, with a follow-up workshop to take place on the 17 March 2020.

Table 2: Status update on current Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects

Project

Description

Current status

Status change

Funds allocated

Station Road parking and pedestrian improvements

A project to formalise and improve parking on Station and Birch Roads, and improve pedestrian safety by providing new footpath on Station Road, Pukekohe.

On 25 September 2018, the FLB approved $181,104.

A firm order of costs was completed and presented to the local board at a workshop on 9 April 2019.

A funding shortfall was identified and at the 23 June meeting the local board allocated the balance of $320,000 from its Community Safety Fund to fully fund the project.

This project is now being delivered as a Community Safety Fund project.

Prior to Christmas 2019, Opus were re-engaged and the project is proceeding with the original design but amended with the footpath section in front of KiwiRail land now proposed to be constructed.

Current Status: A revised plan has been circulated to the local board for feedback on the 3 March 2020.

At this stage, this project is expected to start construction in the third quarter of 2020.

Yes

$181,104 ($30,554 spent to date)

Beachlands Kerb and Channel

 

Improvements

project to install kerb and channel in Beachlands on following roads:

· Shelley Bay Road

· Karaka Road

· First View Ave

· Second View Ave

The local board approved project rough order cost (ROC) estimate up to $1.18m to progress to detailed design and report back with Firm Estimate of Cost.

A workshop was held on the 10 September for the local board to prioritise the various sections in order to progress this project through the electoral period and summer months. The confirmed order is as follows:

i) Shelley Bay Road

ii) Karaka Road

iii) First View Ave

iv) Second View Ave.

 

All four sites have been designed to construction drawing phase.  

Current Status: AT is in the process of procuring this work (Contract documents are being peer reviewed before it goes out to the market).  It is expected that AT will go to the market in the next two weeks with a contractor engaged by the end of March.  Physical works will commence thereafter.  They will be constructed in the order of priority as resolved by the Board.

 

 

No

$1.18m

($70,490 spent to date.)

 

Project

Description

Current status

Status change

Funds allocated

Tourist Road-Monument Road intersection electronic warning signage

 

Installation of electronic warning signage on each leg of the intersection and smart studs on Tourist Road

The local board approved project ROC estimate up to $80,000 to progress to detailed design and report back with Firm Estimate of Cost.

Follow up with NZTA resulted in advice that their trial is not accepting further sites.

At the 23 July meeting the local board resolved that the $80,000 Local Transport Capital Funding allocated to this project be reserved until such time NZTA confirms the outcome of its trial.

Direction from AT is that this project is to be progressed as the NZTA trial is now over.

Current Status: In progress with a delivery timeline to be confirmed.

No

$80,000

Community Safety Fund (CSF)

10.     At its meeting on 23 July 2019, the FLB resolved the following priority for projects nominated for construction using AT’s Community Safety Fund (CSF) monies (FR/2019/103):

i.    Clevedon Town Centre Pedestrian Crossing

ii.   Gun Club Road/ Patumahoe Intersection Improvements

iii.  Hart / Gun Club Road Intersection Improvements

iv.  Queen Street and Victoria Avenue (Waiuku) intersection improvements

v.   Racecourse/ Kitchener Road (Waiuku) Intersection Improvements

vi.  Station Road Parking Upgrade

vii. Taurangaruru Road Safety Improvements, Waiuku

viii. Woodhouse Road Pedestrian Crossing, Patumahoe.

11.     Design work is now progressing on these projects and it is anticipated that those funded through the CSF process will be completed during the 2020/2021 financial year.

12.     As advised previously, the CSF is a finite fund that must be spent by June 30, 2021. If final pricing for a particular project (post tender) exceeds the available budget, local boards will have the option of either re-allocating some of their CSF budget (meaning not doing another of the CSF projects chosen by the local board) or using their LBTCF to top-up the budget, as opposed to being unable to fund the project. This will allow each local allocation of the CSF to be fully utilised.

13.     The majority of the listed projects are progressing and design and consultation will take place in 2020, except for Gun Club Road/ Patumahoe Intersection Improvements, Hart-Gun Club Road Intersection and Gun Club - Helvetia Road, and Racecourse/ Kitchener Road Intersection Improvements, which are planned for delivery in the current financial year.

14.     Racecourse/ Kitchener Roads Intersection improvements were circulated to the local board for feedback on 2 March 2020.

Responses to resolutions

15.     The local board has passed various resolutions to AT at their previous meeting.  The resolutions are outlined in italics and the response is noted directly below in plain text.

16.     Resolution number FR/2020/6:

b)      note the observation in the RIMU report “Living in Addison: An investigation into the lived experience of a master planned housing development in Auckland November 2019” (technical report 2019/023 November 2019), highlighting the implications when urban design principles do not align with the lived experience.

c)      express its concern that current design guidelines are not appropriate for areas not served by a comprehensive public transport network and are creating public safety issues, and request that Auckland Transport return to the board with options for influencing an amended approach to roading design within green-field development areas.

d)       request that Auckland transport develop a greenfields subdivision settlement design guideline to supplement the current Auckland Transport urban design guideline.

17.     The local boards resolutions that have been noted were referred to the relevant teams within AT for a response and will be reported back to the local board via the monthly AT report.

Guidance for local board Transport representatives

18.     In the previous electoral term, the Franklin Local Board allocated transport representatives that worked with transport agencies, primarily AT, representing the local board views on transport issues and projects.

19.     This role assisted in progressing projects or issues that could be time sensitive and unable to be presented to the whole of the local board due to competing interests for the local board’s time.

20.     The local board representatives would subsequently relay relevant information and interactions to their colleagues on the board. Follow-up workshops and communications by staff to the whole of the local board would record any actions, views or outcomes as a result of engagement with the transport representatives.

21.     In the current term, the Franklin Local Board has not appointed any transport representatives and therefore all consultation is currently required to consult with the whole board.

22.     The local board may wish to consider appointing representatives in this electoral term as transport representatives to take up the lead role in engaging on the board’s behalf with AT, and other transport agencies.

23.     The local board can select a number of representatives and resolve on who those members are as a resolution of this report. 

Local Projects and activities

Stadium Drive Overbridge

24.     AT’s Rail team is currently looking at installing vertical anti-throw nets on the Stadium Drive overbridge in Pukekohe as a result of a number of incidents linked to this site.

25.     AT previously intended to prioritise the Stadium Drive Overbridge as a stand-alone project but has reconsidered this position as part of a wider review of all overbridges in the Auckland region. 

Whitford-Maraetai Road Maintenance Works

26.     The reseal of Whitford Maraetai Road between Siberia Hill and Henson Corner has been completed. 

27.     The rehabilitation work on Whitford-Maraetai Hill is in progress and a planned culvert replacement and retaining walls repair at the top of the Siberia Hill is due to be completed by the end of April.

28.     Ongoing chipseal and AC programme will continue until the end of March/early April.

 

Public Transport statistics for Franklin Local Board area

29.     In the Pukekohe area, rail boardings increased in the year to August 2019 by 43,000, up 21 per cent from the previous year.

30.     Bus patronage in the same period has also increased by 27,000, up 28 per cent from 93,600 boardings the previous year.

31.     At the time of writing this report, a request for more up-to-date information has been made and will be reported to the local board in future reports.

32.     Image 1 below refers to the Pukekohe origin of trips with regards to early morning commuters (6 am -9 am weekdays) where 74% of commuters have used the train

Image 1: Pukekohe Catchment for early morning commuters


 

33.     Image 2 refers to growth over time from the new network south analysis, which came into effect 30 Oct 2016.

Franklin Speed Bylaw 2019 roll out information

34.     The AT Board approved speed limits bylaw in October 2019 and speed reductions will take effect on 30 June 2020. 

35.     From 2014-2018, Franklin and Rodney had the highest number of people killed or seriously injured on Auckland’s roads.

36.     AT is committed to reaching its goal of zero deaths and serious injuries on the network by 2050, and this decision is the first step in reaching this target.

37.     In the lead up to speed limits changing, the Franklin Local Board will be kept up to date with the programme of works, including a workshop on the 10 March 2020.

38.     The design and construction of new signs and new poles is underway, and work will continue on getting them ready and put in place before 30 June 2020.

39.     Communications and relevant information for residents and businesses will also be given in the lead up to the speed changes. 

40.     The updated timeline is as follows:

Step

When

Compile list of changes to speed limits

Completed

Engagement with Local Boards and Councillors

Completed in October – December 2018

Approval for consultation sought from the Auckland Transport Board

Completed in December 2018

Public consultation on the Bylaw

Carried out 28 February – 31 March 2019

Analysis and feedback

Completed April – October 2019

Bylaw (with changes resulting from public feedback) approved by the Auckland Transport Board

22 October 2019

Preparing for the speed limit changes

October 2019 onwards

Implementation of changes

30 June 2020

Implementation of town centres early start

30 November 2020

Implementation of town centres late start

30 June 2021

 

41.     Further information on the safer speeds programme is available at: https://at.govt.nz/speed

Regional Impacts

Happy birthday to two Rodney bus services funded by a targeted rate

42.     Rodney residents recently celebrated one year since two new bus services started, helping to connect Auckland’s northern communities.

43.     Funded by the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate, the Route 998 Wellsford to Warkworth bus service and Route 128 Helensville to Hibiscus Coast station service have been well-used over the past year.

44.     The popular 998 service has carried more than 25,000 passengers since its establishment.

45.     The services came about when the Rodney Local Board consulted on a targeted rate to fund transport improvements in the area.

46.     Under the targeted rate, Auckland Transport (AT) delivered Route 998 and Route 128 on 24 February 2019.

47.     Last year, AT extended a school bus service to Hibiscus Coast Station in order to allow students to connect from the 128 to the school service.

48.     As part of the same targeted rate, Route 126 - Westgate to Albany - commenced on 6 May 2019.

49.     126 has also proven extremely popular with Rodney residents. For the first three months, there were just under 1,000 passengers per week on average.

50.     Auckland Transport’s Group Manager Metro Services states that its apparent that these services are growing in that the average patronage per week in January this year (the quietest time for public transport) was 443 per week, only one less than during the annual peak demand in March last year.

51.     The Rodney Local Board is delighted with how successful these new services have been in such a short time.

52.     “There has been a lot of very positive feedback from our community on how much they value these buses.”

53.     “The Wellsford service has finally allowed residents to get back and forth to Warkworth and also access to the rest of Auckland’s public transport network.”

54.     See more at https://at.govt.nz/Rodneyrate

Dynamic Lanes for Redoubt Road, Manukau

55.     The installation of dynamic lanes on Redoubt Road in Manukau has been approved to improve peak vehicle traffic flows along this key link between SH1 and Mill Road.

56.     The lanes will operate on a 350-metre section of Redoubt Road, between the Southern Motorway and Hollyford Drive.

57.     The dynamic lanes will use overhead signs and on road LED lights to change the direction of the centre lanes at peak times.

58.     Initially this project was scheduled to start works in the fourth quarter of 2019 but was delayed due to technical issues. A review of the project scope in late 2019 resulted in the inclusion of pedestrian facilities due to a fatality and community feedback about lack of safe crossing facilities on Redoubt Road.

59.     Construction will now commence around May 2020 and will run over a period of two to three months (concrete curing) with minimal impact to traffic due to work being done in the berm or at night if road closures are needed.

City Centre bus routes change

60.     Most services in the city centre had route changes that took effect from Sunday, 23 February. These changes are needed so construction can start on what will be the country’s busiest train station, Aotea Station. The station will be built 15m underneath the city and will be 300m long. There will be entrances on Victoria Street and Wellesley Street, providing the option to connect to bus services.

61.     As a result of construction, the intersection of Wellesley Street, Albert Street and Mayoral Drive will be closed from 1 March until early 2021. At peak, currently 145 buses travel along Wellesley Street.

62.     The new routes for the 26 bus services currently using Wellesley Street will stay in place until the intersection reopens next year. The amended bus routes are designed to cause as little disruption as possible while keeping people moving through the city. Most new bus routes will be using Victoria Street or Mayoral Drive to cross the city, which means most passengers will only be one block away from their old stop.

63.     Aotea will be the busiest rail station in the country and will make a big contribution to Auckland’s future development when it opens. Link Alliance, which is building the station, acknowledges the impact the construction and the intersection closure will have on the immediate community and road users. While its central Auckland location means disruption during construction is unavoidable, Link Alliance will continue to work with AT and Auckland Council to minimise those impacts.

64.     The bus routes are being supported by new bus priority measures such as bus lanes and priority signaling at traffic lights.  AT staff will be on the ground to assist passengers before and during the closure.  

65.     To find out more about the bus changes and intersection closure, visit AT.govt.nz/BetterWay

66.     For information on Aotea Station, visit: https://www.cityraillink.co.nz/crl-stations-aotea

Extra seats on buses and trains 

67.     AT is providing extra capacity on buses and trains during March, the busiest time of the year as Aucklanders head back to work and study. An additional 5000 seats will be provided on buses at peak times and extra train cars will be added to accommodate demand.

68.     Last year public transport patronage totaled 103.2 million passenger boardings, an annual growth of eight per cent.

69.     The extra seats have been provided on the 15 busiest routes services, which include Onewa and Dominion Roads, and the 70 which run from Botany to Britomart.

70.     The very popular NX2 service has also been extended, with nine services to the city each weekday morning and eight return services to Hibiscus Coast Station in the afternoon peak. Late night options are also being added, with new services at 11.30 and midnight all the way to Hibiscus Coast Station.

71.     The first of AT’s new trains have arrived from Spain and these are being rolled out with more six car trains during the busy periods, providing 1200 extra seats in the morning peak and the same in the afternoon. 

72.     AT also has extra buses to provide additional capacity and address problems, scheduling extra services where necessary. There may be times when customers may not be able to board the first bus on high frequency routes but AT is aiming to keep the wait time to a minimum.

73.     All public transport routes will be busy but AT and its operators will do their best to manage the demand and, while the good weather continues, biking, scootering and walking are great alternative options, as is travelling outside the very busy peak periods.

Walking School Bus Month

74.    A reminder that March is ‘Walking School Bus Month’ and there are some great activities and prizes for the kids to win:

·   Week 1 is Hilarious Head Gear;

·   Week 2 is Fancy Feet;

·   Week 3 is Super Hero; and

·   Week 4 is Trolls World Tour.

75.    Find out more about the Walking School Bus scheme and (in March) Walking School Bus Month at: https://at.govt.nz/cycling-walking/travelwise-school-programme/walking-school-bus/how-a-walking-school-bus-works/.

Puhinui Station Interchange

76.     The Puhinui Station Interchange is the first stage of the early improvements works associated with the A2B - Airport to Botany Rapid Transit project. This project is led by Auckland Transport and forms part of the wider Southwest Gateway programme.

77.    The existing station has been temporarily closed during construction, from Saturday, 28 September 2019 to early 2021.

78.    Detailed design has been completed. Early works are underway and piling has been completed.

79.    Early works scope has been increased to include the new concourse columns, lifts shafts and bridge deck, planned to be constructed by the end of May 2020.

80.    The main works are to be awarded in February 2020 and completion of all the construction is scheduled for the 1st quarter 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

81.    Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

82.    Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.


 

83.    To this end, Auckland Transport’s Statement of Intent contains three performance measures:

Measure

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Number of buses in the Auckland bus fleet classified as low emission

5

25

55

Reduction in CO2 (emissions) generated annually by Auckland Transport corporate operations (from 2017/18 baseline)

7%

9%

11%

Percentage of Auckland Transport streetlights that are energy efficient LED

56%

66%

76%

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

84.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Auckland Transport consultations

Local Board consultations

85.    Auckland Transport provides the FLB with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in the local board area.

86.    The local board’s views on any proposed schemes are taken into account during consultation on those proposals.

87.    In the reporting period from February 2020, one proposal was put forward for comment by the FLB. The local board transport representative’s views and ongoing communication are recorded in the table below.

Table 3: Local Board Consultations

Location

Proposal

Details and Local Board Feedback

Cape Hill Road, Pukekohe 

Roundabout

Circulated to the local board on 11 February 2020. The local board supported this project and made the following feedback, that it must be constructed to allow safe routing for heavy transport and that the mountable island/apron edge needs to be of minimum height to make it practical for vehicles to easily mount as recent upgrades have not supported this.

9 Kitchener Road Car Park

Restrict access from Victoria Ave

Circulated to the local board on 17 February 2020. The board supported this, to install bollards to close off access to the carpark from the Victoria Avenue entrance.

They suggested a staged approach with flexible bollards installed as a first step until drivers have become fully aware of the closure.

They also suggested that communication should incorporate a request from the neighbouring property owner and collaboration between Auckland Council, AT and the Local Board, and it is the best outcome to ensure safety and future access to the area that council manages as a carpark.

 

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

88.    Traffic Control Committee (TCC) decisions within the FLB area are reported on a monthly basis. There were no decisions within the local board area during February 2020 reporting period.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

89.     There are no specific impacts on Māori for this reporting period. AT is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi-the Treaty of Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori.

90.     Our Maori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to with 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them.

91.     This plan in full is available on the Auckland Transport Website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

92.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

93.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

94.     AT will provide an update report to the local board next month

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kenneth Tuai, Elected MemberRelationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes

File No.: CP2020/02873

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to outline key amendments to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework and to obtain the local board’s views.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region (ENV/2018/11).

3.       To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (ACAF) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors.

4.       In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved a consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

5.       In February 2020, a memorandum was circulated to share key findings from the public consultation (Attachments A and B).

6.       To address the feedback from the consultation, this report outlines key structural changes proposed for the framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers to which all actions will align (i.e., a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change).

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities to streamline actions and address feedback.

7.       It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

8.       The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the changes to the draft Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers for climate action (i.e. a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change)

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities

·   changing the title from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region, addressing both emissions reduction (i.e. mitigation) and preparing for the impacts of a changing climate (i.e. adaptation) (ENV/2018/11).

10.     To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (ACAF) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors, reaching hundreds of Aucklanders.

11.     Local board engagement and insights were sought throughout development of the framework, including meetings and cluster workshops.   A summary of feedback from local boards is available in Attachments C and D.

12.     In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved the consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

13.     In February 2020, a memo was circulated to all local boards to share key findings from the public consultation on the draft ACAF (Attachment A and B).

14.     This report provides an overview of key proposed changes to the draft ACAF to address the feedback received through the consultation.  Local Board views will be reflected in the final version, which will be reported to the Environment and Climate Change Committee in May 2020.

15.     More detailed changes reported in the consultation summary are not repeated here but will be reflected in text changes in the final version.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The proposed changes to ACAF have been informed by consultation feedback received on the draft document.  Some key themes that arose include:

·       Urgency and scale of action needs to be better articulated

·       Lack of clarity on how key moves work together and how they address our climate goals. In addition it was felt that there are too many.

·       Need to be clearer about roles and responsibilities with a request for more information on who is responsible for actions at each level.

·       Need for partnership working across sectors and with central government and mana whenua in particular.

·       Greater focus on equity across feedback points.

·       Need for a strong Māori voice with widespread support for working with Māori, using mātauranga Māori and Māori practices in designing and implementing climate action.

·       Need for a system shift and scale of change required, and to better articulate this with Aucklanders.

·       Need for communication and behaviour change and a request for campaigns to raise awareness across the region and enable action at an individual level.

·       Need for a significant shift in transport (of all key moves) with the identified actions supported but a need for these to be delivered at pace and scale.

17.     To address this feedback a number of key structural changes are proposed.

18.     The first of these is establish three core drivers for action – our ‘pillars’ (Attachment E).  These provide greater clarity on the goals of the framework and all actions will align to how they deliver against these goals:

·      A Tāmaki response: This pillar reflects the uniqueness of Auckland and our place-based response to climate change.  It is informed by learning from Māori principles and practice, provides a greater focus on equity and a better definition of roles and responsibilities and collective action across governance and sectors.

·   Reducing our emissions: This pillar reflects the need to provide greater clarity on our emissions target and the need to halve emissions by 2030 and reach net zero emissions by 2050.  It improves alignment with the actions and how we will deliver and prioritise emissions reductions.

·   Preparing for climate change: This pillar enables a greater focus on how we will approach climate change adaptation and take a precautionary approach for the region and also provides greater alignment with the actions.

19.     The second structural change is that the eleven key moves are streamlined into eight priorities (Attachment F). This proposed change is to address feedback on where areas are more foundational and therefore should be embedded throughout all priority areas, or where there is confusion and overlap.

·   It is proposed that Key Move 3: Make development and infrastructure climate compatible and Key Move 4: Transform existing buildings and places are combined into a single built environment priority area. 

·   It is proposed that Key Move 1: Lay the foundation is embedded into our three pillars in recognition of the cross-cutting nature of the actions.

·   Similarly, Key Move 9- Rangatahi (Youth & Inter-generational equity) is embedded into pillar 1 to reflect the need to consider actions across the framework.

20.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1 and 9 will still be maintained and reflected in the updated document.

21.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1-11 will be carried through into Priorities 1-8 (Figure 2) and updated to:

·   clarify any ambiguities that were raised in consultation 

·   remove repetition or overlapping actions

·   make additions in response to consultation feedback

·   strengthen alignment to delivery of the three pillars.

22.     Overall, the intent of the actions between the Key Moves 1-11 and Priority areas 1-8, remain the same. Attachment G briefly summarises how the actions have changed from the consultation document to the updated priority areas.

23.     It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

24.     The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     The changes identified in this report have been made to reflect feedback received and updated emissions modelling.  As such, they will further deliver and strengthen climate action already identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Regular meetings and workshops took place across the council group for development of the framework.

27.     In addition, a working group was established from the outset to provide expertise from across the council group, central government and district health boards.

28.     This group has continued to provide input post-consultation and has reviewed and provided input into the proposed changes.

29.     In addition, the team has been working closely across the Council group in the development of costed actions for consideration in the Long-term Plan. This process is running concurrently with the finalisation of the plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The framework will have implications for all local boards.

31.     In June 2018, the Chief Sustainability Office attended workshops of 19 of the 21 local boards and obtained informal email feedback from the other two local boards to identify their main priorities related to climate change.  This was followed up in September 2018 at cluster workshops to assess and test a series of ‘must haves’, which were the precursors to the actions included in the draft framework.

32.     Priorities included:

·      coastal erosion and inundation concerns

·      affordable and accessible transport

·      long-term infrastructure development to consider climate impacts

·      better stormwater management

·      climate-related education and awareness

·      building community resilience

·      for Auckland Council to lead by example.

33.     This report seeks Local Board formal views on proposed changes to the draft Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework outlined in this report. These views will be reflected in the final version.

34.     Local boards will be key in taking climate action at a local level. Support will be provided for local board planning and alignment with outcomes.

35.     The Chief Sustainability Office and Quality Advice Unit will implement a programme of work for the whole council family to provide guidance and training on how to embed climate action in Local Board plans and what to expect in climate impact statements.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Climate change impacts and associated policy and action will have significant impacts for Māori communities.

37.     A Tāmaki and climate change subject matter expert rōpū (group) was established in March 2019 which has been supporting and advising mana whenua and council on climate change issues for Māori and providing direct advice and narrative for the draft framework.

38.     A rangatahi Māori and Pasifika rōpū has also been working in partnership with council on this kaupapa to develop rangatahi-focused actions for the framework.

39.     A joint mana whenua and Māori expert task group is finalising a Tāmaki and climate change position paper, Te ora ō Tāmaki, which will be used as the bridging document to weave key anchor points into the climate action framework. 

40.     Anchor points include:

·   weaving the narrative into the framework, specifically the following sections: Climate change and Māori, Impacts on Māori and Developing the Plan with Māori

·   a section developed by rangatahi (the Youth and intergenerational equity key move)

·   a separate key move of Te puawaitanga o te tangata (Resilient Māori communities).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Actions within the framework will result in budgetary implications for organisations across the region; identifying and unlocking appropriate funding and financing streams in the future will be critical. 

42.     Taking climate action will require a range of finance and/or funding mechanisms. For instance, green bonds have been a useful tool for financing council-owned assets such as electric trains but investment in clean tech may require crowd-sourcing, grants or venture capital.

43.     To support this, a climate finance work package is underway to identify partnerships and broader funding mechanisms across actions such as bonds, grants, equity instruments and public/private partnerships.

44.     The final framework and specific Auckland Council actions being developed will need to inform on-going Long-term Plan discussions to support delivery and avoid costs associated with inaction, such as increased maintenance costs and infrastructure failures through to missed opportunities to Auckland’s economy in delivering the transition. 

45.     Not all actions within council’s remit will require additional budget. Some actions can result in long-term cost avoidance – for example electrifying fleets can reduce fuel and maintenance costs. Some actions could require existing funds to be redirected if priorities change.

46.     Also, not all actions will require funding, for example those related to advocacy to central government or expert input into actions led by other organisations.

47.     The costs associated with different council-specific actions will consider funding sources as described above.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     No high or extreme risks have been identified with the proposed approach.

49.     Moderate risks exist, including:

·   preparing for the implications of climate change may not comply with current rules and regulations

·   potential strategic risk with non-alignment with New Zealand Government direction and policy

·   potential governance risk in shared leadership and ownership of the framework across sectors.

50.     A risk mitigation plan has been developed to address the above, including targeted engagement approaches, a legal review of the final framework, on-going partnership with central government and establishment of clear governance structures for the implementation of the framework. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Workshops will be held in April 2020 with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Independent Māori Statutory Board to discuss updated framework text, and the final text will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for approval in May 2020.

52.     The draft digital plan layout will be workshopped with the Environment and Climate Change Committee in June 2020 and finalised in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ACAF Consultation Summary Memo

67

b

ACAF Consultation Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Engagement Summary - LB workshops June 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Engagement Summary - Clusters workshops Oct 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

ACAF Proposed Three Pillars

71

f

ACAF Proposed Eight Priorities

73

g

ACAF Proposed Priority Areas and Actions

75

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Anderson - Principal Specialist Sustainability and Climate Resilence

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 

Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review

File No.: CP2020/02999

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Review to the Independent Panel.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governing Body approved the Terms of Reference for an Independent Panel to undertake a review of substantive CCOs at its meeting on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127].

3.       The review covers Auckland Transport, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development, Panuku Development Auckland, Regional Facilities Auckland and Watercare.  The overall objectives are to examine:

·   whether CCOs are an effective and efficient model for delivering services to the council and Aucklanders, and

·   whether the CCO decision-making model provides sufficient political oversight, public transparency and accountability.

4.       The review asks the Independent Panel to examine three areas: the CCO model and its accompanying roles and responsibilities; the accountability of CCOs; and CCO culture.

5.       The Independent Panel is seeking the views of local boards on these areas.

6.       Local boards are advised that their views are requested by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations Review to the Independent Panel.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Governing Body approved the CCO review Terms of Reference on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127]. The Independent Panel was appointed by the Governing Body on 12 December 2019 and is comprised of Miriam Dean, Doug Martin and Leigh Auton. Miriam Dean has been appointed panel chair [GB/2019/149].

8.       Briefings on the CCO Review were provided to local board chairs in December 2019 by staff and in February 2020 by panel member Leigh Auton.  The panel wrote to local board chairs in February asking for advice on what constitutes good engagement between CCOs and local boards.  

9.       Monthly updates on the review are reported to the CCO Oversight Committee and circulated to all local boards.

10.     The Independent Panel is seeking comprehensive engagement to obtain a range of views about the issues forming the subject of the review (Attachment A).  Community engagement on the review is occurring alongside the Annual Budget 2020/2021 in February/March 2020. An engagement document has been developed and a summary document has been translated into five languages and a New Zealand Sign Language video. A webpage[1] provides information on the review, including stakeholder updates, relevant documents (including the Terms of Reference) and a contact for further information.

11.     All feedback on the CCO Review will be provided to the Independent Panel.  The Panel will report on the key issues and community and stakeholder feedback in May and will provide a final report and recommendations in July 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     To identify the scope of their work, the Independent Panel has distilled the essence of the review terms into a list of issues, that forms the basis of the engagement and eventual report. The list and prompts, at Attachment A, provide a structure for local boards to give feedback.

13.     The three key areas of focus set out in the list of issues are:

CCO model, roles and responsibilities

The essential question here is whether the CCO model delivers council services with the maximum of operational efficiency, transparency and accountability, or whether there are better ways to deliver such services

CCO accountability

Here the key question is whether the council’s current approach to holding CCOs to account on behalf of Aucklanders could be improved

CCO culture

The central issue here is whether CCOs need to improve how they consult, engage with and respond to the wider community and council

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Local boards have an opportunity to consider suggestions that might improve climate change outcomes/mitigation in their feedback on the CCO Review.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The Independent Panel is engaging across the council group on the review, including:

·   the chair of the independent panel wrote introducing the panel and the review objectives to all CCO chairs and chief executives, councillors, local board chairs, chief executive of IMSB and the co-chairs of the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 20 December 2019

·   the panel met briefly with the CCO chief executives and chairs on 28 January 2020 to discuss the proposed review process and CCO engagement. Each CCO was asked to provide the panel with key stakeholders/customers

·   individual meetings have taken place with CCO chief executives and board chairs over February and March 2020, and the panel is meeting with CCO stakeholders.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local board formal feedback on the CCO Review, including issues experienced with CCOs, good practice and options for improvement, is sought by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

17.     Material on the CCO Review was available at Have your Say local board events for the Annual Budget.

18.     Following the conclusion of the Independent Panel’s review, as part of the development of the next 10-year budget, local boards will have the opportunity to provide formal views on any proposals for change to the CCO model.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Staff presented to the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 19 December 2019. The panel met with one of the Forum co-chairs and mana whenua are invited to provide feedback to the panel.  Mana whenua have also been invited to a hui with panel members on 18 March 2020.

20.     The panel has met with the Independent Māori Statutory Board. 

21.     Panel members spoke on Radio Waatea to promote Māori interest and feedback on the CCO review. Material on the CCO review is being provided at mataawaka events for the Annual Budget and mataawaka organisations have been briefed on the review during the public engagement period. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There are no financial implications from this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are no risks associated with the recommendations in this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The Independent Panel is due to report on key issues, community and stakeholder feedback in May and to provide a final report, with recommendations, in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review list of issues

81

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Gomas - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 

Public feedback on proposed new Food Safety Information Bylaw 2020

File No.: CP2020/02969

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek input on public feedback to the proposed new Food Safety Information Bylaw 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To help the Franklin Local Board decide whether to input into deliberations on public feedback to the proposed new Food Safety Information Bylaw 2020, staff have summarised and attached all feedback from people in the local board’s area.

3.       The proposal continues to require the same food businesses as in the existing Food Safety Bylaw 2013 to display a food safety information certificate (food grade) and contains new rules about the physical and online food grade display.

4.       Staff recommend that the local board consider providing input into deliberations on public feedback to the proposal by resolution by the close of business on 24 March 2020, and by presenting those views to the Bylaw Panel on 30 March 2020.

5.       There is a reputational risk for the local board that feedback from the local board area is from a limited group of people and does not reflect the views of the whole local board area. This report mitigates this risk by providing local boards with a summary of all public feedback (including by local board area and demographic) for comparison and transparency.

6.       The Bylaw Panel will consider all formal local board input and public feedback, and deliberate and make recommendations on 30 March 2020. A final decision on any new bylaw will be made at the Governing Body meeting on 30 April 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)   note the public feedback to the proposed new Food Safety Information Bylaw 2020 by people from the Franklin Local Board area contained in this agenda report.

[Recommendations (b), (c) and (d) are optional]

b)   adopt the following views on the public feedback in (a) to assist the Bylaw Panel in its deliberations on all public feedback to the proposal:

i)          [local board to determine at meeting]

c)   appoint [insert one or more local board members] to present the views in (b) to the Bylaw Panel on Monday 30 March 2020.

d)   delegate authority to the local board chair to make replacement appointment(s) to the persons in (c) if a member is unavailable.

 

Horopaki

Context

The local board can input into deliberations on proposed new food bylaw

7.       The local board can input into deliberations on public feedback to the proposal to make a new Food Safety Information Bylaw 2020 at its meeting in March 2020.

8.       The local board can also choose to present those views to the Bylaw Panel on 30 March.

9.       The nature of the input is at the discretion of the local board. Any input must however remain inside the scope of the proposal and public feedback. For example, the local board could:

·  indicate support for public feedback by people from the local board area

·  recommend how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback.

The proposed new food bylaw aims to better protect public health

10.     On 25 July 2019 the Governing Body adopted a proposal for public consultation to make a new Food Safety Information Bylaw 2020 (GB/2019/70, Attachment A).

11.     The proposal arose from the review of the existing Food Safety Bylaw 2013 (Figure 1), and aims to better protect public health by improving food grade display rules to:

·   clarify that the requirement to display a food grade applies to all food businesses that operate under a Template Food Control Plan[2], serve the public and are registered and verified by council (meaning most Auckland-only cafés, restaurants and takeaways)

·   specify physical locations for food grade display

·   introduce a new rule for food grade display on the homepage or similar of online platforms that the food business has control over (for example a café website managed by the café owner).

         

Figure 1: Decisions leading to the proposal

 

 

 

Feedback on the proposal was received from 1498 people from across Auckland

12.     The proposal was publicly notified for feedback from 2 December 2019 to 2 February 2020. During that period, council had received feedback from 1498 people (Table 1).

Table 1: Summary of public feedback

Consultation reach (number of responses)

·    Online and written feedback provided by 1300 people, including:

188 via the online ‘Have Your Say’ feedback form, including 80 from food business operators and organisations. Five of those organisations also provided feedback by email (Attachment B)

1112 via an online feedback form by a representative People’s Panel sample (Attachment C).

·    Attendee feedback at ‘Have Your Say’[3] events by 198 people (Attachment D)

·    Key stakeholders were invited to provide feedback in person to the Bylaw Panel. No stakeholders however opted to provide feedback in this manner.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The majority of feedback from people in the local board area support the proposal

13.     A total of 76 people from the Franklin Local Board area provided feedback to the proposal via online and written feedback.[4] The majority agreed with the proposal, which is consistent with the total support from all people who provided feedback (Table 2).

          Table 2: Percentage support of proposal in Franklin Local Board area

Proposal

Total support from local board area

Total support from all people who provided feedback

1: Food grade display by certain food businesses

96 per cent

96.4 per cent

2: Food grade display at physical and online sites

81.6 per cent

84.6 per cent

3: Physical display location

82.9 per cent

89.7 per cent

4: Online display location

76.3 per cent

75.3 per cent

14.     Key themes from public feedback include:

·    grade display is useful for the public

·    proposal is reasonable and important

·    require display at specific preferred physical location/s

·    require display on online platforms regardless of control by the food business.

15.     Attachments B, C and D contain a summary of all public feedback (including by local board area). A copy of all public feedback related to the local board is in Attachment E.

The local board should consider whether to provide input into deliberations

16.     Staff recommend that the local board note the public feedback, and consider whether it wishes to input into deliberations on the proposal by:

·   adopting views on the public feedback by the close of business on Tuesday 24 March 2020

·   presenting those views to the Bylaw Panel on Monday 30 March 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The impacts of a “business-as-usual” climate change scenario over the next five years[5] will impact food in terms of food resilience and a continued need for food waste minimisation.

18.     The above impacts will not however impact the proposed requirement for certain food businesses to continue to display a food grade. This means that the proposal is not inconsistent with the aims to reduce emissions in the Low Carbon Strategic Action Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The proposal impacts the operation of the Environmental Health Unit. Input was sought during the review of the existing Food Safety Bylaw 2013. Council units are aware of the impacts of the proposal and their implementation role.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     Local board member views were sought in June 2019 as part of the review of the current Food Safety Bylaw 2013.

21.     Generally, local board members supported the current Bylaw and food grading scheme. Key concerns included public confusion, for example about how not all Auckland food businesses that serve the public are required to display a food grade and display requirements for market stalls and mobile shops.

22.     The proposal addresses concerns about public confusion by clarifying requirements. Display for other Auckland food businesses may be inconsistent with the Food Act 2014.

23.     This report provides an opportunity for the local board to input into deliberations on public feedback to the proposal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Kai is significant for Māori as it is embedded in the tikanga of manaakitanga. There is specific tikanga around its preparation and consumption. The sharing of kai with manuhiri is an essential part of marae tikanga. Marae are exempt from verification under the Food Act 2014 where kai is prepared for customary purposes (for example, at a tangi).

25.     Marae committees that responded to staff requests for feedback in mid-2019 support food grading for businesses that sell food to the public. The proposal supports this view by continuing to require most food businesses to display a food grade.

26.     One marae committee provided feedback on the proposal. The Makaurau Marae Trust – Te Ahiwaru agrees with the proposal and notes the importance of food grades being current.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     Local board input into deliberations will be met within existing budgets.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     There is a reputational risk for the local board that feedback from the local board area is from a limited group of people and does not reflect the views of the whole local board area. This report mitigates this risk by providing local boards with a summary of all public feedback (including by local board area and demographic) for comparison and transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     A Bylaw Panel on 30 March 2020 will consider all formal local board input and public feedback, deliberate and make recommendations. A final decision on any new bylaw will be made at the Governing Body meeting on 30 April 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Statement of Proposal

89

b

Overview of public feedback - online feedback form

111

c

Overview of public feedback - People's Panel online feedback form

123

d

'Have Your Say' event feedback

135

e

Online, email and hardcopy feedback from Franklin Local Board area

139

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Osborne - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Paul Wilson - Team Leader Bylaws

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 

McNicol Homestead Reserve - Classification as Historic Reserve

File No.: CP2020/02240

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the classification of three parcels of land that make up McNicol Homestead Reserve under section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 as historic reserve. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       McNicol Homestead Reserve at 2R, 12 R and 80R McNicol Road, Clevedon is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as follows: 

a)         Lot 8, Deposited Plan 356440 as an unclassified local purpose (recreation) reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 (2R McNicol Road); 

b)         Lot 1, Deposited Plan 89145 as an unclassified historic reserve under Reserves Act 1977 (12R McNicol Road). Located on this parcel is the Auckland Council owned McNicol Homestead; 

c)         Lot 1, Deposited Plan 429258 as unclassified recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 (80R McNicol Road).   

3.       The Clevedon and District Historical Society Incorporated (CDHS) currently occupies and manages the McNicol Homestead Museum under a lease arrangement for the benefit of       the community. 

4.      CDHS has applied to lease council land located behind the McNicol Homestead Museum   at 80R McNicol Road to house and display antique rural housewares, tools and       machinery. 

5.      It is best practice under the Reserves Act 1977 to classify the three unclassified reserves.  This will enable the council to formally grant a renewal or a new community    lease to the CDHS when required. 

6.      Staff recommend that the Franklin Local Board approve the classification of the three parcels held under the Reserves Act 1977 as outlined in paragraphs 2 a), b) and c) as historic reserve under section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977. This classification will allow the CDHS to continue its activities on the reserve. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the classification of the following parcels of land as historic reserve under section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 being part of McNicol Homestead, 2R, 12 R and 80R McNicol Road, Clevedon: 

i.      Lot 8, Deposited Plan 356440 contained in Record of Title 230156 and comprising 1,0966 hectares is held as an unclassified local purpose (recreation) reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 (2R McNicol Road);

ii.     Lot 1, Deposited Plan 89145 contained in Record of Title NA46B/268 comprising 4315m² more or less and held as an unclassified historic reserve under Reserves Act 1977 (12R McNicol Road); 

iii.     Lot 1, Deposited Plan 429258 contained in Record of Title 580536 comprising 2706 m² more or less and is held as unclassified recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 (80R McNicol Road).  

 

Horopaki

Context

7.      This report considers land classification matters impacting on proposed community leasing activities at McNicol Homestead Reserve.

8.      Local boards hold delegated authority under section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 to approve classifications of council owned reserves. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

 

McNicol Homestead Reserve

 

9.        McNicol Homestead Reserve is made up of three parcels of land (Attachment A).  The three parcels are all held in fee simple by Auckland Council and described as follows: 

a)       Lot 8, Deposited Plan 356440 contained in Record of Title 230156 and comprising 1,0966 hectares is held as an unclassified local purpose (recreation) reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 (2R McNicol Road)

b)       Lot 1, Deposited Plan 89145 contained in Record of Title NA46B/268 comprising 4315m² more or less and held as an unclassified historic reserve under Reserves Act 1977 (12R McNicol Road) Located on this parcel is the Auckland Council owned McNicol Homestead

c)       Lot 1, Deposited Plan 429258 contained in Record of Title 580536 comprising 2706 m² more or less and is held as unclassified recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 (80R McNicol Road).

Clevedon and District Historical Society 

10.       The Clevedon and District Historical Society Incorporated (CDHS) manages the McNicolHomestead Museum on behalf of the council for the benefit of the community through a community lease.  The community lease is for the parcel of land upon which the historic McNicol Homestead is located at 12R McNicol Road as outlined in paragraph 9 b).

11.    The lease to CDHS is for a term of 10 years commencing on 1 June 2010.  There is one right of renewal of 10 years commencing 1 June 2020 effecting final expiry on 31 May 2020.

12.      CDHS has applied for a lease on the adjacent land at 80R McNicol Road for the purpose of expanding the museum by relocating a large shed to house and display antique rural housewares, tools and machinery. 

13.    CDHS were advised of the requirement to classify the three parcels of land prior to Auckland  Council considering land owner approval for its proposed future activities at 80R McNicol Road.

Reserves Act 1977

14.    The Reserves Act 1977 came into force on 1 April 1978 and requires all reserves to be classified for their primary purposes. 

15.     The Reserves Act 1977 requires the administering body to have considered the activity on the reserve necessary or desirable and to classify it for its specified purpose.

16.    The three parcels of the reserve outlined in paragraph 10 a), b) and c) have remained unclassified and require classification.  Staff recommend the parcels be classified as an historic reserve. 

17.    Classification of the three parcels will allow the Auckland Council to grant a renewal or new lease and will formally allow the CDHS to continue its activities on the reserve.

18.    Classification will also enable the Council to process a land owner approval application by CDHS for proposed activities on the land. 

19.    Prior to proceeding with the classification, the council is required under section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 to engage with local iwi.  There is no provision under Section 16 (2A) requiring the council to publicly advertise its intention to classify.     

20.     Engagement with iwi has been undertaken as outlined in paragraphs 30, 31 and 32 below. 

21.   In March 2019 the Department of Conservation (DOC) announced that it is proposing to revoke the majority of administering bodies delegations under the Reserves Act 1977.  DoC has given all administering bodies time to prepare submissions before making adecision.  During this time administering bodies may continue to progress matters as the delegations remain in place during the submission and decision process. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     There will be no climate impact as the proposed classification will partly formalise an existing      activity. 

23.     Classification as an historic reserve will preserve the purpose for which the land is held. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Council’s Heritage Unit supports the proposed classification of the land by referencing the purpose of an historic reserve as “possessing places, objects and natural features as are of historic, archaeological, cultural, educational and other special interest”. Heritage staff consider the primary purpose or value of the land is to protect the McNicol Homestead and its surrounding setting. 

25.     Council’s Heritage Unit points out the Reserves Act guidance published by DOC notes that the area (in the case of historic reserves) should be sufficiently large to preserve all the significant historic or archaeological features associated with the place, object or natural feature, and the area should include sufficient additional land as a buffer against incompatible development or as unobtrusive sites for necessary services for management and public use.  This is particularly relevant in relation to the McNicol Homestead, where the view towards the homestead from the main road contributes significantly to the values of the place as a historic landmark within the district. 

26.     Council Park Services staff are supportive of the classification which would allow the CDHS to expand the museum activities. 

27.     Staff from council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation team support the proposed classification of the land to reflect the activities being undertaken on the reserve.

28.     The proposed classification has no identified impact on other parts of the council group.  The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of advice in this report. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     The Franklin Local Board holds the delegated authority under section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 to approve the classification of the McNicol Homestead Reserve.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     Prior to reserve classification proceeding under the Reserves Act 1977, council is required under Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 to consult with local iwi and advise of the proposal. 

31.     In August 2019 engagement was undertaken with Ngai Tai ki Tamaki, identified as having an interest in land, regarding the intention to classify three parcels of McNicol Homestead Reserve. 

32.     Engagement involved: 

·        Ngai Tai ki Tamaki were provided with detailed information about the reserve and the activities undertaken by the Clevedon and District Historical Society.

·        Iwi representatives were invited to hui and a kaitiaki site visit to comment on any spiritual, cultural or environmental impact with respect to the proposal. 

33.     By email dated 10 October 2019 Ngai Tai ki Tamaki advised that they were in support of the classification of the site to an historic reserve.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     Publication in the New Zealand Gazette records the local board’s resolution. A permanent public record of the classification will be obtained after registration of the published gazette notice against the titles containing the three reserves.   The cost of publication is approximately $100 and will be borne by Community Facilities. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     Should the Franklin Local Board resolve not to approve classification of McNicol Homestead Reserve this decision: 

·        would (subject to the satisfactory completion of all statutory processes which will mean that the land status legally supports the lessee’s current and future activities) prevent council staff from recommending a renewal of a new community lease.  

·        may increase Auckland Council’s maintenance requirements in terms of maintaining the improvements on the reserve.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     Subject to local board approval council staff will publish a notice in the New Zealand Gazette for a permanent public record of the classification. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aerial view of land to be classified

301

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Katerina Marinkovich  - Specialist Technical Statutory Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 

Prospect Terrace foot path extension concept design

File No.: CP2020/02627

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the Prospect Terrace pathway extension concept design by the Franklin Local Board and progress with delivery as part of the 2020/2021 financial year work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Discussions with the Franklin Local Board and council staff to extend the walkway started in 2018. Community Facilities FY 2018/2019 work programme identified park asset renewal projects.

3.       The Franklin Local Board requested council staff to look at the possibility of extending the walkway to improve connections through the park to accommodate the communities needs and desires.

4.       The proposed concept design can be delivered within the remaining approved locally driven initatives (LDI) and renewal budget of $198,512.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the pathway extension concept design connecting Prospect Terrace and Franklin Road as provided in Attachment A of the report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       On 26 June 2018 the Franklin Local Board allocated $17,500 from their locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget to investigate extending the Prospect Terrace walkway 120m to the car park (FR/2018/100). The existing walkway starts between 26 and 32 Prospect Terrace and continues down an alleyway into the open space of Growers Stadium.

6.       The scope of the project was to connect the walkway extension from Prospect Terrace to Growers Stadium car park, connecting to the Growers Stadium car park which would require modifications to ensure access through the car park is safe. This would likely lead to a loss of car park spaces and additional costs.

7.       In April 2019, the local board gave direction for staff to investigate the additional costs to produce a design suitable for increased accessibility. This led staff to recommend a connection from Prospect Terrace to Franklin Road.

8.       The proposed Prospect Terrace concept design aligns with the outcomes of the Pukekohe local paths plan, formerly greenways plan.

9.       The aim of a local paths plan is to advance cycling and walking routes which are safe and pleasant, while also improving local ecology and access to recreational opportunities. To achieve these aims, local paths may cross existing areas of parkland and follow street connections between localities, community facilities and parks.

10.     The path will link areas of housing and employment, open spaces, town centres, recreational facilities, places of interest and transport hubs.

11.     In December 2019, the local board indicated support for the concept design and the progressing of delivery within the 2020 financial year, on the condition that staff talk to Counties Manukau Rugby Football Union, who lease the carpark, regarding pedestrian interface with the changing rooms at the end of path.

12.     The Counties Manukau Rugby Football Union’s only requirement was that the proposed path does not go through their gate into Growers Stadium no.1 field.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The proposed concept design creates a new link between Prospect Terrace and the Growers Stadium carpark. The path will connect to an existing path connecting the carpark to Franklin Road. See attachment A

14.     There are many benefits to developing local paths, including:

·    Recreational – Improving people’s access to outdoor recreation and enjoyment close to their home

·    Environmental – Reducing our reliance on fossil fuels by providing attractive and safe alternative transport choices, improving storm water quality and reducing flooding events through low impact design measures and by improving ecosystems, habitats and ecological niches

·    Social – Providing improved opportunities for people to get out of their cars and meet their neighbours, to be engaged with a diverse range of communities and to connect with their local community facilities

·    Health – Providing improved opportunities for activity and fitness

·    Education – Providing opportunities to learn about the plants, wildlife, ecology, history of the landscapes that people pass through

·    Economic – Improving local employment opportunities as areas become more accessible and desirable for businesses and shoppers.

15.     A topography survey identified that the proposed path will not meet the maximum gradient of 5° required for accessible access.

16.     Due to the different gradient levels, the following have been included in the design:

·    connect proposed concrete path to 2m wide existing path

·    addition of root bridges where required within the drip line of trees

·    addition of a retaining wall to meet the permitted gradient

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     In June 2019, Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and a commitment to the community to look at ways how we can consider climate implications in everything that we do.

18.     Maintaining our green spaces is a proven climate solution to reduce harmful carbon emissions. The proposed pathway will reduce our reliance on fossil fuels by providing an attractive and safe alternative transport choice.

19.     All waste resulting from the project will be minimised and recycled wherever possible.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     Council staff from Community Facilities and Community Services collaborated to provide advice for this report. Staff agree that investment to extend the walkway and connect the two roads will improve overall utilisation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     This initiative aligns with Pukekohe paths plan and delivers to the local board’s aspirations for the community.

22.     The local board has provided feedback at two workshops to form the concept deign during the current financial year.

23.     This project aligns with outcome 3 of the Franklin Local Board Plan (2017) - An improved transport system, as well as one of the key objectives of this outcome ‘Accessibility and safety is improved in urban centres.’

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     All community assets contribute significantly to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions. Where we anticipate any aspects of the proposed project having a significant impact on sites of importance to mana whenua, we will undertake appropriate engagement. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     A preliminary estimate for delivery of the proposed concept design is $177,970. Actual costs will be confirmed prior to delivery. Any unused funds will be returned to the local board.

26.     On 6 December 2019, through the local board quarterly performance report for Quarter One 2019/2020, the local board approved the amendment to the Community Facilities 2019/2020 work programme and 2020-2022 indicative work programme, to add projects to the Risk Adjusted Programme: (CP2019/18913)

·     Work Programme ID 2480 Prospect Terrace, Pukekohe – extend existing walkway (stage 2)

27.     Allocation of locally driven initiatives (LDI) and renewals funding is specified below:

Funding Source

Totals

Renewals FY21

$8,980

LDI FY20

$19,532

LDI FY21

$170,000

Total project budget

$198,512

 

28.     The Franklin Local Board has sufficient unallocated LDI capex to fund this initiative in financial year 2020-2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     Project progression and delivery is dependent on a decision from the local board.

30.     If the project does not continue it will result in a missed opportunity to enhance, protect and maintain Franklin’s diverse natural environment and make sure it’s able to be enjoyed by the community and deliver on a Local Board Plan 2017 priority outcome.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Following approval from the local board, staff will apply for resource consent in order to progress delivery.

32.     Staff will update the local board with progress and delivery timeframes will be confirmed as soon as resource consent is achieved.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Prospect Terrace Pathway Final Design March 20

307

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jasmine Samuel - Community Led & LDI Specialist

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 

Correction to a road type (Suffix) at the new subdivision within Stage 6 of the Auranga development in Drury.

File No.: CP2020/02787

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to correct a road type (suffix) for ‘ROAD 6’ at the new subdivision within Stage 6 of the Auranga development in Drury.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council’s road naming guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       This report is a re-submission of a road naming application that was presented to and approved by the Franklin Local Board on 26 November 2019. The November report sought approval for an existing road name (‘Ata Road’) from stage 5A to extend along a new road within stage 6. The road extending through both stages is referred to as ROAD 6. Unfortunately an incorrect road type (‘Drive’) was included in the November report, resulting in two different road types now being used for ROAD 6: Ata Road (approved in stage 5A) and Ata Drive (approved in stage 6).

4.       This report seeks approval to change the road type ‘Drive’, approved within stage 6, so that only one road type (‘Road’) is used along the entire road.

5.       Only the road type is to be changed. The road name (‘Ata’) approved in resolution FR/2019/16 for ROAD 6 remains unchanged.

6.       The applicant has proposed the following road type change:

Table 1: Proposed Change to ROAD 6 Road Type

Road Reference

Approved Road Name

Approved Road Type

Proposed change to Road Type

ROAD 6

Ata

Drive

Road

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      rescind resolution FR/2019/16 to name ROAD 6 ‘Ata Drive’ (due to incorrect road type used), within the subdivision at the Auranga Development (Stage 6) in Drury (Council reference BUN60310376 & SUB60310378), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

b)      approve the replacement road type for ROAD 6 as ‘Ata Road’ within the subdivision at the Auranga Development (Stage 6) in Drury (Council reference BUN60310376 & SUB60310378), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B respectively.

8.       On 11 December 2018, the Franklin local board approved the road name ‘Ata Road’ for ROAD 6 as part of the road naming application for Stages 1 and 5A.

9.       ROAD 6 would extend through two stages: Stage 5A and Stage 6. However the formal approval for the extension of the name ‘Ata Road’ into stage 6 was not included in the December report as the stage 6 road layout was yet to be confirmed.

10.     On the 23 April 2019, the applicant (McKenzie & Co Consultants Limited) lodged a road naming application for stages 2, 3, and 6. Included in the stage 6 road naming application was the request for approval of an existing name from stage 5 to extend along the remaining half of ROAD 6. However, a different road type (‘Drive’) was included in the application to Council, and unfortunately was not picked by Council staff at the time of writing the November report. The name ‘Ata Drive’ was therefore presented to and approved by the Franklin board at the 26 November 2019 meeting (Resolution FR/2019/16). This resulted in two different road types being approved for ROAD 6: Ata Road (approved within stage 5A) and Ata Drive (approved within stage 6).  

11.     This report seeks approval to change the road type (‘Drive’), approved within stage 6, to ‘Road’, so that only one road type is used along the entire road.

12.     Only the road type is to be changed. The road name (‘Ata’) approved in resolution FR/2019/16 for ROAD 6 is to remain unchanged.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

14.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

·    a historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·    a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·    an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

15.     The Applicant’s road name meaning and propose road type change is set out in the table below:

Table 2: ROAD 6 road name meaning and proposed road type change

Road Reference

Approved Road Name
(to remain unchanged)

Road Name meaning

Replacement Road Type (suffix)

ROAD 6

Ata

Maori word meaning: (noun) Morning.

Road

 

16.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that the proposed name is acceptable and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

17.     Road type: ‘Road’ is an acceptable road type for the new road, suiting the form and layout of the road, as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The review sought from the Franklin Local Board on this report is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome “A Maori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Maori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Maori identity.

22.     There are no changes proposed to the approved road name in the previous report, only to the road type (suffix) to correct the road type in resolution FR/2019/16. This being the case, no further contact with iwi has been sought to the proposed changes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Location plan of Stage 6 within the Auranga development

313

b

 Master and siteplan of ROAD 6 within the Auranga development

315

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 

Franklin Local Board Grants Programme 2020/2021

File No.: CP2020/02335

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Franklin Grants Programme 2020/2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt their own local grants programme for the next financial year.

4.       This report presents the Franklin Grants Programme 2020/2021 for adoption (see Attachment A).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)   adopt the Franklin Grants Programme 2020/2021.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

6.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt its own local grants programme for the next financial year. The local board grants programme guides community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.       The local board community grants programme includes:

· outcomes as identified in the local board plan

· specific local board grant priorities

· which grant types will operate, the number of grant rounds and opening and closing         dates

· any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

· other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

8.       Once the local board grants programme 2020/2021 has been adopted, the types of grants, grant rounds, criteria and eligibility with be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. The new Franklin Grants Programme has been workshopped with the local board and feedback incorporated into the grants programme for 2020/2021.

10.     The new grant programme includes:

·        retrospective costs and initiatives that are eligible and can be funded by central government as a lower priority.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through the support of projects that address food production and food waste; alternative transport methods; community energy efficiency education and behaviour change; build community resilience and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

13.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant council unit will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     The grants programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of its grants programme. This programme is reviewed on an annual basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     All grant programmes respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Māori. Applicants are asked how their project aims to increase Māori outcomes in the application process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2018 -2028 and local board agreements.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the adoption of the grants programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     An implementation plan is underway and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels, including the council website, local board facebook page and communication with past recipients of grants.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Grants Programme 2020/2021

321

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Agus Castro Pons - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar March 2020

File No.: CP2020/01987

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Franklin Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Franklin Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar dated March 2020 (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

March 2020 Governance Forward Work Calendar

329

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor - Franklin

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 

Franklin Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2020/01988

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for workshops held on 18 and 25 February and 3 March 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board holds weekly workshops to facilitate oversight and delivery of projects in their work programme or that have significant local implications.

3.       The local board does not make decisions at these workshops.

4.       Workshops are not open to the public, but records of what was discussed and presented at the workshop are reported retrospectively.

5.       Workshop records for the Franklin Local Board are attached for 18 and 25 February and 3 March 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for 18 and 25 February and 3 March 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 February 2020 Franklin Local Board workshop record

333

b

25 February 2020 Franklin Local Board workshop record

335

c

3 March 2020 Franklin Local Board workshop record

337

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor - Franklin

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 March 2020

 

 


 

    

    



[1] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/council-controlled-organisations/Pages/review-of-council-controlled-organisations.aspx

[2] Food Act 2014, section 39 template food control plans.  

[3]     ‘Have Your Say’ events were drop-in opportunities for the public to learn more about the proposal, ask questions and provide feedback to council officers and panel members. ‘Have Your Say’ events were held at Avondale Market on 8 December 2019, Otara Market on 14 December 2019, Henderson Night Market on 16 January 2020, Pakuranga Night Market on 18 January 2020 and Glenfield Night Market on 19 January 2020.

[4]     Local board information of people who gave feedback at ‘Have Your Say’ events is unknown.

[5]     Auckland’s temperature is expected to increase and seasonal distribution of rainfall to change. Auckland region climate change projections and impacts, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), 2018.