I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 19 March 2020

2:00pm

Council Chamber
Orewa Service Centre
50 Centreway Road
Orewa

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Gary Brown

 

Deputy Chairperson

Victoria Short

 

Members

Andy Dunn

 

 

Janet Fitzgerald, JP

 

 

Gary Holmes

 

 

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

 

Alexis Poppelbaum

 

 

Leanne Willis

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Gemma Kaldesic

Democracy Advisor for Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

20 March 2020

 

Contact Telephone: 02 152 7397

Email: gemma.kaldesic@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

7.1     Petition: Claire Tierney - Hibiscus and Bays Park and Ride                           5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Public Forum - Stewart Milne                                                                              6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

10.1   Notice of Motion: Member J Parfitt - Penlink                                                    7

11        2019/2020 Regional Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund project endorsement                                                                                                                  9

12        Hibiscus and Bays local parks classifications                                                        15

13        Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan - approval of draft plan for public notification                                                                                                                    45

14        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Grant Programme 2020/2021                            167

15        Auckland Transport Update to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board March 2020 177

16        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020                                                                                         189

17        Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review                                                                                                                                     233

18        Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes                                                                                                                                     239

19        Addition to the 2019-2022 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Meetings Schedule 255

20        Governance forward work calendar                                                                        259

21        Deputations update                                                                                                   263

22        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records                                              267  

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

The chairman welcomed those in attendance and opened the meeting with a Karakia.

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday 20 February 2020 as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

7.1       Petition: Claire Tierney - Hibiscus and Bays Park and Ride

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present a petition regarding additional park and ride car park spaces.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the petition

b)      thank Claire Tierney for her attendance at the meeting

 

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Stewart Milne

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Stewart Milne has requested time at public forum to discuss Placemaking for Silverdale.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Stewart Milne for his verbal presentation

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

10.1     Notice of Motion: Member J Parfitt - Penlink

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Member J Parfitt has given notice of a motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Member J Parfitt and Member J Fitzgerald as seconder, is appended as Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive this Notice of Motion

b)      write to the Prime Minister, Deputy Prime Minister, and Ministers of Finance and Transport thanking them for their recent announcement to now fully fund Penlink in the recent $12 billion infrastructure package. Also express our local board’s view that we would like to reconfirm our support for a four laned Penlink that allows for public transport, walking and cycling options. We also wish to see initial establishment works, like site clearance and any further land acquisition required, commencing immediately which would add certainty to the project.

c)      invite NZTA to our April business meeting to present a briefing on the next steps for Penlink

d)      ask NZTA to give consideration to options to accelerate Penlink – including alternative procurement options, and the possibility of issuing a separate Establishment Works contract while the main design and build contract(s) are being procured.

 

Attachments

a          Notice of Motion Penlink March 2020.......................................................... 281

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

2019/2020 Regional Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund project endorsement

File No.: CP2020/02644

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board endorsement of the Metropark Community Sports Charitable Trust Pavilion Project application to the regionally contested Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund is a $120 million contestable fund allocated through The Long-term Plan 2018-2028, that supports the development of regional and sub-regional community sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

3.       The fund looks to address gaps in provision and allow council to proactively respond to changing sport and recreation preferences.

4.       Applicants may seek investment in the planning, design, or capital development stages of a project.

5.       Decision making for this regionally contested fund sits with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee. A workshop with the committee will be held in March 2020, with a business meeting to follow in April 2020.

6.       Local boards are being asked to provide their views on applications from local groups who have applied for funding to ensure a regionally aligned approach.

7.       Fifty eight expressions of interest were received. Of those, 21 projects aligned strongly with Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund criteria. Of those, 17 Stage two proposals were submitted.

8.       There is $7m available in the 2019/2020 financial year. However, applicants can apply for funding from future years as the planning and investment required to deliver regional and sub-regional sport and recreation facilities is significant.

9.       It is likely that not all the projects that have submitted a Stage two application will receive Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Funding.

10.     The Metropark Community Sports Charitable Trust has applied for funding in the 2019/2020 funding round for the Pavilion on Metro Park East in Millwater.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      Endorse the Metro Park Community Sports Charitable Trust Pavilion Project application to be considered for investment through the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020

 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund (the fund) is a contestable fund that supports the development of regional and sub-regional community sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

12.     The fund looks to address gaps in provision across the Auckland Region and allow council to proactively respond to changing sport and recreation preferences.

13.     Applicants may seek investment in the planning, design, or development stages of a project.

14.     The Long-term Plan 2018-2028 allocated $120 million to this fund over the next ten years, including $7 million in 2019/2020, $7 million in 2020/2021, $13.4 million in 2021/2022 and $13.6 million in 2022/2023.

15.     Decision making for this regionally contested fund sits with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.

16.     The fund’s priorities align with the ‘Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039’ priorities:

High priority

Medium priority

Low priority

Core infrastructure (e.g. courts, fields, playing surfaces/structures and lighting) that is central to sport and recreation participation.

Ancillary infrastructure (e.g. toilets, changing rooms, equipment storage and carparking) that enables safe and sanitary access for participants and spectators.

Incidental infrastructure (e.g. clubrooms and administration facilities) that is not required for sports participation but exist for social and management purposes.

 

17.     The fund prioritises investment into facility development projects over $500,000 and partnerships able to leverage additional investment, allowing more of the facilities Auckland needs to be built quicker and more effectively.

18.     Projects will be assessed in the context of ‘Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039’ and the following four investment principles:

Principle

Description

% of

assessment

Equity

Ensures equity of outcomes across the population regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status or location

40%

Outcome-focused

There is a clear ’line of sight’ between the investment and the outcomes it delivers

30%

Financial sustainability

Projects need to be financially viable and affordable for the public

20%

Accountability

Investment should be efficient, effective, transparent and consistent

10%

 

19.     The application process for the fund comprises two gateways:

·        Stage one (closed 1 November 2019) – Expression of Interest (EOI). A one-page canvas that asked for key information about the problem and opportunity, the proposed intervention, where and who is involved, the funding required and the impact if delivered.

·        Stage two (closed 2 February 2020) – Full application. A formal application process asking the applicant to expand on their EOI with further detail, including evidence such as needs analyses, feasibility studies, business cases, detailed design, or other supporting information as relevant to their application.

20.     Fifty-eight EOIs were received. Of those, 21 projects aligned strongly with the fund criteria. Of those, 17 Stage 2 submissions were made.

21.     An assessment panel comprised of Sport New Zealand and Auckland Council staff will review Stage two applications and a workshop will be held with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee (PACE) in March 2020, with a business meeting to follow in April 2020.

22.     Aktive Auckland Sport & Recreation were originally on the assessment panel but have withdrawn for this round as they are making an application on behalf of the multi-code Regional Indoor Court Leadership group, to procure professional services.

23.     To capture local board views the 17 projects will be workshopped with local boards to understand if the projects are supported by the relevant board. A formal resolution is required if the board choose to endorse the project.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options considered

Option one:  Endorse an application from Metropark Community Sports Charitable Trust, to the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund, to construct a pavilion building at Metro Park East.

24.     Option one is to endorse Metropark Community Sports Charitable Trust’s (the trust) application for investment to construct a pavilion building at Metro Park East. 

25.     The Trust’s investigation and design stage total costs are reported as $260,000. Remaining costs are $152,000 which would be considered for allocation in 2019/2020 from the Fund.

26.     The trust advised the project will cost $2.8m to complete and is currently at the investigation and design stage of the project.

27.     The project entails construction of a pavilion building delivering:

·    four changing rooms

·    public access toilets

·    equipment storage for Athletics, Cricket, Football and Rugby

·    administrative/event management space for users

·    bar

·    deck/sun shelter

·    kitchenette

·    meeting space

28.     The need for the pavilion was identified in the Metro Park Multi-Sport Feasibility Study 2017 funded by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board and produced by Opus.

29.     The pavilion in Metro Park East is also identified as a priority in Auckland Cricket’s Regional Facilities Plan.

Recommendation

30.     Staff recommend endorsing the trust’s application for investment to construct a pavilion building at Metro Park East.

Option two: Do not endorse an application from Metropark Community Sports Charitable Trust, to the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund, to construct a pavilion building at Metro Park East.

31.     Option two is that the local board does not endorse the trust’s application for investment to construct a pavilion building at Metro Park East. 

32.     Should the local board support Option two, the PACE committee could still approve investment in this project.  The PACE committee is focusing on regional and sub regional facilities that will benefit Aucklanders.

33.     Staff recommend option one to endorse the trust’s application and support the efficiency for the completion of the pavilion project.

Recommendation

34.     Staff do not recommend option two as it will delay the completion of the pavilion project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     Local board endorsement of the applications is not in itself considered to carry a climate impact.

36.     The potential climate impact of the projects proposed is considered. Potential impacts are noted but are yet to be quantified.

37.     The project is intended to attract increased visitation to the area, which may promote vehicle use regionally.

38.     The project involves significant construction of a new facility. Sustainable design principles are likely to be considered but emissions arising from the construction, maintenance, and associated ongoing operating costs are yet to be quantified.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     Decision making for the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund sits with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.

40.     Staff have added preparation of an agreement to lease into the draft 2020/2021 Work Programme. Landowner Approval, public notification, and mana whenua engagement will be completed as part of this process.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     The regional and sub-regional nature of sport and recreation facilities that are the target of this fund mean there will likely be a multi-board impact across all projects.

42.     The local board plan has the following outcome, objective and key initiative:

Outcome: Our community enjoys access to quality parks, reserves and facilities for leisure, sport and recreation

Objective: Partner with other organisations to develop sport and recreation infrastructure.

Key Initiative: Support the development of multi-sport and recreation projects, e.g. Freyberg Park in Browns Bay and Metro Park East in Silverdale.

43.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board have funded $118,000 ($108,000 towards design costs, and $10,000 towards engineering works) towards the developed design phase of this project.  These elements have been completed.

44.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has provided Landowner Approval to the trust for the containers currently on Metro Park East.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

45.     The assessment criteria developed for this fund has a stronger weighting for projects that are Māori-led, have high collaboration with Māori organisations, prioritises strategically increased participation by Māori and/or involves activities with the likelihood of high Māori participation.

46.     The 5km catchment area shows a population of 27,480 with 4.1% identifying as Māori.

47.     6.1% of the wider Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area identify as Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund is a regional budget allocated through The Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

49.     $7 million is budgeted in 2019/2020, $7 million in 2020/2021, $13.4 million in 2021/2022 and $13.6 million in 2022/2023.

50.     A key objective of the fund is to invest in significant capital development projects that will be delivered quickly to get Aucklanders active. The fund will also help to develop a pipeline of projects by advancing the investigation, planning and design stages of projects. The balance between planning and capital development investment will depend on the merits of the applications received.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

51.     The ability to deliver projects is a key weighting within the criteria to be used by the assessment panel. This includes:

·        having an achievable funding plan in place

·        having the necessary skills and expertise (in-house or procured) to deliver the project

·        having ticked off any relevant key project milestones such as site tenure, consent, etc

52.     Not all applications for projects will receive Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Funding. Some organisations have already been redirected to other funding sources as appropriate (e.g. Local Board Grants, Surf 10:20 Fund, Regional Facilities Auckland), whilst others may apply again in future rounds when their project is further developed.

53.     Some projects will not align strongly with the criteria used for the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund. However, there may be other local drivers as to why local boards and non-council funders invest in those projects. It is incumbent on all parties to set realistic expectations in regard the funding mechanisms available.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     Staff are seeking a resolution from the local board to endorse the project.

55.     The assessment panel meet to review projects and make recommendations.

56.     Staff workshop the assessment panel’s recommendations with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in March 2020.

57.     Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee business meeting in April 2020.

58.     Funding agreements with successful applicants developed May-June 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Laura Bertelsen - Sport & Recreation Lead

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays local parks classifications

File No.: CP2020/01008

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm land to be held under the Local Government Act 2002, to make decisions on land status and classification of land under the Reserves Act 1977, including revisiting some earlier resolutions, and to approve public notification where required.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As part of the classification programme and development of the local parks management plan under the Reserves Act 1977 (RA), additional classification decisions are needed for some local parks in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area (the local board area). The reasons for this are:

·    some parcels were excluded from earlier reports to the local board, including new parks that were acquired over the past 18 months

·    technical advice has confirmed that 81 parcels that were thought to be automatically classified under S16(11b) of the RA still require a resolution of the local board under Section 16(2A) to be correctly classified

·    to correct errors made on the reclassification of parcels in Freyberg Park surrounding the Red Cross facility and on reserving and classifying land adjacent to Rakauananga Point Esplanade Reserve that services the Gulf Harbour Marina.

3.       We have considered the benefits and disadvantages of the RA and Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) in managing and enabling the use, protection and development of each local park. 

4.       Criteria have been used to assess each land parcel, including consideration of the local park’s values, current and likely future use of the local park, workshop feedback from the local board and consultation with mana whenua.

5.       The status and recommendations for parcels of land included in this report are as follows:

Land status

Recommended actions

Fourteen parcels held under the LGA

·    Confirm the following parcels will continue to be held under the LGA (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report):

five parcels in Maka Terrace Park

single parcels in Long Bay / Beach Road Reserve and Tatou Pounamu Park.

·    That six parcels in Freyberg Park be declared reserve and classified under s14(1) of the RA. No public notification is required (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report).

·    Publicly notify the proposal to declare as reserve and classify under s14(1) of the RA a single parcel in Pōhutukawa Reserve.

120 unclassified parcels held under the RA

·    Classification is required for five parcels under s16(1) and 115 parcels under s16(2A) of the RA (refer to Attachment C of the agenda report).

·    Public notification is not required for any of these parcels.

Six parcels classified and held under the RA, being considered for reclassification under s24

·    Arkles Bay Beachfront Reserve (two parcels), De Luen Avenue Beachfront Reserve, Freyberg Park, Hatfields Beach Reserve and Owens Lookout Reserve (refer to Attachment D of the agenda report).

·    All proposed reclassifications need to be publicly notified.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      confirm the seven parcels of land included in Long Bay / Beach Road Reserve, Maka Terrace Park and Tatou Pounamu Park, as described in Attachment A of the agenda report (dated 19 March 2020), will continue to be held under the Local Government Act 2002.

b)      withdraw the proposal to reclassify Parts Lots 6, 7 and 8 DP 39141 in Freyberg Park, being part of resolution c) of 18 September 2019 meeting (Resolution number HB/2019/154).

c)      revoke the resolution regarding the declaration and classification of Lot 3 DP 124672 as part of Rakauananga Point Esplanade Reserve being part of resolution b) of 19 September 2018 meeting (Resolution number HB/2018/155).

d)      approve the declaration and classification of the six parcels of land in Freyberg Park, pursuant to section 14(1) of the Reserves Act 1977, as described in Attachment B of the agenda report (dated 19 March 2020).

e)      approve public notification of the proposal to declare and classify Section 1 SO 425793 covering 105m2, held in CT 519300 and forming part of Pōhutukawa Reserve as local purpose (esplanade) reserve, pursuant to section 14(1) of the Reserves Act 1977.

f)       approve the classification of 120 parcels of reserve land pursuant to section 16(1) and section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, as described in Attachment C of the agenda report (dated 19 March 2020).

g)      approve public notification of the proposals to reclassify six parcels of reserve land pursuant to section 24 of the Reserves Act 1977, as described in Attachment D of the agenda report (dated 19 March 2020).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has decision-making responsibility for all local parks in the local board area.

7.       On 13 December 2017, the local board resolved to prepare an omnibus open space management plan for all local parks in Hibiscus and Bays (now known as the local parks management plan) to assist park management and meet obligations for reserve management planning under the RA (resolution number: HB/2017/207).

8.       The local parks management plan will be a statutory reserve management plan prepared in line with section 41 of the RA and cover parkland held under the Act as well as LGA, including land covered by existing reserve management plans.

9.       In September 2018 officers completed a comprehensive park land status investigation for all local parks. This was an essential preliminary task in developing the draft local parks management plan and a statutory requirement under the RA. Section 16 of the RA requires all land held as reserve under the Act be classified appropriately.

10.     The classification of reserve land in Hibiscus and Bays has been covered in four previous reports to the local board. Two reports on 19 September 2018 (CP2020/01008 and CP2020/01008) covered land status and classification proposals for approximately 550 parcels of park land in Hibiscus and Bays. A report on 20 March 2019 (CP2019/01923) and further report on 18 September 2019 (CP2019/16935) covered the classification or reclassification of an additional 21 parcels.

11.     In reviewing the information presented in the draft local parks management plan (the draft plan) and doing a final check on any further acquisitions of new parks or parcels adjacent to existing parks, we have discovered 140 parcels require further decisions from the local board. 

12.     Fourteen of these parcels are held under the LGA, 120 parcels are held as unclassified reserve under the RA and six parcels that are classified could have a more suitable classification.

13.     The options for the parcels of parkland are:

a)   holding the land under the LGA

b)   declaring land as reserves and classifying this in accordance with Section 14 of the RA

c)   classifying existing unclassified reserves in accordance with Section 16 of the RA

d)   reclassifying classified reserves in accordance with Section 24 of the RA.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Proposed actions for land held under the LGA

14.     The local board have the option to hold park land under the LGA or the RA. Any land held under the LGA which the local board wishes to manage under the RA must be declared reserve and classified appropriately in accordance with Section 14 of the RA.

15.     When reviewing the future land status options for land under the LGA, staff considered the following:

•    Why does the council own the land and how was it acquired?

•    What is the current and likely future purpose of the land?

•    What potential does the land have for protection, enhancement and development?

•    Is there likely to be a need to retain flexibility for future use?

•    What is the status of adjacent parcels of land within the same park?

Decisions on park land acquired by the Governing Body under the LGA

16.     Seven of the recent parcels acquired: Maka Terrace Park (made up of five parcels of land), Tatou Pounamu Park and a parcel that provides access behind the Sir Peter Blake Marine Education and Recreation Centre (MERC) in Long Bay / Beach Road Reserve were intentionally acquired under the LGA by the Governing Body, refer to Attachment A of the agenda report. 

17.     At a workshop on 5 February 2020, the local board asked staff to provide greater clarity on the differences in holding land under the LGA versus the RA. The following factors are worth considering:

·    The LGA allows for a wider range of uses and retains flexibility (consistent with council’s role under that legislation) ​

·    The RA introduces greater complexity into decision-making (greater resource requirements) ​

·    The RA outlines a values-driven framework for managing reserves and potentially a greater opportunity for public input.  However, the local parks management plan will provide consistent management direction for all parks and reserves regardless of whether they are held under the RA or LGA 

·    Longer term leases granted under either Act will require public notification. However, the RA has stricter criteria for the types of activities that can be granted a lease (criteria also applies for granting a licence or easement)

·    The Conservation Act requirements to give effect to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi apply to the RA and require active protection of Māori interests

·    The RA scenic, historic or scientific reserve classifications add a layer of protection as these can only be changed if in the opinion of the Minister the natural, historic or scientific values have been destroyed. 

18.     Maka Terrace Park and Tatou Pounamu Park were acquired on subdivision with the intention they provide an informal recreation function.  No natural or historic values are present on these parks that require protection under the RA.

19.     The parcel behind MERC in Long Bay / Beach Road Reserve was acquired for a walkway under the Public Works Act 1981 as identified in Gazette Notice 2019-In554.

20.     We propose these seven parcels continue to be held under the LGA, as intended by the Governing Body.

Correcting and making decisions on the land status of part of Freyberg Park

21.     Six parcels in Freyberg Park are held under the LGA, being Parts Lots 5-10 DP 39141.  This land on the south side of Glencoe Road was severed from the main area of the park when Glencoe Road was moved to align with Anzac Road at the Beach Road intersection. 

22.     Incorrect advice was provided on Parts Lots 6, 7 and 8 DP 39141 in September 2019. It was thought these parcels were classified as recreation reserve.  The resolutions from 18 September 2019 (Resolution number HB/2019/154 c) approved the public notification of the proposal to reclassify these parcels as local purpose (community use) reserve to accommodate the Red Cross facility.

23.     We have reinvestigated the land status of these parcels and determined that they are held in fee simple under the LGA. It is, therefore, proposed that this error is corrected by withdrawing the earlier proposal and resolving again to address the status of this land. 

24.     The local board has the option of either continuing to hold Lots 5-10 DP 39141 under the LGA or declaring and classifying them under the RA which would be consistent with the land status of the rest of Freyberg Park.

25.     We recommend that these six parcels be reserved and classified under section 14 of the RA: the most eastern parcel classified as recreation reserve while all the parcels to the west of this, which includes the site of the Red Cross building, be classified as local purpose (community use) reserve. Refer to Attachment B of the agenda report for the legal descriptions and Attachment E of the agenda report for an aerial and further explanation. 

Proposal to revoke earlier resolution and retain land under the LGA

26.     As part of the initial round of classifications in September 2018, the local board declared and classified Lot 3 DP 124672 (refer to Attachment F of the agenda report) as a local purpose (esplanade) reserve. While this parcel adjoins Rakauananga Point Esplanade Reserve, the site supports the activities of the Gulf Harbour Marina and is the location of the breakwater. 

27.     On review we suggest this parcel would best be retained as land held under the LGA to provide flexibility in how it is managed in the future.

28.     We propose the part of resolution HB/2018/155 b) of 19 September 2018 meeting relating to Lot 3 DP 124672 be revoked.

Proposal to declare and classify land under the LGA

29.     Section 1 SO 425793 is located off Pōhutukawa Avenue on the south side of the Orewa estuary and forms part of Pōhutukawa Reserve and Esplanade.

30.     The land was acquired for walkway and cycleway purposes as identified in Gazette Notice 2010-In2513. Te Ara Tahuna Cycleway runs through the parcel.

31.     We propose the land be reserved and classified under section 14 as local purpose (esplanade) reserve to be consistent with the adjacent land parcel. 

32.     Public notification is required under the RA as this land parcel is not zoned open space in the Auckland Unitary Plan.

Proposed actions for land held under the RA

33.     For land held under the RA, the following options have been considered:

·    classify according to its primary purpose

·    reclassify to align to its primary purpose

·    revoke the reserve status and hold the land under the LGA

·    continue to hold the land as unclassified reserve under the RA (status quo for 120 parcels).

34.     The option to continue to hold the land as unclassified reserve, has been discounted as it would mean that the local parks management plan would not comply with the RA and the council would not be meeting its statutory obligations under the RA. 

35.     In the context of this investigation, we have not identified any parcels of local park that warrant the reserve status to be revoked and being managed under the LGA.

Classification of land held under the RA 1977

36.     Classification involves assigning a reserve (or part of a reserve) a primary purpose, as defined in section 17 to 23 of the Act, that aligns with its present values. Consideration is also given to potential future values and activities and uses.

37.     We have identified 120 parcels currently held as unclassified reserve under the RA, requiring classification.

38.     This includes 81 parcels that were thought to be automatically classified. Further technical advice has confirmed those parcels vested under section 44 of Counties Amendments Act are not automatically classified in accordance with section 16(11b) of the RA and still require a resolution of the local board under Section 16(2A) of the RA.

39.     Staff have considered the Reserves Act Guide[1] and the following questions when determining the primary purpose and appropriate classification for each parcel:

·   What was the intended purpose of the reserve when it was acquired?

·   What are the main values of the land or potential future values, uses and activities?

·   What potential does the land have for protection, preservation, enhancement or development?

·   What is the status of adjacent parcels of land within the park?

·   Is there likely to be a need to retain flexibility for future use?

40.     Attachment C of the agenda report identifies the parcels that require classification under s16(1) or s16(2A) of the RA.  Section 16(1) applies to Crown-owned reserves that have been vested in council, for example any park that was part of the former East Coast Bays Domain. Section 16(2A) applies to land directly vested in the council.  

41.     For most parcels listed in Attachment C of the agenda report it is proposed they be classified as recreation reserves, or local purpose (esplanade) or (accessway) reserves.  For Bruce Scott and Augur Lane Reserves a scenic reserve classification is proposed.

42.     The RA does not require public notification of these classification proposals.

Reclassification of some land held under the RA

43.     Reclassification involves assigning a different classification to a reserve (or part of a reserve) to better cater for its primary purpose.

44.     During this additional land classification investigation, six parcels of classified reserves were identified as requiring reclassification (see Attachment D of the agenda report).  This will ensure better alignment with the current or anticipated future use of the reserve.

45.     The RA requires public notification of all proposed reclassifications under Section 24(2b) of the RA together with the reasons for the proposed change in classification. 

How these proposed actions have been recorded in the draft local parks management plan

46.     The draft local parks management plan is also being reported to the 19 March meeting. This acknowledges the land status and classification for those parcels covered in this report that are under the LGA or where public notice is required will be subject to confirmation. The report on the draft plan suggests the plan be amended to reflect the local board’s decisions on the land status of these parcels. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

Potential impact of proposed decisions on greenhouse gas emissions

47.     The decisions in this report are largely administrative and we anticipate that they will have no direct impact on greenhouse gas emissions.

48.     However future management and potential development of park land, which is determined by its purpose, could have a potential positive or negative impact on greenhouse gas emissions. The degree and nature of the impact is dependent on the specific management and development of each park. Two examples of potential impacts are:

·   a potential reduction of emissions by classifying land as scenic reserve. The purpose of a scenic reserve is largely to protect and restore the natural environment; ecological restoration of a site could result in a reduction of emissions and increase in carbon sequestration

·   a potential increase in emissions through increased traffic, following the development of a community facility; the development of facilities could be enabled through the classification of local purpose (community use) reserve or recreation reserve. 

Effect of climate change over the lifetime of the proposed decisions

49.     Classification recommendations in this report consider the potential impacts of climate change in the context of current and future use and values of a park.  An example of this is the consideration of whether a park could be affected by coastal inundation or sea level rise in the future. There are several examples where land was vested as recreation reserve, but since this vesting coastal erosion has reduced the reserve width. It is being recommended these parcels be classified or reclassified as local purpose (esplanade) reserve. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     The land classification investigations that have formed the recommendations in this report have been discussed with relevant council units, including Legal Services, Parks, Sport, and Recreation, Community Facilities (including Leasing and Land Advisory) and Infrastructure and Environmental Services. They have provided information and technical advice that has helped inform reserve classification proposals.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

51.     Two workshops were held with the local board on 5 December 2019 and 5 February 2020 to present the land classification recommendations detailed in this report.  Amendments have been made to the proposed classifications based on feedback from local board members present at the workshops and mana whenua engagement (refer to paragraph 54).   

52.     At the February workshop the local board requested additional advice on the land parcels currently held under the LGA. This advice is outlined in paragraphs 17-19.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

53.     All mana whenua with an interest in Hibiscus and Bays were invited to provide feedback on the proposed classifications.  This included Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua, Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki, Te Kawerau a Maki, Ngāti Tamaoho, Te Akitai Waiohua, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, Ngāti Paoa, Ngāti Maru, Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Tamaterā and Te Patukirikiri.

54.     Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara was the only mana whenua that provided a response requesting some further information on some of the parcels and proposed the classification of Augur Lane Reserve (the bush area to the south of Metro Park West) recognise any ecological values retained in the reserve. The classification for this parcel is now proposed to be scenic rather than recreation reserve. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.     This report has no financial implications for the local board. The cost for public notices, hearings (if required) and gazette notices will be covered through existing departmental budgets. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

56.     No risks have been identified with completing the classification actions as the recommendations reflect current land use and do not add additional restrictions.

57.     The revocation of previous resolutions is intended to ensure land is correctly classified under the appropriate section of the Act to avoid future issues, such as leasing (Red Cross site on Freyberg Park) or to ensure the land’s legal status is most appropriate for its current or intended future use (land held for marina purposes adjacent to Rakauananga Point Esplanade Reserve).

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

58.     Once the local board has approved the classification actions, the next steps following this are:

·   publish notices in local newspapers for those parcels that require public notification (for at least one calendar month)

·   report to the local board in May 2020 to address any submissions or objections to the notified proposals including any requests for a hearing

·   update any changes to the classifications in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan

·   arrange gazette notices for the classifications. Approval of gazette notices has been delegated from the Minister of Conservation to the General Manager Community Facilities.  A report will be prepared seeking his signature to the gazette notices.

·   ensure all classifications are correctly recorded on council’s databases.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Parcels to be held under the LGA (19 March 2020)

23

b

Parcels to be delcared and classified under Section 14(1) of the Reserves Act (no public notification required) (19 March 2020)

25

c

Parcels to be classified under Section 16(1) or Section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act (no public notification required) (19 March 2020)

27

d

Parcels proposed to be reclassified under Section 24 of the Reserves Act (public notification required) (19 March 2020)

39

e

Freyberg Park

41

f

Rakauananga Point Esplanade Reserve

43

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Annette Campion - Kaihautu Tai-Ranga-whenua

Matthew Ward - Service & Asset Planning Team Leader

Authorisers

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan - approval of draft plan for public notification

File No.: CP2020/03068

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve public notification of the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan.

2.       To establish a hearings panel and appoint an independent commissioner to undertake the hearings process.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report seeks approval from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board (local board) to publicly notify the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan (the draft plan).

4.       The draft plan includes all local parks held under the Local Government Act 2002 and Reserves Act 1977 in the local board area except for parks contained within the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan 2015.

5.       The local parks management plan will provide a policy framework to manage use, protection and development of the parks within the local board area.

6.       In line with the requirements of the Reserves Act, public consultation will be open for two months, planned from late March to late May 2020.

7.       In September 2019, the previous local board recommended the provisional draft to the incoming local board for their consideration. Since then an external peer review has resulted in some amendments to the structure and content of the draft plan.

8.       Amendments to the draft plan ensure:

·    the plan is easier to read and use

·    greater policy direction in the areas of volunteering, public and private utilities, overnight accommodation, park naming and plaques and memorials

·    better alignment with council’s strategic direction (e.g. the draft Auckland Climate Action Plan)

9.       The draft plan is presented in two volumes, with appendices:

10.     This report also recommends establishment of a hearings panel, consisting of an independent hearings commissioner and at least three local board members, to hear submissions, consider amendments and recommend changes to the draft plan to the local board. The decision to approve the final plan remains with the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan for public consultation (Attachment A to D dated March 2020 under separate cover)

b)      appoint a hearings panel consisting of an independent hearings commissioner as chair and at least three local board members to:

·        hear objections and comments from submitters

·        consider the extent to which objections and comments would be allowed or accepted, or disallowed or not accepted  

·        make recommendations to the local board about amendments to the draft plan following the hearings process.

c)      delegate to the local board chair approval of minor amendments to the draft plan, prior to public notification

d)      note that the decision to approve the final Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan will remain with the local board.  

 

Horopaki

Context

Background information

11.     Hibiscus and Bays Local Board (the local board) has decision-making responsibility for all local parks in the Hibiscus and Bays local board area.

12.     The Reserves Act 1977 requires a reserve management plan be developed for most types of reserves administered by the local board.

13.     The draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan (the draft plan), which initially was called the Open Space Management Plan, is a statutory reserve management plan prepared in line with section 41 of the Reserves Act.

14.     The local parks management plan will provide a policy framework to manage use, protection and development of the parks within the local board area.

15.     The scope of the draft plan is shown in the table below:

In scope

Out of scope

ü land held under this Reserves Act 1977

ü land held under the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA)

û reserves included in the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan

û land for which the local board does not have allocated decision-making responsibility, e.g. drainage reserves, roads

û regional parks land

16.     The final plan, once adopted, will replace all existing reserve management plans in the local board area, except the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan 2015.

17.     It will establish a policy for the management of all local parks in the local board area and mean that the council will comply with the requirements of the Reserves Act to have a reserve management plan (for most types of reserves held under the Act).

18.    
Engagement with mana whenua throughout development of planThe timeline below gives an overview of key decisions in developing the draft plan:

19.     This report is seeking approval from the local board to publicly notify the draft plan (see Attachment A to D under separate cover).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Peer review and subsequent amendments to draft plan

20.     Following the reporting of the provisional draft plan to the local board in September 2019, a peer review of the plan was undertaken. 

21.     The review gathered input from relevant teams across the council and looked at other omnibus reserve management plans prepared elsewhere in New Zealand to compare the scope and structure of these plans.

22.     The review made several recommendations, which have been incorporated into the draft plan (see Attachment E for an overview of the amendments made to the draft plan). 

23.     Two more recent recommendations from the review were unable to be incorporated into this draft plan within the timeframe. They were creating an additional management focus area to capture cultural values as a theme and to more comprehensively cover future developments such as marae. We will aim to include those in local parks management plans for other local board areas. If submissions are received on this topic, they may also be able to be incorporated into the final plan (following a hearings and deliberations process – see below).

24.     The following table summarises the amendments made and benefits of the amendments:

Amendments made

Benefits

·   restructured the plan to keep all park management related polices and tools together in one section

·   added a ‘how to navigate the plan’ section within the plan

·    make the plan easier to use

·    improve readability

 

·   strengthen the acknowledgement of climate change

·    better alignment with council’s strategic direction (e.g. the draft Auckland Climate Action Plan)

·   amended the sections relating to volunteering, public and private utilities, overnight accommodation, park naming and plaques and memorials

·    provides greater policy direction to address any potential impacts of these activities

·    ensures policies fully reflect Reserves Act provisions

·   added 13 new parks, most of which had been acquired by council since the start of this project.

·    ensures the plan is comprehensive and up to date

·   amended Individual Parks section to ensure consistency in wording and the level of detail provided

·    better consistency in implementing management intentions for individual parks

25.     Additions to Volume 1 of the draft plan have been highlighted in yellow. Minor amendments to the wording in the draft plan have been captured as tracked changes.

The draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan – in a nutshell

26.     The draft plan structure is outlined below and covers 284 parks that extend over approximately 604 hectares of land. 

27.     Volume 1 contains background information, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board context and the management planning framework and general policies.

28.     Volume 2 contains the individual parks information for all local parks under the local board’s jurisdiction.

29.     Some park specific information in Volume 2 may need to be updated to reflect the local board’s decisions on additional classifications (a report is on the agenda for the business meeting on 19 March 2020).

30.     We recommend that the local board delegate approval of minor amendments to the draft plan prior to public notification to the local board chair.

Public notification

31.     Section 41 of the Reserves Act outlines the obligations of an administering body to prepare and publicly notify a reserve management plan. The Hibiscus & Bays Local Board is the administering body for the reserves included in the draft plan.

32.     As per the requirements of section 41(6) of the Reserves Act, the draft plan will be open for public consultation for a period of at least two months. Public consultation is planned to start in late March/ early April and close in late May/ early June 2020, subject to approval of the draft plan by the local board. All submitters have the option of requesting the opportunity to speak to their submission at a hearing.

Hearings and decision making on the plan

33.     In terms of hearing submissions, the local board can choose whether the full local board, certain members and/or independent commissioners will hear submissions and make a decision on the draft plan.  The table below describes the various options.

Option

Description

Option 1 - Local board only

The full local board hears submissions and makes decision on the management plan.

Option 2 - Local board panel with an independent commissioner as chair

The local board appoints a commissioner to chair a panel comprising of all or some of the local board to hear the submissions and make recommendations to the local board on required amendments to the draft plan following hearings.

The local board would then make the decision on whether to support the recommendations.

Option 3 - Independent commissioners hear submissions and make recommendations to the local board

The local board appoints an independent panel comprising three commissioners to hear and consider the submissions and make recommendations to the local board.

The local board would make the decision whether to support the recommendations.

Option 4 - Appoint a committee to hear submissions and make decisions

The local board appoints a committee and delegates the decision-making on the management plan to that committee.

The committee would have a minimum of three members, at least one of whom is a member of the local board.

The committee would hear submissions and make decisions on the management plan.

34.     All options except option 1 involve the use of commissioners.

35.     The council uses commissioners in a variety of situations, to provide varying levels of independent consideration of submissions and decision-making, or where there is the need for specialist or independent advice such as the Reserves Act or te ao Māori.

36.     Under options 2 to 4, commissioners with knowledge and experience of the Reserves Act and te ao Māori could assist in guiding the decision-making for the draft plan.

37.     In assessing which of the above option to recommend, staff have considered the following factors (see Attachment F for the full options assessment):

·    retaining local knowledge, input and decision-making in hearing submissions and approving the final plan,

·    ensuring Reserves Act expertise on the panel,

·    ensuring a level of independence during the hearings process,

·    cost.

Recommended option

38.     Staff recommend that option 2 is progressed, with the local board appointing a panel, consisting of at least three local board members and an independent commissioner to:

·        hear objections and comments from submitters

·        consider the extent to which objections and comments would be allowed or accepted or disallowed or not accepted

·        make recommendations to the local board on amendments to the draft plan following the hearings process.

39.     The decision to approve the final Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan will remain with the local board. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

40.     The decisions in this report are largely administrative and we anticipate them to have no direct impact on greenhouse gas emissions. However, the future management direction set in the plan for local parks, emphasises the role of local parks in climate change mitigation and adaptation.

41.     Part C in Volume 1 of the draft plan includes a climate change and natural hazards policy, which sets objectives to manage parks in a way that minimises and mitigates the impacts of climate change and improves the resilience of parks by adapting to the effects of climate change, especially in coastal areas.

42.     Other policies which aim to manage the impacts of climate change are:

·    access and parking - by not providing for peak use parking and encouraging active forms of transport

·    plants and animals - by encouraging plantings to increase urban canopy cover and manage riparian margins

·    park development - by encouraging utilising green building practices in design, construction and operation of park development

43.     Part D in Volume 2 of the draft plan identifies potential coastal hazards at an individual park level and in some cases includes management intentions which aim to address potential hazards.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

44.     A council project group has met regularly to support the project, understand implications of the draft plan and ensure alignment with other council plans and projects. This group included staff from Community Facilities, Parks, Sport and Recreation and Community and Social Policy.

45.     Other council departments and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) have provided specialist input into the development of the draft plan including Infrastructure and Environmental Services, Legal Services, Local Board Services, Auckland Transport, Panuku Development Auckland and Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED). 

46.     The Chief Sustainability Office provided feedback on the climate change related content of the plan and amendments have been made to the draft plan to strengthen this element. Amendments are highlighted in yellow in Volume 1 of the draft plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

47.     A workshop was held with the local board on 5 February 2020 to present the draft plan. Board members were also given the opportunity to provide any additional feedback to staff in writing by 21 February 2020.

48.     The following table outlines the feedback themes raised and subsequent amendments made to the policies:

Policy/ Type of Authorisation

Feedback received

Amendments made following workshop

Accessibility of draft plan and ease of finding information on individual parks

Concerns were raised about providing an online plan only during consultation and about how easy it would be for the public to locate ‘their’ local park within a large document.

The draft plan will be made available to the public online and as a hard copy at council facilities, such as local libraries and the local board office.

As requested by the local board, the consultation material will be split into the two subdivisions within the local board area, Hibiscus Coast and East Coast Bays. Parks will be listed in alphabetical order within the subdivisions.

Events authorisation

Concern raised that the event application process could be onerous for applicants and that decision-making responsibility (to give landowner approval) would not be with local board.

Introducing the events authorisation will not mean a change to the application process for events as it is currently. Decision making for events will as previously, sit with local board.

Plaques and memorials authorisation

 

Wording of policy too restrictive, only allowing plaques and memorials for significant events and people.

The local board should still have the discretion to approve an application for a memorial, if they deem it to be appropriate.

Authorisation of plaques and memorials will continue to be at the discretion of the local board.

Wording in policy changed from of ‘exceptional significance’ to ‘particular significance’.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

49.     The Reserves Act is one of the Acts in the First Schedule to the Conservation Act 1987. In performing functions and duties under the Reserves Act, the local board must give effect to the principles of te Tiriti o Waitangi.

50.     Treaty obligations are overarching and not something to be considered or applied after all other matters are considered.

51.     The draft plan acknowledges council’s obligation to iwi under the Te Tiriti o Waitangi / the Treaty of Waitangi in local parks management planning. In developing the draft plan council aimed to honour these obligations.

52.     We invited mana whenua to be involved in the development of the draft plan. This opportunity was taken up by Ngāti Manuhiri, Te Kawerau ā Maki, Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara, and Ngaati Whanaunga.

53.     Points of interest and input from mana whenua relate to the management of natural and coastal areas, sites and areas of cultural significance and the ability for mana whenua to provide input into future decisions on local parks.

54.     The draft plan seeks to embed te ao Māori / the Māori world view and values throughout the document. Section 7 of the document outlines core Māori values and how they should be considered in the management of local parks.

55.     Mana whenua priorities for local parks are:

·    kaitiakitanga – ecological management: the ongoing health of waterways and bush areas; biocontrol of pest species; the impact on water quality of current and planned infrastructure on and near the park.

·    living Māori presence: ensuring that signage and narratives on the park reflect iwi past and present.

·    protecting cultural landscapes and ensuring connections between parks and other sites are recognised and managed in a respectful and culturally appropriate way.

·    providing mana whenua with the opportunity to give input into future decisions on local parks particularly where implications for the environment and culturally significant sites and landscapes potentially exist.

56.     Many of the above can also contribute to the hauora (well-being) of both mana whenua and mataawaka.

57.     Mana whenua and mataawaka will have the opportunity to provide further feedback on the draft plan during the public consultation period.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

58.     There are no cost implications from this decision. Costs for advertisements and engagement tools are covered through the project budget.

59.     The cost for appointing one commissioner is met from existing operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

60.     The following table outlines relevant risks and mitigations.

Risk

Mitigation

The plan is a high-level plan and does not contain the same level of detail in the previous reserve management plans. The plan does not include specific development proposals for individual parks.

Include information in the consultation material about the benefits of having an omnibus plan such as consistency and ease of decision making for parks across the local board area.

Public consultation for specific development proposals will need to be undertaken in line with the requirements of the Reserves Act and LGA.

Receiving a low number of submissions, due to lack of awareness of the public consultation taking place or potential submitters being discouraged from making a submission by the size of the document.

Work with the local board communications and engagement staff to let people know that the consultation is happening and make it as easy as possible for people to provide feedback by offering different ways to do this e.g. paper, online, email, drop in sessions, open days.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

61.     Subject to approval from the local board to notify the draft plan, public consultation will start in late March/ early April 2020 for two months in accordance with the Reserves Act.

62.     It is anticipated that a hearing will be held in July 2020 with a decision on the final plan around September 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Volume 1 part A-C

55

b

Draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan - Volume 2 - East Coast Bays subdivision (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan - Volume 2 - Hibiscus Coast subdivision (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan - Volume 2 - Appendices 2 (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Amendments made to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan following peer review

159

f

Options for hearings and decision-making on final plan

165

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Matthew Ward - Service & Asset Planning Team Leader

Nicki Malone - Service and Asset Planner

Authorisers

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Grant Programme 2020/2021

File No.: CP2020/03266

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Hibiscus and Bays Grants Programme 2020/2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt their own local grants programme for the next financial year.

4.       This report presents the Hibiscus and Bays Grants Programme 2020/2021 for adoption (see Attachment A).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      Adopt the Hibiscus and Bays Grants Programme 2020/2021.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

6.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt its own local grants programme for the next financial year. The local board grants programme guides community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.       The local board community grants programme includes:

·    outcomes as identified in the local board plan

 

·    specific local board grant priorities

 

·    which grant types will operate, the number of grant rounds and opening and closing dates

 

·    any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

 

·    other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making

 

8.       Once the local board grants programme 2020/2021 has been adopted, the types of grants, grant rounds, criteria and eligibility with be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. The new Hibiscus and Bays Grants Programme has been discussed with the local board at the 27 February 2020 business meeting with the feedback incorporated into the grants programme for 2020/2021.

10.     The new grant programme includes:

·    applicants that have considered other sources of funding as an important factor

·    the Facilities Grant information

·    a revised facilities grant round date to align with other major funders

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through the support of projects that address food production and food waste; alternative transport methods; community energy efficiency education and behaviour change; build community resilience and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

13.     Based on the priority focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant council unit will provide input and advice. The priority focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     The grants programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of its grants programme. This programme is reviewed on an annual basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     All grant programmes respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Māori. Applicants are asked how their project aims to increase Māori outcomes in the application process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018 -2028 and local board agreements.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the adoption of the grants programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     An implementation plan is underway, and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels, including the council website, local board Facebook page and communication with past recipients of grants.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Grant Programme 2020/2021

171

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mary Kienholz - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021

Purpose

Grants help groups and organisations to provide activities, projects, programmes, initiatives and events that make a positive contribution to the community within the local board area.

The local board would like to see applicants demonstrate that they are working collaboratively with other community groups and have identified alternative funding partnerships. It is important for groups and organisations to be sustainable and deliver good community outcomes.

Important Advice for Applicants

Applicants are encouraged to read the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan before submitting an application.

 

You will be asked to identify how your project aligns with one or more of the local board plan priorities and show how the project will benefit the community.

 

Ensure that you clearly outline the contribution you are making to the project within the local board area.

The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board plan can be found on the Hibiscus and Bays Community page.

 

Priorities

The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has confirmed the following priorities for its contestable community grants. In your application identify how your events/projects/activity will contribute to one or more of the following:

 

•     Place-shaping which includes adding value or making improvements to our community spaces

•     Promote economic benefits locally

•     Leisure or sporting opportunities that encourage the community to be more active

•     Improving and enhancing access and amenity in parks, reserves and coastal areas

•     Youth activities including leadership, education and training

•     Inter-generational and “age-friendly” activities that support participation

•     Artistic and creative opportunities for people and our community

•     Education on pollution prevention, stream care or stream enhancement projects

•     Restoration and environmental projects including pest free and waste minimisation initiatives

•     Acknowledge New Zealand history and showcase our local heritage.

 

Other important factors (where appropriate to a proposed event/project or activity):

The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will also take into account whether the applicant:

•     has considered other sources of funding for their project

•     is making a contribution to the event or project (financial, volunteer time etc.)

•     has identified collaboration and working with other groups to deliver an event/activity and seek funding collaboratively

•     is utilising and supporting volunteer groups through the delivery of an event or project

•     will get the community involved early on, by working collaboratively and creating opportunities to meet new people and share experiences

•     is part of the sun-smart programme (for outdoor activities)

•     has considered health and safety in the design of their event or project

•     promotes smoke free programmes as part of their event or project.


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Facilities Grant

The Facilities Grant provides funding to assist with the costs of planning or developing a facility with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. This can include:

•     needs assessments

•     feasibility studies

•     investigation and design

•     small building works

 

Lower Priorities

The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has identified the following as lower priorities:

•     Wages and salaries, with the exception of fees for professional and specialised services

•     Ongoing operational costs

•     Churches and Educational Institutions, except where these groups can demonstrate the wider community benefit

Limitations

Applicants are generally ineligible to apply for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board contestable grants if they have had two successful grant applications within the current financial year.

General Exclusions

The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will not consider grants for financial assistance for:

•     Activities that do not relate to one or more of the local board plan priorities

•     Activities or projects where the funding responsibility lies with another organisation or central government

•     Prizes for sports and other events (except trophies)

•     Commercial business enterprises and educational institutions in accordance with the Council’s Community Grants Policy (Scope and Eligibility, Page 20)

•     Internal applicants to fund projects, programmes or facilities run by Auckland Council or its employees

•     Auckland Council CCO’s or organisations who receive funding from the Auckland Regional Amenities Fund.

•     Applications for activities or projects outside of the local board area*

•     Commitment to ongoing funding or financial support

•     Applications to subsidise rentals, reduce debt or payment of rates

•     Applications for the purchase or subsidy of alcohol or costs associated with staging after- match functions

•     Grants for the sole purpose of an individual

•     Family reunions

•     Debt servicing

•     Legal expenses

•     Activities that promote religious or political purposes

•     Medical expenses.

 

 

*With the exception of multi-local board applications where a benefit to the local board area can be shown

 

 

 

 

Contestable Grant Amounts:

 

 

Name of grant

Local board’s proposed figures

Minimum

Maximum

Quick Response Grants

$200.00

$2,000

Local Grants

$2,000.00

Generally, the local board will not grant more than $10,000. There may be special circumstances that warrants consideration of allocations above $10,000.

 

 

Grant Round Application Dates

 

Quick Response 2020/2021

 

Grant round:

Open date

Close date

Decision date

Projects to occur after:

Round One

21 September 2020

23 October 2020

19 November 2020

1 December 2020

Round Two

12 April 2021

14 May 2021

17 June 2021

1 July 2021

 

 

Local Grant 2020/2021

Grant round:

Open date

Close date

Decision date

Projects to occur after

Round One

13 July 2020

21 August 2020

15 October 2020

1 November 2020

Round Two

15 February 2021

26 March 2021

20 May 2021

1 June 2021

 

Facilities Round 2020/2021

 

Grant round:

Open date

Close date

Decision date

Projects to occur after:

Round One

27 July 2020

11 September 2020

19 November 2020

1 December 2020

 

 

Multi-board funding

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will also consider funding multi-board grant applications in collaboration with other local boards. Applicants will need to clearly demonstrate how their intended project, event or activities will specifically benefit people and communities in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

 

Multi-board grant round:

Open date

Close date

Decision date

Projects to occur after:

Round one

15 June 2020

7 August 2020

15 October 2020

1 November 2020

Round two

18 January 2021

19 March 2021

20 May 2021

1 June 2021

 

Obligations if you receive funding

In order to ensure that the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board grant achieves positive results, recipients will be obligated to provide evidence that the assistance has been used for the agreed purpose and the stated outcomes have been achieved. Obligations will be outlined in a funding agreement that the applicant will be required to enter into.

 

The following accountability measures are required:

·      The completion and submission of accountability forms (including receipts), proving that grants have been used for the right purpose

·      Any grant money that is unspent and not used for the project must be returned to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

·     Recognition of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s support of your initiative (e.g. using the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board logo on promotional material).


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport Update to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board March 2020

File No.: CP2020/03663

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide an update to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board members on transport related matters in their area, including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund and Auckland Transport’s Community Safety Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      This report covers:

·  a summary of Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area;

·  a summary of the board’s Transport Capital and Community Safety Funds;

·  a summary of general information items.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s guidance

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Update March 2020.

b)      request that Auckland Transport provide scopes and rough order costs for the                     following projects for potential funding through the local board’s transport capital             funding available for the 2019 – 2022 electoral term:

·    the installation of retractable bollards and improved pedestrian and cycling environments on Inverness, Clyde and Glen Roads, Browns Bay, to facilitate the use of Inverness Road and the adjacent Village Green and community facilities as a market venue and community focal point

·    the provision of appropriate signage and road markings at strategic locations entering the villages of Mairangi Bay and Silverdale to denote that travellers are entering and leaving these town centres

·    options for the installation of both a shared path and a footpath on Laurie Southwick Parade, Hobbs Bay, from the roundabout to the Gulf Harbour Ferry Terminal, excluding the area known as the Hammerhead

·    undergrounding of the existing overhead power lines on Beach Road, Browns Bay, from its intersection with Argyle Road to its intersection with Anzac and Glencoe Roads

·    installation of a footpath from the intersection of Forge Road and East Coast Road, Silverdale, on the eastern side of East Coast Road to Hibiscus Coast Highway

·    installation of a footpath on the western side of East Coast Road in the vicinity of Silverdale Adventure Park, 2104 East Coast Road, Silverdale to improve the safety       of pedestrians who exit cars parked on East Coast Road and walk to the Adventure Park facility

·    installation of a footpath from Hatfields Beach to Orewa, using existing paths available through Alice Eaves Reserve, to complement the local board’s Greenways Plans for the Alice Eaves Reserve area.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

3.      Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play in the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities.

4.      This report updates the local board on AT projects and operations in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area, it summarises consultations and Traffic Control Committee decisions, and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and Community Safety Fund (CSF).

5.      The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects they believe are important to their communities but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must:

·   be safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   be in the road corridor (although projects in parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

6.      AT’s CSF comprises $20 million in total allocated across all 21 local boards, with $5 million to be allocated during the 2019/2020 financial year and the balance of $15 million over the 2020/2021 financial year. This is a safety fund that sits within AT’s safety budget so the major component of the funding allocation formula is the Deaths and Serious Injuries (DSI) in a local board area. The purpose of the fund is to allow local communities to address long-standing road safety issues that have yet to become regional priorities and have therefore not been addressed by AT.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.      The total funds in the current electoral term available to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is $5,061,244. This includes $1,350,304 carried over from the previous electoral term.

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$6,760,460

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$1,699,216

Remaining Budget left

$5,061,244

 

8.      A series of workshops were scheduled to discuss projects the local board wish to nominate using the balance of funding available this electoral term.

9.      At a workshop on 13 February members were advised of the more systematic process recently adopted by Auckland Council and AT for spending monies made available through the LBTCF. The new approach will:

·   create a more strategic and transparent decision making process to delivering these assets;

·   improve consistency and ensure the same approach across all local boards;

·   streamline the process to ultimately achieve faster turnaround of both scoping/estimating and delivery.

10.    The local board was provided with the following timeline which will support this more systematic approach:

 

Timeline

Action

February 2020

Workshop to identify potential LBTCF projects.

March 2020

Workshop to confirm potential LBTCF projects.

March 2020

Formal request to scope and cost (ROC) for LBTCF projects (AT needs these by 31 March).

May/June 2020

ROCs reported back to local boards for consideration.

June 2020

Formal approval for construction (projects under 300K) or design and firm estimate (projects over $300K).

11.    A second workshop was scheduled for Thursday, 12 March 2020, at which potential projects were discussed and members short-listed those projects they wished to prioritise for possible construction during the 2019 – 2022 electoral term.

12.    In accordance with the timeline provided in paragraph 10 above it is requested that at this meeting the local board formally request the scope and rough order costs for projects it wishes to pursue for possible construction during the 2019 – 2022 electoral term.

13.    AT will provide the scope and rough order of costs for these projects at a workshop scheduled for 14 May 2020.

14.    Updates on projects approved for design and/or construction are provided below.

15.    A speed reduction on Hibiscus Coast Highway and those roads intersecting within the Boulevard area associated with Project 578 - Orewa Boulevard Stage 3, was consulted on as part of AT’s Speed Limit Bylaw Review. Additional improvements proposed by AT in association with the speed limit reductions will focus on improving some of the existing pedestrian crossings and investigating new crossings and kerb build outs on those roads intersecting with the Hibiscus Coast Highway.

16.    The speed limit changes outlined in the bylaw will become effective on 30 June 2020 and it is anticipated that the reduction approved for the Boulevard will be implemented with others for the Orewa Town Centre in November 2020.

17.    At the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board meeting on 21 August the local board resolved to (HB/2019/134):

           advise Auckland Transport that the local board prefers Option Two, with a shared pedestrian/cycle path on the seaward side, for Local Board Transport Capital Fund Project 578, Orewa Boulevard Stage Three.

18.    AT staff have established a community liaison group to consider the proposed improvements noted in paragraph 10. Public consultation for the improvements proposed under Project 578 – Orewa Boulevard Stage 3 will be carried out at the same time as public consultation for the improvements proposed by AT.

19.    Speed reductions in the Mairangi Bay and Torbay town centres associated with Project 580 – Town Centre Slow Zones, were included in AT’s Speed Limit Bylaw Review.

20.    The speed limited changes outlined in the bylaw will become effective on 30 June 2020 and it is anticipated that those for Mairangi Bay and Torbay will be implemented in November 2020.

21.    Construction of the physical works on Beach Road, Torbay associated with Project 580 – Town Centre Slow Zones, began on 18 November and was completed early in December as anticipated.

22.    The Mairangi Bay improvements associated with Project 580 – Town Centre Slow Zones, began in late-February and will be completed by the end of April 2020.

 

Community Safety Fund

 

23.    At its meeting on 19 June 2019, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board resolved the following priority for projects nominated for construction using AT’s CSF monies (HB/2019/91):

i)      20 Ramsgate Terrace, Mairangi Bay – conversion of existing raised table to a zebra crossing;

ii)     214 Hibiscus Coast Highway, Orewa – signalised mid-block crossing facility;

iii)     Hatfields Beach, Orewa - gateway treatment;

iv)     Saddleback Rise, Murrays Bay - pedestrian crossing.

24.    At its meeting on 15 August the local board resolved (RD/2019/132) to maximise the use of its Community Safety Fund on construction of these projects, authorising top-up funding from its LBTCF to meet any shortfall in funding for construction of the final project, the Saddleback Rise pedestrian crossing. If there is a shortfall in CSF funding, the Saddleback Rise project will be delivered on the provision of supplementary funding from the local board’s LBTCF. Staff will advise the local board if this situation should eventuate, providing full details at that time.

25.    Design work is now progressing on all the CSF projects nominated by local boards. It is anticipated that those funded will be constructed during the 2020/2021 financial year.

 

Auckland Transport Consultations

 

26.    Over the last reporting period, AT has invited the local board to provide its feedback on the following proposal:

 

Location

Proposal

Details and Local Board Feedback

Central Boulevard and Milner Avenue, Silverdale

Proposed parking restrictions on Central Boulevard and Milner Avenue in Silverdale.

Members were advised on 13 February that consultation will open on proposed parking restrictions on Central Boulevard and Milner Avenue, Silverdale, responding to requests from local businesses to improve parking turnover and make parking more accessible for customers, on 20 February. The proposal includes P30 (30 minute parking restrictions) and P120 (2 hour parking restrictions) Monday-Sunday, 8am-6pm. Signs that will enforce illegal parking on grass berms will be installed as part this project. Information about the proposal and an online feedback survey was made available at: https://at.govt.nz/about-us/have-your-say/north-auckland-consultations/central-boulevard-and-milner-avenue-silverdale-parking-restrictions/

Public consultation closed on 5 March 2020 and at the time of writing this report, no objections to the proposal had been received from the local board.

 

Traffic Control Committee Decisions

 

27.    AT's resolution and approval process ensures the most appropriate controls and restrictions are put in place and can be legally enforced. Decisions made by AT’s Traffic Control Committee in relation to regulatory processes relevant to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board during January and February are shown below:

 


Street Name

Report Type

Nature of Restriction

Decision

Ashley Avenue / Cavalli Road / Glenvar Ridge Road / Ralph Eagles Place / Karengo Street / Bight Road / Windlass Street / Barque Rise / Pennant Street, Long Bay

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

Lane Arrow Marking / Cycle Lane / No Stopping At All Times / Bus Stop / Bus Shelter / Traffic Island / Road Hump / Pedestrian Crossing / Give-Way Control / Roundabout / Flush Median

Carried

Montrose Terrace / Sidmouth Street, Mairangi Bay

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Mairangi Bay Food and Wine Festival - 15/02/2020)

Temporary Traffic and Parking controls

Carried

Lyons Avenue, Murrays Bay

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Murrays Bay Birdman Festival - 14/03/2020)

Temporary Traffic and Parking controls

Approved with Conditions

 

Issues Raised by Elected Members

 

28.    Elected members and local board staff forward a range of issues to AT’s Elected Member Relationship Manager for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board (EMRM) and AT’s specialist Elected Member Response Team. Those received by AT’s EMRM by 3 March 2020 are summarised below:

 

 

Issue

 

Location

Status

1

East Coast Road and Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale

Request for readjustment of the signals phasing at East Coast Road and Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale.

Councillor Watson believed the signals phasing at the intersection of East Coast Road and Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale needed adjustment, noting that traffic had been backing up along the Hibiscus Coast Highway from the intersection with East Coast Road.  On 29 January 2020 Cr Watson was reassured that AT's Operation Centre had been aware of increased congestion along Hibiscus Coast Highway in early November 2019. The vehicle sensors at the relevant intersections were reviewed and no faults were identified. A minor adjustment was made to the connection between the intersections of the East Coast Road/Hibiscus Coast Highway and Painton Road/Hibiscus Coast Highway, but this did not have a significant effect on travel. The issue in this area is the intersection of Hibiscus Coast Highway and East Coast Road. In the morning peak, the two westbound lanes are congested with traffic from Whangaparaoa, Orewa, and Millwater heading towards the motorway. This intersection is also the sole access point for traffic heading east on Hibiscus Coast Highway towards the Forge Road industrial area. In the morning peak, the Hibiscus Coast Highway/East Coast Road intersection reacts to the traffic demands from each direction, except for the Brian Smith Drive exit which is minimised due to rat-runners avoiding the queue for the right turn into East Coast Road. Increasing the time for westbound traffic on Hibiscus Coast Highway would increase the delay for traffic arriving at the Silverdale Industrial area, and increase the delay for Public Transport (school buses) travelling northbound on East Coast Road.
The intersection of Hibiscus Coast Highway and Painton Road also needs to be considered as this would require extra westbound green time to meet the increase in westbound flow. The downside of this would be an increased delay for pedestrians crossing Hibiscus Coast Highway, and an increased delay for buses entering the Hibiscus Coast Station
For these reasons, improving congestion in this area is complex. However, AT’s Traffic Signals Operators monitor this area as one of the high priority intersections and make real-time adjustments to the traffic signals, if required, to relieve long queues without adversely impacting the wider network. AT is working towards some long-term changes, and the Hibiscus Coast Highway/East Coast Road intersection is also being investigated as part of the resource consent process for the development on the western side of East Coast Road. Those improvements include an additional eastbound lane on Hibiscus Coast Highway which will improve flow in the evening peak. The designers are also investigating whether facilities can be created to improve morning westbound traffic flow.

2

Beach Road, Mairangi Bay

Concerns regarding Bus Stop 3097, Beach Road, Mairangi Bay.

Member Parfitt raised concerns about Bus Stop 3097, on Beach Road in Mairangi Bay, which is particularly difficult for elderly people to use. Concerns are that the bus stop floods in winter, the road is very low, the bus stop is old, and the road has been built up causing the step up to bus to be a metre high (only some buses are able to kneel). On 20 February 2020 Member Parfitt was advised that AT's Metro team had investigated and staff agreed with the concerns raised. They will therefore investigate further to see what improvements can be made to the bus stop.

3

Bakehouse Lane, Orewa

Request for one-way system for Bakehouse Lane, Orewa.

Member Dunn requested consideration of a one-way system for Bakehouse Lane, Orewa, stating that the lane is so narrow that vehicles often have difficulty passing each other when travelling in opposite directions. Member Dunn’s suggested solution was to make Bakehouse Lane a one-way street for traffic exiting Moana Avenue. This would also make it much safer for drivers backing out of parking spaces into traffic, often blindly.  Member Fitzgerald, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board representative on Destination Orewa Beach Business Association, provided additional comments on 21 February, noting that Bakehouse Lane had been established on the basis that the shops fronting Hibiscus Coast Highway (the Boulevard) could be extended so that access could also be gained from Bakehouse Lane. Member Fitzgerald asked that this and additional information provided by the business association be forwarded to the engineers responding to the request from Member Dunn. On 26 February 2020 Member Dunn was advised that his request for consideration of a one-way system for Bakehouse Lane, Orewa had been investigated by an Auckland Transport traffic engineer, who noted that there were only 2 reported non-injury crashes in the last 5 years, both involving parked vehicles; the area is a slow speed environment and has relatively low traffic volumes; there is 5m of road width between marked angled parking; and Bakehouse Lane is a low risk road.
The engineer also noted that, although one-way streets can make traffic flow more efficient, such configuration can also create higher speeds, since opposing traffic can have a traffic calming effect on vehicle speeds. Detours for vehicles wanting to access shops near the entry of the one-way street (and the furthest from the exit of the one-way street) can also cause compliance, enforcement and road safety issues when vehicles ignore the change due to the inconvenience that a one-way configuration presents. Because of these reasons, and because this would not be a priority project for Auckland Transport, changes cannot be justified at this time.

4

Clayden Drive, Hobbs Bay

Requested upgrade of Clayden Drive, Hobbs Bay.

Member Parfitt asked if AT has any plans to upgrade Clayden Drive, Hobbs Bay with curb, channel, footpaths and street lights. On 12 February 2020 Member Parfitt was advised that AT’s Planning and Investment team had advised they have no recent development applications in this area, and that AT’s lighting project manager had also confirmed there were no plans for additional street lights in Clayden Drive at this time. However, the existing street lights will be upgraded to LED lights as part of the regional LED Retrofit Programme during the next 12-24 months. Beyond that, AT has no further upgrade plans for Clayden Drive.

5

Whangaparaoa Peninsula

Traffic Issues on Whangaparaoa Peninsula.

A presentation was made to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board at its meeting on 20 February about Whangaparaoa Peninsula traffic issues. Comment has been requested on the concerns raised about both present and future issues that might arise as a result of the construction of Penlink, together with a request for advice as to how AT might address these issues, from AT’s Planning and Investment and Traffic Operations teams.

 

Median barrier for dangerous Dairy Flat Highway

29.    AT continues to roll out of safety improvements on Dairy Flat Highway, one of the most dangerous rural roads in Auckland, with the installation of a median wire rope barrier at the current southbound passing lanes between Durey Road and Potter Road. Flexible road safety barriers down the middle of the road are installed to catch vehicles and prevent serious head-on collisions. 

30.    A number of fatalities and serious crashes have been recorded on the former state highway, with nine deaths and 55 serious injuries over the period 2008 – 2017. The southbound passing lanes have been the location of several serious and one fatal head on collision over the past five years. Whilst it is acknowledged that drivers make mistakes, roads and roadsides can be designed to help prevent these from resulting in fatal crashes.

31.    The median wire rope barrier safety project is complemented by a new right-turning bay at the intersection of Potter Road and Dairy Flat Highway, with this work starting after completion of the median barrier.

32.    This is the first time AT will use a median wire rope on Auckland’s local road network and represents an important step in AT’s commitment to moving towards Vision Zero. The North Shore’s population is expected to grow by 17 per cent over the next 10 years, with 6,000 more homes to be built around Silverdale and Dairy Flat. Vehicle numbers are set to increase over the next decade, and better and safer roads are therefore required.

33.    The Dairy Flat Highway Safety Improvements project, which includes construction of a roundabout at the intersection of Dairy Flat and Coatesville-Riverhead Highways, is one of several safety projects across Auckland made possible by the Regional Fuel Tax.

34.    Further information on the Dairy Flat Highway Safety Improvements project is available at:

https://at.govt.nz/projects-roadworks/dairy-flat-highway-safety-improvements/.

 

City Centre bus routes change

35.    Most services in the city centre had route changes that took effect from Sunday, 23 February. These changes are needed so construction can start on what will be the country’s busiest train station, Aotea Station. The station will be built 15m underneath the city and will be 300m long. There will be entrances on Victoria Street and Wellesley Street, providing the option to connect to bus services.

36.    As a result of construction, the intersection of Wellesley Street, Albert Street and Mayoral Drive will be closed from 1 March until early 2021. At peak, currently 145 buses travel along Wellesley Street.

37.     The new routes for the 26 bus services currently using Wellesley Street will stay in place until the intersection reopens next year. The amended bus routes are designed to cause as little disruption as possible while keeping people moving through the city. Most new bus routes will be using Victoria Street or Mayoral Drive to cross the city, which means most passengers will only be one block away from their old stop.

38.    Aotea will be the busiest rail station in the country and will make a big contribution to Auckland’s future development when it opens. Link Alliance, which is building the station, acknowledges the impact the construction and the intersection closure will have on the immediate community and road users. While its central Auckland location means disruption during construction is unavoidable, Link Alliance will continue to work with AT and Auckland Council to minimise those impacts.

39.    The bus routes are being supported by new bus priority measures such as bus lanes and priority signaling at traffic lights.  AT staff will be on the ground to assist passengers before and during the closure.  

40.     To find out more about the bus changes and intersection closure, visit AT.govt.nz/BetterWay

41.      For information on Aotea Station, visit: https://www.cityraillink.co.nz/crl-stations-aotea

 

Extra seats on buses and trains 

42.    AT is providing extra capacity on buses and trains during March, the busiest time of the year as Aucklanders head back to work and study. An additional 5000 seats will be provided on buses at peak times and extra train cars will be added to accommodate demand.

43.    Last year public transport patronage totaled 103.2 million passenger boardings, an annual growth of eight per cent.

44.    The extra seats have been provided on the 15 busiest routes services, which include Onewa and Dominion Roads, and the 70 which run from Botany to Britomart.

45.    The very popular NX2 service has also been extended, with nine services to the city each weekday morning and eight return services to Hibiscus Coast Station in the afternoon peak. Late night options are also being added, with new services at 11.30 p.m. and midnight all the way to Hibiscus Coast Station.

46.    The first of AT’s new trains have arrived from Spain and these are being rolled out with more six car trains during the busy periods, providing 1200 extra seats in the morning peak and the same in the afternoon. 

47.    AT also has extra buses to provide additional capacity and schedule extra services where necessary. There may be times when customers may not be able to board the first bus on high frequency routes but AT is aiming to keep the wait time to a minimum.

48.    All public transport routes will be busy but AT and its operators will do their best to manage the demand and, while the good weather continues, biking, scootering and walking are great alternative options, as is travelling outside the very busy peak periods.

 

Walking School Bus Month

 

49.    A reminder that March is ‘Walking School Bus Month’ and there are some great activities and prizes for the kids to win:

·   Week 1 is Hilarious Head Gear;

·   Week 2 is Fancy Feet;

·   Week 3 is Super Hero; and

·   Week 4 is Trolls World Tour.

50.    Find out more about the Walking School Bus scheme and (in March) Walking School Bus Month at: https://at.govt.nz/cycling-walking/travelwise-school-programme/walking-school-bus/how-a-walking-school-bus-works/.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

51.    Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

52.    Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

53.    To this end, Auckland Transport’s Statement of Intent contains three performance measures:

 

Measure

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Number of buses in the Auckland bus fleet classified as low emission

5

25

55

Reduction in CO2e (emissions) generated annually by Auckland Transport corporate operations (from 2017/18 baseline)

7%

9%

11%

Percentage of Auckland Transport streetlights that are energy efficient LED

56%

66%

76%

 

Vector and AT sign memorandum of understanding

 

54.    On 20 January 2020 Auckland Transport and Vector announced a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to explore the impacts of a full implementation.

55.    The MoU is a direct response to AT’s Low Emission Bus Roadmap, published in late 2018, that outlined its commitment to have all new buses in Auckland being electric from 2025, with the whole fleet fully electric by 2040.

56.    A faster transition to electric buses requires a detailed assessment of the future demand on the electricity network.

57.    Two reports will be produced as part of the MoU, the first exploring a route and service profile, which will model the electricity demand that a fully electrified bus fleet will require. The second report will provide guidance on the electricity network infrastructure upgrades required at each bus depot, as well as likely timings and costs. These two reports are expected to be delivered by June 2020.

58.    Buses make up 87 per cent of the carbon emissions produced from public transport, so converting them from diesel to electric will also be a significant step towards meeting New Zealand’s 2050 zero-carbon emissions goal. 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

59.    The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is/are confined to AT and do/does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

60.     The local board’s views with respect to projects proposed for funding by the LBTCF during the 2019 – 2022 electoral term were incorporated in this report.

61.     The local board will continue to be engaged on LBTCF projects as they progress via AT’s Local Board Monthly Update reports.

62.     Any engagement with, or impact on, local communities will be assessed on a project by project basis. Sub-regional and regional impact will also be assessed on a project by project basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

63.    The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64.    There are no financial implications in receiving this report or, at this stage, requesting the scope and rough order of costs for projects proposed for funding by the LBTCF during the 2019 – 2022 electoral term.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

65.     Auckland Transport will put risk management strategies in place on a project by project basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

66.     In accordance with the timeline noted in paragraph 10 of this report, AT will provide the scope and rough order of costs for those projects provisionally selected by the local board for potential funding by the LBTCF during the 2019 – 2022 electoral term at a workshop scheduled for 14 May 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ellen Barrett – Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Hibiscus and Bays Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/03141

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter two, 1 October – 31 December 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the local board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2019/2020 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

a)      East Coast Bays Community Projects and Future Whangaparāoa continue to deliver programmes to engage the local community. The local board continues to support the vibrancy of its community by supporting a number of community groups and events via the community grants programme and the Civic Events team

b)      quarter two resulted in high attendance and participation for activities, programmes and shows at Centrestage Theatre, Estuary Arts Centre and Mairangi Arts Centre, and staff continue to foster strong relationships with youth to identify aspirations and needs across the local board area

c)      community groups and schools have joined together to improve our natural environment through tree planting, pest trapping, bait lining and water quality monitoring and the North-West Wildlink Waterways projects continue to grow.

d)      community facilities, including leisure centres, have continued high demand for services and libriaries are implementing programmes that cater for inter-generational and cultural diversity needs

e)      open spaces benefitted from renewal projects for public facilities and completed projects in Q2 included the installation of bollards at Waiake beach, the renewal of the retaining wall at Jelas/Moffat Esplanade Reserve, and the seawall at Stanmore Bay Park.

5.       All departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery (Attachment A). Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

a)   (OLI) Ōrewa Beach - Kohu-Marine View - renew northern seawall (ID 2104)

The outcome of the Environment Court hearing held in May 2019 is still pending. The verdict, whether consent is granted or not, will determine the future of this project

b)   Long Bay Reserves – develop parks (ID 3536)

In November 2011, Auckland Council was informed that the Long Bay development was sold by Todd Development to NZ PropCo Limited (NZPL). It is yet to be confirmed by NZPL if the Long Bay Reserves’ Development, which includes paths, seating, signage (including in Te Reo Māori) and landscaping of nine local parks, will continue under the new ownership including the delivery of assets at reserves 12 and 13. This project is on hold until an understanding on implications of the change in ownership is confirmed.

6.       The financial performance report compared to the FY2019/2020 budget is attached (Attachment B). There are some points for the local board to note:

·    Overall, the net operational financial performance of the local board is tracking at 99 percent against revised budget as at December 2019. Revenue is slightly above budget for the year to date and is likely to be on target for the full financial year. From the local boards’ Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) funding, the majority of projects are underway and on track to be completed during the year. Capital projects underway or completed include Freyberg Park renewal of sports fields, demolition of 12 Hibiscus Coast Highway, Whangaparāoa Library entrance development, and Metropark West reserve development.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter two ending 31 December 2019.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has an approved 2019/2020 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Arts, Community and Events;

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation;

·        Libraries and Information;

·        Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration;

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew;

·        Community Leases;

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        Plans and Places;

·        ATEED Local Economic Development;

8.       Work programmes are produced annually, to meet the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board outcomes identified in the three-year Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan. The local board plan outcomes are:

·        A strong local economy.

·        Our communities have excellent transport choices.

·        Our communities enjoy access to quality parks, reserves, and facilities for leisure, sport and recreation.

·        Our people are involved and have a strong sense of pride in the look and feel of their local places.

·        A protected and enhanced environment.

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

 

 

 

 

11.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

         

Key activity updates from quarter two

12.     The following key initiatives have progressed through quarter two:

a)      Local board plan key initiative: “Support our local arts centres to continue to be sustainable and inclusive and embrace diversity”.

This key initiative progressed during quarter two with Centrestage Theatre producing 25 programmes with a total of 12,565 attendees, Estuary Arts Centre produced 121 programmes attracting 3,889 participants, and Mairangi Arts Centre produced 144 programmes attracting 6,138 attendees. Centrestage also elected a new committee for the next 12 months at their AGM.

b)      Local board plan key initiative: “Identify, develop and support opportunities for communities to influence decisions that respond to the unique needs in their area and to run engagement processes themselves at neighbourhood and town centre level e.g. community-led place-making”.

While East Coast Bays Community Projects continue to deliver an extensive programme of activities to engage the local community, staff continue to work with the group to enhance the governance of the organisation. Future Whangaparāoa continues to deliver community led activities and have introduced hot desking opportunities at the Hub generating an additional income stream. A mobile engagement trailer is being explored, in partnership with community agencies.

The Civic Events team delivered three citizenships during Q2 with 177 people in the local board area becoming citizens. Four Event Partnership funded Christmas events took place in December, and the local board supported the Ōrewa Community Centre, Friends of Okura Bush, and funded an additional event survey via the grants budget.

c)      Local board plan key initiative: “Encourage our youth to work with us; to have a voice and opportunities to learn, develop and become leaders”.

Staff facilitated a hui with Hibiscus Coast Youth Centre, Bays Youth Trust and Coast Youth Centre to share their research findings on identifing youth aspirations and needs. The groups explored opportunities to create sustainable platforms for youth voice across the local board area.

d)      Local board plan key initiative: “Work with our partners to ensure that activities in our community facilities meet the needs of our residents”.

The “Share the love” membership campaign supported new registrations across all libraries showing an increase compared to this time last year. Libriaries have run extensive programmes to engage with all age groups from pre-school weekly Storytime and Wriggle & Rhyme sessions, well attended school holidays programmes for youth, and support sessions for elderly such as Monday’s ditigal drop-in events. The programmes continue to be well attended.

Libaries also provided for our diverse communities in Q2 by way of Spanish Language sessions, Tea & Topics, regular talks and presentations for the Chinese Community, Transform Your Health talks, and the Heritage Festival walk event. The Whangaparāoa Library received an entrance and courtyard upgrade which was completed in Dec 2019.

e)      Local board agreement key initiative: “Ecological restoration and environmental programmes in local parks will be delivered and supported by volunteers”.

In Q2 Alice Eaves pest animal control resumes, and the Forest and Bird group attended the 'Very Coastie Christmas’ event to recruite volunteers and education public. Staff distributed 45 trapping tunnels and traps to the community and Forty Timms trap platforms were built by the Hibiscus Mens Shed. Ninety extra trapping tools were provided to Pest Free Hibiscus and Bays as the control and monitoring expands across the Whangaparoa peninsula.

f)       Local board agreement key initiative: “Support the North-West Wildlink corridor including the protection of freshwater and terrestrial areas that have been identified as key ‘Wildlink Wonders” and “Continue to work with schools on water sensitive design projects to help educate children about the importance of water conservation and stormwater pollution in an urban setting”.

The North-West Wildlink Waterways projects continue to go from strength to strength with two planting events in Silverdale hosting 50 volunteers and planting 1,000 plants at the events. Local schools and community groups support water quality monitoring through Wai Care and fish surveys. At Nukumea Stream, ten signs designed by Ōrewa Primary Environment Club were erected along the stream to encourage people to keep their dogs on leads and not to drop rubbish. Activities have also taken place at Long Bay/Awaruku, Rothesay Bay Stream, and Stanmore Bay Stream.

The Ōrewa Estuary Restoration Plan continues to make progress with new bait and trap lines and backyard pest animal trapping on the northern side of the estuary established. Ongoing engagement continues with Ōrewa College, Kingsway and Silverdale Primary with students building trap boxes, maintaining bait lines and planting. Pest Free Hibiscus and Bays have appointed a new manager and field officer. Forest and Bird continue to engage schools and are setting up hub and halo pest control projects. Native plants have been ordered and procurement for site preparation is nearly complete for the Weiti Wildlink.

g)      Local board plan key initiative: “Improve parks and coastal facilities so they are adaptable for a range of activities, e.g. all-ability playgrounds, events, toilets, drinking water fountains, shades, barbeques, lighting, bicycle racks, and passive and family-friendly use”.

In Q2 Community Facilities completed refurbishment works on public facilities at Arkles Bay, Stanmore Bay, Waiwera, Ōrewa Reserve, The Esplanade Manly, Gulf Harbour and Campbells Bay. Work at Rothesay Bay toilets and Leal Place were stopped due to structural issues. Pricing is underway for these two facilities.

The development of a play space at Beachwood Drive is due to be completed in January 2020. The installation of bollards at Waiake beach, and renewal of the retaining wall at Jelas/Moffat Esplanade Reserve and seawall at Stanmore Bay Park has been completed in Q2.

Stanmore Bay Pool and Leisure Centre continues to provide learn-to-swim classes with participant numbers increasing to 800. Basketball registrations have grown in all but one age group league, overall membership numbers remain positive, at over 2,400 members.

East Coast Bays Leisure Centre has had a challenging second quarter with a series of maintenance issues including broken tiles, air conditioning and airflow issues. Sports leagues are still running at capacity during terms, and Pickleball on Tuesday evenings and Friday daytime is increasingly popular.

h)      Local board plan key initiative: “Prioritise walkway and cycleway connections to parks, reserves, beaches, town centres and public transport networks”.

Reports by specialist sub-consultants and site visits with three iwi groups regarding the proposed path routes from Sharon Road to Manly Esplanade (Lotus walkway) and Alice Eaves to West Hoe Heights have been completed in Q2. Additional survey work is currently underway on specific sections of the route. Due to a structural assessment and options report for the Nukumea Stream bridge, Community Facilities is working with the Kauri Dieback team and the Greenways project manager on this renewal.

Detailed design has been completed for Emlyn Place and is currently with the community group to provide feedback. Remediation works at the Bournemoth Tce end of the Crows Nest in Murrays Bay was completed in November, with works to build a new aluminium staircase to address the slip at Montrose Tce is underway.

Activities with significant issues

13.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as having significant risk and are currently on hold:

a)      (OLI) Ōrewa Beach - Kohu-Marine View - renew northern seawall (ID 2104)

The outcome of the Environment Court hearing held in May 2019 is still pending. The verdict, whether consent is granted or not, will determine the future of this project.

b)      Long Bay Reserves – develop parks (ID 3536)

In November 2011 Auckland Council was informed that the Long Bay development was sold by Todd Development to NZ PropCo Limited (NZPL). It is yet to be confirmed by NZPL if the Long Bay Reserves’ Development, which includes paths, seating, signage (including Te Teo Māori) and landscaping of nine local parks, will continue under the new ownership including delivery of the assets at reserves 12 and 13. This project is on hold until an understanding is formed on the implications of the change in ownership.

Activities on hold

14.     There are no further activities on hold.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

15.     No activities have been deferred.

Cancelled activities

16.     The following activities are cancelled:

a)      Mairangi Bay Beach Reserve – renew playspace (ID 2696)

The renewal of the playspace equipment based on condition data and playspace inspection has been cancelled due to works being completed earlier this calendar year by Community Facilities Operations and Maintenance. Funds will be reallocated to Stanmore Bay Leisure Centre – renew lift which required urgent health and safety related work (ID 3383).

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

17.     No activities have been merged.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

19.     Work programmes were approved in June 2019 and delivery is well underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

20.     The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

a)      Mairangi Bay Reserve - implement development plan (ID 2436)

A draft coastal processes and options report for the beach, reserve and seawall has been completed. The report will provide guidance on coastal options for the development and protection of the overall reserve.

b)      Silverdale Business Waste Advisory Programme (ID 420)

Starting in October this programme has been running concurrently with the Auckland Tourism and Events and Economic Development (ATEED) project that is also funded by the local board. Meetings have been held with Ōrewa, Whangaparāoa, Browns Bay and Mairangi Bay business associations to help engage their members. collaborative opportunities to support businesses have been discussed with Whangaparāoa Community Recycling Centre and the City to Farm Compost Scheme, Econonwaste, Supertrash, We Compost, Divert NZ and E-Cycle to develop. Three businesses in Whangaparāoa are currently taking part in the programme. A total of 5.9 tonnes per annum of waste diversion opportunities have been identified for these businesses.

c)      Hibiscus and Bays Business Sustainability Development Programme (ID 1183)

The consultant visited thirty businesses in the Browns Bay and Ōrewa business areas. Sixteen waste assessments were completed. Opportunities exist for businesses to divert their soft plastics from landfill waste.

d)      Sustainable Schools - Ko te wai he taonga (water is a treasure) (ID 360)

Uptake of the Mountains to Sea interactive educational sessions continue with three schools booked in to receive the programme in quarter three. Rainworks Limited have built 12 rain barrels ready for installation in quarter three and four.

e)      EcoNeighbourhoods (ID 636)

Since October three EcoNeighbourhoods have formed; The first is the Rothesay Bay Kai EcoNeighbourhood with six households. The second group is the Browns Bay Growing Food and Zero Waste EcoNeighbourhood, with eight households. The third group is the Hatfields Beach Eco-Neighbourhood, with six households.

 

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This report informs the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board of the performance for quarter two ending 31 December 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     Māori as stakeholders of council are affected and have an interest in any report on the quarterly financial results.  However, the recommendation to the local board of receiving the report has no particular benefit to, or adverse effect on, Māori. Some specific work programme items of interest are outlined below.

a)      Māori Responsiveness (ID1141)

Staff are continuing to work with mana whenua and mataawaka to develop initiatives that identify key aspirations and priorities for Te Herenga Waka o Ōrewa Marae. Staff are currently identifying key community relationships and seek opportunities to work collaboratively to build on relationships and information sharing with Māori. Staff are scoping opportunities for feedback and input into new Local Board Plan, utilising Silverdale marae contacts. An opportunity to work with these groups will occur in Q3 around planned Empowered Community Approach workshops.

b)      Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthing responsiveness to Māori Whakatipu i te reo Māori (ID 900)

Whangaparāoa Library started a weekly intergenerational waiata session where staff and customers learn Te Reo Māori through song and puti-puti weaving. This has been extended to and is extremely popular at Ōrewa Library.

c)      HB: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Year 3 (ID 361)

d)      More Mana whenua have joined the programme this quarter with good collaborative discussions taking place.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

25.     Operating expenditure relating to Asset Based Services (ABS) is tracking above budget by $192,000 for the year to date, while the LDI operational projects are currently $213,000 below budget.  This is due to a variety of projects yet to draw down on financial allocations. 

26.     Capital spend of $2.2 million represents investments in the Freyberg Park renewal of sports fields, demolition of 12 Hibiscus Coast Highway, Whangaparāoa Library entrance development, and Metropark West reserve development. The board has also seen progress on a number of projects from their discretionary LDI capital fund.

27.     The complete Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Financial Performance report can be found in Attachment B.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

29.     The approved Community Facilities 2019/2020 work programme and 2020-2022 indicative work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the 2019/2020 financial year, by ensuring that if projects intended for delivery in the 2019/2020 financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances, that other projects can be progressed while the causes for delays are addressed.

30.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter three (31 March 2020).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Quarter Two Work Programme Update

199

b

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Quarterly Performance Report December 2019 - Finance Appendix

229

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Saskia Coley – Local Board Advisor for Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 



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Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review

File No.: CP2020/02994

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations Review to the Independent Panel.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governing Body approved the Terms of Reference for an Independent Panel to undertake a review of substantive Council-Controlled Organisations at its meeting on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127].

3.       The review covers Auckland Transport, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development, Panuku Development Auckland, Regional Facilities Auckland and Watercare. 

4.       The overall objectives are to examine:

·   whether Council-Controlled Organisations are an effective and efficient model for delivering services to the council and Aucklanders, and

·   whether the Council-Controlled Organisations decision-making model provides sufficient political oversight, public transparency and accountability.

5.       The review asks the Independent Panel to examine three areas: The Council-Controlled Organisations model and its accompanying roles and responsibilities; the accountability of Council-Controlled Organisations; and Council-Controlled Organisations culture.

6.       The Independent Panel is seeking the views of local boards on these areas.

7.       Local boards are advised that their views are requested by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations Review to the Independent Panel.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Governing Body approved the Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) review Terms of Reference on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127]. The Independent Panel (the panel) was appointed by the Governing Body on 12 December 2019 and is comprised of Miriam Dean, Doug Martin and Leigh Auton. Miriam Dean has been appointed panel chair [GB/2019/149].

9.       Briefings on the CCO Review were provided to local board chairs in December 2019 by staff and in February 2020 by panel member Leigh Auton. The panel wrote to local board chairs in February asking for advice on what constitutes good engagement between CCOs and local boards.  

10.     Monthly updates on the review are reported to the CCO Oversight Committee and circulated to all local boards.

11.     The Panel is seeking comprehensive engagement to obtain a range of views about the issues forming the subject of the review (Attachment A to the agenda report).

12.     Community engagement on the review is occurring alongside the Annual Budget 2020/2021 in February/March 2020. An engagement document has been developed and a summary document has been translated into five languages and a New Zealand Sign Language video. A webpage[2] provides information on the review, including stakeholder updates, relevant documents (including the Terms of Reference) and a contact for further information.

13.     All feedback on the CCO Review will be provided to the Independent Panel.  The panel will report on the key issues and community and stakeholder feedback in May and will provide a final report and recommendations in July 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     To identify the scope of their work, the panel has distilled the essence of the review terms into a list of issues, that forms the basis of the engagement and eventual report. The list and prompts, at Attachment A, provide a structure for local boards to give feedback.

15.     The three key areas of focus set out in the list of issues are:

Issue

Area of Focus

CCO model, roles and responsibilities

The essential question here is whether the CCO model delivers council services with the maximum of operational efficiency, transparency and accountability, or whether there are better ways to deliver such services

CCO accountability

Here the key question is whether the council’s current approach to holding CCOs to account on behalf of Aucklanders could be improved

CCO culture

The central issue here is whether CCOs need to improve how they consult, engage with and respond to the wider community and council

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     Local boards have an opportunity to consider suggestions that might improve climate change outcomes/mitigation in their feedback on the CCO Review.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The Independent Panel is engaging across the council group on the review, including:

·   the chair of the independent panel wrote introducing the panel and the review objectives to all CCO chairs and chief executives, councillors, local board chairs, chief executive of IMSB and the co-chairs of the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 20 December 2019

·   the panel met briefly with the CCO chief executives and chairs on 28 January 2020 to discuss the proposed review process and CCO engagement. Each CCO was asked to provide the panel with key stakeholders/customers

·   individual meetings have taken place with CCO chief executives and board chairs over February and March 2020, and the panel is meeting with CCO stakeholders.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Local board formal feedback on the CCO Review, including issues experienced with CCOs, good practice and options for improvement, is sought by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

19.     Material on the CCO Review is available at ‘Have your Say’ local board events for the Annual Budget.

20.     Following the conclusion of the Independent Panel’s review, as part of the development of the next 10-year budget, local boards will have the opportunity to provide formal views on any proposals for change to the CCO model.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     Staff presented to the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 19 December 2019. The panel met with one of the forum co-chairs and mana whenua are invited to provide feedback to the panel.  Mana whenua have also been invited to a hui with panel members on 18 March 2020.

22.     The panel has met with the Independent Māori Statutory Board. 

23.     Panel members spoke on Radio Waatea to promote Māori interest and feedback on the CCO review. Material on the CCO review is being provided at mataawaka events for the Annual Budget and mataawaka organisations have been briefed on the review during the public engagement period. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     There are no financial implications from this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There are no risks associated with the recommendations in this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     The Independent Panel is due to report on key issues, community and stakeholder feedback in May and to provide a final report, with recommendations, in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review list of issues

237

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Gomas - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes

File No.: CP2020/03010

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to outline key amendments to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework and to obtain the local board’s views.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region (ENV/2018/11).

3.       To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors.

4.       In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved a consultation draft of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework and associated materials.

5.       In February 2020, a memorandum was circulated to share key findings from the public consultation (Attachments A and B to the agenda report).

6.       To address the feedback from the consultation, this report outlines key structural changes proposed for the framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers to which all actions will align (i.e. a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change).

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities to streamline actions and address feedback.

7.       It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

8.       The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the changes to the draft Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework including:

i)   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers for climate action (i.e. a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change)

ii)  moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities

iii) changing the title from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region, addressing both emissions reduction (i.e. mitigation) and preparing for the impacts of a changing climate (i.e. adaptation) (ENV/2018/11).

10.     To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (ACAF) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors, reaching hundreds of Aucklanders.

11.     Local board engagement and insights were sought throughout development of the framework, including meetings and cluster workshops. A summary of feedback from local boards is available in Attachments C and D to the agenda report.

12.     In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved the consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

13.     In February 2020, a memo was circulated to all local boards to share key findings from the public consultation on the draft ACAF (Attachment A and B).

14.     This report provides an overview of key proposed changes to the draft ACAF to address the feedback received through the consultation.  Local Board views will be reflected in the final version, which will be reported to the Environment and Climate Change Committee in May 2020.

15.     More detailed changes reported in the consultation summary are not repeated here but will be reflected in text changes in the final version.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The proposed changes to ACAF have been informed by consultation feedback received on the draft document.  Some key themes that arose include:

·     Urgency and scale of action needs to be better articulated

·     Lack of clarity on how key moves work together and how they address our climate goals. In addition, it was felt that there are too many

·     Need to be clearer about roles and responsibilities with a request for more information on who is responsible for actions at each level

·     Need for partnership working across sectors and with central government and mana whenua in particular

·     Greater focus on equity across feedback points

·     Need for a strong Māori voice with widespread support for working with Māori, using mātauranga Māori and Māori practices in designing and implementing climate action

·     Need for a system shift and scale of change required, and to better articulate this with Aucklanders

·     Need for communication and behaviour change and a request for campaigns to raise awareness across the region and enable action at an individual level

·     Need for a significant shift in transport (of all key moves) with the identified actions supported but a need for these to be delivered at pace and scale

17.     To address this feedback several key structural changes are proposed.

18.     The first of these is establish three core drivers for action – our ‘pillars’ (Attachment E to the agenda report). These provide greater clarity on the goals of the framework and all actions will align to how they deliver against these goals:

·   A Tāmaki response: This pillar reflects the uniqueness of Auckland and our place-based response to climate change.  It is informed by learning from Māori principles and practice, provides a greater focus on equity and a better definition of roles and responsibilities and collective action across governance and sectors.

·   Reducing our emissions: This pillar reflects the need to provide greater clarity on our emissions target and the need to halve emissions by 2030 and reach net zero emissions by 2050.  It improves alignment with the actions and how we will deliver and prioritise emissions reductions.

·   Preparing for climate change: This pillar enables a greater focus on how we will approach climate change adaptation and take a precautionary approach for the region and also provides greater alignment with the actions.

19.     The second structural change is that the eleven key moves are streamlined into eight priorities (Attachment F to the agenda report). This proposed change is to address feedback on where areas are more foundational and therefore should be embedded throughout all priority areas, or where there is confusion and overlap.

·     It is proposed that Key Move 3: Make development and infrastructure climate compatible and Key Move 4: Transform existing buildings and places are combined into a single built environment priority area. 

·     It is proposed that Key Move 1: Lay the foundation is embedded into our three pillars in recognition of the cross-cutting nature of the actions.

·     Similarly, Key Move 9: Rangatahi (Youth & Inter-generational equity) is embedded into pillar 1 to reflect the need to consider actions across the framework.

20.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1 and 9 will still be maintained and reflected in the updated document.

21.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1-11 will be carried through into Priorities 1-8 (Figure 2) and updated to:

·     clarify any ambiguities that were raised in consultation 

·     remove repetition or overlapping actions

·     make additions in response to consultation feedback

·     strengthen alignment to delivery of the three pillars.

22.     Overall, the intent of the actions between the Key Moves 1-11 and Priority areas 1-8, remain the same. Attachment G to the agenda report briefly summarises how the actions have changed from the consultation document to the updated priority areas.

23.     It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

24.     The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     The changes identified in this report have been made to reflect feedback received and updated emissions modelling.  As such, they will further deliver and strengthen climate action already identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Regular meetings and workshops took place across the council group for development of the framework.

27.     In addition, a working group was established from the outset to provide expertise from across the council group, central government and district health boards.

28.     This group has continued to provide input post-consultation and has reviewed and provided input into the proposed changes.

29.     In addition, the team has been working closely across the Council group in the development of costed actions for consideration in the Long-term Plan. This process is running concurrently with the finalisation of the plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The framework will have implications for all local boards.

31.     In June 2018, the Chief Sustainability Office attended workshops of 19 of the 21 local boards and obtained informal email feedback from the other two local boards to identify their main priorities related to climate change.  This was followed up in September 2018 at cluster workshops to assess and test a series of ‘must haves’, which were the precursors to the actions included in the draft framework.

32.     Priorities included:

·     coastal erosion and inundation concerns

·     affordable and accessible transport

·     long-term infrastructure development to consider climate impacts

·     better stormwater management

·     climate-related education and awareness

·     building community resilience

·     for Auckland Council to lead by example.

33.     This report seeks Local Board formal views on proposed changes to the draft Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework outlined in this report. These views will be reflected in the final version.

34.     Local boards will be key in taking climate action at a local level. Support will be provided for local board planning and alignment with outcomes.

35.     The Chief Sustainability Office and Quality Advice Unit will implement a programme of work for the whole council family to provide guidance and training on how to embed climate action in Local Board plans and what to expect in climate impact statements.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Climate change impacts and associated policy and action will have significant impacts for Māori communities.

37.     A Tāmaki and climate change subject matter expert rōpū (group) was established in March 2019 which has been supporting and advising mana whenua and council on climate change issues for Māori and providing direct advice and narrative for the draft framework.

38.     A rangatahi Māori and Pasifika rōpū has also been working in partnership with council on this kaupapa to develop rangatahi-focused actions for the framework.

39.     A joint mana whenua and Māori expert task group is finalising a Tāmaki and climate change position paper, Te ora ō Tāmaki, which will be used as the bridging document to weave key anchor points into the climate action framework. 

40.     Anchor points include:

·     weaving the narrative into the framework, specifically the following sections: Climate change and Māori, Impacts on Māori and Developing the Plan with Māori

·     a section developed by rangatahi (the Youth and intergenerational equity key move)

·     a separate key move of Te puawaitanga o te tangata (Resilient Māori communities).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Actions within the framework will result in budgetary implications for organisations across the region; identifying and unlocking appropriate funding and financing streams in the future will be critical. 

42.     Taking climate action will require a range of finance and/or funding mechanisms. For instance, green bonds have been a useful tool for financing council-owned assets such as electric trains but investment in clean tech may require crowd-sourcing, grants or venture capital.

43.     To support this, a climate finance work package is underway to identify partnerships and broader funding mechanisms across actions such as bonds, grants, equity instruments and public/private partnerships.

44.     The final framework and specific Auckland Council actions being developed will need to inform on-going Long-term Plan discussions to support delivery and avoid costs associated with inaction, such as increased maintenance costs and infrastructure failures through to missed opportunities to Auckland’s economy in delivering the transition. 

45.     Not all actions within council’s remit will require additional budget. Some actions can result in long-term cost avoidance – for example electrifying fleets can reduce fuel and maintenance costs. Some actions could require existing funds to be redirected if priorities change.

46.     Also, not all actions will require funding, for example those related to advocacy to central government or expert input into actions led by other organisations.

47.     The costs associated with different council-specific actions will consider funding sources as described above.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     No high or extreme risks have been identified with the proposed approach.

49.     Moderate risks exist, including:

·     preparing for the implications of climate change may not comply with current rules and regulations

·     potential strategic risk with non-alignment with New Zealand Government direction and policy

·     potential governance risk in shared leadership and ownership of the framework across sectors.

50.     A risk mitigation plan has been developed to address the above, including targeted engagement approaches, a legal review of the final framework, on-going partnership with central government and establishment of clear governance structures for the implementation of the framework. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Workshops will be held in April 2020 with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Independent Māori Statutory Board to discuss updated framework text, and the final text will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for approval in May 2020.

52.     The draft digital plan layout will be workshopped with the Environment and Climate Change Committee in June 2020 and finalised in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ACAF Consultation Summary Memo

245

b

ACAF Consultation Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Engagement Summary - LB workshops June 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Engagement Summary - Clusters workshops Oct 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

ACAF Proposed Three Pillars

249

f

ACAF Proposed Eight Priorities

251

g

ACAF Proposed Priority Areas and Actions

253

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Anderson - Principal Specialist Sustainability and Climate Resilence

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Addition to the 2019-2022 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Meetings Schedule

 

File No.: CP2020/03267

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for a meeting date to be added to the 2019-2022 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board meeting schedule in order to accommodate the Annual Plan 2020/2021 timeframes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board adopted the 2019-2022 meeting schedule on 21 November 2019.

3.       At that time the specific times and dates for meetings for local board decision making in relation to the local board agreement as part of the Annual Plan 2020/2021 were unknown. 

4.       The local board is being asked to approve a meeting date as an addition to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board meeting schedule so that the Annual Plan 2020/2021 timeframes can be met.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the following meeting date to be added to the 2019-2022 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate the Annual Plan 2020/2021 timeframes as follows:

i)             Thursday 7 May 2020

b)      note the venue for the meeting will be at the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board office, 2 Glen Road, Browns Bay, starting at 5pm.

 

 

Horopaki / Context

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·    clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·    sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board adopted its business meeting schedule at its 21 November 2019 business meeting.

8.       The timeframes for local board decision making in relation to the local board agreement which is part of the Annual Plan 2020/2021 were unavailable when the meeting schedule was originally adopted.

9.       The local board is being asked to make decisions in May and June to feed into the Annual Plan 2020/2021 process.  These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu / Analysis and advice

10.     The local board has two choices:

i)        Add the meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule.

or

ii)       Add the meeting as an extraordinary meeting.

11.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for the meeting to be scheduled as an addition to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the Annual Plan 2020/2021 timeframes change or the information is not ready for the meeting there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled anyway.

12.     For option two, only the specific topic Annual Plan 2020/2021 may be considered for which the meeting is being held. There is a risk that no other policies or plans with similar timeframes are running in relation to the Annual Plan 2020/2021 process could be considered at this meeting.

13.     Since there is enough time to meet statutory requirements, staff recommend approving the meetings as an addition to the meeting schedule as it allows more flexibility for the local board to consider a range of issues.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe /
Local impacts and local board views

14.     Local boards have a statutory responsibility to develop an annual local board agreement, which forms part of the annual budget and is adopted by the Governing Body. At the May business meeting the local board will agree their feedback and advocacy on the Annual Budget 2020/2021. The Governing Body is approving the Annual Budget 2020/2021 on 23 June 2020, so an additional local board business meeting is required in June to meet the budget-setting process timelines.

15.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule an additional meeting and consider whether to approve it as an extraordinary meeting or an addition to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori / Māori impact statement

16.     There is no specific impact for Māori arising from this report.  Local boards work with Māori on projects and initiatives of shared interest.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea / Financial implications

17.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono / Risks

18.     There are no significant risks associated with this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri / Next steps

19.     The local board democracy advisor will implement the processes associated with preparing for business meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Gemma Kaldesic - Democracy Advisor for Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2020/03492

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

2.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

· ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

· clarifying what advice is required

· clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work calendar for April 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Programme April 2020

261

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gemma Kaldesic - Democracy Advisor for Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Deputations update

File No.: CP2020/03493

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       As part of its monthly community forum, Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has set aside time for deputations/presentations during which time members of the public can address the local board on matters within the local board’s delegated authority.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Orders there is provision for deputations/presentations to the local board. Applications for deputations/presentations must be in writing setting forth the subject and be received by the Relationship Manager at least seven working days before the meeting concerned. Subsequently, requests for deputations are considered and approved by the local board chairperson.

3.       Requests, matters arising and actions from the deputations/presentations are recorded and updated accordingly. The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board deputations/presentations update is attached as attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      note the deputation update for 5 February 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Deputations 05 February 2020

265

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gemma Kaldesic - Democracy Advisor for Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2020/03498

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records for 5 December 2019, 13 February and 27 February 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for 5 December 2019, 13 February and 27 February 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Records 5 December 2019

269

b

Workshop Records 13 February 2020

273

c

Workshop Records 27 February 2020

277

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gemma Kaldesic - Democracy Advisor for Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Relationship Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 

    

  


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 10.1    Attachment a    Notice of Motion Penlink March 2020           Page 281


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

 



[1] Local Government New Zealand and Department of Conservation (n.d), Reserves Act Guide, retrieved from https://www.doc.govt.nz/Documents/about-doc/role/legislation/reserves-act-guide.pdf

[2] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/council-controlled-organisations/Pages/review-of-council-controlled-organisations.aspx