I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Henderson-Massey Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 17 March 2020

4.00pm

Council Chamber
Henderson Civic Centre
6 Henderson Valley Road
Henderson

 

Henderson-Massey Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Chris Carter

 

Deputy Chairperson

Will Flavell

 

Members

Brenda Brady, JP

 

 

Peter Chan, JP

 

 

Matt Grey

 

 

Brooke Loader

 

 

Vanessa Neeson, JP

 

 

Ingrid Papau

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Brenda Railey

Local Board Democracy Advisor (Henderson-Massey)

 

11 March 2020

 

Contact Telephone: (021) 820 781

Email: brenda.railey@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         3

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        3

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   3

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               3

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          3

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       3

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          3

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    3

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  3

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                3

11        Annual Budget 2020/2021 - Have Your Say                                                                3

12        Unlock Henderson - Opanuku Link                                                                             3

13        To classify an unclassified recreation reserve – Kervil Park                                   3

14        Auckland Transport update for March 2020                                                               3

15        Ward Councillors' Update                                                                                             3

16        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Henderson-Massey Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020                                                                                             3

17        Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes    3

18        Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review                                                                                                                                         3

19        Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020 - project endorsement 3

20        Notion of Motion: Chair C Carter - Progression of Waitakere City Council resolutions Te Atatu Marae.                                                                                         3

21        Confirmation of Workshop Records                                                                            3

22        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                          3  

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

            Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

            The following are declared interests of elected members of the Henderson-Massey Local Board.

Member

Organisation

Position

Brenda Brady, JP

-        Safer West Community Trust

Trustee

Chris Carter

(Chair)

-        Nil

 

Peter Chan, JP

-        Cantonese Opera Society of NZ

-        Asian Leaders Forum

-        NZ-Hong Kong Business Association

-        NZ-China Business Association

-        Auckland Chinese Environment Protection Association (ACEPA)

-        Whau Coastal Walkway Trust

Member

Member

Member

Member

Advisor

 

Trustee

Matt Gray

-        West Auckland Youth Development Trust

-        Billy Graham Youth Foundation

Director

Board Member

Will Flavell

(Deputy Chairman)

-        Asia New Zealand Leadership Network

-        COMET

-        Waitākere Literacy Board

Member

Employee

Board Member

Brooke Loader

-        Nil

 

Vanessa Neeson

-        Village Green Quilters

-        Ranui Advisory Group

Member

Chairperson

Ingrid Papau

-        Nil

 

            Member appointments

            Board members are appointed to the following bodies. In these appointments the board members represent Auckland Council

External organisation

 

Leads

Alternate

Central Park Henderson Business Association

Brenda Brady and Brooke Loader

 

Heart of Te Atatu South

Brenda Brady and Brooke Loader

 

Massey Matters

Will Flavell and Peter Chan

 

Ranui Advisory Group

Ingrid Papau and Vanessa Neeson

 

Te Atatu Peninsula Business Association

Peter Chan and Ingrid Papau

 

Waitakere Ethnic Board

Ingrid Papau and Peter Chan

 

Waitakere Healthlink

Peter Chan

Chris Carter

Te Whau Pathway Trust

Matt Gray and Brenda Brady

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 18 February 2020, as  true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Henderson-Massey Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Annual Budget 2020/2021 - Have Your Say

File No.: CP2020/02140

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide members of the Henderson-Massey Local Board community with an overview of the Annual Budget 2020/2021 – Have Your Say Consultation Document.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is an opportunity for Aucklander’s to have a say about what Auckland Council and the local boards are planning over 2020/2021 towards making Auckland a world-class city.  The consultation period is open from 21 February until 22 March 2020 on the Annual Budget 2020/2021 – Have Your Say Consultation document (Attachment A). 

3.       Once every three years, councils are required to adopt a long-term plan (10-year budget), and in the intervening years an annual plan (referred to by Auckland Council as the Annual Budget). Each year the budget enables rates to be set for the year and includes a Local Board Agreement for each of our 21 local boards.

4.       In 2020/2021, the Henderson-Massey Local Board plans to invest $12.2 million to renew and develop assets and $25.4 million to maintain and operate assets as well as provide local programmes and initiatives.

5.       Final decisions will be made by June 2020 and will be available on the Auckland Council website in July 2020.

6.       Along with online and written opportunities for people to have their say, three local face to face opportunities have been provided and promoted for interested individuals and organisations to present and converse directly with elected members and delegated staff:

Event name

Date and time

Venue

West Auckland Māori engagement – in partnership with Radio Waatea a live stream panel discussion

Friday 28 February 2020, 4:30p to 7pm

Hoani Waititi Marae

451 West Coast Road, Oratia.

Rānui Library drop-in

Wednesday 4 March 2020, 2pm to 4pm

Rānui Library, 431 Swanson Road.

Henderson-Massey Local Board hearing style event

Tuesday 17 March 2020, 4pm to 5pm

Council Chambers, L2, 6 Henderson Valley Rd, Henderson. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the 2020/2021 Annual Budget Consultation document

b)      receive verbal feedback from members of the public who have chosen to present on matters in relation to the 2020/2021 Annual Budget.

Horopaki

Context guidance

7.       The Annual Budget 2020/2021 – Have Your Say Consultation Document, which is attached to this report as Attachment A, is also available on the Auckland Council website in more detail and in other languages.

8.       The Chair of the Henderson-Massey Local Board, in his introduction to the document, has declared the board’s intention to focus on the following areas:

9.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board has invited its community to come and have a say at the upcoming business meeting at the Council Chambers, 6 Henderson Valley Rd, Henderson, on 17 March 2020 at 4.00pm.

10.     Alternatively, feedback can be made:

a)   Online – on the Auckland Council website aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

b)   Via social media:

i)     Using @aklcouncil and #akhaveyoursay

ii)    Posts on facebook.com/aklcouncil – using the #akhaveyoursay

c)   Email: akhaveyoursay@auckland@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

d)   By post: Ak Have Your Say, Auckland Council, Freepost Authority 182382, Private Bag 92300, Victoria Street West, Auckland 1142.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Annual Budget 2020/2021 Consultation Document

3

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tracey  Wisnewski - Local Board Advisor

Wendy Kjestrup - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Unlock Henderson - Opanuku Link

File No.: CP2020/02690

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the finalised concept design of the Opanuku bridge and playground located in Opanuku Reserve, connecting to Corban Estate Arts Centre.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board and Panuku Development Auckland are co-funding the Opanuku Link with the objective of re-connecting Corban Estate to the train station and town centre.

3.       The Local Board on 19 February 2019 approved Panuku Development Auckland to progress the alternate concept design of the Opanuku Link bridge and playground “Te Mana o Tāne”, a concept for a “felled tree” bridge based on the story of Rata and the children of the forest of Tāne. (refer Attachment A)

4.       The change to alternate design was recommended after the concept and feasibility stage of the original “bat wing” design identified a number of issues and challenges including higher costs, structural complexity, additional flood risk, potential maintenance, and universal access challenges. The move to the alternate “felled tree” design proposes a box girder construction which offers greater efficiencies than the original design.

5.       During the concept design phase, strong engagement has been held with our mataawaka rōpū on behalf of the original Henderson Intermediate school rangatahi group who were involved in the original design proposing natural play opportunities.

6.       Funding and budgets have remained the same for the alternate design.

7.       Te Kawerau ā Maki and the Panuku Mana Whenua forum have been engaged on the development of the alternate concept plan and have endorsed the alternate “felled tree” design.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      approve the finalised concept design of the Opanuku Link bridge and playground inspired by the Māori story of Rata and expressed as a “felled tree” bridge.

b)      endorse Panuku Development Auckland to continue to lead and progress the detailed design to developed drawings, resource consent and project delivery.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Panuku Development Auckland is working with the Henderson-Massey Local Board and mana whenua to develop Henderson into an urban eco-centre.  This will seek to achieve quality environmental and community health outcomes that enhance the:

·     quality of life

·     mauri of the twin streams and

·     social and spatial connectivity.

 

9.       One of the initial projects approved by the Board is the Opanuku Link that gives effect to a Key Move 4 “Re-connect with Corban Estate” identified in the Henderson Implementation Plan 2014.

10.     The Opanuku Link is comprised of three key components:

·     a pedestrian and cyclist bridge over the Opanuku Stream from Henderson Valley Road to the Corban Estate Arts Centre

·     the enhancement of the Opanuku Reserve incorporating natural play opportunities and

·     a greenway connecting the reserve from Henderson Valley Road to the Kakogawa Japanese Garden/Henderson Rail Station.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The alternative design proposed by artist Johnson Witehira was inspired by the Māori story of Rata.  In the legend of Rata, Rata enters Te Wao nui o Tāne (the great forest of Tāne) and cuts down a tree to fashion a waka for his journeys. Having felled the tree, he then heads home to return the next day. To his surprise though, the next day the tree was restored. Rata continues to cut down the tree a number of times only to find it back up again and again. Puzzled by this, he hides in the ngahere (forest) one evening to watch. He sees that nga tamariki o Tāne (the children of Tāne) birds, bats and insects are putting the tree back together each night.  Asking why the children of Tāne are repairing the tree, he hears the response, ‘Who gave you authority to fell the forest god to the ground? You had no right to do so. 'When Rata heard, he was overcome with shame. Rata had failed to acknowledge Tāne and the life within his domain. Once he had done this, though, he was successful in cutting down the tree to create his waka.

12.     The bridge design takes the form of a fallen tree with the trunk spanning the stream and abstracted branches providing informal play opportunities within the Opanuku Reserve.  Given the role that children representative of nga tamariki o Tāne (the children of Tāne) metaphorically reconstruct the tree it is considered appropriate that the playground and the bridge are incorporated together as an integrated concept.

13.     The stump of the tree in the landing forecourt within Corban Estate Arts Centre where the stump of the felled tree will incorporate a blackened tree stump element.  This stump gives expression to the traditional Māori way of felling large trees where fires were lit at their base. The branches will therefore be within the Opanuku Reserve and inspire the natural play opportunities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     The Panuku Priority Location programmes support regeneration of existing town centres, developing under-utilised sites within the urban area, close to transport links. A key element of this is ensuring the provision of easy, safe and attractive walking and cycling routes and improved access to public transport to reduce reliance on private motor vehicles and enabling low carbon lifestyles. This project contributes to that by re-connecting Corban Estate to the train station and town centre.

15.     Climate change is likely to subject the Henderson-Massey area to hotter temperatures and more frequent flooding and drought. We are seeking to future-proof our communities by accounting for climate change, factoring adaptation and resilience into the creation of buildings and spaces. Our infrastructure and developments should be designed to cope with warmer temperatures and extreme weather events. This includes use of green infrastructure and water sensitive design for increased flood resilience, ecological and biodiversity benefits (through the enhancement of the stream embankment) and provision of increased shade and shelter for storm events and hotter days.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     The Council Parks Services team have been involved in the Opanuku Link from its inception. The Community Facilities design team have also been involved and have advised on the scale and demographic approach to the playground. The important aspect is that the playground is not too large as strategically the larger playground opportunity sits within the larger Henderson Park area and Opanuku Reserve is more of a small play opportunity (at a similar scale to the existing playground) without barbeque facilities or toilets.

17.     Additionally, the operational management and maintenance representative had some preliminary concerns with the previous playground designs inclusion of water play and potentially the scale of the playground. The recommended alternate design will not include water features.

18.     The alternate bridge design is a more standardised bridge type and is therefore less risky and easier to maintain. The general approach to the alternate bridge design is support by the Chief Engineer’s representative and asset management team.

19.     Community Facilities Asset management team and the Chief Engineers Office has also been involved in the Opanuku Link with an interest in the bridge design. These teams have contributed to advice and will be required to approve the final design from a technical perspective.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The Henderson Massey Local Board resolved in November 2017 to allocate $1.5 million of  Local Board Transport Capital Funds to Panuku Development Auckland in order to co-ordinate the integrated delivery of the “Opanuku Link”, and allocate $1 million of the Henderson-Massey Local Board’s Local Discretionary Initiatives capital funds to Panuku Development Auckland to lead, integrate and co-ordinate the delivery of  the enhancement of Opanuku Reserve at 1A and 1B Henderson Valley Road (Resolution HM/2017/187)

21.     The Local Board resolved in November 2018 to approve the overall Opanuku Link project that included the previous concept design of the bridge. (Resolution HM/2018/157)

22.     The Local Board resolved in February 2019 to approve the alternate design of the “felled tree” bridge and playground. (Resolution HM/2019/8)

23.     A workshop with the Board was held on 17 September 2019 to gain feedback on the progress of the early concepts of the alternative “felled tree” bridge and integrated playground.

24.     A workshop with the Board held on 25 February 2020 unanimously supported and gave initial endorsement of the finalised concept plans of the alternative “felled tree” bridge and integrated playground design.

25.     The Local Board asked that engagement with Mataawaka and the rangatahi group be continued to ensure they are kept aware and involved with the eventual development.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     Te Kawerau ā Maki iwi have been involved throughout the design process for the Opanuku Link. This included the support of a Te Kawerau ā Maki endorsed artist to design and plan the previous playground. The previous bridge design was also supported. The alternative bridge design with integrated and more natural play has been well received and the considerations and issues of the previous bridge design were noted.

27.     Te Kawerau ā Maki acknowledge that a well-supported engagement and artist selection process was undertaken, however the alternative more integrated compelling felled tree design and play opportunities inspired by the children of the forest is enthusiastically supported and represents a stronger narrative and concept to progress.

28.     The Panuku Mana Whenua Forum have also been involved throughout the design process for the Opanuku Link.  This has included:

·     The preparation of the design brief

·     Input to the design as it has progressed

·     The selection of the artists for the playground and the bridge

·     The endorsement of the previous design

·     Agreement in principle with the revised bridge and playground design.

29.     Mataawaka have also been involved in the design process with number of idea sessions for the previous playground.  It is proposed that this continue through the new bridge and playground developed design integration.

30.     The original playground design was also workshopped with local children from Henderson Intermediate and their involvement and influence will continue acknowledging the previous engagement.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     This project is co-funded between the Henderson Massey Local Board and Panuku Development Auckland.  The Local Board have committed $1.0million for the upgrade of the Opanuku Reserve and a further $1.5million for the Opanuku Bridge, subject to approval for a mid-block pedestrian crossing over Henderson Valley Road (from Auckland Transport).  Panuku Development Auckland will fund the balance.

32.     There are no budget changes with the revised design.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     There are number of risks associated with this project as it is building within a flood plain, over a stream with level differences at each end. 

34.     Planning risks include building and resource consents not granted or delayed.

35.     There are a number of construction risks including site contamination, geotechnical stability (for the bridge) and the identification of archaeological sensitive sites.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     Following approval of finalised concept design, Panuku Development Auckland will progress developed design towards construction. 

37.     The design change has resulted in a delay to the previous schedule, however stage one of the implementation works is targeted to commence in March 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te Mana O Tāne bridge and play concept plan dated 12/11/19

3

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Lisa Gooding - Senior Engagement Advisor


Authorisers

Amir Saadatjoo, Snr Project Mgr

John Carter, Priority Location Director.

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


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17 March 2020

 

 

To classify an unclassified recreation reserve – Kervil Park

File No.: CP2020/02425

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request approval from the Henderson-Massey Local Board to classify two parcels of land that make up Kervil Park at 652B Te Atatu Road, Te Atatu Peninsula under Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 as recreation reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The land at 652B Te Atatu Road, Te Atatu Peninsula, is made up of two parcels currently held in fee simple as unclassified recreation reserves and subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

3.       The parcels are legally described as:

·     Lot 187 Deposited Plan 48684, formally held in Record of Title NA1089/1 (part-cancelled) and comprising 1.443 ha of land

·     Lot 240 Deposited Plan DP 40799, formerly held in Record of Title NA266/50 (cancelled) and comprising 5,767m2 of land

4.       Classification is a mandatory process under the Reserves Act and if not undertaken, would mean the Council is not meeting its statutory obligations.

5.       Classification of the park enables an easement to be granted for a wastewater connection to the public wastewater network within the boundary of Kervil Park from a proposed subdivision by Kāinga Ora at 85-89 Kervil Avenue, Te Atatu Peninsula.

6.       This proposal aligns with the Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan 2017 “Outcome1: A network of vibrant and loved urban neighbourhoods” by providing intensification and additional housing options for residents.

7.       Local boards hold delegated authority under Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act to classify all council owned reserves.

8.       This report recommends that Henderson-Massey Local Board approve the classification of Kervil Park as indicated in Attachment A to comply with the statutory requirement to classify reserves according to their principal or primary purpose.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      approve, pursuant Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act the classification of Lot 187 Deposited Plan 48684, formally held in Record of Title NA1089/1 (part-cancelled) and comprising 1.443 ha of land and Lot 240 Deposited Plan DP 40799, formerly held in Record of Title NA266/50 (cancelled) and comprising 5,767m2 of land to be recreation reserve.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Classification is a mandatory process under section 16 of the Reserves Act 1977 which involves assigning a reserve (or parts of a reserve) to the appropriate class. The class determines the principal or primary purpose of the reserve. The present values of the reserve are considered as well as the future “potential” values and the possible future uses and activities on the reserve.

10.     This report considers land classification matters impacting on the ability to provide an easement for the wastewater connection from 85-89 Kervil Avenue, Te Atatu Peninsula to the nearest public wastewater network close to the boundary within Kervil Park as indicated in Attachment B. Land classification gives council the ability to grant an easement for a wastewater connection from a Kāinga Ora subdivision for 21 dwellings at 85-89 Kervil Avenue, Te Atatu Peninsula.

11.     Local boards hold delegated authority under Section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 to approve classifications of council owned reserves, subject to all statutory processes having been satisfied.

12.     While there is no provision under the Reserves Act requiring the council to publicly notify its intention to classify any reserve in terms of Section 16 (2A) of that Act, engagement with iwi is still necessary in terms of Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987.

13.     The request for classification is being presented to the Northern Mana Whenua Forum on 4 March 2020 and will be followed up with iwi groups identified with having an interest in the land via email contact.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The land

14.     Kervil Park is made up of two parcels of land held in fee simple by Auckland Council as unclassified recreation reserves and described as follows:

·     Lot 187 Deposited Plan 48684, formally held in Record of Title NA1089/1 (part-cancelled) and comprising 1.443 ha of land

·     Lot 240 Deposited Plan DP 40799, formerly held in Record of Title NA266/50 (cancelled) and comprising 5,767m2 of land.

Reserves Act 1977

15.     The Reserves Act 1977 came into force on 1 April 1978 and requires all reserves to be classified for their primary purposes.  

16.     The purpose of recreation reserves as set out in section 17 of the Reserves Act 1977 is to provide for “recreation and sporting activities and the physical welfare and enjoyment of the public, and for the protection of the natural environment and beauty of the countryside, with emphasis on the retention of open spaces and on outdoor recreational activities, including recreational tracks in the countryside”.

17.     The recreation reserve classification is the most appropriate as it allows formal and informal recreation in an almost totally urbanised area, enabling residents and visitors to enjoy the reserve in a manner supported by the Reserves Act 1977. This was also the intended purpose for the reserve when it was originally acquired.

18.     Staff recommend the two parcels of the reserve outlined in paragraphs 3 and 13 which form Kervil Park to be classified to meet the statutory requirements.   

Specialists’ comments/consultation 

19.     Land advisory, the parks and places specialist and senior maintenance delivery coordinator have been consulted and support the proposal.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     There is no impact on greenhouse gas emissions as the proposal does not introduce any new source of emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The proposed reserve classification has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice. Classification of reserves gives the council guidance for the development of management plans that coincide with this purpose.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Planning Context

22.     This proposal aligns with the Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan 2017 “Outcome 1: A network of vibrant and loved urban neighbourhoods” by providing intensification and additional housing options for residents by enabling the easement for the wastewater infrastructure which is not possible on an unclassified reserve.

23.     The proposal supports the outcome that “Residential intensification provides an opportunity to reduce reliance on cars and improve the quality of the hospitality, retail and cultural offerings in Henderson. We want to work with Panuku Development Auckland, private developers and our business association to take advantage of the opportunities provided in the Auckland Unitary Plan to bring life into Henderson”.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Prior to proceeding with the classification, the council is required under Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 to engage with local iwi. The item was presented to the North/west mana whenua forum on 4 March .

25.     There are no sites of value or significance to mana whenua identified in the Auckland Unitary Plan – Operative in Part in relation to the application.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     There are no financial operational implications for the local board over and above the existing maintenance requirements of this reserve.

27.     Publication in the New Zealand Gazette records the local board’s resolution. A permanent public record of the classification will be obtained after registration of the published gazette notice against the titles containing the two reserves. The cost of publication is approximately $100 and will be borne by Community Facilities.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     If the Henderson-Massey Local Board resolve not to approve the classification of Kervil Park as recommended, this decision would contravene the requirements of the Reserves Act.


 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Land advisory staff will complete the classification requirements.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Geomaps location - Kervil Park

3

b

Proposed wastewater drainage

3

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Raewyn  Sendles - Land Use Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport update for March 2020

File No.: CP2020/02856

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Henderson-Massey Local Board (the Board) on Auckland Transport (AT)  matters in its area and an update on its local board transport capital fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Progress on the Board’s LBTCF funded projects is noted.

3.       Included is a list of the public consultations sent to the Board in December 2019 and January and February 2020 for comment and the decisions of the Traffic Control Committee of AT for November 2019 to February 2020, as they affect the Board’s area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive Auckland Transport’s update for March 2020.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities.

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport (AT). Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·     be safe

·     not impede network efficiency

·     be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).


 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Funds allocated in the last term to projects and carried forward into the 2019-2023 term for project completion:

ID

Project Name

Allocation

Project Update

585

Unlock Henderson Projects

1,494,540

No Update as Panuku is leading this project.

 

662

Henderson North Home and School Zone

1,606,579

Consultation is underway and closes on Sunday, 7 March.  Auckland Transport will report back to the Local Board on the outcome of the consultation at a workshop in mid-April.

 

 

$3,101,119

 

 

 

 

 

 

2019/20

$253,359

Already part allocated by previous Board)

 

2020/21

$1,473,210

 

 

2021/22

$1,473,210

 

 

2022/23

$1,473,210

 

 

 

$4,672,989

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Funds Available in current political term

$7,774,108

 

 

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$3,101,119

 

 

Remaining Budget left

$4,672,989

 

Community Safety Fund

6.       The Community Safety Fund (CSF) was established in the 2018 Regional Land Transport Plan and it allocated $20 million for local initiatives in road safety: $5 million in the financial year 2019/2020 and $15 million in financial year 2020/2021.  It is apportioned to local board areas by a formula focused on numbers of Deaths and Serious Injuries (DSI).

7.       The fund has been named the Community Safety Fund (CSF) and Henderson-Massey Local Board was allocated $800,168 over two years. The Board developed a list of safety projects which were prioritised after assessment and a rough order costs established.

8.       Currently projects are being further assessed and design work is in progress.  It is expected that most projects will be delivered in year two of the programme.

9.       AT expect to report back on the progress of these projects in the first quarter of 2020.


 

Henderson-Massey Local Board Community Safety Projects

 

Location

Description

Update on Progress

Approved by Local Board

Universal Drive/Rathgar Road – Signalisation

Over the last 5 years (2014 – 2018), there has been 14 reported crashes (1 serious, 4 minor and 9 non injury) at this intersection.

 

The main crash type at this intersection is ‘crossing / turning’, in particular with vehicles turning right out of Rathgar Road and colliding with vehicles travelling on Universal Drive.

 

Further, there are no formal crossing facilities provided at this intersection.

 

The draft scheme plan design for a signalised intersection has commenced.  Traffic counts, concept design and traffic modelling has been completed.  One of the key features that will considered is the inclusion of a separate left turn lane on the Rathgar Rd approach to the intersection.  This will form part of the design that includes the following;

-    Signalisation of all approaches

-    Signalised pedestrian crossings

-    Cycle facilities

-    Minor road widening

-    Auxiliary stormwater work

-    New footpath; and

-    New road marking and signage.

 

July 2019

Universal Drive / Rathgar Road – Raised Intersection

Over the last 5 years (2014 – 2018), there has been 14 reported crashes (1 serious, 4 minor and 9 non injury) at this intersection.

 

The main crash type at this intersection is ‘crossing / turning’, in particular with vehicles turning right out of Rathgar Road and colliding with vehicles travelling on Universal Drive.

 

Further, there are no formal crossing facilities provided at this intersection.

 

A separate document has been submitted for the signalisation of this intersection. Signalisation of the intersection reduces the number of potential crossing / turning type conflicts at this intersection, however it does not manage the speed and energy of vehicle should a driver make a mistake (i.e. red light running).

 

In line with the safe system philosophy and with AT’s commitment to vision zero, further mitigation measures should be considered to reduce the speed / energy at this intersection such that if I crash was to occur, it does not result in any people being killed or seriously injured.

In conjunction to the draft scheme plan detailed above, a raised intersection is also being designed. The cost for this will determine if this is constructed at the same time as the above project.  Notwithstanding this the final design will not preclude its installation at a later date.

July 2019

Vector and AT Sign Memorandum Of Understanding

10.     On 20 January 2020 Auckland Transport and Vector announced a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to explore the impacts of a full implementation of electric buses.

11.     The MoU is a direct response to AT’s Low Emission Bus Roadmap, published in late 2018, that outlined its commitment to have all new buses in Auckland being electric from 2025, with the whole fleet fully electric by 2040.

12.     A faster transition to electric buses requires a detailed assessment of the future demand on the electricity network.

13.     Two reports will be produced as part of the MoU, the first exploring a route and service profile, which will model the electricity demand that a fully electrified bus fleet will require. The second report will provide guidance on the electricity network infrastructure upgrades required at each bus depot, as well as likely timings and costs. These two reports are expected to be delivered by June 2020.

14.     Buses make up 87 per cent of the carbon emissions produced from public transport, so converting them from diesel to electric will also be a significant step towards meeting New Zealand’s 2050 zero-carbon emissions goal. 

AT’s Speed Management Bylaw

15.     At the end of October 2019, after considering nearly 12,000 public submissions and reviewing technical reports, Auckland Transport’s board approved a bylaw that will reduce speed limits on around 10 per cent of Auckland’s urban and rural roads.

16.     The greatest impact of the speed-limit reductions will be on high-risk rural roads, town centre streets and Auckland’s central business district. There are no effects in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area with this first suite of changes.

Speed Management Bylaw Consultation

17.     AT is fast-tracking implementation of a speed management plan for Auckland and delivering an ambitious $700 million safety infrastructure acceleration programme estimated to reduce DSi by up to 18% over an initial three-year period and by up to 60% by 2028. It will deliver major, minor and mass-action safety engineering projects, including speed management on high-risk routes and locations across the network.

18.     As part of this programme, AT is proposing to change speed limits across Auckland using The Speed Limits Bylaw. This is the legal process for changing speed limits as per Section 27.1 of the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017. This will affect approximately 10% of Auckland’s local roads.

19.     In December 2018, Auckland Transport’s Board approved a public consultation on the Bylaw. This is in accordance with the special consultative procedure under the Local Government Act 2002 and in accordance with the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017 with regard to the new speed limits themselves.

20.     The consultation commenced on 28 February 2019 and lasted for approximately one month. The Bylaw will contain a complete list of the roads proposed for speed limits changes and will include information on their current speed limits and the new proposed speed limits.

21.     No roads in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area are impacted by these changes but residents are fully entitled to give feedback on the proposed changes in other areas of Auckland.

22.     Following consultation, the feedback will be analysed, and any required changes made. The Auckland Transport Board will then make and pass the new bylaw with the recommended changes.

23.     Once consultation on the bylaw is complete and the bylaw is adopted there will need to be changes of signage and sometimes supporting engineering measures to encourage driving at slower speeds. These measures could include installing raised zebra crossing, raised tables, speed humps and narrowing roads.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

25.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

26.     To this end, Auckland Transport’s Statement of Intent contains three performance measures:

Measure

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Number of buses in the Auckland bus fleet classified as low emission

5

25

55

Reduction in CO2e (emissions) generated annually by Auckland Transport corporate operations (from 2017/18 baseline)

7%

9%

11%

Percentage of Auckland Transport streetlights that are energy efficient LED

56%

66%

76%

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     The impact of information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group. Any engagement with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Basra Drive, Henderson narrow road and street cleaning issues

28.     Auckland Transport (AT) receives multiple requests to investigate issues relating to roads which have a width of less than 7m. Generally, such requests relate to difficulties in accessing properties or the ability of vehicles such as rubbish trucks or emergency vehicles to access a road which has vehicles parked on both sides.

29.     The most requested solution is the installation of No Stopping controls along all or sections of the street. In AT’s experience proposals that result in loss of on-street parking are often not supported by the majority stakeholders.

30.     Auckland Transport has investigated this and can confirmed that Basra Drive, is classed as a narrow street.

31.     To streamline this process and to reduce the possibility of future objections, AT is requesting that before investigating the issue support is evidenced from at least three residents who would be affected by any change. Once the completed form is received, AT will carry out a site visit and investigate the problem.

Cnr Te Atatu and Matipo Road – Missing Bus Shelter

32.     Auckland Transport are in the process of getting this bus shelter replaced.  The timeline for this replacement is still to be determined.  The Local Board will receive a verbal update at their meeting, as the information was not available at the time of writing this report.

Edsel Street, Henderson Safety issue pedestrian crossing access Repairs

33.     A request has come from the Local Board for Auckland Transport to investigate the safety issues of the Oratia Stream Bridge and footpath crossing on Edsel Street, Henderson.  Auckland Transport has visited the site in question and will be repairing the safety concerns in due course.

Makora Road Bridge and Triangle Road Intersection Safety issues

34.     Auckland Transport (AT) are currently investigating improvements to this intersection. AT want to make some changes so the intersection is safer for road users, but in particular, pedestrians and cyclists.

35.     As part of the intersection improvements, AT are looking into making the culvert (bridge) safer too.

36.     At the moment, we are not able to provide an exact timeframe for when this project will be completed.

37.     Public consultation will begin following the finalisation of the design; this consultation may result in some changes to the final design. Subject to funding, AT expect any upgrades to the intersection to begin construction in 2021.

Newington Road Safety Concerns

38.     Auckland Transport (AT) has completed the investigation into the safety concerns on Newington Road and found that the intersection of Newington Road and View Road is operating relatively safely.

39.     This is a residential intersection with low traffic volumes and a low speed environment.  There have been no reported incidents to Police related to on-street parking in the last five years.  The existing broken yellow lines in the vicinity of the intersection are appropriate and there is no signs of significant safety issues identified at this intersection.

40.     As stated with the above reasons AT are unable to justify further removal of on-street parking from this location.

Vodanovich Road Upgrade Update

41.     The Vodanovich Intersection update is scheduled for delivery by June 2020.

Hindmarsh Street, Henderson speed humps request

42.     Auckland Transport (AT) have adopted an area-based focus for residential speed management, recognising that traffic-calming changes on one street have a flow-on effect on the surrounding neighborhood.

43.     Hindmarsh Street has not been identified in the first group of areas within our Residential Speed Management programme as other areas in the region are experiencing higher speeds and safety risk.

44.     While investigating the concerns about Hindmarsh Street, we have checked the crash records for this street and have found the following:

·          There have been 3 crashes on Hindmarsh St in the last 5 years, 2 of which resulted in injury and a non-injury crash.

·          The non-injury crash occurred at the Hindmarsh Street/Ohira Place intersection where a driver failed to give way on a side road.

·          One of the injury crashes involved a driver striking a parked vehicle and the remaining crash involved a child crossing the Hindmarsh Street behind a parked vehicle without properly checking if the road was clear for crossing.

45.     These crashes did not have speed as a contributing factor, which suggests that the street is operating relatively safely and there is a low safety concern related to speed.

46.     Therefore, AT are not proposing speed calming measures on Hindmarsh Street since we are taking an area-based approach to speed calming. Also, based on the crash history, Hindmarsh Street is operating relatively safely and there is a low safety concern related to speed.

47.     Auckland Transport will however install of ‘SLOW’ markings on Hindmarsh Street where the speeding concerns have been raised.

Waimumu Road Speed Hump Requests

48.     Auckland Transport (AT) are currently working on a plan to reduce speeds on Auckland’s roads. This plan targets the highest priority areas based on the level of safety risk measured for each road on our network. The initial roll out of speed reduction is focused on approximately 10 per cent of our road network, including residential areas.

49.     To address traffic speeds in residential areas AT have adopted an area-based focus for 2019 onwards. This recognises that traffic-calming changes on one street have a flow-on effect on the surrounding neighbourhood. This plan will support all drivers to travel at the appropriate speed and to the road conditions.

50.     This programme focuses delivery to areas that have been prioritised for changes to reduce the incidence and impact of crashes. This is based on several factors, including the number of crashes, safety risk, traffic speed, land use and concerns raised by local residents and their elected representatives.

51.     Waimumu Road has not been identified in the first group of areas within our Residential Speed Management programme as other areas in the region are experiencing higher speeds and safety risk.

52.     Auckland Transport have added the comments to its database to indicate support for safer speeds in your residential area. More information, including the residential areas that will be prioritised for further investigation can be viewed on the Residential Speed Management Programme page on our website.

53.     Notwithstanding the above, we will raise residents’ concerns regarding speeding on Waimumu Road with the NZ Police during our regular liaison meetings. Please note that enforcement of speed limits is a police matter.

Local board issues under investigation

54.     The local board have requested the following issues be investigated and these are still under investigation:

·        Border Road, Henderson Pedestrian Crossing  Request

·        Glendene Pavement Repairs

·        Henderson Creek and Oratia Stream Shared Paths

·        Hepburn Road, Road Safety Concerns

·        Alderman Drive/ Great North Road Pedestrian Safety Concerns.

Local Board Workshops

55.     AT attended workshops in December 2019 and February 2020.  The purpose of these workshops was to update and seek feedback from the Local Board on these topics:

·        Swanson Road Pedestrian Improvements

·        Henderson Cycleways Project – Single Stage Business Case

Consultation documents on proposed improvements

56.     Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Henderson-Massey Local Board for its feedback and are summarised below for information purposes only.

57.     After consultation, Auckland Transport considers the feedback received and determines whether to proceed further with the proposal as consulted on or proceed with an amended proposal if changes are considered necessary.

·        Proposed bus stop relocation - Westgate Drive

·        Proposed speed humps, Kerb build outs, and pedestrian crossing upgrade with a pedestrian island, new raised table, kerb ramps and footpath reconstruction at 12 to 42 Pomaria Road, Henderson.

·        Proposed speed humps and kerb build outs at 56 to 70 Pomaria Road, Henderson.

·        Proposed speed table and bus stop upgrade with minor parking removal at 38 Larnoch Road, Henderson.

·        Proposed speed humps, speed tables, threshold treatment consisting of red road surfacing, and a bus stop upgrade with minor parking removal at 3 to 6 Larnoch Road, Henderson

·        Proposed speed hump and speed table with footpath reconstruction and kerb ramps at 52 Fairdene Avenue, Henderson

·        Proposed speed humps, speed table, and pedestrian crossing upgrade with a pedestrian island, new raised table, new zebra markings, kerb ramps and footpath reconstruction at 13 Edwards Avenue, Henderson

·        Proposed improvements pedestrian safety on Te Atatu Road, Te Atatu.

Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee (TCC) report

58.     Decisions of the TCC during the month of December 2019 affecting the Henderson/Massey Local Board area are listed below:

Date

Street (Suburb)

Type of Report

Nature of Restriction

Decision

 

1-Dec-19

 

Vodanovich Road / School Road, Te Atatu South

 

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

 

 

No Stopping At All Times / Footpath / Surface Friction Treatment / Road Hump / Flush Median / Shoulder Marking / Traffic Island / Roundabout / No Passing

 

CARRIED

 

1-Dec-19

 

Edgware Road, West Harbour

 

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

 

No Stopping At All Times

 

CARRIED

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

59.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

60.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

61.     The table below gives the LBTCF financial summary for the Henderson-Massey Local Board.

Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Total Funds Available in current political term

$7,774,108

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$3,101,119

Remaining Budget left

$4,672,989

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

62.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

63.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the Board in April 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Owena Schuster – Elected Member Relationship Manager (Henderson-Massey)

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Manger

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Ward Councillors' Update

File No.: CP2020/01775

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a verbal update from the Waitākere Ward Councillors.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A period of 10 minutes has been set aside for the Waitākere Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Henderson-Massey Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      thank Councillors Linda Cooper and Shane Henderson for their update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor - Henderson-Massey

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Henderson-Massey Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/01301

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Henderson-Massey Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter two, 1 October – 31 December 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2019/2020 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with the Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·     The Kai Whakaawe (Māori Broker) role was appointed to take and build on the actions of Waitākere ki tua action plan. The broker presented the project plan for Waitākere ki tua to the local board in November 2019 with strong support given.

·     The successful candidate for the Henderson-Massey Arts Broker service contract was formalised in this quarter and has developed and designed the brand identity for ‘Creative Henderson-Massey’.

·     The first Reference Group meeting for developing an all accessible play space in Henderson-Massey was held in this quarter.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·     The renewal of the damaged heritage building Corban Estate Old Wine Shop is behind delivery as physical works were tendered with no conforming responses received. Negotiation with contractors is in progress.

6.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2019/2020 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note:

·     Operating expenditure of $15.2 million is $1.8 million over budget mainly resulting from miscoding of accruals for parks and facilities maintenance which will be corrected next month.

·     Operating revenue of $2.9 million is $53,000 above budget due to

·     Capital spend of $2.1 million is $1.4 million below budget. This mainly refers to local asset and coastal asset renewals. The main expenditure in the quarter related to work at West Wave Aquatic centre, 399 Don Buck Road and Riverside Park playground.

·     The Henderson Massey Local Board Financial performance report is in attachment B.

 


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter two for the period 1 October–31 December 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Henderson-Massey Local Board has an approved 2019/2020 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Arts, Community and Events;

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation;

·        Libraries and Information;

·        Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration;

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew;

·        Community Leases;

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        The Western Initiative

·        ATEED.

8.       Work programmes are produced annually to meet the Henderson-Massey Local Board outcomes identified in the three-year Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan. The local board plan outcomes are:

·        A network of vibrant and loved urban neighbourhoods.

·        A thriving local economy that supports quality of life.

·        Communities know each other and work together on common interests.

·        Community facilities are vibrant and welcoming places at the heart of our communities.

·        It is easy to get around without a car.

·        Natural spaces are valued and restored.

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.


 

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

11.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 


 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter two

12.     The Kai Whakaawe (Māori Broker) was appointed in this quarter who met with the elected members and the western Strategic Brokers. He is clarifying his role and its interrelations with local boards, the Hoani Waititi Marae and the local Māori community. Discussions have occurred with Māori organisations and individuals to explore options for a new rangatahi programme. Two options will be implemented from January to June 2020. These are the Kuraoke programme (youth leadership through waiata) and the Mana Motuhake group run by Ranui 135, in conjunction with Te Kawerau ā Maki.

13.     Creative Henderson-Massey is a new initiative to support and enable community-led arts activities throughout the Henderson-Massey area. The local board have funded an Arts Broker (who has been appointed) whose role is to identify, curate, programme and enable community arts activities. Creative Henderson-Massey is currently seeking proposals for funding submissions, for those seeking funding support.   

14.     The development of a service assessment for an all accessible play space within the Henderson-Massey Local Board area has progressed, with the first Reference Group meeting held in November 2019. Representatives from six organisations took part in the first meeting to establish outcomes for this project. An accessible play space will provide play experiences to users of varying abilities and provide access to play equipment.

Activities with significant issues

15.     The renewal of the damaged heritage building Corban Estate Old Wine Shop is behind delivery as physical works were tendered with no conforming responses received. Negotiation with contractors is in progress.

Activities on hold

16.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·     Implementation of the board approved masterplan for Te Rangi Hiroa Nursery/Birdwood Winery is on hold until consultation with tenants of the adjacent properties is complete and direction confirmed.

·     The refurbishment of the skate park at Te Pai Park is on hold as it was re-prioritised in Q1 to allow urgent delivery of other projects. Investigation of requirements is now underway and project scope will now be developed.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

17.     There are no deferred activities from the 2019/2020 work programme in quarter two.

Cancelled activities

18.     There are no cancelled activities for quarter two.

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

19.     No activities were merged with other activities in this quarter.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

21.     Work programmes were approved in June 2019 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

22.     The local board is currently investing in several sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

·     The Henderson-Massey Low Carbon Plan is under development with a stocktake of low carbon initiatives in the Henderson-Massey Local Board area being carried out and setting up a key stakeholder working group comprising community members, iwi, youth and business representatives. The group will be facilitated to identify and prioritise strategic, community-based, low carbon outcomes and initiatives for inclusion in the Henderson-Massey Low Carbon Plan.

·     EcoMatters Environment Centre and Sustainability Hub continue to deliver free ‘Zero Carbon Here We Come’ workshops for the community on how to reduce carbon emissions at an individual level. This community partner has a wide focus on environmental issues and initiatives.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     This report informs the Henderson-Massey Local Board of the performance for quarter two for the period 1 October–31 December 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     The Kaiwhakaawe (Māori Broker) for the three west local boards was appointed in quarter two and has met with the elected members and the western Strategic Brokers to help clarify the role and its interrelations with local boards, the Hoani Waititi Marae and the local Māori community.

26.     The local board continued to celebrate te ao Māori with events and programmes and to engage with Iwi and Māori organisations and champion and embed te reo Māori in our libraries and communities.

27.     Through councils Community Empowerment Unit, the local board continued to respond to the aspirations of mana whenua, mataawaka, marae and Māori organisations.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

29.     Henderson Massey Local Board capital investment for the period was $2.1million and net operational cost of service was $12.3million. Operating expenditure is thirteen per cent above budget. The main driver being increased parks and facilities maintenance than scheduled.

30.     Operating revenue was above budget by two per cent, mainly due slightly higher membership fees at West Wave Aquatic Centre than planned. Capital expenditure was 39 per cent below budget. The main driver relates to local asset and coastal asset renewals.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

32.     Community Facilities are currently going through a departmental restructure to provide better support and guidance for decision makers.  There is a risk that the work programmes could be disrupted or delayed. To mitigate this risk, a transition plan is in place to ensure that your work programmes are delivered, and disruptions are kept to a minimum. The local board will be kept informed throughout the transition

33.     The approved Community Facilities 2019/2020 work programme and 2020-2022 indicative work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the 2019/2020 financial year, by ensuring that if projects intended for delivery in the 2019/2020 financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances, that other projects can be progressed while the causes for delays are addressed.

34.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter three (31 March 2020).

 


 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work Programme 2019-2020 quarter two report.

3

b

Operating Performance financial summary as at 31 December 2019

3

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tracey  Wisnewski - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 



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Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes

File No.: CP2020/02872

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to outline key amendments to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework and to obtain the local board’s views.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region (ENV/2018/11).

3.       To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (‘ACAF‘) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors.

4.       In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved a consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

5.       In February 2020, a memorandum was circulated to share key findings from the public consultation (Attachments A and B).

6.       To address the feedback from the consultation, this report outlines key structural changes proposed for the framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers to which all actions will align (i.e., a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change).

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities to streamline actions and address feedback.

7.       It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

8.       The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the changes to the draft Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers for climate action (i.e., a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change)

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities

·   changing the title from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region, addressing both emissions reduction (i.e. mitigation) and preparing for the impacts of a changing climate (i.e. adaptation) (ENV/2018/11).

10.     To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (‘ACAF‘) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors, reaching hundreds of Aucklanders.

11.     Local board engagement and insights were sought throughout development of the framework, including meetings and cluster workshops.   A summary of feedback from local boards is available in Attachments C and D.

12.     In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved the consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

13.     In February 2020, a memo was circulated to all local boards to share key findings from the public consultation on the draft ACAF (Attachment A and B).

14.     This report provides an overview of key proposed changes to the draft ACAF to address the feedback received through the consultation.  Local Board views will be reflected in the final version, which will be reported to the Environment and Climate Change Committee in May 2020.

15.     More detailed changes reported in the consultation summary are not repeated here but will be reflected in text changes in the final version.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The proposed changes to ACAF have been informed by consultation feedback received on the draft document.  Some key themes that arose include:

·   Urgency and scale of action needs to be better articulated

·   Lack of clarity on how key moves work together and how they address our climate goals. In addition it was felt that there are too many.

·   Need to be clearer about roles and responsibilities with a request for more information on who is responsible for actions at each level.

·   Need for partnership working across sectors and with central government and mana whenua in particular.

·   Greater focus on equity across feedback points.

·   Need for a strong Māori voice with widespread support for working with Māori, using mātauranga Māori and Māori practices in designing and implementing climate action.

·   Need for a system shift and scale of change required, and to better articulate this with Aucklanders.

·   Need for communication and behaviour change and a request for campaigns to raise awareness across the region and enable action at an individual level.

·   Need for a significant shift in transport (of all key moves) with the identified actions supported but a need for these to be delivered at pace and scale.

17.     To address this feedback a number of key structural changes are proposed.

18.     The first of these is establish three core drivers for action – our ‘pillars’ (Attachment E).  These provide greater clarity on the goals of the framework and all actions will align to how they deliver against these goals:

·     A Tāmaki response: This pillar reflects the uniqueness of Auckland and our place-based response to climate change.  It is informed by learning from Māori principles and practice, provides a greater focus on equity and a better definition of roles and responsibilities and collective action across governance and sectors.

·   Reducing our emissions: This pillar reflects the need to provide greater clarity on our emissions target and the need to halve emissions by 2030 and reach net zero emissions by 2050.  It improves alignment with the actions and how we will deliver and prioritise emissions reductions.

·   Preparing for climate change: This pillar enables a greater focus on how we will approach climate change adaptation and take a precautionary approach for the region and also provides greater alignment with the actions.

19.     The second structural change is that the eleven key moves are streamlined into eight priorities (Attachment F). This proposed change is to address feedback on where areas are more foundational and therefore should be embedded throughout all priority areas, or where there is confusion and overlap.

·   It is proposed that Key Move 3: Make development and infrastructure climate compatible and Key Move 4: Transform existing buildings and places are combined into a single built environment priority area. 

·   It is proposed that Key Move 1: Lay the foundation is embedded into our three pillars in recognition of the cross-cutting nature of the actions.

·   Similarly, Key Move 9- Rangatahi (Youth & Inter-generational equity) is embedded into pillar 1 to reflect the need to consider actions across the framework.

20.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1 and 9 will still be maintained and reflected in the updated document.

21.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1-11 will be carried through into Priorities 1-8 (Figure 2) and updated to:

·   clarify any ambiguities that were raised in consultation 

·   remove repetition or overlapping actions

·   make additions in response to consultation feedback

·   strengthen alignment to delivery of the three pillars.

22.     Overall, the intent of the actions between the Key Moves 1-11 and Priority areas 1-8, remain the same. Attachment G briefly summarises how the actions have changed from the consultation document to the updated priority areas.

23.     It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

24.     The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     The changes identified in this report have been made to reflect feedback received and updated emissions modelling.  As such, they will further deliver and strengthen climate action already identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Regular meetings and workshops took place across the council group for development of the framework.

27.     In addition, a working group was established from the outset to provide expertise from across the council group, central government and district health boards.

28.     This group has continued to provide input post-consultation and has reviewed and provided input into the proposed changes.

29.     In addition, the team has been working closely across the Council group in the development of costed actions for consideration in the Long-term Plan. This process is running concurrently with the finalisation of the plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The framework will have implications for all local boards.

31.     In June 2018, the Chief Sustainability Office attended workshops of 19 of the 21 local boards and obtained informal email feedback from the other two local boards to identify their main priorities related to climate change.  This was followed up in September 2018 at cluster workshops to assess and test a series of ‘must haves’, which were the precursors to the actions included in the draft framework.

32.     Priorities included:

·   coastal erosion and inundation concerns

·   affordable and accessible transport

·   long-term infrastructure development to consider climate impacts

·   better stormwater management

·   climate-related education and awareness

·   building community resilience

·   for Auckland Council to lead by example.

33.     This report seeks Local Board formal views on proposed changes to the draft Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework outlined in this report. These views will be reflected in the final version.

34.     Local boards will be key in taking climate action at a local level. Support will be provided for local board planning and alignment with outcomes.

35.     The Chief Sustainability Office and Quality Advice Unit will implement a programme of work for the whole council family to provide guidance and training on how to embed climate action in Local Board plans and what to expect in climate impact statements.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Climate change impacts and associated policy and action will have significant impacts for Māori communities.

37.     A Tāmaki and climate change subject matter expert rōpū (group) was established in March 2019 which has been supporting and advising mana whenua and council on climate change issues for Māori and providing direct advice and narrative for the draft framework.

38.     A rangatahi Māori and Pasifika rōpū has also been working in partnership with council on this kaupapa to develop rangatahi-focused actions for the framework.

39.     A joint mana whenua and Māori expert task group is finalising a Tāmaki and climate change position paper, Te ora ō Tāmaki, which will be used as the bridging document to weave key anchor points into the climate action framework. 

40.     Anchor points include:

·   weaving the narrative into the framework, specifically the following sections: Climate change and Māori, Impacts on Māori and Developing the Plan with Māori

·   a section developed by rangatahi (the Youth and intergenerational equity key move)

·   a separate key move of Te puawaitanga o te tangata (Resilient Māori communities).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Actions within the framework will result in budgetary implications for organisations across the region; identifying and unlocking appropriate funding and financing streams in the future will be critical. 

42.     Taking climate action will require a range of finance and/or funding mechanisms. For instance, green bonds have been a useful tool for financing council-owned assets such as electric trains but investment in clean tech may require crowd-sourcing, grants or venture capital.

43.     To support this, a climate finance work package is underway to identify partnerships and broader funding mechanisms across actions such as bonds, grants, equity instruments and public/private partnerships.

44.     The final framework and specific Auckland Council actions being developed will need to inform on-going Long-term Plan discussions to support delivery and avoid costs associated with inaction, such as increased maintenance costs and infrastructure failures through to missed opportunities to Auckland’s economy in delivering the transition. 

45.     Not all actions within council’s remit will require additional budget. Some actions can result in long-term cost avoidance – for example electrifying fleets can reduce fuel and maintenance costs. Some actions could require existing funds to be redirected if priorities change.

46.     Also, not all actions will require funding, for example those related to advocacy to central government or expert input into actions led by other organisations.

47.     The costs associated with different council-specific actions will consider funding sources as described above.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     No high or extreme risks have been identified with the proposed approach.

49.     Moderate risks exist, including:

·   preparing for the implications of climate change may not comply with current rules and regulations

·   potential strategic risk with non-alignment with New Zealand Government direction and policy

·   potential governance risk in shared leadership and ownership of the framework across sectors.

50.     A risk mitigation plan has been developed to address the above, including targeted engagement approaches, a legal review of the final framework, on-going partnership with central government and establishment of clear governance structures for the implementation of the framework.. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Workshops will be held in April 2020 with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Independent Māori Statutory Board to discuss updated framework text, and the final text will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for approval in May 2020.

52.     The draft digital plan layout will be workshopped with the Environment and Climate Change Committee in June 2020 and finalised in July 2020.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ACAF Consultation Summary Memo

3

b

ACAF Consultation Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Engagement Summary - LB workshops June 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Engagement Summary - Clusters workshops Oct 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

ACAF Proposed Three Pillars

3

f

ACAF Proposed Eight Priorities

3

g

ACAF Proposed Priority Areas and Actions

3

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Anderson - Principal Specialist Sustainability and Climate Resilence

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

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Henderson-Massey Local Board

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Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review

File No.: CP2020/03401

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Review to the Independent Panel.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governing Body approved the Terms of Reference for an Independent Panel to undertake a review of substantive CCOs at its meeting on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127].

3.       The review covers Auckland Transport, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development, Panuku Development Auckland, Regional Facilities Auckland and Watercare.  The overall objectives are to examine:

·   whether CCOs are an effective and efficient model for delivering services to the council and Aucklanders, and

·   whether the CCO decision-making model provides sufficient political oversight, public transparency and accountability.

4.       The review asks the Independent Panel to examine three areas: the CCO model and its accompanying roles and responsibilities; the accountability of CCOs; and CCO culture.

5.       The Independent Panel is seeking the views of local boards on these areas.

6.       Local boards are advised that their views are requested by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations Review to the Independent Panel.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Governing Body approved the CCO review Terms of Reference on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127]. The Independent Panel was appointed by the Governing Body on 12 December 2019 and is comprised of Miriam Dean, Doug Martin and Leigh Auton. Miriam Dean has been appointed panel chair [GB/2019/149].

8.       Briefings on the CCO Review were provided to local board chairs in December 2019 by staff and in February 2020 by panel member Leigh Auton.  The panel wrote to local board chairs in February asking for advice on what constitutes good engagement between CCOs and local boards.  

9.       Monthly updates on the review are reported to the CCO Oversight Committee and circulated to all local boards.

10.     The Independent Panel is seeking comprehensive engagement to obtain a range of views about the issues forming the subject of the review (Attachment A).  Community engagement on the review is occurring alongside the Annual Budget 2020/2021 in February/March 2020. An engagement document has been developed and a summary document has been translated into five languages and a New Zealand Sign Language video. A webpage[1] provides information on the review, including stakeholder updates, relevant documents (including the Terms of Reference) and a contact for further information.

11.     All feedback on the CCO Review will be provided to the Independent Panel.  The Panel will report on the key issues and community and stakeholder feedback in May and will provide a final report and recommendations in July 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     To identify the scope of their work, the Independent Panel has distilled the essence of the review terms into a list of issues, that forms the basis of the engagement and eventual report. The list and prompts, at Attachment A, provide a structure for local boards to give feedback.

13.     The three key areas of focus set out in the list of issues are:

Issue

Area of Focus

CCO model, roles and responsibilities

The essential question here is whether the CCO model delivers council services with the maximum of operational efficiency, transparency and accountability, or whether there are better ways to deliver such services

CCO accountability

Here the key question is whether the council’s current approach to holding CCOs to account on behalf of Aucklanders could be improved

CCO culture

The central issue here is whether CCOs need to improve how they consult, engage with and respond to the wider community and council

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Local boards have an opportunity to consider suggestions that might improve climate change outcomes/mitigation in their feedback on the CCO Review.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The Independent Panel is engaging across the council group on the review, including:

·   the chair of the independent panel wrote introducing the panel and the review objectives to all CCO chairs and chief executives, councillors, local board chairs, chief executive of IMSB and the co-chairs of the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 20 December 2019

·   the panel met briefly with the CCO chief executives and chairs on 28 January 2020 to discuss the proposed review process and CCO engagement. Each CCO was asked to provide the panel with key stakeholders/customers

·   individual meetings have taken place with CCO chief executives and board chairs over February and March 2020, and the panel is meeting with CCO stakeholders.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local board formal feedback on the CCO Review, including issues experienced with CCOs, good practice and options for improvement, is sought by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

17.     Material on the CCO Review was available at Have your Say local board events for the Annual Budget.

18.     Following the conclusion of the Independent Panel’s review, as part of the development of the next 10-year budget, local boards will have the opportunity to provide formal views on any proposals for change to the CCO model.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Staff presented to the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 19 December 2019. The panel met with one of the Forum co-chairs and mana whenua are invited to provide feedback to the panel.  Mana whenua have also been invited to a hui with panel members on 18 March 2020.

20.     The panel has met with the Independent Māori Statutory Board. 

21.     Panel members spoke on Radio Waatea to promote Māori interest and feedback on the CCO review. Material on the CCO review is being provided at mataawaka events for the Annual Budget and mataawaka organisations have been briefed on the review during the public engagement period. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There are no financial implications from this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are no risks associated with the recommendations in this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The Independent Panel is due to report on key issues, community and stakeholder feedback in May and to provide a final report, with recommendations, in July 2020.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review list of issues

3

 


 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Gomas - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020 - project endorsement

File No.: CP2020/03067

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

To seek endorsement from the Henderson-Massey Local Board of an application from within its local board area to the regionally contested Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1)      The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund (the “Fund”) is a contestable fund that supports the development of regional and sub-regional community sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

2)      There is $7 million available in the 2019/2020 funding round which is currently underway. Allocation of the Fund will be decided by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.

3)      Local boards have an opportunity to endorse applications to the Fund from groups within their local board boundaries. A formal resolution is required for the local board to endorse a project.

4)      The following group from the Henderson-Massey Local Board area has applied in the 2019/2020 funding round:

a)   Waitemata Rugby Union Football and Sports Club Incorporated: “Waitemata Park Sports Field and Light Upgrades”

5)      Henderson-Massey Local Board is invited to endorse the above project to be considered for investment through the Fund.   

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      endorse the following application to be considered for investment through the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020:

i)        Waitemata Rugby Union Football and Sports Club Incorporated:

“Waitemata Park Sports Field and Light Upgrades”

 

Horopaki

Context

Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund

6)      The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund is a contestable fund that supports the development of regional and sub-regional community sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

7)      The Fund looks to address gaps in provision across the Auckland region and allow council to proactively respond to changing sport and recreation preferences.

8)      The Long-term Plan 2018-2028 allocated $120 million to the Fund over the next ten years, including $7 million in 2019/2020, $7 million in 2020/2021, $13.4 million in 2021/2022 and $13.6 million in 2022/2023

9)      Decision making for the Fund sits with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (“PACE”) Committee.

10)    The Fund’s priorities align with the ‘Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039’ priorities:

High priority

Medium priority

Low priority

Core infrastructure (e.g. courts, fields, playing surfaces/structures and lighting) that is central to sport and recreation participation.

Ancillary infrastructure (e.g. toilets, changing rooms, equipment storage and carparking) that enables safe and sanitary access for participants and spectators.

Incidental infrastructure (e.g. clubrooms and administration facilities) that is not required for sports participation but exist for social and management purposes.

 

11)    Applicants may seek investment in the planning, design, or development stages of a project.

12)    The Fund prioritises investment into facility development projects over $500,000 and partnerships able to leverage additional investment, allowing more of the facilities Auckland needs to be built more quickly and effectively.

13)    Projects will be assessed in the context of ‘Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039’ and the following four investment principles:

Principle

Description

% of

assessment

Equity

Ensures equity of outcomes across the population regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status or location

40%

Outcome-focused

There is a clear ’line of sight’ between the investment and the outcomes it delivers

30%

Financial sustainability

Projects need to be financially viable and affordable for the public

20%

Accountability

Investment should be efficient, effective, transparent and consistent

10%

 

14)    The application process for the Fund comprises two gateways:

·        Stage one (closed 1st November 2019) – Expression of Interest (EOI). A one-page canvas that asked for key information about the problem and opportunity, the proposed intervention, where and who is involved, the funding required and the impact if delivered.

·        Stage two (closed 2nd February 2020) – Full application. A formal application process asking the applicant to expand on their EOI with further detail, including evidence such as needs analyses, feasibility studies, business cases, detailed design, or other supporting information as relevant to their application.

15)    In stage one, fifty-eight EOIs were received, of which 21 projects aligned strongly with the criteria and were invited to proceed to stage two. In stage two, 17 applications were received.

16)    An assessment panel comprised of Sport New Zealand and Auckland Council staff reviewed stage two applications and a workshop will be held with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee (PACE) in March 2020, with a business meeting to follow in April 2020.

17)    Aktive Auckland Sport & Recreation was originally represented on the assessment panel but has withdrawn as it has submitted an application on behalf of the multi-code Regional Indoor Court Leadership Group, to procure professional services.

18)    Prior to the PACE Committee decision, local boards are invited to endorse applications to the Fund from groups within their local board boundaries. A formal resolution is required for the local board to endorse a project.

19)    Endorsement of an application means the local board supports the application being considered for investment through the Fund. No other commitment is sought from Henderson-Massey Local Board at this stage. 

20)    Local board endorsement of an application, or refusal to endorse, will be included in advice prepared for the PACE Committee regarding investment of the Fund. 

21)    The PACE Committee may approve or decline investment in a project irrespective of local board endorsement.

Waitemata Rugby Union Football and Sports Club

22)    One stage two application to the Fund was received from within the Henderson-Massey Local Board area – from Waitemata Rugby Union Football and Sports Club (“Waitemata Rugby”). 

23)    Waitemata Rugby owns the land at 96 Swanson Rd, Henderson which compromises three sports fields and associated buildings and services. The club maintains the sports fields at its own cost and makes them available for scheduled competition games and community use. The site is referred to “Waitemata Park”.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24)    One application has been received from the Henderson-Massey Local Board area:

Application

Summary

Sum requested

Total project cost

Waitemata Rugby Union Football and Sports Club: “Waitemata Park Sports Field and Light Upgrades”

Investigation and design for upgrade of sports fields and floodlighting at Waitemata Park.

$65,000

$65,000

 

25)    Two options have been considered:

Option one:  Endorse the application

26)    The local board may elect to endorse the application from Waitemata Rugby to the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020:

27)    This option provides the highest level of support for the application from within the Henderson-Massey Local Board area.

28)    Option one is recommended.

Option two:   Do not endorse the application

29)    The local board may decline to endorse the application.

30)    This provides the local board with opportunity to indicate an objection to the project, or regional investment in the project. If the local board is not opposed to the project there is no benefit in withholding endorsement.

31)    Option two is not recommended.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32)    Local board endorsement of the applications is not in itself considered to carry a climate impact

33)    The proposed project involves professional services only, therefore minimal or no climate impact is anticipated. When engaging professional consultants, the scope of works can include climate impact considerations. Design elements can maximise environmental sustainability principles to lessen climate impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34)    The application relates to land and facilities owned by Waitemata Rugby. There are no impacts on council land.

35)    Future upgrade of the sports fields and floodlighting at Waitemata Park will increase the capacity of the overall sports field network which supports participation in sport and recreation and reduces the number of sports fields council has to provide in the local area.

36)    There are no other anticipated council group impacts. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37)    Due to tight regional timeframes the views of the Henderson-Massey Local Board have not been sought prior to preparation of this report.

38)    The decision to endorse the Waitemata Rugby application is not considered contentious. The investigation and design of sports field and floodlighting upgrades at Waitemata Park will position Waitemata Rugby to fundraise for physical works. Resulting future upgrades at Waitemata Park will increase the local provision sports field capacity which supports participation in sport and recreation.

39)    The application from Waitemata Rugby aligns with the Henderson-Massey Local Board Plan 2017 Outcome 3: “Community facilities are vibrant and welcoming places at the heart of our communities”

a) Objective: People are more active

i)   Key Initiative: Partner with community sport and recreation groups to lift residents’ exercise levels.

ii)  Support our sport and recreation groups to find appropriate accommodation and playing venues.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40)    Local board endorsement of the applications is not in itself considered to impact on Māori issues.

41)    The assessment criteria developed for the Fund has a stronger weighting for projects that are Māori led, have high collaboration with Māori organisations, prioritise strategically increased participation by Māori and/or involves activities with the likelihood of high Māori participation.

42)    This funding round was presented to the Manawhenua Forum on 4 March 2020. Feedback related to improving the process for administering the Fund. No specific mention was made of the application from Waitemata Rugby.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

43)    The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund is a regional budget allocated through The Long-term Plan 2018-2028

44)    $7 million is budgeted in 2019/2020, $7 million in 2020/2021, $13.4 million in 2021/2022 and $13.6 million in 2022/2023.

45)    A key objective of the Fund is to invest in significant capital development projects that will be delivered quickly to get Aucklanders active. The Fund will also help to develop a pipeline of projects by advancing the investigation, planning and design stages of projects. The balance between planning and capital development investment will depend on the merits of the applications received.

46)    Local board endorsement of the applications will support investment through the Fund.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47)    The ability to deliver projects is a key weighting within the criteria to be used by the assessment panel. This includes:

a)   having an achievable funding plan in place

b)   having the necessary skills and expertise (in-house or procured) to deliver the project

c)   having achieved any relevant key project milestones such as site tenure, consent, etc

48)    Not all applications for projects will receive Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Funding. Some organisations have already been redirected to other funding sources as appropriate (e.g. Local Board Grants, Surf 10:20 Fund, Regional Facilities Auckland), whilst others may apply again in future rounds when their project is further developed.

49)    Some projects will not align strongly with the criteria used for the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund. However, there may be other local drivers as to why local boards and non-council funders invest in those projects. It is incumbent on all parties to set realistic expectations in regard the funding mechanisms available.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

50)    Henderson-Massey Local Board endorses (or declines to endorse) the applications.

51)    Staff workshop the applications, assessment panel’s recommendations and local board endorsement with the PACE Committee in March 2020.

52)    Report to the PACE Committee business meeting in April 2020 for allocation of the Fund.

53)    Funding agreements with successful applicants developed May-June 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    


 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Nick Harris - Sport & Recreation Team Lead

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Notion of Motion: Chair C Carter - Progression of Waitakere City Council resolutions Te Atatu Marae.

File No.: CP2020/03399

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Notice of Motion presented by Chairperson Chris Carter to consider the progression by Auckland Council of legacy Waitakere City Council resolutions with regards to the proposed Te Atatu Marae.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Following ongoing advocacy Chairperson C Carter has given a Notice of a Motion to request Auckland Council to progress earlier Waitakere City Council resolutions in regard to Te Atatu Marae that had been held in abeyance due to non-related legal matters which have been settled and the amalgamation of earlier council entities.

3.       The notice, signed by Chairperson C Carter and Deputy Chairperson Will Flavell as seconder, is appended as Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      request that the Director of Governance take forward current discussions between Auckland Council staff and representatives of the Te Atatu Marae Coalition with respect to land tenure for the planned Te Atatu Marae on Habourview-Orangihina Park and that these be formalised in a committee meeting report to the Parks, Arts Community and Events (or most appropriate) Committee

b)      note the ongoing endorsement of the local board over the past four electoral terms for the land to be used for marae purposes

c)      acknowledge and commend the Te Atatu Marae Coalition and supporting affiliates for their unwavering drive since the amalgamation of Auckland Council and for more than three decades to secure tenure and progress the vision of development of a community marae on the Te Atatu peninsula.

 


 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of Motion by Chair C Carter for consideration of Progression of Waitakere City Council resolutions Te Atatu Marae.

3

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor - Henderson-Massey

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Confirmation of Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2020/01774

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present records of workshops held by the Henderson-Massey Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Briefings provided at the workshop held are as follows:

          4 February 2020:

a)   Update on north-west aquatic provision project (Confidential Item)

b)   AT Henderson Cycleways Project – Single Stage Business Case

c)   Inclusive Play Space

d)   6 monthly progress report on achievements in CEU work programme

e)   Local Board Plans

f)    Administration (weekly)

11 February 2020:

a)   Corbans Art Estate Tour with board members

b)   Disposal of Land at 595 Te Atatu Rd

c)   2020/2021 Henderson-Massey Local Board grants programme review

d)   Administration (weekly)

25 February 2020:

a)   Community Facilities Update

-   Royal Reserve – amenity block mural

-   Work Programme NZTA mitigation funding

-   Growth Funding

b)   Local Board Plan update

c)   Panuku update - Opanuku bridge/playground and HVR Enhancement project

-   Unlock Henderson update

-   Disposal of 331 Gt North Rd Henderson

d)   Te Atatu Pony Club Incorporated, Harbourview-Orangihina, Te Atatu

e)   Assessment of applications for ex-Massey Library space, 545 Don Buck Road, Massey

f)    Henderson Croquet Club Incorporated, Cranwell Park, 20 Alderman Drive, Henderson

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for 4, 11 and 25 February 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop records 4, 11 and 25 February 2020

3

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor - Henderson-Massey

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2020/01773

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Henderson-Massey Local Board with a Governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The Governance forward work calendar (the calendar) for the Henderson-Massey Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Henderson-Massey Local Board:

a)      receive the Governance forward work calendar for March 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar - March 2020

3

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Brenda  Railey - Democracy Advisor - Henderson-Massey

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitakere Ranges, Whau

 


Henderson-Massey Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

    

    



[1] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/council-controlled-organisations/Pages/review-of-council-controlled-organisations.aspx