I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Kaipātiki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 18 March 2020

10.00am

Kaipātiki Local Board Office
90 Bentley Avenue
Glenfield

 

Kaipātiki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

John Gillon

 

Deputy Chairperson

Danielle Grant, JP

 

Members

Paula Gillon

 

 

Ann Hartley, JP

 

 

Melanie Kenrick

 

 

Cindy Schmidt

 

 

Andrew Shaw

 

 

Adrian Tyler

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacinda Short

Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

 

11 March 2020

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 484 6236

Email: jacinda.short@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          6

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       6

6.1     Wendy Harsant                                                                                                     6

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          7

7.1     Petition - Make the Paragon Avenue Intersection Safer                                  7

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    8

8.1     Northart                                                                                                                 8

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  8

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

11        Approval of the shared path upgrade at Birkenhead War Memorial Park            11

12        Portsea Reserve playground renewal – addition of fencing and shading            33

13        Approval of additional funding for Normanton Reserve – renew basketball courts, path drainage and drinking fountain                                                                         49

14        Approval for the Onepoto Domain Pathway Renewal Concept Plan                    75

15        Concept design approval for the renewal of Camelot Reserve play space          81

16        Approval for Private Road Name for Development at 208 Birkdale Road, Birkdale                                                                                                                                       89

17        Auckland Transport Monthly Update                                                                        97

18        Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan                                                                        105

19        Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework - proposed changes                                                                                                                                     111

20        Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review                                                                                                                                     313

21        Feedback from Kaipātiki Local Board: 2019 Local Elections and Liquor Licensing Trust Elections and Recent Energy Trust Elections                                             319

22        National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity                                        325

23        Inter-Regional Marine Pest Management Plan                                                       335

24        Kaipātiki Community Places Quarterly Reports                                                    337

25        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Kaipātiki Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020                                                                                               369

26        Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report                                                          381

27        Members' Reports                                                                                                      383

28        Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board Members' Update    385

29        Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - February 2020                               387

30        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      395  

31        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome Karakia

 

           

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

i)       A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member; and

ii)      A non-financial conflict of interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Relationship Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 19 February 2020, as true and correct.


 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

6.1       Wendy Harsant

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To acknowledge Wendy Harsant’s retirement as Gallery Director at Northcote’s Northart gallery, after more than 20 years of service to the arts and Kaipātiki community.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Wendy Harsant was Gallery Director of Northart gallery for more than 20 years.

3.       Wendy was not only a manager at Northart but has curated a range of exhibitions from solo shows to small-group exhibitions, showing the latest works by well-known professional artists; from student shows to important retrospectives honouring some of the best artists; shows that focus on painting, or photography, or ceramics, or weaving; members’ exhibitions; and school/student exhibitions.

4.       Wendy was also very involved in the changing demographics of the North Shore, and alongside regular ‘Stations of the Cross’ window exhibition for Easter, Northart has featured art by Maori, Korean, Pasifika, and Chinese artists. This was reflected in appointing a Chinese liaison coordinator in 2017.

5.       As Christine Young mentioned in the December Channel magazine (issue 105 December 2019), Wendy carved a reputation for Northart as innovative and committed to contemporary fine art.

6.       This report provides the local board an opportunity to formally acknowledge Wendy Harsant’s service to the arts and the Kaipātiki community.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      acknowledge Wendy Harsant’s retirement as Gallery Director at Northart after more than 20 years of service to the arts and Kaipātiki community.

 


 

7          Petitions

 

7.1       Petition - Make the Paragon Avenue Intersection Safer

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present a petition to the Kaipātiki Local Board regarding the safety of the Paragon Avenue intersection in Beach Haven.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Belinda Simpson will present a petition to the Kaipatiki Local Board. The prayer of the petition is as follows:

"Everyday we put our own and our families lives at risk when we try to pull out of Paragon Ave onto Beach Haven Road. It is impossible to see oncoming traffic due to cars parked to the right of the intersection. It shouldn't take an accident to make AT (Auckland Transport) take notice. 

This issue not only affects residents of Paragon Ave and the local streets but also anyone frequenting Beach Haven's busiest sportsground, Shepherds Park, particularly in winter when numbers swell from across the North Shore due to soccer season. This part of Beach Haven is experiencing huge growth at the moment with extensive new housing being built just up from the intersection. Our roads are only going to get busier. Our ability to pull out from Paragon Ave safely is only going to get harder. The chances of someone getting hurt even higher. 

All we need is some yellow lines to remind people not to park so close to the intersection so we can have a little more visibility. This issue has been raised with AT before and no action was taken. There is power in numbers however and I hope that once they know how many people are affected they'll take notice. There are too many of us fearing for our safety at this intersection and we need to speak up. We don't want to have to drive a different way to get ourselves or our families to their destinations. We don't want to put our lives at risk everyday.

Thanks for taking the time to sign this petition to help make our community and its members safer."

3.       The full petition is attached to this report at Attachment A, and contains 156 signatures.

4.       The Kaipātiki Local Board’s Orders (7.6) allow for the presentation of a petition to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      thank Belinda Simpson for her attendance.

b)      receive the petition in relation to making the Paragon Avenue intersection safer.

 

Attachments

a          18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Paragon Petition PDFS............................................................................................... 401

 


 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Kaipātiki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Northart

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this deputation is to update the Kaipātiki Local Board regarding Northart.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Jonathan Organ, Director of Northart, Jessica Pearless, Director of Northart, and Lindsay Waugh, Board Member of Northart, will be in attendance to address the board in support of this item.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Northart.

b)      thank Jonathan Organ, Jessica Pearless and Lindsay Waugh for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Approval of the shared path upgrade at Birkenhead War Memorial Park

File No.: CP2020/01829

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the preferred concept design and location for the shared pathway upgrade from Mahara Avenue to Recreation Drive in Birkenhead War Memorial Park. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Three concept design options were presented and discussed at the 28 August 2019 local board workshop. The local board expressed support for the recommended option - 1A Concrete Path on Existing Path. 

3.       The 2016 Kaipātiki Connection Network Plan and the 2019 Birkenhead War Memorial Park Master Plan both prioritise an upgrade of the existing service road between Mahara Avenue to Recreation Drive to a shared path for walking and cycling.

4.       The project will include the formalisation of the connection to encourage improved opportunity for activity and fitness, improving people’s access to outdoor recreation, and active transportation modes. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the design and location of a shared path as detailed in “Option 1A–Concrete Path on Existing Path”, as depicted in Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Birkenhead War Memorial Park is a 30-hectare park located within the Kaipātiki Local Board area. It is a large public reserve that is currently home to multiple sports fields, nature bush tracks, and various built facilities. 

6.       ​​​​​​​​​The Birkenhead War Memorial Park underwent the development of a master plan in winter 2019 and was approved by the local board in August 2019 under resolution number KT/2019/45. This master plan was developed by working closely with mana whenua and park user groups, and features this upgraded shared path connection across this section of the site. 

7.       The local board approved resolution number KT/218/248 in December 2018 for the allocation of funds through the Kaipātiki Local Board Auckland Transport Capital Fund to progress the upgrade of the walking and cycling connection for formalisation as recorded:

a)      allocate the below amounts from the Kaipātiki Local Board Auckland Transport Capital Fund to progress the following transport projects that have been scoped by Auckland Transport and were reported back to the local board in October 2018:

Birkenhead War Memorial Park Shared path project (#605): additional $260,000 (making the total allocation $460,000). ​

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Three alternative concept designs were prepared and presented to the local board for consideration at a workshop on 28 August 2019. The recommended option was confirmed as the preferred outcome based on limited impact, treatment for stormwater runoff, and being within the available budget. This option is included as the Attachment – Birkenhead War Memorial Park Shared Path. 

9.       The existing service road is steep along the eastern portion and features a slope of 17 per cent. This is in excess of the standard design practice of 10 per cent. Both options 1A and 1B propose this surface to smoothed and regraded to the extent possible to minimise this slope. Option two is the shallowest grading but would require new basecourse and further land disturbance.

10.     Due to the steep slopes on site, resulting stormwater runoff and sheet flow was a strong consideration in the design. The recommended design features swales and riprap to slow and control the release of water. The metalled drive nearest the pump track is currently subject to erosion and will be stabilised as a sealed surface in all options.  Additionally, there is a proposed minor concrete bridge in the lower area to provide flow underneath the shared path. This design feature is in all prepared options.

11.     Both options 1A and 1B have more visibility and exposure to the users and would be considered the safer options in terms of site safety, while option two delivers users to the rear of the existing club rooms and is a more obscured space. Under this consideration of surveillance methods, option 1A is recommended. 

12.     Access to the service road is controlled at both ends by lockable swing gates. The gate nearest the pump track is a single swing arm, while the gate nearest Recreation Drive is a double swing arm gate. In the current state, these gates act as barriers to cycling users. In order to maintain control of the service drive but allow for cyclists to ride through, the gates are recommended to be removed and replaced with removable bollards and feature wayfinding signage. 

13.     A summary table of the proposed options is as follows:

 

Option 1A – concrete path on existing path- recommended option

Option 1B – concrete and gravel path on existing path

Option 2 – Based on Draft Master Plan

Surface Type

Concrete, 3 metres wide

Mixed - concrete and existing gravel, 3 metres wide

Concrete, 3 metres wide

Benefits

· Minimal earthworks

· Reduce erosion

· Minimal earthworks

· Lower construction costs

· Shorter route

· Shallower gradient

 

Challenges/

Constraints

· Not in line with master plan for direct stair route, longer route

· Not in line with master plan for direct stair route, longer route

· Gravel stretch not suitable for thin bicycle tyres

· Higher maintenance in long term of gravel

· Requires new basecourse, fill, signage, markings, etc.

· Not a comfortable connection to back of clubs

Estimated total cost

$414,700

$293,500

$470,200

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     The recommended option of sealing this connection and promoting its use for walking and cycling is in support of climate mitigation. More opportunities for emission-free access will help minimize the release of carbon dioxide and global warming. Although the initial installation uses concrete (a material that has a high carbon-footprint to prepare), it is offset by the minimised water pollution caused by erosion and the promotion of emission-free transportation corridors. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The concept designs were consulted with council’s Operational and Maintenance and Project Delivery teams. Both teams supported option 1A and have requested this be a controlled access. This has been accommodated in the recommended concept design by proposing removable bollards.  

16.     A senior Healthy Waters specialist has reviewed each option for potential impact to any changes in hydrology in the catchment area. The resulting modifications to the design have included further soil stabilization treatment and runoff control in the swales. This area is recognized as a low-lying area subject to overland flow paths, and any disturbance should be minimal and controlled. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local board members indicated support for concept design - Option 1A. They also requested the following be indicated on the plans:

·      a future stair connection to the Recreation Drive Carpark; and

·      a future māra hūpara and clarify wayfinding signage with distances for users. 

These actions are outside of this scope of work but are sited on the plans as per the request of the local board members.  

18.     Feedback was received from Bike Auckland which indicated Birkenhead War Memorial Park is somewhat isolated to commuting road cyclists, and that it would likely be utilised by leisure or recreational cyclists only. 

19.     The project aligns with the following Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes and objectives –

·      Outcome: Our people are active and healthy

§ Objective – Active and healthy transport opportunities and continue to deliver the Kaipātiki Connections Network Plan. 

·      Outcome: Getting to and around Kaipātiki is easy

§ Objective – Walking and cycling focus as the Kaipātiki Connections Network Plan delivers walking and cycling links through the local board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     Māori engagement was conducted through the master planning process and this upgrade is a derivative of that effort, as approved in August 2019 under resolution number KT/2019/145. The recommended option 1A is in support of Māori values by reusing the existing service road, eliminating erosion, and encouraging sport and physical activity on the park. Further engagement will occur in this area with the proposed māra hūpara nature playground.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     Each option has been prepared in conjunction with a cost estimate that shows a range from $293,500 up to $470,200.  The lowest initial cost option is Option 1B, followed by Option 1A, and Option 2 being the most expensive.

22.     Options 1A and 1B can be completed within the current budget, while Option 2 is above the available budget.

23.     The recommended and preferred Option 1A is within the budget of $460,000 as approved per resolution number KT/2018/248.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

 

Risk

Mitigation

Option 1A – concrete path on existing path- (recommended option)

Low – reuse of existing drive, improves erosion

Design is improvement to current conditions for erosion and access

Option 1B – concrete and gravel path on existing path

Low/Medium – reuse of existing drive, but has potential erosion in gravel section

Accept higher maintenance

Option 2 – Based on Draft Master Plan

Medium – reuses most of existing drive, but has new work that overextends the budget

Not recommended option

 

24.     Option 1A is a low-risk upgrade as the limit of disturbance is over an existing service drive.  The footprint for this project does not interfere with existing vegetation and would further enhance pedestrian use across the park. 

25.     The resulting runoff and sheet flow across the proposed concrete surface will be mitigated by providing a swale to slow the flow of water and prevent further erosion. The connection nearest Recreation Drive is already an impervious asphalt surface and will have no change in runoff once established as concrete.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     If approved, staff will progress the project through to detailed design, consent, and delivery of the physical works. The local board will be notified of progress through the updates of the project status as required actions are completed. These actions will be coordinated with the proposed works from the master plan within Birkenhead War Memorial Park.  

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Birkenhead War Memorial Park Shared Path

15

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kimberley Graham - Growth Development Specialist

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 



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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Portsea Reserve playground renewal – addition of fencing and shading

File No.: CP2020/02118

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of option three, installing a post and rebar fence surrounding the play space and parts of the reserve at Portsea Reserve.

2.       To seek approval of option two, installing full shade sail coverage of the play space at Portsea Reserve.

3.       To seek approval to re-allocate $13,362.14 of locally driven initiative (LDI) capex funding, which was originally allocated for fencing, to address the budget shortfall for the installation of full shade sail coverage at Portsea Reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.       The design for the renewal of the Portsea Reserve play space was approved by the Kaipātiki Local Board on 20 September 2019 (resolution number KT/2019/190).

5.       As part of the design approval the Kaipātiki Local Board also allocated up to $40,000 of the local board’s locally driven initiative (LDI) capex fund towards installing a perimeter fence around Portsea Reserve.

6.       Public consultation was undertaken to validate several fencing options that could be installed at Portsea Reserve.

7.       This report outlines the results of the survey, provides an overview of fencing options and seeks approval of the recommended fencing option (option three).

8.       The report further seeks to provide an update on the costing for the shade coverage at Portsea Reserve.

9.       The Kaipātiki Local Board had originally allocated $12,000 of the local board’s LDI capex funds towards full shade sail coverage of the play space based on an early cost estimate. It was found that the estimate was insufficient to provide full shade cover, and the report outlines options for shading.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the recommended fencing option (option three), which is the installation of a post and rebar fence at Portsea Reserve.

b)      approve the recommended shade sail option (option two), as this will provide full shade cover for the Portsea Reserve play space.

c)      approve the re-allocation of $13,362.14 of the local board’s locally driven initiative (LDI) capex budget, previously allocated to the delivery of a new fence, to address the shortfall in the LDI capex budget previously allocated to the delivery of the shade sail at Portsea Reserve.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Portsea Reserve play space was identified for renewal in financial year 2018/2019. The play space has been recognised as a neighbourhood park for the local community in Chatswood.

11.     Portsea Reserve is situated on the corner of two residential streets, between Chatswood Reserve and Kauri Point Domain. Chelsea Primary School is within walking distance of this reserve.

12.     The play space is clearly visible from the surrounding street network and residential properties, and has no catchment overlaps with nearby neighbourhood parks.

13.     The concept design for the renewal of the play space was approved by the local board on 20 September 2019. At the same meeting, the local board allocated additional locally driven initiative (LDI) capex funding towards the installation of shading and fencing.

14.     Public consultation was to be completed for fencing options and reported back to the Kaipātiki Local Board for its consideration.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Fencing options

15.     Portsea Reserve is characterised by its corner position, border planting and centralised play space. Given the corner position, the fencing will be required to be unobtrusive and maintain visibility for passing traffic.

16.     The survey presented four fencing options for the public to comment on:

Option one

Renew the playground without the inclusion of fencing

Option two

Strategically placed barrier fence

Option three

Post and rope barrier fence

Option four

1200mm high aluminum fence with gated access


For the survey form refer to Attachment A “Fencing survey_Portsea Reserve playground” of the agenda report.

17.     The results of the survey have been summarised in Attachment B of the agenda report, “Portsea Reserve_fencing survey results_Dec 2019”. The three graphs below provide a summary of the results:
    

18.     Based on the options presented in the survey, 37 per cent of respondents indicated that fencing was not a desirable option for this reserve. Out of those in favour of fencing, 37 per cent preferred the 1200mm high fence with gated access.

19.     Due to this split in opinion, the fencing options were re-visited to achieve a more balanced outcome that would consider all views presented by the community, and provide an option that would be supported by all parties.

20.     Below is an analysis of the updated fencing options and staff recommendation:

Option

Description

Analysis

Advice

One

No fencing

The reserve is currently not fenced and there are no known injuries from children running onto the street. While there is a great number of respondents that are in support of keeping the reserve unfenced and reference the track record to date, many respondents still voted for installation of a fence. This, paired with the continuous risk from school traffic along Chelsea View Dr, justifies the installation of a fence.

This option is not recommended.

Two

Timber posts and steel rods


(indicative photo)

This option consists of evenly spaced timber posts, connected via two lines of steel rods.
The fence would be installed at 700mm height with rods at 200mm and 550mm off the ground.

This is a modified version of the post and rope fence that was proposed in the survey. It provides a simple low-fencing option that would mitigate the risk from children running onto the road by providing minimal visual impact as it could be mostly concealed by planting.

 

This option is not recommended.

Three

Timber post and rebar

(indicative photo)

This fence would be installed at a height of 1050mm and would have three to four closely spaced rebars at the bottom and two wider spaced rebars at the top.

The timber post and rebar option is the closest to the aluminium pool type fence that was proposed in the survey. It provides a higher barrier to the street, which means that particularly small children would be much less inclined to climb, thereby better mitigating the risk of children running onto the busy street.
While it is close to the proposed aluminium fence it also takes into account the visual amenity and is likely to be more acceptable for those that were in favour of “no fencing” for the reserve. Surrounded by a planting strip, the fence will blend better with is surrounds and be less intrusive.

 

This is the recommended option.

 

21.     The approved fencing option will be installed as indicated in the below diagram:




Diagram 1: proposed fence line at Portsea Reserve

22.     As outlined in an earlier report to the Kaipātiki Local Board (presented at the 20 September 2019 business meeting), installing the fence around the outer boundaries of the reserve would increase the risk of losing visibility for passing traffic and thereby increasing the likelihood for accidents along the reserve.

23.     Taking this into consideration, the fence was designed to enclose only about half of the reserve, thereby maintaining full visibility for passing traffic.

24.     The existing garden beds will be expanded along the full length of the fence which will provide an additional visual barrier for children playing on the playground, and will also allow easier maintenance of the reserve.

25.     The fence would maintain the current two entry points to the playground as indicated by red arrows in diagram one above. Gates are not proposed at this stage but could be added to the proposed fencing option at a later stage, if deemed necessary.

Shading options

26.     The playground at Portsea Reserve is currently unshaded.

27.     The placement of the playground within the reserve and the lack of natural shade means the play equipment may heat up considerably during the summer months. The installation of shade sails is therefore considered beneficial given it is frequently used by the community.

28.     The below table outlines the identified options:

Option

Description

Analysis

Advice

One

Providing partial shade over the large play module.

This option provides an acceptable amount of shade for the play elements that children are most likely to spend longer durations of time on.

Due to this being the only neighbourhood play space and having no overlaps with other catchments, there is a chance that it will be heavily used (especially after school) and the swing may become equally popular, which would mean partial shade may be insufficient.

This option is not recommended.

Two

Providing full shade for the entire play space

Provision of full shade would consist of the installation of two shade sails above the play space. This would allow for all day play on the playground without the increased risk of sunburn or dehydration from heat. Being on a school route and being the only neighbourhood playground in the catchment, it appears reasonable to provide full coverage.

This is the recommended option.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

Fencing

29.     Impacts on climate as well as sustainability considerations were taken into account when determining options for fencing at Portsea Reserve. While the addition of fencing may have negative impacts, these are mitigated by limiting the length of the fence and thereby minimising required materials. An installation methodology has been chosen that looks at integration of the fence in the garden, which in turn allows installation without the usually applied concrete mowing strip and thereby reducing climate impact.

Shading

30.     During the investigation of options, staff considered the alternative of planting trees which would be a more sustainable and climate friendly solution. However, for this site it was found that there wasn’t enough space to plant trees that would provide the sought after level of shading, therefore staff suggest that shade sails remain the only option. Staff will endeavour to procure a high-quality shade sail and supporting post structure that will limit the need for renewal and maintenance, thereby at least limiting its impact on climate into the future.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     Through collaboration with the council’s Operational Management and Maintenance team, staff will ensure fit-for-purpose assets are implemented that not only meet the community’s needs but also consider ongoing maintenance costs and useful life of an asset.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     The installation of a new fence and shade sails at Portsea Reserve will ensure council continues to provide the high-quality assets and services for Aucklanders.

33.     Feedback from both the community consultation in June 2019 as well as the fencing survey undertaken in December 2019 have indicated support of shade sails and the new fence.

34.     The concept design is supported by the Kaipātiki Local Board and has been formally resolved at its September 2019 business meeting (resolution number KT/2019/190). This resolution also carries support of the shade sail and fence installation which are being funded through the local board’s LDI capex fund.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Engagement with mana whenua on this project had been initiated through presentation of the play space project at the Parks and Recreation - North West Mana Whenua Engagement Forum on 5 June 2019.

36.     A general interest in the consideration of Māori play elements was voiced. No further feedback has been received since.

37.     Due to the previously described limitations of the project budget and the site itself, the opportunities to integrate Māori play elements for this playground were considered less than ideal. Other play spaces within the Kaipātiki Local Board area, such as Windy Ridge play space, have been identified as more suitable.

38.     Therefore, and because no site-specific feedback has been received, Māori play elements were not considered for inclusion in the design.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

Financial Implications – LDI capex funding

39.     Both fencing and shade sails are funded by the local board’s LDI capex fund. The local board has allocated $ 40,000 for fencing and $12,000 for installation of shade sails.

40.     The below outlines the overall costs estimated for fencing and shading and the impact on the allocated locally driven initiative (LDI) capex budget:

Cost for fencing

$ 12,715.00

 

LDI capex funds allocated for fencing

$ 40,000.00

 

Remaining available LDI capex funds

$ 27,285.00

$27,285.00

 

 

 

Costs for shading

$ 25,362.14

 

LDI capex funds allocated for shading

$ 12,000.00

 

Shortfall

$ 13,362.14

$ 13,362.14

Remaining available LDI capex funds

 

$ 13,922.86

 

41.     The overall LDI capex budget made available to this project will allow for delivery of both the recommended fencing and shading options.

42.     Based on the current estimate, $13,922.86 of LDI capex funding will remain available to be re-allocated by the Kaipātiki Local Board for the delivery of other initiatives. The Kaipātiki Local Board may choose to re-allocate the funds now or keep them allocated to this project until it is completed to allow for some contingency that may occur during delivery.

Financial Implications – Renewals funding

43.     Fencing and shading were not part of the renewal of the play space, therefore the overall allocated renewals budget remains unaffected by the above described amendments and is currently estimated as follows:

Professional Services
(Surveys, consultation, Design, Project Management)

$ 22,000.00

Construction:

 

Play equipment

$ 50,133.00

Landscaping works

$ 37,158.72

Total

$109,291.72

Allocated renewals budget

$109,600.00

Available

$ 309.28

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     There is a risk that the recommended fencing option will not be supported by the community. Staff have addressed this risk during the design process and amended the presented options to better suit the feedback received from the community, and to help achieve a balanced outcome for all stakeholders.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     The table below summarises the anticipated next steps and estimated delivery timeframe for the project. The estimated timeframes assume successful and timely completion of each identified project step. 

Procurement

February/March 2020

Physical works

March/April 2020

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Att A Fencing survey_Portsea Reserve playground

39

b

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Att B Portsea Reserve_fencing survey results_Dec 2019

41

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Barbara Heise – Senior Project Manager (Ops), Community Facilities

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Approval of additional funding for Normanton Reserve – renew basketball courts, path drainage and drinking fountain

File No.: CP2020/02955

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for additional funding to complete the renewal of the basketball courts and skate dot feature at Normanton Reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The options for replacement of the basketball court and the concept plan for the skate dot feature were considered by the local board at a workshop in April 2019.

3.       The renewal of the basketball courts and skate dot feature was initially removed from the scope of the project to enable the procurement of a physical works contract for construction works to commence in January 2020. This allowed works to start on the higher priority assets before the onset of the winter season. The local board gave approval (signed by the Chairperson under delegation on 18 December 2019) in the signed memorandum attached as Attachment A.

4.       There is a budget shortfall of $235,315 required to complete the full scope of works for the delivery of the project. This can be funded from the remaining unallocated budget of the deferred Marlborough Park car park renewal.

5.       Construction of the replacement basketball court and skate dot feature may be able to be completed before the end of this financial year, subject to specialist contractor availability and favourable ground conditions this autumn.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the allocation of $235,315 from the remaining available budget of the deferred Marlborough Park car park renewal for the renewal of the Normanton Reserve basketball court and skate dot feature.

b)      request staff to expedite physical works for renewal of the basketball court and skate dot feature for completion with the rest of the construction works currently in progress.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       ‘Normanton Reserve – the renewal of the basketball courts, path drainage and drinking fountain’ is an existing approved project in the 2019 – 2022 Community Facilities Work Programme, with a total renewal budget of $140,000 allocated over three financial years:

Financial Year

Approved Budget

Expenditure to Date

2018 – 2019

$20,000

$27,483

2019 – 2020

$50,000

$50,587

2020 – 2021

$70,000

-

Totals

$140,000

$78,070

 

7.       The project scope includes:

·      Renewal of the accessway walkway between Normanton Reserve and Ashfield Road (Condition 4)

·      Renewal of the basketball courts currently consisting of one undersized court with two hoops and a quarter practice court with hoop (Condition 3)

·      Addressing sections of the existing reserve path network that is subject to poor drainage and floods in the winter months

·      Reinstatement of the drinking fountain near the playground and toilet that mysteriously disappeared several years ago, and that Operational Maintenance and Management (OMM) has been unsuccessful in replacing because the water pipe could not be located

·      Collaboration with Healthy Waters with the proposed stormwater daylighting project at the southern end of the reserve.

8.       The options for renewing the basketball courts were workshopped with the local board in April 2019, with the preferred option being replacing the existing two courts with one new larger reoriented court with two hoops and contemporary coloured surfacing and line-marking.

9.       The proposed concept design for the replacement of the skate dot feature, which needs to be removed as part of path drainage works, was also presented at the workshop.

10.     The indicative budget shortfall of $147,000 to undertake the full project scope was also highlighted at the workshop. This figure is based on high level preliminary costings. These have subsequently increased to $235,315 with the completion of detailed design and revised engineer’s estimates.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     A memorandum to the local board in December 2019 sought approval to reduce the scope of the project initially by excluding the renewal of the basketball court and replacement of the skate dot feature. This was advised in order to keep within the current allocated budget and to allow a contract to be awarded for physical works to commence this summer construction season for the higher priority scope of works. Construction works commenced in early January 2020 and are currently in progress. A copy of the signed memorandum is attached as Attachment A to the agenda report.

12.     The request for additional funding at the beginning of this financial year had been unsuccessful as all available funding had been fully allocated at that stage. Since that time, the Marlborough Park Car Park Renewal project has been deferred with some of the remaining budget still available to be reallocated to other projects. The budget made available through deferral of the Marlborough Park Car Park Renewal project is outlined in the ’Financial implications’ section of this report.

13.     Detailed design for the replacement of the basketball courts with the one larger two hooped court has been completed. A copy of the final plan is attached as Attachment B to the agenda report. The engineer’s estimate for construction is $140,800.

14.     The final plans for the skate dot feature, of which the concept plan was presented to the local board workshop on 10 April 2019, is attached as Attachment C to the agenda report. The engineer’s estimate for construction is $35,000.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     The existing basketball court and skate dot feature lies within a designated floodplain.  However, their proposed replacement will have no detrimental effect to the floodplain as the level of the new basketball court will be the same, and the bulk mass of the skate dot feature is very small in comparison to the overall size of the floodplain contained in the reserve.

16.     It is difficult at this stage to give an assessment of the impact of greenhouse gas emissions arising from the construction works for the replacement of the two existing assets.

17.     Both the basketball court and the skate dot feature are made from concrete which generates gas emissions in the manufacturing of the materials (aggregate and cement), transporting of the products produced at source to retail distributors, and finally the batching of the concrete at the concrete plant to be transported for placement at the construction site.

18.     There will also be emissions generated from the machinery required to demolish the existing concrete assets and carted away from site to a concrete crushing plant for recycling. 

19.     Auckland’s Climate Action Framework is due for completion in the first quarter of 2020.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     Community Facilities Operational Management and Maintenance staff have been previously consulted on the assets to be renewed, and have also attended the recent prestart meeting for the construction works currently in progress for the first stage of works.

21.     Healthy Waters has advised the proposed daylighting of the storm water network at the southern end of Normanton Reserve has been deferred until the next construction season, commencing October 2020.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The options for the renewal/replacement of the basketball courts was discussed at a local board workshop in April 2019. The preferred option identified was to replace the concrete court with two hoops and the quarter court with practice hoop, with the one larger reoriented court with two hoops with contemporary coloured surfacing and line-marking.

23.     This project contributes to the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017 outcome of ‘Our people are active and healthy’ by funding replacements of worn-out facilities through the budget renewals programme, and looking at where it can use its own funding to add value and deliver a better outcome. While the current courts are not worn out, the main court is under size and not fit for purpose.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     This project is like-for-like renewal of existing assets, so it was considered that there was no value to be added to Māori by engaging with mana whenua on this particular project. The benefits to Māori will be to improve health and enable connection to each other just as it will for the wider community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     It has been difficult to keep expenditure for the Stage paths drainage and other minor works within the current available budget even with reducing the scope of works for the Ashfield Road accessway. Extra site visits and monitoring was required by the arborist for much of the drainage works that encroached into tree root zones while there were additional contract variation costs for additional spoil removal from site for the drainage, a low keystone retaining wall, replacement of an uplifted concrete pavement slab at the Ashfield Road accessway entrance and removal of a problem tree on the boundary responsible for the pavement uplift.  This resulted in an overspend of $46,000 for Stage 1. Stage 1 works were completed 10 March 2010.

26.     The cost to renew the basketball court and skate dot feature is $175,800 based on the engineer’s estimates provided. The total additional funding required to complete the project including the current physical works in progress based on the current adjusted forecasts are as follows:

Cost Item

Current Commitments & Expenditure – Stage 1 (Paths Drainage & Miscellaneous Works)

Stage 2 (Basketball Court and Skate Dot Feature Replacement)

Forecast to Complete All Stages

Professional services for design, engineering, construction management and arborist services

$38,000

$10,343

$48,343

Physical works/construction:

$136,000

$175,925

$311,925

Internal project management

$12,000

$3,047

$15,047

Totals

$186,000

$189,315

$375,315

Current Project Budget

$140,000

    -

$140,000

Shortfalls

($46,000)

$189,315

($235,315)

 

27.     The additional $235,315 required to complete the full scope of the project can be funded from the remaining unallocated 2019/20 budget from the deferred Marlborough Park car park renewal project:

Budget made available from removing the carpark renewal component from project ‘Marlborough Park Renew - Skate Park and Carpark renewal (SharePoint 2431)’ project

$530,000

 

2019/20 - $430,000

2020/21 - $100,000

Allocated to the Elliott Reserve Playspace renewal project

- $125,792.30

Allocated to the Lynn Reserve – renew playground and furniture’ project

- $44,940

Allocated to ‘Vandeleur Reserve – renew play space and pathways’ project

- $20,000

Remaining budget available 19/20

$239,267.70

Remaining budget available 20/21

$100,000

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     There is a risk that the renewal of the basketball court may not be able to be completed this financial year ending 30 June 2020, depending on the availability of a specialist subcontractor to the main Ventia contractor, or a wet autumn occurring and ground conditions deteriorating quickly. 

29.     If this was to occur the remaining construction works to complete the project would have to be delayed to the beginning of the following construction season commencing October 2020.  This would necessitate carrying forward the balance of the unexpended funding to the next financial year (FY2020/21).

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Once the funding is approved quotes will be requested from Ventia’s subcontractors for the additional works for renewing the basketball court and the skate dot feature.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Signed Memo - Normanton Reserve

53

b

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Normanton Reserve Basketball Court Plan

57

c

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Normanton Reserve Skate Dot Plans

59

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Peter Bilton – Senior Project Manager, Community Facilities

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Approval for the Onepoto Domain Pathway Renewal Concept Plan

File No.: CP2020/02178

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the preferred concept plan for the installation of a shared path connection at the Onepoto Domain Reserve pond. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The existing pathway around the pond within Onepoto Domain is a low-lying walking path that is often affected by rising water and frequent inundation. The pathway becomes impassable for extended periods, particularly for peak stormwater events and king tides. Due to this loss in use, the pathway has been identified as a health and safety issue that requires renewal. 

3.       Several concept options were prepared that would re-establish this as a shared path connection in accordance with the 2004 North Shore Development Plan, 2015 Onepoto Domain Reserve Access Master Plan, and the 2016 Kaipātiki Network Connection Plan. 

4.       This report seeks the approval of the recommended concept option as preferred by the local board to deliver on the shared path connection within Onepoto Domain. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the concept design for a new shared path in Onepoto Domain Reserve, as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda report.

Horopaki

Context

5.       Onepoto Domain is a popular public reserve in the Northcote area, as formed from a series of volcanic eruptions until approximately 185,000 years ago. It was a tidal lagoon until 1975, when the crater floor was reclaimed and thereby altering the park’s overall form. Two small freshwater lakes were designed to function as collection ponds for stormwater from the surrounding residential areas. The park is now heavily used for active and informal recreation, including sports fields, playgrounds, walkways, and natural wetland spaces. 

6.       There is a concrete pathway adjacent to the northeast side of the pond that provides an important walking connection across the reserve. During winter, this path becomes impassable for extended periods due to high water levels in the pond.

7.       This situation has triggered a health and safety concern due to risk of drowning.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The options were reviewed with stormwater specialists and are not expected to have adverse effects. The overall site is a low point to the surrounding area, and there was concern for additional ponding. The preferred concept option allows for cross flow of water toward the pond to avoid acting like a dam. The current pond elevation is 0.5 metres while the proposed shared path is roughly at 1.0 metre. 

9.       A small portion of the existing pathway that experiences the most frequent inundation would be removed and replaced with plantings. This design feature has been suggested to revitalise the pond edge and restore wetland habitat. Overall, no existing plantings would be affected by these works.

10.     The preferred concept option maintains a connection to the existing picnic tables and would continue to provide access to these amenities. 

11.     A summary table of the proposed options is as follows:

 

Option 1 – Do Nothing (Status Quo)

Option 2 (preferred option) – Renew Pond Pathway

Option 3 – Pond Pathway, Crossing, & Boardwalk Connection

Option 4 – New turnaround, new pathway connections

Pathway type

No change, existing pathway 1.5metre and 3metre wide

Concrete, 2.5metre wide

Concrete, 2.5metre wide

Concrete, 2.5metre wide

Benefits & Challenges

·  Benefit is no further costs

·  Challenge is pathway seasonally unusable and not safe

·  Benefit is safe pedestrian connection

·  Challenge is temporary disturbance

·  Recommended concept option

·  Benefit is complete connection per master plan

·  Challenge is disturbance, cost, and disruption

·  Benefit is complete connection per master plan

·  Challenge is highest disturbance, outside of budget

Rough Order of Cost

$0

$270,000 includes 20% Contingency

$400,000

$550,000

 

12.     The draft concept options were discussed at the local board workshops on 12 September 2018 and 24 April 2019. It was at this time the local board expressed their preference for the pond renew pathway option only (outlined as option 2 in the table above), as it would improve the safety and use for pedestrians, is within the scope and budget of the approved works, and would not disturb the existing carpark nor turning circle. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The pond will be subject to sea level rise. It is a naturally low-lying area that collects rainfall and runoff, as well as submerges from tidal inundation. It currently cannot drain during king tide events and will likely become more inundated by sea level rise in the future. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The concept designs were consulted with the Auckland Council Operational and Maintenance and Project Delivery teams. These teams supported the proposed concept option (option 2 – renew pond pathway).    

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     The preferred concept plan was shared with the New Zealand Radio Yacht Squadron (NZRYS) for feedback. NZRYS currently congregates at the edges of the pond for boat racing and access this frontage using the existing pathway. They are welcome to the proposed concept plan in terms of creating an additional footpath for cyclists and pedestrians, but are concerned the proposed planting would suffer from prolonged inundation. This has been reviewed in the design and acknowledges the need for water tolerant plantings. 

16.     Local board members indicated support for the recommended concept design option (option 2) during the 24 April 2019 workshop. This option was preferred to the others as it increased the safety and usability of the pathway, maintained a connection across the site, and did not disturb the current function of the carpark and turning circle.

17.     The project aligns with the following Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes and objectives –

·    Outcome: Our people are active and healthy

§ Objective – Active and healthy transport opportunities and continue to deliver the Kaipātiki Connections Network Plan. 

·    Outcome: Getting to and around Kaipātiki is easy

§ Objective – Walking and cycling focus as the Kaipātiki Connections Network Plan delivers walking and cycling links through the local board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     Engagement with mana whenua was undertaken as part of the consultation process. A joint site walk was conducted with Ngāti Maru, Ngaati Whanaunga, Te Akitai Aaiohua, and Te Patukirikiri on 24 April 2019. All concept options were discussed, and council staff received feedback that there was concern for the extended disturbance of option 3 and 4, and it was encouraged to install planting along the pond edge as shown in option 2. Having planting along the pond edge better supports habitat, conservation, and water quality. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The recommended and preferred option has a rough order cost of $270,000. This is within the available budget.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     The preferred and recommended concept option is to only renew the pond pathway connection (option 2). Although the other options do provide for a similar pedestrian link, they expand upon the scope of work and would incur higher costs as well as increase the area of disturbance: 

Concept Plan Options

Risk

Mitigation

Option 1- Do Nothing (Status Quo)

Medium – existing pathway still subject to inundation

Not recommended option

Option 2 – Renew Pond Pathway (preferred)

Low – Pathway is improvement to users and has minimised limit of disturbance

Recommended option

Option 3 – Pond Pathway, Crossing, & Boardwalk Connection

Medium – area to be disturbed is higher as well as increased costs

Not recommended option

Option 4 – New turnaround, new pathway connections

Medium/High – area to be disturbed is higher as well as increased costs

Not recommended option

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     If approved, staff will progress the project through to detailed design, consent, and delivery of the physical works. The local board will be notified of progress through the updates of the project status as required actions are completed.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Attachment A_Onepoto Domain Renew Pathway Concept Plan

77

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kimberley Graham - Growth Development Specialist

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator



Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Concept design approval for the renewal of Camelot Reserve play space

File No.: CP2020/03273

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the design for the renewal of the play space at Camelot Reserve, and to progress the project to procurement and physical works.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Camelot Reserve play space was identified by the Kaipātiki Local Board as an important playground for the community. The local board has allocated $170,000 of renewals funding towards the renewal of the play space. The project was approved as part of the 2019/2020 financial year Community Facilities Work Programme (resolution number KT/2019/119).

3.       To date, community consultation has been undertaken through an initial neighbourhood survey which has helped to inform the project and assist in shaping the requirements for the concept design.

4.      At the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop in June 2019, a concept design was presented to the local board and feedback was received.

5.      Based on the earlier concept design and consideration of the feedback provided by the Kaipātiki Local Board, a detailed design was finalised and presented to the local board at a workshop in February 2020 and received mostly positive feedback.

6.       Subject to design approval, it is anticipated that the physical works would be undertaken in Autumn 2020 or Spring 2020.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the detailed design (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report entitled “Camelot Res play renewal_detailed design”) for the renewal of the play space at Camelot Reserve.

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Camelot Reserve play space was identified as a neighbourhood park playground and of high priority (rated number nine on the priority schedule) for renewal in the Play and SunSmart Provision Study October 2018.

8.       Camelot Reserve directly abuts Glenfield Primary School with path access through to the playground. It is also within walking distance of Glenfield’s suburban centre and therefore is an important asset to the community.

9.       Camelot Reserve is characterised by a flat grass terrace with a slight bank transition to a lower area. The play space is installed at the crossroads of two pedestrian paths on the lower area.

10.     Current play provisions accommodate early childhood (one - four years) to childhood (five - nine years) age group. The play space provides the common elements such as swings, slides and a see saw.

11.     The slide and see saw are in poor condition, with the swing having been replaced in 2019 due to safety concerns and being of very good condition.

12.     The play space lacks play provisions for balancing / jumping activities and unstructured play.

13.     The ‘Play and SunSmart Provisions report’ (October 2018) outlines that the junior and senior age groups (10 – 14 years) are projected to have the highest relative proportion in this census area, but also recognises an overall increase in the childhood to senior age groups (five -14 years).

14.     Initial consultation with the community was undertaken by way of a neighbourhood survey in May 2019, and consultation was held with iwi at the North West Mana Whenua Engagement Forum in June 2019 to help inform and shape the design.

15.     The results were presented to the local board at a workshop in June 2019. The feedback from the community was very supportive of the renewal of the play space. The below outlines key messages that were received:

¡

Camelot Reserve play space is a well-used play space – 54 per cent of respondents indicated use of the reserve at least weekly or more often.

¡

Based on the 78 participating households, 48 per cent of children were in the early childhood to junior age groups, thereby confirming the focus groups for the play space as accurate.

¡

The top three favourite play elements of respondents are natural play, swinging and climbing.

¡

Asked about specific improvements for the play space, participants’ favourites were the inclusion of a basket swing and shading.

 

16.     The community feedback and general project scope were the basis for the concept ideas that were presented and discussed with the local board at the workshop in June 2019.

17.     The detailed design (refer Attachment A to the agenda report entitled “Camelot Res play renewal_detailed design”) has been developed based on the initial concept and feedback received from the Kaipātiki Local Board as well as from internal stakeholders, such as the Operational Management and Maintenance team within Community Facilities.

Previous decisions

18.     The local board has approved the project as part of the 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme (resolution number KT/2019/119), with the total allocated budget of $170,000.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     Camelot Reserve is located beside Glenfield Primary School, connects Camelot Place with Battle Place, and is located within walking distance of Glenfield’s suburban centre.

20.     Glenfield was commonly known as ‘Mayfield’ by early settlers because the white blossom of the manuka trees reminded them of May springtime back home.

21.     The playground design is inspired by the history of the site and aims to support this by the use of natural materials and colour selection that supports a “field-like” look and feel.

22.     The proposed design (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report entitled “Camelot Res play renewal_detailed design”) includes play experiences for early childhood (one – four years), childhood (five – nine years) and junior age groups (ten -12 years).

23.     The design sees the existing swing being relocated to the northern end of the play space and upgraded with an additional bar to allow for a basket swing. The surface below the basket swing and the toddler swings will be renewed with wet pour to allow for all abilities access to the swings. The addition of a basket swing was also one of the key play elements the community had asked for in the neighbourhood survey in May 2019.

24.     A combination of smaller play elements along the eastern and southern edge of the play space will allow for spinning, rotating, rocking and jumping through the installation of a duo rocker, a spinner and ‘jumping jack’ balancing platforms.

25.     Where the play space meets the lawn from the northern to southern corner the playground is closed in by natural play elements, such as stepping logs and balancing logs that invite balancing and imaginative play, but also ensuring that the safety surface stays in place within the playground.

26.     The playground will also receive planting to allow for unstructured natural play and better integration with the wider reserve.

27.     The center element of the new playground is the large module that is located in the western corner of the play space. It hosts a variety of play elements: climbing, balancing, imaginative play, adventure play and sliding. It’s a module that appeals to all ages and caters well for large groups of kids.

28.     Shading was considered as part of the design, and a number of large shade trees will be planted along the playground edge to provide natural shade. An inclusion of shade sails was also considered for the swing set and the spinner, as these are items where children are expected to spend longer durations of time in one place.

29.     A shade sail over the main module was not considered as part of the design, however following a presentation of the play space design to the Kaipātiki Local Board at the workshop in February 2020, it was indicated that full shade cover for the playground is sought.

30.     The project team has since contacted suppliers to investigate options for full shade coverage. While the inclusion of shade sails has not been finally decided, there are no, or only minor, implications expected to the playground design itself.

31.     The proposed playground design meets the recommendation from the Play and SunSmart Provision Study (October 2018) by renewing the play space with all current activity elements, additional provision for collaborative balance / jumping and spinning / rocking elements, as well as unstructured natural play using logs and planting.

32.     It is recommended to approve the detailed design for Camelot Reserve play space and to allow the project to continue to the next stage (procurement and physical works).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     Climate impact was considered for the decision on using a mix of shade sail and shade trees in the playground design, thereby reducing carbon dioxide emission and minimising the need for shade sails once trees have matured.

34.     Staff further focussed on sourcing play equipment options that were available from local play equipment suppliers and could be maintained without requiring sourcing from oversees suppliers.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     The Community Services team supports the project as it is providing improved services to the community.

36.     The Community Facilities Operational Management and Maintenance team support the upgrade as it will improve the quality of the park.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     This project is in line with one of the outcomes of the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2017, to improve recreational facilities for the local community to enjoy.

38.     The play space is recognised as a key neighbourhood play space within Glenfield, and the renewal will maintain play value and ensure conformity with today’s Play Compliance Standards.

39.     The design has been discussed in detail with the Kaipātiki Local Board and has received positive feedback. Requested changes to the shading options are still under investigation but have no (or only minor) impact on the overall playground design.

40.     The majority of the community who participated in the neighbourhood survey in May 2019 support the renewal of the play space.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     The project was presented at the Parks and Recreation - North West Mana Whenua Engagement Forum on 5 June 2019. While general interest in greater inclusion of Māori elements in projects was discussed, no feedback was received for this specific playground design.

42.     Due to the limitations in the project budget, the opportunities to integrate Māori play elements were not considered in this design. Other play spaces within the Kaipātiki Local Board area (such as Windy Ridge play spaces) have been identified as more suitable and will be considered.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

43.     The project has a total allocated budget of $170,000 (resolution number KT/2019/119).

44.     The below table outlines the estimated cost for the delivery of the play space:

45.     The renewal of the playground can be delivered within the allocated renewals budget.

46.     Shading for the play space is currently unfunded as outlined in the above table. A previous quote for the shade sail above the swing had been received at $16,640, however quotes for a full shading option are still being received to confirm the above overall cost estimate for shading. In the above table staff have accounted for costs for full shade coverage (currently unfunded) of up to $45,000.

47.     When cost estimate for full shading is confirmed, the project team will work with the Community Facilities Work Programme team, as well as the Project Manager prioritising playground shading options (as part of the “Local Board SunSmart priorities for Playspaces” project), to determine funding options for shading of Camelot Reserve play space.

48.     Once a funding option has been identified, approval will be sought from the local board for the allocation of funds to shading of Camelot Reserve play space.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     The playground is located along a school route and there will be a large number of children travelling past the construction site. Staff will ensure that the contractor is aware of the risks and that adequate Health and Safety measures are in place. Works may also be limited during peak times (school start and finish times).

50.     Funding for shade sails is currently unallocated and may lead to a delay in the delivery of shading. The play space can be renewed independent of the shading option agreed and enough time is available to agree funding for shading prior to construction of the play space. If the playground renewal were to be constructed early, the risk from delayed shading would still be minor as shade sails are usually stored for winter for all playgrounds, and the delay would not be noticeable to the public.

51.     The playground is located adjacent to existing footpaths and construction works may cause damage to the existing paths. The contractor will be instructed to stay clear of the existing paths as much as possible and to apply caution when crossing the paths. Jakmats and similar will be used to minimise impact of machinery on the path. If damage were to occur, this would have to be remedied at cost to the project. A small contingency has been factored into the budget to account for this.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

52.     The estimated timeframes, assuming successful and timely completion of each identified project step, is outlined in the table below: 

Confirm shading option and funding

Approval will be sought for the recommended shading option to be included in the design.

April 2020

Procure build partner

The tender will be submitted to council’s Full Facilities Contractor as per the procurement guidelines.

May 2020

Physical works

Accurate commencement and duration of physical works is not known at this time, but it is anticipated that works would take place during spring 2020.

October 2020

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Attachment A Camelot Reserve play space renewal detailed design

85

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Barbara Heise – Senior Project Manager (Ops), Community Facilities

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Approval for Private Road Name for Development at 208 Birkdale Road, Birkdale

File No.: CP2020/02917

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Kaipātiki Local Board to name a new private road being a commonly owned access lot (COAL) within a subdivision being undertaken by Solution Street Limited (the applicant) at 208 Birkdale Road, Birkdale.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council has road naming guidelines that set out the requirements and for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region.

3.       The applicant has submitted the following names in order of preference for consideration by the local board:

·      Toitū Lane;

·      Mataati Place; and

·      Whānui Close.

4.       The names are considered suitable and meet the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the road name, Toitū Lane, Mataati Place or Whānui Close for the private road constructed within the subdivision being undertaken by Solution Street Ltd at 208 Birkdale Road, Birkdale in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

Horopaki

Context

5.       The 8-lot residential subdivision and associated dwellings (council references BUN60344380 and SUB60344382) were approved on 25 November 2019 and is currently under construction.

6.       The council and Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) require that private roads serving 6 or more lots be named.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider / developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the relevant local board’s approval.

8.       Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines typically require that road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

·      an historical or ancestral linkage to an area;

·      a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·      an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

9.       In selecting the names, the applicant has chosen to use Maori names. The names reflect the developer’s philosophy of providing sustainable modular and energy efficient, warm, dry, heathy and low maintenance homes. This is in keeping with the New Zealand Green Building Council’s Homestar 6 rating or the general community around the development.

10.     The names reflect this scenario and translate to mean:

·      Toitū Lane – to be sustainable;

·      Mataati Place - first procured or produced; and

·      Whānui Close – broad, wide, extensive.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations (CCOs) were not required for the preparation of the advice contained within this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     The decision sought through this report does not trigger any significant policy, and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     On the applicant’s behalf the council has consulted with 11 local iwi identified as possibly having an interest in the proposal and received two responses. Ngāti Whātua Orakei deferred to Ngāti Paoa (who have not responded to the initial consultation), and Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki, who supported the names and commended the applicant’s rationale for their choice.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) which records them on its New Zealand-wide land information database that includes street addresses issued by councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - 208 Birkdale Road Birkdale - Locality Map for Private Road

91

b

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - 208 Bikdale Road Birkdale - Private Road Name Scheme plan

93

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

John Benefield – Senior Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport Monthly Update

File No.: CP2020/03018

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Auckland Transport monthly update report to the Kaipātiki Local Board for March 2020 is attached.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Auckland Transport monthly update to the Kaipātiki Local Board for March 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Auckland Transport monthly update for March 2020

97

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan

File No.: CP2020/02561

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the continued development of an open space network plan for the Kaipātiki Local Board area and confirmation of the previously approved key moves.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An open space network plan will allow the local board to plan and respond to population growth and climate change.

3.       The plan was put on hold until the development of the Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan had reached a point where the two could be developed concurrently.

4.       Staff recommend that the local board recommence development of a network plan to improve the quality of parks and open space in Kaipātiki. Staff also recommend that the local board reconfirms the previously agreed key moves.

5.       The network plan will inform local board open space planning, resource allocation and advocacy over a 10-year period.

6.       There are limited risks in developing the network plan. It may raise community expectations that all projects are fully funded. No additional budget is allocated for the implementation.

7.       If approved, staff will prepare a draft plan and hold a prioritisation workshop with the local board in April 2020. Following engagement with mana whenua, a final draft open space network plan can be presented to the local board for consideration in June 2020.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the continued development of an open space network plan for the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

b)      reconfirm the four key moves approved by the local board, at its meeting of 17 October 2018 (resolution number KT/2018/194), to guide the continued development of the Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan:

i)     growth and changing demographics (including the focus areas of “upgrade the quality of sunshade, playgrounds, and sports fields facilities” and “ascertain additional coastal walkway opportunities”)

ii)     improving and developing network connections (including the focus areas of “increase and enhance connections between open spaces” and “promote the cultural heritage of parks”)

iii)    managing ecological quality and biodiversity (including the focus areas of “closing the gaps in the open space network” and “improve the ecological quality of parks”)

iv)   accessible and social open spaces (including the focus areas of “improve the quality and accessibility of parks around social experience” and “increase socialisation and active recreation opportunities through novel types of parks or open space”).

c)      note that the Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan and Kaipātiki Local Park Management Plan will be developed concurrently and be guided by the key moves approved by the local board.

 

Horopaki

Context

The proposed Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan will help guide parks and open space development over the next 10 years

8.       An open space network plan is a key mechanism for implementing the Auckland Plan and the Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan 2013 at a local level.

9.       The network plan is strategically aligned to three Auckland Plan focus areas:

10.     The Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan is a strategic document that sets out high level objectives and activities for Auckland’s parks and open spaces in order to achieve Auckland Plan outcomes.

11.     It promotes four focus areas: (1) treasuring, (2) enjoying, (3) connecting; and (4) utilising parks and open spaces. These will guide the development of the open space network plan.

12.     An open space network plan will allow the local board to plan and respond to population growth and climate change.

The open space network plan is developed in three stages and includes a current state, key moves and prioritised actions

13.     The process for developing a network plan involves research, collaboration and planning phases.

14.     The scope of work is illustrated in figure one below, and includes:

·      identifying and analysing the current performance of the open space network, incorporating the work of existing local park development plans

·      identifying the aspirations and key moves required to improve performance of the open space network

·      identifying and prioritising local place-based actions to achieve the key moves.

Figure One: Three main sections of the open space network plan


 

The proposed open space network plan has a clearly defined scope

15.     The scope of the network plan includes all open space that is controlled and managed by the local board, including parks, sports fields, greenways and outdoor civic areas.

16.     Regional Facilities Auckland manage some parks and open spaces. These contribute to the overall network of open space but will not have any direct actions in the network plan.

17.     Reserve management plans, regional parks, maunga and recreation facilities (including stadia, pools, indoor courts and cemeteries) are out of scope.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Development of the Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan is underway

18.     Staff began preparation of the Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan in 2018 in consultation with the local board.

19.     Staff researched the current state of open space in the Kaipātiki area through desktop research, user surveys and discussions with key staff members.

20.     The plan was put on hold until the development of the Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan had reached a point where the two could be developed concurrently.

21.     Staff have already undertaken the current state analysis and have identified the following key points about the existing open space network:

·     total area of the Kaipātiki open space network is 4917 hectares, including 110 hectares of suburb parks land 156 hectares of neighbourhood parks

·     while there are good levels of open space provision across the network, there are gaps in Beach Haven and Totara Vale

·     the council is not the only provider of open space and recreational infrastructure in the area – some local schools provide publicly accessible recreation facilities, but this can change and continued public access cannot be guaranteed

·     while there are good levels of sports field provision in Northcote and Birkenhead, the local board has identified a desire for a multi-purpose sports field facility.

22.     Now that the development of the Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan has sufficiently progressed, staff are seeking approval to continue the development of the network plan and confirmation of the previously approved key moves.

Four key moves have been approved by the local board

23.     Four key moves were identified through workshops with the local board on 2 May 2018 and 4 July 2018. Two sessions with the political working group also took place on 20 June 2018 and 5 July 2018.

24.     The local board, at its meeting of 17 October 2018, approved the proposed key moves and added some focus areas for staff to incorporate into the plan (resolution number KT/2018/194).

25.     The intention to prepare the Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan has been publicly notified and the resulting feedback has been analysed. Emerging themes from the consultation align with the four key moves approved by the local board in 2018.

26.     Staff recommend that the local board re-confirms the approved key moves and approves the continued development of an open space network plan for the Kaipātiki Local Board area.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     Parks and open spaces can serve as ecological stepping-stones or corridors. They can promote and protect native plants and animals, enhance biodiversity and increase resilience to environmental change. Vegetation captures carbon from the air, helping slow the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

28.     Vegetated areas, including grass, help reduce maximum temperature ranges in urbanised areas. Parks and open spaces can also help reduce flood risk during rainstorms by buffering peak flows and reducing the volume and velocity of stormwater runoff.

29.     Parks and open spaces must be managed appropriately to help achieve these benefits. This includes reducing energy usage, reducing waste and conserving water resources to minimise the environmental impact of maintenance operations.

30.     The open space network plan will acknowledge predicted climate change effects and consider ways to help manage the impacts of increasing temperatures, sea level rise and changing weather patterns on the open space network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     The plan will be developed in consultation with relevant council departments, in particular the team developing the Kaipātiki Local Park Management Plan to ensure alignment between the documents.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     Parks and open spaces provide access to a range of activities and experiences for people which lead to improved individual and community health and wellbeing.

33.     The local board can use the plan to help inform prioritisation of its locally driven initiative capital budgets and advocate for increased funding through annual and Long-term Plan processes.

34.     The plan can also be used to help to Kaipātiki Local Board illustrate their parks and open space priorities and provide direction across the council.

35.     Local board views on the preparation of the plan are sought through this report.

36.     If the local board approves continued preparation of the plan, further consultation will be undertaken to obtain their views as the plan is developed.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     Māori identity and well-being is an important outcome in the Auckland Plan. The implementation of a network plan responds to and supports the following focus areas:

38.     Quality parks and open spaces help facilitate Māori participation in sport and recreation.

39.     The 2018 Census identified that 7680 Māori usually reside in Kaipātiki (8.7 per cent of the Kaipātiki population, compared to 11.5 per cent for the whole of Auckland).

40.     This is an increase of 1068 people, or 16.2 per cent, since the 2013 Census.

41.     The median age of Māori (half are younger and half are older than this age) is 25 years in Kaipātiki, compared with a median of 24.9 years for all Māori in Auckland. Slightly over 30 per cent of Māori in Kaipātiki are aged under 15 years and 39.7 per cent are under 20 years of age.

42.     Māori have high engagement in parks and open space in childhood and adolescence, after which rates decrease. This is relevant to the network plan given the high number of Māori less than 20 years of age. The network plan will seek to develop activities that engage Māori early and continue to engage them throughout their lives.

43.     Mana whenua with interests in the Kaipātiki Local Board area will be consulted during the continued development of the network plan. This will involve seeking their views and advice to ensure their interests are acknowledged in the document.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     Development of the open space network plan is funded by Community and Social Policy.

45.     No funding has been allocated for public consultation, as the open space network plan informs local board decision-making. Public consultation is undertaken on proposed park developments as part of the development process.

46.     No additional budget is currently allocated for the implementation of the open space network plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     There are limited risks in developing the open space network plan. The plan may raise community expectations that all projects are fully funded. However, no additional budget for implementation is currently allocated.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     Once continued development of the open space network plan has been approved and previously agreed key moves are confirmed, staff will prepare a draft plan and hold a prioritisation workshop with the local board in April 2020.

49.     Following engagement with mana whenua, a final draft open space network plan can be prepared and presented to the local board for consideration in June 2020.

50.     The current status of the plan and next steps in the preparation process are shown on figure two below:

Figure Two: The open space network plan preparation process showing the current status

51.      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ezra Barwell - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework - proposed changes

File No.: CP2020/02957

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback on the changes to the draft Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region (resolution number ENV/2018/11).

3.       To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (ACAF) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors.

4.       In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved a consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

5.       In February 2020, a memorandum was circulated to share key findings from the public consultation (Attachments A and B).

6.       To address the feedback from the consultation, this report outlines key structural changes proposed for the framework, including:

·        introducing three pillars representing the core drivers to which all actions will align (i.e. a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change).

·        moving from 11 key moves to eight priorities to streamline actions and address feedback.

7.       It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against council’s climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regard to implementation.

8.       The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the changes to the draft Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, including:

i)     introducing three pillars representing the core drivers for climate action (i.e. a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change)

ii)     moving from 11 key moves to eight priorities

iii)    changing the title from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region, addressing both emissions reduction (i.e. mitigation) and preparing for the impacts of a changing climate (i.e. adaptation) (resolution number ENV/2018/11).

10.     To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework (ACAF) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors, reaching hundreds of Aucklanders.

11.     Local board engagement and insights were sought throughout development of the framework, including meetings and cluster workshops. A summary of feedback from local boards is available in Attachments C and D.

12.     In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved the consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

13.     In February 2020, a memo was circulated to all local boards to share key findings from the public consultation on the draft ACAF (Attachment A and B).

14.     This report provides an overview of key proposed changes to the draft ACAF to address the feedback received through the consultation. Local board views will be reflected in the final version, which will be reported to the Environment and Climate Change Committee in May 2020.

15.     More detailed changes reported in the consultation summary are not repeated here but will be reflected in text changes in the final version.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The proposed changes to ACAF have been informed by consultation feedback received on the draft document. Some key themes that arose include:

·      Urgency and scale of action needs to be better articulated.

·      Lack of clarity on how key moves work together and how they address council’s climate goals. In addition, it was felt that there are too many.

·      Need to be clearer about roles and responsibilities with a request for more information on who is responsible for actions at each level.

·      Need for partnership working across sectors and with central government and mana whenua in particular.

·      Greater focus on equity across feedback points.

·      Need for a strong Māori voice with widespread support for working with Māori, using mātauranga Māori and Māori practices in designing and implementing climate action.

·      Need for a system shift and scale of change required, and to better articulate this with Aucklanders.

·      Need for communication and behaviour change and a request for campaigns to raise awareness across the region and enable action at an individual level.

·      Need for a significant shift in transport (of all key moves) with the identified actions supported but a need for these to be delivered at pace and scale.

17.     To address this feedback a number of key structural changes are proposed.

18.     The first of these is establish three core drivers for action – the ‘pillars’ (Attachment E).  These provide greater clarity on the goals of the framework and all actions will align to how they deliver against these goals:

·      A Tāmaki response: This pillar reflects the uniqueness of Auckland and council’s place-based response to climate change. It is informed by learning from Māori principles and practice, provides a greater focus on equity and a better definition of roles and responsibilities and collective action across governance and sectors.

·      Reducing emissions: This pillar reflects the need to provide greater clarity on council’s emissions target and the need to halve emissions by 2030 and reach net zero emissions by 2050. It improves alignment with the actions and how council will deliver and prioritise emissions reductions.

·      Preparing for climate change: This pillar enables a greater focus on how council will approach climate change adaptation and take a precautionary approach for the region and also provides greater alignment with the actions.

19.     The second structural change is that the 11 key moves are streamlined into eight priorities (Attachment F). This proposed change is to address feedback on where areas are more foundational and therefore should be embedded throughout all priority areas, or where there is confusion and overlap. Proposed changes include:

·      Key move 3: Make development and infrastructure climate compatible and Key Move 4: Transform existing buildings and places are combined into a single built environment priority area. 

·      Key move 1: Lay the foundation is embedded into the three pillars in recognition of the cross-cutting nature of the actions.

·      Key move 9: Rangatahi (Youth & Inter-generational equity) is embedded into pillar 1 to reflect the need to consider actions across the framework.

20.     Actions contained within key moves 1 and 9 will still be maintained and reflected in the updated document.

21.     Actions contained within key moves 1-11 will be carried through into priorities 1-8 (Figure 2) and updated to:

·      clarify any ambiguities that were raised in consultation 

·      remove repetition or overlapping actions

·      make additions in response to consultation feedback

·      strengthen alignment to delivery of the three pillars.

22.     Overall, the intent of the actions between the key moves 1-11 and priority areas 1-8, remain the same. Attachment G briefly summarises how the actions have changed from the consultation document to the updated priority areas.

23.     It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against council’s climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regard to implementation.

24.     The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     The changes identified in this report have been made to reflect feedback received and updated emissions modelling. As such, they will further deliver and strengthen climate action already identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Regular meetings and workshops took place across the council group for development of the framework.

27.     In addition, a working group was established from the outset to provide expertise from across the council group, central government and district health boards.

28.     This group has continued to provide input post-consultation and has reviewed and provided input into the proposed changes.

29.     In addition, the team has been working closely across the council group in the development of costed actions for consideration in the long-term plan. This process is running concurrently with the finalisation of the plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The framework will have implications for all local boards.

31.     In June 2018, the Chief Sustainability Office attended workshops at 19 of the 21 local boards and obtained informal email feedback from the other two local boards to identify their main priorities related to climate change. This was followed up in September 2018 at cluster workshops to assess and test a series of ‘must haves’, which were the precursors to the actions included in the draft framework.

32.     Priorities included:

·      coastal erosion and inundation concerns

·      affordable and accessible transport

·      long-term infrastructure development to consider climate impacts

·      better stormwater management

·      climate-related education and awareness

·      building community resilience

·      for Auckland Council to lead by example.

33.     This report seeks local board formal views on proposed changes to the draft Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework outlined in this report. These views will be reflected in the final version.

34.     Local boards will be key in taking climate action at a local level. Support will be provided for local board planning and alignment with outcomes.

35.     The Chief Sustainability Office and Quality Advice Unit will implement a programme of work for the whole council family to provide guidance and training on how to embed climate action in local board plans and what to expect in climate impact statements.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Climate change impacts and associated policy and action will have significant impacts for Māori communities.

37.     A Tāmaki and climate change subject matter expert rōpū (group) was established in March 2019 which has been supporting and advising mana whenua and council on climate change issues for Māori and providing direct advice and narrative for the draft framework.

38.     A rangatahi Māori and Pasifika rōpū has also been working in partnership with council on this kaupapa to develop rangatahi-focused actions for the framework.

39.     A joint mana whenua and Māori expert task group is finalising a Tāmaki and climate change position paper, Te ora ō Tāmaki, which will be used as the bridging document to weave key anchor points into the climate action framework. 

40.     Anchor points include:

·      weaving the narrative into the framework, specifically the following sections: Climate change and Māori, Impacts on Māori, and Developing the Plan with Māori

·      a section developed by rangatahi (the youth and intergenerational equity key move)

·      a separate key move of Te puawaitanga o te tangata (resilient Māori communities).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Actions within the framework will result in budgetary implications for organisations across the region; identifying and unlocking appropriate funding and financing streams in the future will be critical. 

42.     Taking climate action will require a range of finance and/or funding mechanisms. For instance, green bonds have been a useful tool for financing council-owned assets such as electric trains but investment in clean tech may require crowd-sourcing, grants or venture capital.

43.     To support this, a climate finance work package is underway to identify partnerships and broader funding mechanisms across actions such as bonds, grants, equity instruments and public/private partnerships.

44.     The final framework and specific Auckland Council actions being developed will need to inform ongoing long-term plan discussions to support delivery and avoid costs associated with inaction, such as increased maintenance costs and infrastructure failures through to missed opportunities to Auckland’s economy in delivering the transition. 

45.     Not all actions within council’s remit will require additional budget. Some actions can result in long-term cost avoidance, for example, electrifying fleets can reduce fuel and maintenance costs. Some actions could require existing funds to be redirected if priorities change.

46.     In addition, not all actions will require funding, for example, those related to advocacy to central government or expert input into actions led by other organisations.

47.     The costs associated with different council-specific actions will consider funding sources as described above.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     No high or extreme risks have been identified with the proposed approach.

49.     Moderate risks exist, including:

·      preparing for the implications of climate change may not comply with current rules and regulations

·      potential strategic risk with non-alignment with New Zealand Government direction and policy

·      potential governance risk in shared leadership and ownership of the framework across sectors.

50.     A risk mitigation plan has been developed to address the above, including targeted engagement approaches, a legal review of the final framework, ongoing partnership with central government and establishment of clear governance structures for the implementation of the framework.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Workshops will be held in April 2020 with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Independent Māori Statutory Board to discuss updated framework text, and the final text will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for approval in May 2020.

52.     The draft digital plan layout will be workshopped with the Environment and Climate Change Committee in June 2020 and finalised in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland’s Climate Action Framework consultation summary memo

115

b

Auckland’s Climate Action Framework consultation summary

119

c

Auckland’s Climate Action Framework local board engagement summary - local board workshops June 2018

259

d

Auckland’s Climate Action Framework local board engagement summary - cluster workshops October 2018

283

e

Auckland’s Climate Action Framework proposed three pillars

305

f

Auckland’s Climate Action Framework proposed eight priorities

307

g

Auckland’s Climate Action Framework proposed priority areas and actions

309

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Anderson - Principal Specialist Sustainability and Climate Resilence

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review

File No.: CP2020/03145

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Review to the Independent Panel.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governing Body approved the Terms of Reference for an Independent Panel to undertake a review of substantive CCOs at its meeting on 26 November 2019 (resolution number GB/2019/127).

3.       The review covers Auckland Transport, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development, Panuku Development Auckland, Regional Facilities Auckland and Watercare.  The overall objectives are to examine:

·      whether CCOs are an effective and efficient model for delivering services to the council and Aucklanders, and

·      whether the CCO decision-making model provides sufficient political oversight, public transparency and accountability.

4.       The review asks the Independent Panel to examine three areas: the CCO model and its accompanying roles and responsibilities; the accountability of CCOs; and CCO culture.

5.       The Independent Panel is seeking the views of local boards on these areas.

6.       Local boards are advised that their views are requested by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations Review to the Independent Panel.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Governing Body approved the CCO review Terms of Reference on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127]. The Independent Panel was appointed by the Governing Body on 12 December 2019 and is comprised of Miriam Dean, Doug Martin and Leigh Auton. Miriam Dean has been appointed panel chair (resolution number GB/2019/149).

8.       Briefings on the CCO Review were provided to local board chairs in December 2019 by staff and in February 2020 by panel member Leigh Auton.  The panel wrote to local board chairs in February asking for advice on what constitutes good engagement between CCOs and local boards.  

9.       Monthly updates on the review are reported to the CCO Oversight Committee and circulated to all local boards.

10.     The Independent Panel is seeking comprehensive engagement to obtain a range of views about the issues forming the subject of the review (Attachment A).  Community engagement on the review is occurring alongside the Annual Budget 2020/2021 in February/March 2020. An engagement document has been developed and a summary document has been translated into five languages and a New Zealand Sign Language video. A webpage[1] provides information on the review, including stakeholder updates, relevant documents (including the Terms of Reference) and a contact for further information.

11.     All feedback on the CCO Review will be provided to the Independent Panel.  The Panel will report on the key issues and community and stakeholder feedback in May and will provide a final report and recommendations in July 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     To identify the scope of their work, the Independent Panel has distilled the essence of the review terms into a list of issues, that forms the basis of the engagement and eventual report. The list and prompts, at Attachment A, provide a structure for local boards to give feedback.

13.     The three key areas of focus set out in the list of issues are:

Issue

Area of Focus

CCO model, roles and responsibilities

The essential question here is whether the CCO model delivers council services with the maximum of operational efficiency, transparency and accountability, or whether there are better ways to deliver such services

CCO accountability

Here the key question is whether the council’s current approach to holding CCOs to account on behalf of Aucklanders could be improved

CCO culture

The central issue here is whether CCOs need to improve how they consult, engage with and respond to the wider community and council

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Local boards have an opportunity to consider suggestions that might improve climate change outcomes/mitigation in their feedback on the CCO Review.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The Independent Panel is engaging across the council group on the review, including:

·      the chair of the independent panel wrote introducing the panel and the review objectives to all CCO chairs and chief executives, councillors, local board chairs, chief executive of IMSB and the co-chairs of the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 20 December 2019

·      the panel met briefly with the CCO chief executives and chairs on 28 January 2020 to discuss the proposed review process and CCO engagement. Each CCO was asked to provide the panel with key stakeholders/customers

·      individual meetings have taken place with CCO chief executives and board chairs over February and March 2020, and the panel is meeting with CCO stakeholders.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local board formal feedback on the CCO Review, including issues experienced with CCOs, good practice and options for improvement, is sought by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

17.     Material on the CCO Review was available at Have your Say local board events for the Annual Budget.

18.     Following the conclusion of the Independent Panel’s review, as part of the development of the next 10-year budget, local boards will have the opportunity to provide formal views on any proposals for change to the CCO model.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Staff presented to the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 19 December 2019. The panel met with one of the Forum co-chairs and mana whenua are invited to provide feedback to the panel.  Mana whenua have also been invited to a hui with panel members on 18 March 2020.

20.     The panel has met with the Independent Māori Statutory Board. 

21.     Panel members spoke on Radio Waatea to promote Māori interest and feedback on the CCO review. Material on the CCO review is being provided at mataawaka events for the Annual Budget and mataawaka organisations have been briefed on the review during the public engagement period. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There are no financial implications from this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are no risks associated with the recommendations in this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The Independent Panel is due to report on key issues, community and stakeholder feedback in May and to provide a final report, with recommendations, in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review list of issues

315

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Gomas - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Feedback from Kaipātiki Local Board: 2019 Local Elections and Liquor Licensing Trust Elections and Recent Energy Trust Elections

File No.: CP2020/02420

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide retrospective endorsement of feedback from Kaipātiki Local Board on the Inquiry into the 2019 Local Elections and Liquor Licensing Trust Elections, and Recent Energy Trust Elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In December 2019 the Justice Committee (“Committee”) notified its inquiry into the 2019 local elections. Submissions closed on 29 February 2020.

3.       The terms of reference on the inquiry into the 2019 local elections include matters relating to the 2019 elections, in particular:

i)     Low voter turnout

ii)     Liquor licensing trusts

iii)    Council staff releasing information that may affect the election outcome

iv)   Disclosure of candidates having serious criminal convictions

v)    Irregularities that could have compromised the fairness of the elections.

4.       The Committee also invited feedback on its recommendations arising from the inquiry into the 2016 elections, in particular:

i)    Electoral Commission to have responsibility for running local elections

ii)    Same voting system to be used for all elections

iii)   Foreign interference. Council will be making a submission on the Urban Development Bill and local boards can provide feedback outlining the impact on their local community as an appendix.

5.       The Kaipātiki Local Board received a report on its 19 February business meeting agenda seeking feedback on the inquiry. At this meeting the local board delegated Chairperson John Gillon and Deputy Chairperson Danielle Grant to prepare the local board feedback on council’s submission to the Justice Committee inquiry into the 2019 local elections and Liquor Licensing Trust and recent energy trust elections, noting the following (resolution number KT/2020/12):

i)     feedback is required in advance of the 27 February Governing Body meeting, where council’s submission will be finalised;

ii)     proposed board feedback will be circulated to all members via email for comment and indicative approval prior to it being submitted; and

iii)    finalised board feedback will be placed on the next available business meeting agenda for retrospective endorsement.

6.          Chairperson John Gillon and Deputy Chairperson Danielle Grant have compiled and submitted the attached feedback (refer Attachment A to the agenda report) on behalf of the board. Retrospective endorsement of the feedback is sought from this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      endorse the feedback (as outlined in Attachment A to the agenda report) on the Inquiry into the 2019 local elections and Liquor Licensing Trust and recent energy trust elections.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Feedback on 2019 Local Elections and Liquor Licensing Trust Elections and Recent Energy Trust Elections

319

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity

File No.: CP2020/03060

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide retrospective endorsement and feedback on the National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       In December 2019 the Ministry for the Environment released He Kura Koiora I hokia: A discussion document on a proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity, including proposed wording for the national policy statement. Submissions closed on 14 March 2020.

2.       In December 2019, Jenny Fuller – Acting Manager Planning provided an update on options for inter-regional marine pest pathway management and next steps through a memorandum (refer Attachment A)

3.       The proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity (NPSIB) has been developed by the Ministry for the Environment and the Department of Conservation based on an initial draft developed by the stakeholder-led Biodiversity Collaborative Group.

4.       In summary, the primary objective of the proposed NPSIB is to maintain indigenous biodiversity through directions relating to:

·      Applying the concept of Hutia te Rito when implementing the NPSIB and managing indigenous biodiversity.

·      Providing opportunities for tangata whenua involvement in the management of indigenous biodiversity.

·      Processes and criteria to identify, assess and protect areas as significant natural areas (areas of significant indigenous vegetation and habitats of indigenous fauna).

·      Managing adverse effects of activities within significant natural areas and managing effects on indigenous biodiversity that occur outside of significant natural areas.

·      Identifying and protecting taonga species and ecosystems.

·      Identifying and managing locations for highly mobile fauna.

·      Promoting and providing for restoration and enhancement of indigenous biodiversity.

·      Requiring development of regional biodiversity strategies and monitoring plans.

5.       Local boards were given the opportunity to provide input into the development of the Auckland Council submission on the proposed NPSIB with an initial deadline of 4 February 2020, subsequently extended to 4 March 2020. As the deadline for feedback fell outside the normal business meeting schedule, Chairperson John Gillon agreed to develop and compile feedback to the board. The feedback submitted on behalf of the Kaipatiki Local Board is provided as Attachment B to this agenda report. Retrospective endorsement of the feedback is sought from this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      endorse the feedback (as outlined in Attachment B to the agenda report) on the National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity memo

325

b

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Feedback on Indigenous Biodiversity Kaipatiki Local Board

329

c

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - PFK Submission on NPS for Indigenous Biodiversity

331

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Inter-Regional Marine Pest Management Plan

File No.: CP2020/03093

 

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide retrospective endorsement of feedback from Kaipātiki Local Board on the Inter-Regional Marine Pest Management Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In December 2019, Phil Brown – Head of Natural Environment Delivery provided an update on options for inter-regional marine pest pathway management and next steps through a memorandum (refer Attachment A). 

3.       Pathway management plans allow councils to manage the way pests are transported from one place to another, with an overall goal to avoid or minimise potential wide-ranging negative impacts. A potential pathway management plan will be complementary to existing and proposed marine biosecurity measures under Auckland’s Regional Pest Management Plan and Auckland’s Unitary Plan.

4.       Informal public consultation on potential approaches for inter-regional marine pest pathway management was undertaken between 18 March and 24 May 2019 in four regions: Northland, Auckland, Waikato and Bay of Plenty.

5.       In summary, the consultation results showed a preference among submitters for consistent rules for boat hull-fouling across the four regions, and a preference for boat owners to maintain a clean hull at all times.

6.       Auckland Council participated in the development of a discussion document for an inter-regional marine pest pathway management plan through the Top of the North Marine Biosecurity Partnership (a group composed of councils from the upper North Island, Department of Conservation and the Ministry for Primary Industries). This initiative was endorsed by the Upper North Island Strategic Alliance (UNISA) in late 2017.

7.       Auckland Council staff progressed with an options analysis to identify a preferred option for marine pest pathway management and collated further supporting evidence through the Top of the North Marine Biosecurity working group.

8.       Staff’s intention is to present a report to the Environment and Climate Change Committee at its 12 March 2020 meeting. This will seek approval to start the statutory process for development of an inter-regional marine pest pathway management plan under the Biosecurity Act, including the preferred option.

9.       Local boards were given the opportunity to provide formal feedback on the proposal with a deadline of 2 March 2020. As the deadline for submissions fell outside the normal business meeting schedule, Member Melanie Kenrick agreed to develop and compile feedback of the board. The feedback submitted on behalf of the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment B to this agenda report. Retrospective endorsement of the feedback is sought from this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      endorse the feedback (as outlined in Attachment B to the agenda report) on the inter-regional marine pest pathway management plan. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Update on options for inter-regional marine pest pathway management and next steps (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki Local Board submission on Regional Marine Pests management plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Kaipātiki Community Places Quarterly Reports

File No.: CP2019/21599

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide a quarterly update to members on the activities and achievements of the community places in Kaipātiki.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The attached reports provide members with an oversight of the activities and achievements of the community places in the Kaipātiki Local Board area. The reports contain updates on:

·      Bayview Community Centre;

·      Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project;

·      Glenfield Community Centre;

·      Hearts and Minds;

·      Highbury House; and

·      Kaipātiki Youth Development Trust.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Kaipātiki community places quarter two 2019/2020 reports. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Bayview Community House 2nd quarterly summary (September - December 2019)

337

b

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Birkdale Beach Haven Community House 2nd quarterly summary (September - December 2019)

339

c

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Glenfield Community Centre 2nd quarterly summary (October - December 2019)

343

d

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Hearts and Minds 2nd quarterly summary (September - December 2019)

347

e

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Highbury House 2nd quarterly summary (October - December 2019)

349

f

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki Youth Development Trust

353

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Kaipātiki Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/03321

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Kaipātiki Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter two, 1 October – 31 December 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2019/2020 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        Placemaking activations at Glenfield Library, Windy Ridge school and Glenfield Community Centre

·        Delivery of the following events in partnership with community organisations – Birkenhead Heritage Festival (Birkenhead Town Centre), Glenfield Santa Parade (Glenfield Lions) and Birkenhead Santa Parade (Birkenhead Rotary)

·        Demolition of toilets at Bartley Street and installation of new toilets at Jean Sampson Reserve

·        Improved play space, paths and structures at Lysander Crescent Reserve

·        Upgraded reception, foyer, gym floors, café, courtyard and pool lining at Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre

·        Installation of dog access signage at Telephone Road Reserve

·        Completion of ‘Larking’s play boat’ and renewal of fixtures and furniture at Larking’s Landing Reserve

·        Completion of a new storage garage at 15 Chartwell Ave, Glenfield

·        Ongoing monitoring of water quality

·        Completion of the Industrial Pollution Prevention Programme in Wairau Valley

·        Engagement of children and youth in Kaipātiki Libraries

·        Expanding ecological volunteer groups in our parks.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery (Attachment A). Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activity is reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·        CF: Project Delivery - Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre - refurbish roof.

6.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2019/2020 is provided as Attachment B to this report. There are several points for the local board to note:

·        Overall, the net operational financial performance of the board is tracking at 88 percent against revised budget to date.

·        Revenue is above budget for the year to date and is likely to be above target for the full financial year, due to an increase in both membership numbers and pool visits at Glenfield and Birkenhead Leisure Centres.

·        From the local board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) funding, the majority of projects are underway and on track to be completed during the year.

·        Capital projects underway or completed include Lysander Crescent Reserve playground renewal, Sulphur Beach reserve carpark and road renewal, John Kay Park carpark and pathway renewal, and comprehensive upgrades at Manukau Reserve and Marlborough Park.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter two ending 31 December 2019.

b)      note the Chairperson has exercised their delegated authority to approve changes to the following work programme activities that were presented by staff, as per Attachment C to the agenda report:

i)        ID#2459 - Normanton Reserve - renew basketball courts, path drainage and drinking fountain, approved 18 December 2019

ii)       ID#2515 - Vandeleur Reserve - renew playspace and pathways, approved 18 December 2019

iii)      ID#2847 - Shepherds Park - build of bleachers with Community Group, approved 20 December 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Kaipātiki Local Board has an approved 2019/2020 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Community services:

§  Arts, Community and Events

§  Libraries and Information

§  Parks, Sport and Recreation

§  Service, Strategy and Integration

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

·        Community Leases

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Plans and Places

·        Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED).

8.       Work programmes are produced annually, to meet the Kaipātiki Local Board outcomes identified in the three-year Kaipātiki Local Board Plan. The local board plan outcomes are:

·        Our people identify Kaipātiki as their kāinga (home) / He kāinga a Kaipatiki ki tō tātou iwi o reira

·        Our natural environment is protected for future generations to enjoy / Kei te tiakina tō tātou taiao hei painga mō ngā uri whakaheke

·        Our people are active and healthy / He ngangahau he ora tonu ō tātou iwi

·        Getting to and around Kaipātiki is easy / He māmā te haere atu me te haereere noa i Kaipātiki

·        Our urban centres are vibrant / He wāhi hihiri te pokapū tāone

·        Our community facilities and infrastructure is high quality and well managed / He rangatira, he tōtika te arataki i ō tātou urunga hapori me ōna kaupapa whakahaere

·        Services are well managed and meet community needs / He tōtika te arataki i ngā ratonga kia eke ai ngā hiahia o te hapori

9.       Graph 1 below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph:

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

10.     The work programme activities have two statuses: RAG (Red, Amber, Green) status which measures the performance of the activity (amber and red show issues and risks), and activity status which shows the stage the activity. These two statuses create a snapshot of the progress of the work programmes.

11.     Operating departments have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery which is provided as Attachment A to this report.

12.     Graph 2 below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey):

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

 

13.     Graph 3 below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes:

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter two

14.     The key activity updates to report from the quarter two 2019/2020 period are as follows:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Quarter 1 update

Placemaking Activations

Green

In Progress

Catalyse supported community placemaking groups to complete three major projects in Q2:

·      Glenfield Library Mural “The Skys the Limit”

·      Windy Ridge school children completed a five-panel mural for the front of the school

·      Glenfield community Hub garden installation.

Kaipatiki Community Facilities Trust continues to provide support to the Monarch Park placemaking group.

Event Partnership Fund - Kaipātiki

Green

In Progress

Events that occurred in Q2 were: - Heritage Festival - Glenfield Christmas Parade - Birkenhead Santa Parade

Bartley Street - renew toilet in Jean Sampson Reserve

Green

In Progress

Current status: New Permaloo toilet at Jean Sampson Reserve completed and open for public use July 2019. The Bartley Street toilet block demolished and site reinstatement with boundary screen fencing and landscape works completed end of November 2019. Some minor remedial works remain.

Next steps: Complete minor remedial works.

Lysander Crescent Reserve - improve play space and renew paths and structures

Green

Completed

Current status: The new playground was completed on 25 October 2019. Temporary line marking to be placed on the basketball quarter court until the permanent surfacing can be completed in warmer conditions in January 2020. Installation of the new seats is the last item still to complete. The local board has decided to hold off an opening event until the new year.

Next steps: Install seats and remove the last of the site fencing prior to the official open day event.

Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre - Pool Relining

Green

Completed

Physical works completed November 2019.

Telephone Road Reserve, Chelsea Bay - install dog gating

Green

Completed

Project completed October 2019.

Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre - Gut and refit reception, foyer, gym floors, café and courtyard

Green

In Progress

Stage one completed by November 2019.

Hilders Park – renew play boat

Green

Completed

Project completed November 2019.

Larkins Landing - renew furniture and fixtures

Green

Completed

Project completed December 2019.

15 Chartwell Ave, Glenfield - demolish and rebuild garage

Green

In Progress

Current status: Physical works to construct the new shed have now been completed. The manhole obstructing the new access ramp has been raised and the boxing for the concrete pour has been completed. Next steps: Pour the concrete for the access ramp when weather permits.

New project: Water quality monitoring programme

Green

In Progress

Sampling is underway with four months worth of data collected so far. The contractor has continued monitoring the sites that were closed due to kauri dieback as proper training and protocol has been provided. This has caused an increase in the cost and more budget has been requested from the local board. Two more sites along the Awataha Greenway have been added to the existing monitoring plan with funding for this provided by Panuku and Healthy Waters.

Industrial Pollution Prevention Wairau Valley – Phase two

Green

In Progress

Site visits are now complete and the budget has been spent. Results are being collated into a report and this will be presented to the local board in quarter three.

Children and Youth engagement - Kaipātiki

Green

In Progress

School holiday programmes were run as usual with a spy-themed evening event run at more than one library. We promoted our Kia Māia te Whai/ Dare to Explore programme at the Santa Parade & Gala and to local schools. The library waka/mobile bus helped with the promotion. In collaboration with library staff at Northcote and Birkenhead Colleges, we delivered three pop-up library events to all Y9s and Y10s, reaching 30 teachers and 538 teens. Fantastic result with this often hard-to-reach audience - great feedback, lots of registrations and loads of books borrowed for summer holiday reading. We shared information literacy skills and raised awareness of the educational resources we hold. As a result, requests for Young Adult fiction increased by 30% in Birkenhead Library.

KT: Ecological volunteers and environmental programme.

Green

In Progress

Excellent ongoing volunteer work mostly through Pest Free Kaipatiki network, with focus on Kauri Point Domain, Tuff Crater and Birkenhead War Memorial Park. Three new reserve groups-Park Hill, Hellyers Creek, Fred Anderson Reserves were included. Restoration and planting planning underway, there were 200 hours spent by community groups collecting rubbish in and around Shoal Bay. All the waste was separated into recyclable and landfill. New groups at Smiths and Akoranga Reserves continue with planting care, weeding and mulching. Tuff Crater Forest and Bird volunteers are keen to expand into Onepoto Stream. Park programmes this quarter included: two guided walks at Kauri Glen Reserve on the 5 November (15 people attended), and Fernglen Gardens on the 5 December (25 people attended) in celebration of International Volunteers Day. There were two volunteer training days this quarter - risk assessment on the 17 October and Level One First Aid course on the 6 November.

Activities with significant issues

15.     The following work programme activity has been identified by operating departments as having significant issues as of 31 December 2019:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Quarter 2 update

Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre - refurbish roof

Red

On Hold

Insufficient budget.

Current status: Report being put together to inform the decision on funding.

Next steps: Decision on the funding to be made by the new local board in the new year.

Activities on hold

16.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold as of 31 December 2019:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Quarter 2 update

Public Fireworks Event

Grey

On Hold

The event organiser has placed the event on hold and the funding has not been paid out. The event organiser has confirmed that this event was not delivered. The funding can be re-allocated.

Jean Sampson Reserve - upgrade toddler park

Amber

On Hold

The decision to defer the approval of the concept design causes a delay in the finalisation of the design and thereby delays the delivery of this project. Until further direction is received from the local board, the project cannot progress.

Next steps: Staff to meet with local board members to work through comments and update concept design, this is scheduled for 4 March 2020.

Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre - refurbish roof

Red

On Hold

Insufficient budget.

Current status: Report being put together to inform the decision on funding.

Next steps: Decision on the funding to be made by the new local board in the new year.

18 Denby Lane, Northcote Point - reroof building and renew electrical board

Green

On Hold

Project on hold subject to local board approval of building options at first business meeting in 2020.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

17.     The following activities have been deferred from the 2019/2020 work programme in quarter two:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Quarter 2 update

Little Shoal Bay, 20R Council Terrace, Northcote: Lease to Little Shoal Bay Boatowners Association

Grey

Deferred

Overarching study undertaken by the coastal and healthy waters team on the future of Little Shoal Bay not due for completion until quarter three or four. No decision concerning any activates at the Little Shoal Bay should be contemplated until this study is finished. Leasing staff will gather all relevant information and present to the board in early 2020/21.

Leasing staff are liaising with several other departments concerning the site and group. There is currently a study being undertaken on the whole of Little Shoal Bay in conjunction with the Coastal and Healthy Waters teams. The team will wait until this study is complete before any decisions on activities in the bay are decided.

152 Queen Street, Northcote: Lease to Northcote Point Community Crèche Incorporated

Grey

Deferred

Land parcel won’t be classified until June 2020. Therefore, report and subsequent lease cannot be completed within the 2019/20 work program year. Land classification report by the Kaipatiki Reserve Management Plan team to be completed in 2020.

Lease cannot be progressed until this is complete, as part of the creche land is currently unclassified.

 

Cancelled activities

18.     The following activities were cancelled from the 2019/2020 work programme in quarter two:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Quarter 2 update

Kauri Park track and signage renewals

Grey

Cancelled

Kauri Die-back has been discovered in the park and the park has been closed. Project cancelled due to the tracks being closed indefinitely to help protect the kauri trees within this reserve. Indefinite closures have been put in place including fencing and signage.

 

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

19.     The following activities have been merged with other activities in the 2019/2020 work programme in quarter two:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Quarter 2 update

Birkenhead War Memorial Park - renew skate park, including park to pool access - stage 2

Grey

Merged

As per adopted masterplan for Birkenhead War Memorial Park, this project will be closed and scope will be delivered as part of the One Local Initiative (OLI) project.

 

Activities changed under delegation of the local board Chairperson

20.     When adopting its work programmes, the local board delegated authority to the Chairperson to make changes to the work programme. Each departmental work programme delegation has a unique resolution to this effect but generally follows the format as below:

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

x)         delegate authority to the Chairperson to approve any changes presented by staff on the Kaipātiki Local Board [Department name] work programme 2019/2020, noting that:

i.          any decisions will be made in consultation with the Deputy Chairperson

ii.          any changes deemed ‘significant’ by the Chairperson or Deputy Chairperson will require consideration and decision making by the full board

iii.         any changes approved by the Chairperson will be reported back to the full board.

21.     To satisfy the condition of reporting back work programme changes to the full board, this quarterly report includes any changes approved under delegation by the Chairperson. Since the quarter one performance report 2019/2020, the Chairperson has exercised their delegated authority to approve changes to the following work programme activities as per the list below. The detail of the approved changes is provided in Attachment C:

·    ID#2459 - Normanton Reserve - renew basketball courts, path drainage and drinking fountain, approved 18 December 2019

·    ID#2515 - Vandeleur Reserve - renew playspace and pathways, approved 18 December 2019

·    ID#2847 - Shepherds Park – build of bleachers with Community Group, approved 20 December 2019

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

23.     Work programmes were approved in June 2019 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     This report informs the Kaipātiki Local Board of the performance for quarter two ending 31 December 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     A number of the activities in the local board work programmes positively impact Māori. Below are the updates on the activities that have a direct Maori outcome focus:

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Quarter 2 update

Manaakitanga

Green

In Progress

In Q2, Kaipātiki Project have completed the first stages of their overall cultural knowledge collection project with filming taking place at the Pā Harakeke restoration day. The Kaipātiki Local Board Manaakitanga fund has contributed to this wider project led by Kaipātiki Project. Kaipātiki Project continue to empower Māori communities through the work done by all their team members, especially their key master weaver on staff. This work has assisted in informing the wider programme of work around the film whilst also being guided by the changing landscape of Māori aspirations in Kaipātiki. Kaipātiki Project are due to provide an update to the local board in early 2020.

Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori. Whakatipu i te reo Māori - Kaipātiki

Green

In Progress

Staff in Birkenhead Library received encouraging feedback from customers who happened to hear the closing announcement in te Reo Māori. They commented on how the library staff champions the language in daily use. Our Kaikōkiri Ratonga Māori for Kaipātiki Libraries Cushla Tohu has been delivering books and storytimes in te Reo Māori to local kohanga reo each Monday as part of the Mobile Library service's Waka to Schools programme. Northcote Library staff have been completing online and in-person te reo and te ao Māori modules and learning a range of waiata appropriate to different occasions. We hosted a big Diwali celebration at Glenfield and were delighted that our customers joined in the organising of the event.

KT: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Year 3

Amber

In Progress

The overlapping interest step in the process will require longer than initially planned - this will push this process out across Q3 and Q4. More mana whenua have joined the programme this quarter with good collaborative discussions taking place. The Te Kete Rukuruku budget reforecast is complete, showing an underspend at year end. This will be discussed with the board in workshop three for FY2020.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

28.     Operating expenditure relating to asset based services (ABS) is tracking below budget by $216,000 for the year to date, while the locally driven initiative (LDI) operational projects are currently $188,000 below budget.  This is due to a variety of projects yet to draw down on financial allocations.  

29.     Capital spend of $4.3 million represents investments in the Lysander Crescent Reserve playground renewal, Sulphur Beach reserve carpark and road renewal, John Kay Park carpark and pathway renewal, and comprehensive upgrades at Manukau Reserve and Marlborough Park. The board has also seen progress on a number of projects from their discretionary LDI capital fund.

30.     The complete Kaipatiki Local Board Financial Performance report is provided as Attachment B.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects, for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

32.     Community Facilities are currently going through a departmental restructure to provide better support and guidance for decision makers. There is a risk that the work programmes could be disrupted or delayed. To mitigate this risk a transition plan is in place to ensure that local board work programmes are delivered and disruptions are kept to a minimum. The local board will be kept informed throughout the transition.

33.     The approved Community Facilities 2019/2020 work programme and 2020-2022 indicative work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the 2019/2020 financial year, by ensuring that if projects intended for delivery in the 2019/2020 financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances, that other projects can be progressed while the causes for delays are addressed.

34.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter three (31 March 2020).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki
work programme update, quarter two 2019/20 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki
financial performance, quarter two 2019/20 (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki
work programme changes approved by delegation (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Paul Edwards - Senior Local Board Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2020/02532

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson to update members on recent activities, projects and issues since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the chairperson’s report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Members' Reports

File No.: CP2020/02533

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for members to update the Kaipātiki Local Board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note any verbal reports of members.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board Members' Update

File No.: CP2020/02534

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board members to update the board on Governing Body or Independent Maori Statutory Board issues, or issues relating to the Kaipātiki Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board members’ verbal updates.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - February 2020

File No.: CP2020/02539

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to record the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 5 February, Wednesday 12 February and Wednesday 26 February 2020. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 5 February 2020, the workshop session was on:

·      Community Facilities

-      Growth update

-      Hinemoa Walkway

-      Glenfield Bowling Club EOI

·      Infrastructure and Environmental Services

-      Stormwater projects

·      Regional Business Improvement District – Northcote

·      Local board plan update

3.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 12 February 2020, the workshop session was on:

·      Arts Community and Events

-      Community Empowerment Unit

·      Parks, Sport and Recreation

-      Urban Forest Ngahere update

·      Local board plan

·      Grants programme

·      Local board plan continued

4.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 26 February 2020, the workshop session was on:

·      Community Facilities

-      New Area Manager Introduction

-      Camelot/Jean Sampson playground

-      Kauri Dieback mitigation work

-      Possible allocation of freed up renewals funding.

·      Auckland Transport

-      Birkenhead Avenue T3 outcome of consultation

·      Local Board Services

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the record for the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 5 February, Wednesday 12 February and Wednesday 26 February 2020. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Wednesday 5 February 2020 Workshop Record

387

b

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Wednesday 12 February 2020 Workshop Record

389

c

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Wednesday 26 February 2020 Workshop Record

391

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2020/02544

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the board for 2020 and an overview of workshops scheduled for the month ahead.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local board’s governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities;

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when; and

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The April - May 2020 governance forward work calendar for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment A to the agenda report.

5.       The March - April 2020 workshop forward work plan for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment B to the agenda report. Scheduled items may change at short notice depending on the urgency of matters presented to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Kaipātiki Local Board April – May 2020 governance forward work calendar and March – April 2020 workshop forward work plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board - Governance Forward Work Calendar April - May 2020

395

b

18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board - Workshop Forward Work Plan March - April 2020

397

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor - Kaipatiki

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 7.1      Attachment a    18 March 2020 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Paragon Petition PDFS                 Page 403


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

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[1] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/council-controlled-organisations/Pages/review-of-council-controlled-organisations.aspx