I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 18 March 2020

5.00pm

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Office
Shop 17B
93 Bader Drive
Māngere

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

 

Deputy Chairperson

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

Members

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

 

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

 

Makalita Kolo

 

 

Anae Dr Neru Leavasa

 

 

Christine O'Brien

 

 

 

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Janette McKain

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

10 March 2020

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 262 5283

Email: janette.mckain@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Ihumaatao Discussion                                                                   5

8.2     Deputation - Tararata Creek/Mangere Development                                        6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Public Forum - Kirsty Cassidy - Maui Whanau Swimming Programme        7

9.2     Public Forum - Reno Marshall - 64 Mascot Avenue, Mangere                        7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Governing Body Member Update                                                                                9

12        Chairpersons Report and Announcements                                                              11

13        Local Board Leads and Appointments Report                                                         23

14        Auckland Transport March 2020 Update report to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board                                                                                                                                       29

15        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Local Board Capital Transport Fund Decisions March 2020                                                                                                                   37

16        Norana Esplanade Walkway Fencing                                                                        43

17        To grant a new community lease at former Constable Room at 121R Bader Drive, Māngere                                                                                                                        47

18        Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes                                                                                                                                       55

19        Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review                                                                                                                                       71

20        Local board resolution responses and information report                                    77

21        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                        83

22        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes                                                    89

23        Acquisition of land for open space and exchanges of reserve land - Māngere East and West                                                                                                                       97  

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 19 February 2020, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Ihumaatao Discussion

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Brendan Corbett would like to discuss with the board the practical steps that the Mangere Otahuhu Local Board can consider to advocate for long-term protection of Ihumaatao including focusing on the traffic management and local road network.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Brendan Corbett for his attendance.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Tararata Creek/Mangere Development

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

 

1.         Julia Tu’ineau from Tararata Stream Team would like to discuss the following queries and concerns with the board:

·     Stormwater Outlet near Elmdon Street?   Four white stakes have been driven into the stream margin on the left bank, about 25m down from Elmdon bridge. Does this indicate the outlet of the next 1.35m diameter stormwater pipe, draining Mangere Development Stage 1 - probably Stage 1e?  I have not had an answer to this query yet from their office.  This structure could impact on the operation of the present 'bandalong' style litter trap nearby.  This is not operating at present, full of weed, with the current diverted under the rt bank side boom.  A Council contractor was observed inspecting it three days ago, saying 'a digger would clear it during the next month'.

·     These new, large, gabioned, rock armoured stormwater installations will constrain stream naturalisation plans.  This stream corridor naturalisation project, we were informed at the 3/12/19 meeting with Tonkin and Taylor. will be dependent on the completion of the West Mangere Stormwater Management Plan in an estimated 5yrs time.  However, could consideration be given now to modifying the design of the next outlets to the best practice design as described by Matt Bloxham, Biosecurity Team?  (This could be a delayed junction, with stormwater running in a swale parallel to the main channel).

·     Fish habitat will be the subject of a meeting next week between Matt Bloxham and reps of Mangere Development, Te Akitai and Tararata Stream Team.  The object will be to modify the stream channel to improve habitat for remnant populations of Giant Kokopu and Longfin Eels recently discovered in the upper channel.  This could involve inserting large logs in the stream banks, to provide refuges, particularly for juvenile recruits to the population.  It should also include placing tree canopy species to grow into shade trees.

·     These issues make our team impatient for an overall plan for the rehabilitation of the channel between Moyle Park and Walmsley Road, regrading the banks from vertical, introducing some natural curves, running stormwater outlets through swales/wetlands, defining recreational features.  With the need to place orders for 2020's planting season, we would like to place canopy species, but where to position them?

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Julia Tu’ineau from the Tararata Stream Team for her presentation and attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Kirsty Cassidy - Maui Whanau Swimming Programme

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Kirsty Cassidy would like to discuss with the board the Maui Whanau Swimming Programme that runs out of Māngere.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Kirsty Cassidy for the presentation and attendance.

 

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Reno Marshall - 64 Mascot Avenue, Mangere

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Reno Marshall would like to discuss with the board the lease at 64 Mascot Avenue, Mangere.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Reno Marshall for the presentation and attendance.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Governing Body Member Update

File No.: CP2020/02183

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 Minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from Cr Alf Filipaina and Cr Efeso Collins.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Chairpersons Report and Announcements

File No.: CP2020/02184

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the Chairperson an opportunity to update the local board on any announcements and for the local board to receive the Chairperson’s written report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal update and written report of the local board Chair.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairpersons Report

13

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Local Board Leads and Appointments Report

File No.: CP2020/02217

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item allows the local board members an opportunity to present verbal and written updates on their lead rolls, such as relevant actions, appointments and meetings.

Topic Area

Lead

Alternate

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Arts, Community and Events (including libraries)

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Parks, Sport and Recreation and Community Facilities

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

1st  Anae Dr Neru Leavasa

2nd Christine O’Brien

Local planning, housing, and heritage – includes responding to resource consent applications on behalf of board

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

1st Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

2nd Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Transport

Makalita Kolo

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Economic development

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

1st Christine O’Brien

2nd Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Youth, Children, Seniors and Uniquely Abled    

Anae Dr Neru Leavasa

1st Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd Christine O’Brien

Landowner Consents (excluding filming)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua (until 27/4/21)

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich (from 28/4/21)

Landowner Consents Filming

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Events (receive staff notifications of areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk)

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Liquor Licences Hearings

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Resource Consent (proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua (until 27/4/21)

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich (from 28/4/21)

Resource Consents (notified hearings)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua (until 27/4/21)

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich (from 28/4/21)

Area Plan Working Group

MOLB

All board members

OPLB

Apulu Reece Autagavaia,

Dawn Trenberth

 

LGNZ (Local Government New Zealand

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Organisation / Initiative

Lead

Alternate

Community Impact Forum for Kohuora Corrections Facility

Makalita Kolo

 

Mangere Bridge BID

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

 

Mangere Town Centre BID

Makalita Kolo

 

Mangere East Village BID

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Otahuhu Business Association

Christine O’Brien

 

South Harbour Business Association BID

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

Auckland Airport Community Trust for

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Te Pukaki Tapu O Poutukeka Historic Reserve & Associated Lands Co-Management Committee

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

Ambury Park Centre

Anae Dr Neru Leavasa

Christine O’Brien

Mangere Mountain Education Trust     

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Youth Connections South Local Governance Group (3 members)

Makalita Kolo,

Harry Fatu Toleafoa,

Anae Dr Neru Leavasa

 

Christine O’Brien

Maori input into local board decision-making political steering group

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Ōtāhuhu Portage Project Steering Group

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

The Southern Initiative (TSI) Steering Group

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal and written reports from local board members.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Member Bakulich Report

27

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport March 2020 Update report to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

File No.: CP2020/03061

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an introduction and an update for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on transport related matters in their area, including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and the Community Safety Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Another report is on this agenda to seek the board’s decision on the LBTCF. This report highlights Auckland Transport activities in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.

3.       The report contains information about the following:

·   Responses to recent resolutions made by the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

·   The wider ‘context’ involving a summary of the strategic projects delivered in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area in the last electoral term

·   information about the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) including projects delivered in the last electoral term

·   an update on the Community Safety Fund (CSF)

·   An update about recent matters raised by the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport March 2020 monthly update report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. Auckland Transport reports monthly to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan.  Monthly reporting acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

5.       Auckland Transport is currently delivering several key strategic projects in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board discussed below.

Airport to Botany - Rapid Transport Network (RTN)

6.       The Airport to Botany – Rapid Transport Network (RTN) project is a strategically important project. The aim is to create a RTN linking the Airport and Botany.

7.       A RTN is a public transport route that has very frequent services, separate from road traffic at least every 15 minutes and more frequently during peak hours. Some examples of RTNs are the rail network and the Northern Busway. 

8.       Although, planning for the RTN is the main focus, upgrading Puhinui Station is the most visible element of the project. Work started in September 2019 and the station will soon become a major bus and train interchange similar to Otahuhu, Panmure and Manukau stations, with bus services to the Airport every ten minutes. See the artist’s impression below.

Figure 1 – Artist’s Impression of the Planned Puhinui Station

9.       The new station will improve travel to and from the airport, and its surrounding areas (including Māngere-Ōtāhuhu) by providing more reliable and timely travel choices - as well as connecting people to wider Auckland through southern and eastern line train services.

10.     The interchange will build on the existing train station, linking the rail platform with a new bus and 'kiss and ride' area via a new elevated concourse.

11.     Soon the project team will return and brief the local board particularly about the project’s early work in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu area including the work at Puhinui Station and on State Highway 20B.

Community Safety Fund (CSF)

12.     The CSF will deliver a total of $20 million over two years distributed across all 21 local boards. It is strictly for road safety initiatives. It is designed to deliver safety projects identified by the local board.

13.     A local board’s share of the fund is based on a formula that assesses the number of deaths and serious injuries in that area. The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s share of the CSF is $1,108,085.

14.     The local board decided to commit this funding to supporting the Otahuhu Upgrade project (use this link for details of the project https://at.govt.nz/projects-roadworks/otahuhu-town-centre-upgrade/#map ).

15.     The following projects are being delivered using the CSF that was allocated to their local board area. The projects are listed in bold font and an update follows in normal font:

·    OtahuhuTown Centre Upgrade – $ 750,000 to subsidise 50% of a shared path on Station Road – The project involves a contribution to Auckland Council’s town centre upgrade project. The shared path on Station Road is 80% complete.  It is anticipated that the Community Safety Fund contribution works will be completed by the end of June 2020.

·    Otahuhu Town Centre Upgrade – $ 260,000 for safety improvements  - The project involves a contribution to the Auckland Council’s town centre upgrade project. Safety related works contributed to by the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu LB are 50% complete.  It is anticipated that Community Safety Fund contribution works will be completed by the end of June 2020.

·    Fort Richard/ Great South Road intersection – $ 50,000 for safety improvements including removing parking outside 519 Great South Road (build out) to improve sight lines and install high friction surfacing on the approaches to signalised mid-block on Great South Road - High friction surfacing is underway. This project is on Route 32 so there is a requirement for liaison with the Connected Communities work program. The project team is working with Connected Communities to include parking removal as part of their plan.

16.     It is anticipated that this local board’s Community Safety Fund contribution works will be completed by the end of June 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     This section of the report contains information about local projects, issues and initiative.  It provides summaries of the detailed advice and analysis provided to the local board during workshops and briefings.  This month this section of the report also includes Auckland Transport’s responses to recent Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board resolutions.

Responding to Resolutions

18.     At the February Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board meeting, the members passed a series of resolutions. Auckland Transport’s responses to these resolutions are recorded below. The resolution in bold font and the answer in normal font. A number of the resolutions may require an update in the future.

Resolution number MO/2019/8

b)   That Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board  request Auckland Transport and Panuku to investigate and provide options to the local board to establish better parking restrictions:

  i)        at the Māngere Town Centre’s market area in particular the pedestrian lanes and crossing.

  ii)       outside the Māngere Town Centre library car park

19.     Auckland Transport provided advice about the issue with cars parking on the walk ways, in the Māngere Town Centre carpark, during Saturday markets previously. The pedestrian walkways were added as part of the Future Streets project.

20.     The key issue is that at the Saturday Market stallholders park their cars on the walkways. When they were installed the walkways were not legally designated as ‘no parking’ areas.  This means if people park on them they cannot be ticketed.  The reason why this was not done at the time is that designation of these areas is a costly process and to be effective must be enforced. The parking issue only arises during market days when there are large numbers of people and enforcement is difficult. Auckland Transport’s advice is that creating enforceable ‘no parking’ areas on the walkways is not cost effective. Rather it is better that the market to manage its stallholders so they do not park on the walkways. 

21.     The markets are managed by Panuku, who are liaising with the market’s governors to develop a solution to the problem.  It is likely that Panuku will resolve this problem through this work with the trust managing the market.

22.     After discussion with local board staff to clarify the problem the car-parking situation outside the Māngere Library has been referred to Auckland Transport’s Parking Team and a response will be provided next month.

c)   That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board request Auckland Transport to enforce the drop off zone parking space rules outside Toia Leisure Centre and to investigate motorists who park their cars at Toia’s car park but are not attendees of this facility. 

23.     The car parking situation in the car park at Toia Leisure Centre and on Mason Ave has been referred to Auckland Transport’s Parking Team and a response will be provided next month.

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

24.     The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·    be safe

·    not impede network efficiency

·    be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks may be considered if they support a transport outcome).

25.     The fund allows local boards to build transport focused local improvements in their areas.

26.     In this electoral term, the local board has approximately $3 million of LBTCF to spend.

27.     Auckland Transport encourages all local boards to maximise the use of their allocated funding and has established a timeline for the board to use for identification, investigation and delivery of projects.

28.     The timeline is listed below:

·    On 20 February 2020, Auckland Transport workshopped an initial list of potential projects with the local board providing an opportunity to identify possible projects

·    At the March 2020 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board meeting, Auckland Transport requests the local board to formally resolve on requesting development of a scope and/or a rough order of cost (ROC) for the projects the local board have identified.

·    During May and June 2020, Auckland Transport will provide costs and feedback on the requested projects.  The local board can use this information to prioritise projects and allocate funds backed by quality advice. Workshops will be scheduled to discuss this information and support the local board’s decision-making

·    In June 2020, the local board will able to either:

Approve construction of projects costing less than $300,000; or

Approve detailed design for complex projects costing more than $300,000.

29.     This process ensures transport projects support the board’s goals. It maximises efficiency and minimises the risk that transport funds are used to fund unplanned or poorly evaluated projects.

30.     Further, it helps to ensure that projects are completed in this electoral term. In the second year of the local board’s electoral term, this cycle will be repeated if the board does not allocate their funds in their first year.

31.     Auckland Transport discussed this process with the local board late in 2019 and on 5 February 2020 provided advice about possible projects.  Officer advice included making sure that the board was aware of the Safe and Healthy Streets South Auckland project. A New Zealand Transport Agency led project, it aims to achieve a fun, safe, healthy and well-connected local area by coordinating government agencies transport spending in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe. Advice from Auckland Transport officers is to consider using the LBTCF to collaborate with this project in order to maximize potential benefits by integrating work streams.

Mangere Bridge Safer Community

32.     The Safer Community project is designed to make Māngere Bridge a much safer area for pedestrians, children and cyclists by building better crossings and more traffic calming (speed bumps etc.) Auckland Transport consulted with the community three times once each in 2017, 2018 and 2019 about the project slowly planning a more pedestrian friendly Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Bridge. The project involves a commitment of approximately $5 million. Details of the project are available on the Auckland Transport website - . https://at.govt.nz/driving-parking/road-safety/safer-communities-programme/mangere-bridge/

33.     Auckland Transport’s plan for delivering the project is that work will start in mid-March concentrating initially on the ‘enabling’ works in the western side of the town centre (moving catch pits and other utilities to make way for the new infrastructure).  Then by April work on the key changes will be underway starting from the west of the town centre and moving south, over time. The aim is that most of the town centre work is completed by June and in the 20/21 Financial Year, the remainder is completed.

34.     Auckland Transport and the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board are committed safer roads and these changes will help improve safety for the many pedestrians, especially schoolchildren.

Speed Limit Changes

35.     Auckland Transport’s package of speed limit reductions that are part of our new Vision Zero, safety focus will be legalised through Auckland’s new Speed Bylaw on 30 June 2020.

36.     The streets that will be effected in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board are:

·    Creamery Road – This road will change from a current speed limit of 70 km/hr to a new limit of 60 km/hr

·    Greenwood Road – This road will change from a current speed limit of 70 km/hr to a new limit of 60 km/hr

·    Pukaki Road - This road will change from a current speed limit of 70 km/hr to a new limit of 60 km/hr.

37.     Auckland Transport plans to run an extensive communications and marketing plan to inform Aucklanders of all speed limit changes.  

Big Increases in Public Transport

38.     More Aucklanders are using public transport with annual growth of almost eight per cent. Last year public transport patronage totaled 103.2 million passenger boarding’s. Auckland Transport train services carried more than 22 million passengers in the past 12 months. The highest rate ever and train patronage is growing at six per cent a year.

39.     Last year Auckland Transport added an additional 13 per cent capacity at peak times to the busiest bus corridors and more services are on the way. Last year bus patronage grew at almost nine per cent and ferry passenger numbers were up two per cent.

40.     Meanwhile, the first three of Auckland’s new trains have arrived. The trains are currently being tested and certified meaning AT can run larger trains during the morning and afternoon peak.

41.     The remaining 12 will be here before the end of the year bringing the fleet to 72.

Mangere Bridge Causeway Road Stopping

42.     Auckland Transport and the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board are responding to community requests to limit anti-social behavior the Māngere Bridge Causeway. Auckland Transport’s is working with the local board to apply for the road on the causeway to be closed and transferred into Auckland Council ownership. This removes the legal requirement for the road to be accessible allowing a gate or bollards to be installed preventing the road being used at night.

43.     Work continues on this project. The application has been lodged and Auckland Transport and New Zealand Transport Agency and Auckland Transport officer are confirming ownership and future plans for the area. 

44.     The transport agency has requested that the road stopping is not actioned until the new bridge is finished. Meanwhile Auckland Transport will continue to work through the internal processes required for the project to be completed.

March - Peak Traffic

45.     Historically, March is the busiest time of year for traffic. This is because the holiday season is finished and tertiary students return to study. This significantly increases the number of people trying to move around Auckland creating congestion.

46.     The most efficient way to fight congestion is to encourage the use of public transport. Auckland Transport is supporting public transport by planning to have extra capacity on buses and trains in March.

47.     Auckland Transport will make sure that the 15 busiest routes services including Route 70, which runs from Botany to Britomart, have an extra 5000 seats on buses at peak times and extra train carriages to accommodate this demand.

48.     This is possible because the first of Auckland Transport’s new trains have arrived from Spain allowing more six-car trains during the busy periods. We will have 1200 extra seats in the morning and afternoon peaks meaning that South Auckland commuters will have much more rail capacity to get to town.  Auckland Transport also has additional buses in reserve to help if a problem arises, we me may be able to slot in extra services if required.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

49.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

50.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

51.      To this end, Auckland Transport’s Statement of Intent contains three performance measures:

Table 1: Climate Impact Measures

Measure

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Number of buses in the Auckland bus fleet classified as low emission

5

25

55

Reduction in CO2 (emissions) generated annually by Auckland Transport corporate operations (from 2017/18 baseline)

7%

9%

11%

Percentage of Auckland Transport streetlights that are energy efficient LED

56%

66%

76%

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

52.     During this reporting period Auckland Transport is still working with Auckland Council to help identify un-funded Council projects that may be considered for LBTCF funding.  Examples include walking and cycling paths that run through parks. By working together in this manner Auckland Transport, Auckland Council and Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board can maximise their impact in this community.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Auckland Transport consultations

53.     Over the last reporting period, Auckland Transport did not invite the local board to provide feedback proposals.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

54.     There are no specific impacts on Māori for this reporting period. Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi-the Treaty of Waitangi-and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori. Our Maori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to with 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.     This report does not have any financial implications that have not already been reported.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

56.     The proposed decision to receive the report has no risks.  Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all of its projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

57.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board next month.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ben Stallworthy, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Local Board Capital Transport Fund Decisions March 2020

File No.: CP2020/03169

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to support and record decisions about Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board’s Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport manages the LBTCF on behalf of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board.  On an as required basis Auckland Transport reports to provides advice and support decision-making.

3.       This month decisions relating to the LBTCF are required.

4.       The project ideas were workshopped on 5 February 2020 and this report records the options discussed and provides the opportunity for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to formalise its decisions by resolution.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      request further investigation and development of a rough order of cost and options for delivery of the following projects:

i.    Māngere East Upgrade – Building infrastructure to make Māngere East safer and more friendly for pedestrians.

ii.    Safer Schools Programme - Supporting Auckland Transport’s Safer Schools programme. 

iii.   Footpath Improvements – Three areas exist in Māngere that do not have footpaths and they are not scheduled to be built by Auckland Transport.

iv.  Greenways Plan projects - Working with Auckland Council to identify projects that contribute to the board’s Greenways Plan and may be delivered using the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

v.   Safer Communities Māngere Bridge - Identifying further projects in and around the Mangere Bridge Safer Community area.

vi.  Existing Cycle Lane ‘Pop Up’ Protection – Building temporary protection near cycle lanes to experiment with better ways of providing protection to cyclists. 

vii.  New Māngere Bridge Underpass – Building a new pathway through the underpass that links Māngere Bridge and Favona.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·    be safe

·    not impede network efficiency

·    be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks may be considered if they support a transport outcome).

6.       The fund allows local boards to build transport focused local improvements in their areas.

7.       In this electoral term, the local board has approximately $3 million of LBTCF to spend.

8.       Auckland Transport encourages all local boards to maximise the use of their allocated funding and has established a timeline for the board to use for identification, investigation and delivery of projects.  In March 2020, Auckland Transport would like local boards to provide a list projects that they would like investigated.

9.       Initial investigations are at no cost to the board and test project feasibility and safety then provide a Rough Order of Cost.  This information is used to provide local boards with quality advice about project before final decisions are made later in the year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     In November 2019, immediately after the local government election Auckland Transport workshopped with Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and outlined a plan for delivery of projects.  Auckland Transport officer provided advice about maximizing the potential of the fund by working with other strategies being delivered by Auckland Transport and New Zealand Transport Agency.

11.     On 5 February 2020, Auckland Transport and New Zealand Transport Agency staff discussed ten projects with the local board.  After the meeting, two more projects were added to the list by members and on advice of officers. Subsequently, all projects were prioritized by the members, then officer advice was provided by memorandum to the Chair and Transport Lead. 

12.     This advice grouped the potential projects based on the following considerations:

·    Member prioritisation.  How highly did board members rate each of the projects?

·    Strategic fit.  How well did each project fit with previous local board plans and other statements of board objectives?

·    Integration with other agency’s strategies.  Does the project provide opportunities to maximise board investment by working with other work programmes? In Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area, key programmes are being delivered providing opportunities for the board to maximise the impact of the fund by working together. The projects are:

Safe and Healthy Streets South Auckland – A large New Zealand Transport Agency led project to improve safety in South Auckland.

Safer Schools – An Auckland Transport project (working with Safe and Healthy Streets South Auckland) to improve safety around schools in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu..

Safer Communities – Another Auckland Transport project (working with Safe and Healthy Streets South Auckland) that is currently improving safety in a large part of Māngere Bridge.

New Māngere Bridge – A New Zealand Transport Agency project re-building Māngere Bridge providing better walking and cycling access across the Manukau Harbour.

Ōtāhuhu Town Centre Upgrade – An Auckland Council project upgrading Ōtāhuhu Town Centre and creating safer and healthier streets in that area.

·    Cost versus benefit – How easy is the project to deliver? And, how much benefit are the community liable to get from it?  Or will the project integrate easily with other projects maximising impact?  Some projects are more difficult to deliver consuming resources and time.  If a project is easy to deliver and has a high benefit it is sensible to prioritise it higher.

13.     At this time community feedback was not included in the analysis because the process is at an early stage.  The scope of some projects will only be defined after the requested analysis is finished. Community consultation is also included in the detailed design process that is the second stage of planning a Local Board Transport Fund Project.

14.     At the end of this process the following projects were identified for further investigation and development of rough costs and options for delivery:

·    Māngere East Upgrade – Building infrastructure to make Māngere East safer and more friendly for pedestrians.

·    Safer Schools Programme - Supporting Auckland Transport’s Safer Schools programme. 

·    Footpath Improvements – Three areas exist in Māngere that do not have footpaths and they are not scheduled to be built by Auckland Transport.

·    Greenways Plan projects - Working with Auckland Council to identify projects that contribute to the board’s Greenways plan.

·    Safer Communities Māngere Bridge - Identifying further projects in and around the Māngere Bridge Safer Community area.

·    Existing Cycle Lane ‘Pop Up’ Protection – Building temporary protection near cycle lanes. This is to experiment with better ways of providing protection to cyclists.  The board and community do not like the large concrete lane dividers currently used in the Future Streets area.

·    New Māngere Bridge Underpass – Building a new pathway through the underpass that links Māngere Bridge and Favona.

15.     The next step is for the local board to request that Auckland Transport conduct an initial investigation and report with options and costs.  This information will then be used to make further prioritisation decisions.  A set of draft recommendations has been included above.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

17.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

18.      To this end, Auckland Transport’s Statement of Intent contains three performance measures:

Table 1: Climate Impact Measures

Measure

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Number of buses in the Auckland bus fleet classified as low emission

5

25

55

Reduction in CO2 (emissions) generated annually by Auckland Transport corporate operations (from 2017/18 baseline)

7%

9%

11%

Percentage of Auckland Transport streetlights that are energy efficient LED

56%

66%

76%

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     Auckland Transport is worked with Auckland Council to help identify un-funded Council projects that may be considered for LBTCF funding.  

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     Auckland Transport did not invite community feedback because the scope of some projects will only be defined after the requested analysis is finished and community consultation is included in the detailed design process that is the second stage of planning a Local Board Transport Fund Project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     Study of the options indicates that none involves a significant decision in relation to land or a body of water, so iwi consultation is not required at this time. Projects that continue will be reviewed again and if required iwi will be consulted and any concerns or suggestions considered in planning.

22.     Although no specific impacts on Māori were identified. Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi-the Treaty of Waitangi-and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori. Our Maori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to with 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     This report does not have any financial implications for the local board. Auckland Transport carries the cost of the work requested.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The proposed decision to receive the report has no risks.  Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all of its projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board next month.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ben Stallworthy, Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon, Manager Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Norana Esplanade Walkway Fencing

File No.: CP2020/03045

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for the provision of esplanade boundary fencing to numbers 20 and 22 Favona Road on the Norana Eslanade Walkway at full cost to Auckland Council.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Issues of safety and security have been high among the public’s concerns over the development of a new walkway along the Norana and Favona Esplanades.

3.       Following the recommendations of a Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) Assessment, the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board resolved to approve the principle of cost-sharing fence installation to ensure security of commercial properties adjacent to the esplanade reserve.

4.       Two properties along the Favona section of the walkway have had their existing secure boundaries removed to allow for the esplanade development.

5.       Staff recommend that the full cost of boundary fencing to these two specific properties is met by council to make good the security of their commercial properties.

6.       Subject to local board approval the fencing will be delivered as soon as possible with the aim to complete the installation in time for the public opening scheduled for late March 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve the provision of esplanade boundary fencing to numbers 20 and 22 Favona Road on the Norana Esplanade Walkway, at full cost to Auckland Council.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Norana Esplanade Walkway is being developed along the Norana and Favona esplanade reserves in Favona, and forms part of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board greenways network.

8.       This development has been the subject of extensive consultation and discussion with neighbours through both planning and delivery stages.

9.       It is recognised that the walkway is isolated in places, and that safety and security issues need to be managed to protect both the public users of the walkway and also the adjacent property owners.

  

10.     Standard Auckland Council practice is to not provide fencing on esplanade boundaries.

11.     However, as a result of the public consultation process and also the recommendations of an independent CPTED Assessment, the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board was advised to deviate from normal council practice and offer a 50/50 cost share for the provision of fencing to commercial properties along this esplanade reserve.

12.     Subsequently the Board resolved to:

approve the principle of cost-sharing fence installation where required, to increase security to commercial properties along the relevant open space boundaries. (MO/2017/113)

13.     This project is now close to completion and final negotiations are in place with adjacent property owners on cost-sharing of esplanade boundary fencing.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The section of walkway along the Favona Esplanade is the most isolated part of the overall walkway.

15.     The adjacent properties along this section are predominantly commercial operations and have existing, secure and effective boundary treatments.

16.     Numbers 20 and 22 Favona Road both had effective boundary treatments which encroached onto the esplanade reserve and were removed to allow for the esplanade development.

17.     Due to the need to remove their existing security measures council has offered to provide new secure fencing along these two boundaries at full cost to council.

18.     This has been offered as a gesture of good will to the neighbours and in recognition of the security risk and necessary removal of existing security measures to develop the esplanade walkway.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The proposed fencing discussed in this report is several metres above sea level and is unlikely to be impacted by sea level rise.

20.     Other sections of this walkway including boardwalks and bridges have been built to allow for sea level rise or alternatively to allow for periodic inundation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The proposals discussed in this report relate to specific isolated agreements between property owners adjacent to an esplanade reserve.

22.     Management of the esplanade reserve is by local board delegation and as such these agreements have no impact on other parts of council.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     This proposed provision of fencing at full cost to council is recognised as an exception to standard council policy.

24.     Justification for this exception is the safety and security risk to adjacent commercial property owners through the development of this new public access.

25.     Specifically the two properties where full cost fencing is proposed are commercial properties which had prior boundary treatments which were removed to allow for this development.

26.     Any further requests for cost sharing by property owners would be on a 50/50 cost share basis as resolved by the board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Parks and heritage is of fundamental importance to mana whenua and their culture and traditions. The development discussed in this report will benefit Māori and the wider community through increased access to recreational opportunities and improved connections between local communities.

28.     Mana whenua have been engaged through the planning and design phase and have been active through the construction phase with cultural monitoring.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     A budget of $5.725M for investigation, design and delivery has been contributed from Auckland Council Local Parks Growth fund.

30.     Eleven thousand seven hundred dollars ($11,700) is required to provide the additional full cost of fencing discussed in this report.

31.     The cost of fencing can be met from the existing project budget.

32.     The following budget has been approved for this project:

Budget source

FY16/17

FY17/18

FY18/19

FY19/20

FY20/21

Total ($)

Community Facilities (local park growth)

200,000

400,000

500,000

1,800,000

2,825,000

5,725,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

$5,725,000

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     The following risks and mitigations have been considered:

Risks identified

Mitigation

Health & Safety

 

Public are exposed to unsafe conditions during construction phase

Health and safety methodology during construction will manage risks

Adjacent properties are exposed to safety and security issues due to the establishment of this new public access

Boundary fencing is offered to commercial properties through a cost share agreement or by negotiation

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Following local board approval of the provision of fencing to the selected properties, contractors will proceed with the work in time for practical completion of the project by 27 March 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tim Keat - Senior Growth Development Specialist

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

To grant a new community lease at former Constable Room at 121R Bader Drive, Māngere

File No.: CP2020/02587

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a new community lease at former Constable Room at 121R Bader Drive, Māngere.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The building, known as the former Constable Room located at 121R Bader Drive, Māngere, has been identified as a community facility and can be used for community purposes.

3.       Staff received direction from Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board during its workshop on 20 November 2019 to forego the expressions of interest process and work with two interested community groups who submitted applications.

4.       Applicants were assessed against the criteria in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 to ascertain their suitability, including the community needs that can be met as an outcome of the applicant’s activities.

5.       The highest scoring applicant is Samoa Atia’e I Magele Incorporated, a community organisation specialising in Samoan culture and heritage. The society has been providing community services in Māngere since 1987. The society collaborates with others to support cultural programmes targeted to the Samoan community.

6.       Staff recommend Samoa Atia’e I Magele Incorporated as the preferred applicant as it will fit well within the building and supports an identified need within the Māngere community.

7.       Iwi engagement has concluded and staff received feedback from iwi representative Te Ahiwaru Waiohua. This report recommends that the new community lease be granted to Samoa Atia’e I Magele Incorporated, in accordance with the terms and conditions under the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      grant, under Section 61(2A)(a) of the Reserves Act 1977, a new community lease to Samoa Atia’e I Magele Incorporated for the council-owned building comprising 36 square metres (more or less) located at 121R Bader Drive, Māngere (outlined in red on Attachment A) on the land described as Lot 2 Deposited Plan 77892 subject to the following terms:

i)        term - two years from 18 March 2020 with one two-year right of renewal

ii)       rent - $1.00 plus GST per annum (if demanded)

iii)      maintenance fee - $250.00 plus GST per annum

iv)      all other terms and conditions to be in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

b)      delegate to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Chairperson, in consultation with local board members, the authority to approve the Community Outcomes Plan, which will be appended to the lease document.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       This report considers the new community lease to Samoa Atia’e I Magele Incorporated for the council-owned building located at 121R Bader Drive, Māngere.

9.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Land, building and lease

10.     The parcel of land at 121R Bader Drive, Māngere is legally described as Lot 2 Deposited Plan 77892. The land is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified local purpose (off-street parking and community buildings) reserve, subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

11.     The building known as the former constable room is owned by council. The lessee will be responsible for the interior maintenance (including plumbing stoppages, interior graffiti and broken glass) and utilities (power and water). Structural maintenance and renovations are undertaken by council. As a single lessee within a council-owned building an annual subsidised maintenance fee of $250.00 (plus GST) is charged. This fee covers building insurance and compliance costs associated with Building Warrant of Fitness, Health and Safety in Employment Act and maintenance.

12.     An asset assessment undertaken by staff on 4 March 2020 indicated the building is in moderate condition commensurate with its age, design and usage.

13.     As the building is relatively small, it limits the range of activities suited to the space. The two groups who applied for the lease intend to use the space for office, administrative and small workshops and meetings.

14.     The area proposed to be leased to Samoa Atia’e I Magele Incorporated consists of approximately 36 square meters (more or less) and is outlined in red on Attachment A.

Application process

15.     During a workshop on 20 November 2019, staff received direction from Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to forego the expressions of interest process, and to work with two interested community groups who submitted applications.

16.     A detailed description of the groups and their activities is referenced below:

Samoa Atia’e I Magele Incorporated

17.     Samoa Atia’e I Magele Incorporated registered as an incorporated society on 10 September 1992. The society has been providing community services in Māngere since 1987 and is one of the oldest groups of its type in the area. The society holds a community lease for part of the council-owned building known as Former Māngere East Library at Walter Massey Park, 372 Massey Road, Māngere East.

18.     The society will use the building as an office from which to manage their Pacific wardens activities. The building will be utilised as a base for the Pacific wardens when on duty, and as a meeting place for members / elders of the local community. The Pacific wardens provide assistance to the Māngere Town Centre, local community and attend local parades and events.

19.     The society indicated that the building will be utilised most days of the week and will allow the local community to use premises when not in use.

 

 

 

 

Māngere Town Centre BID Incorporated

20.     Māngere Town Centre BID Incorporated first registered as an incorporated society on 18 July 2008. The purpose of the society is to manage the Māngere Town Centre for the benefit of the retailers, occupants and local residents.

21.     The society supports other initiatives that benefit the local community. One such initiative is the Māngere Connect group. The group was established in 2016 and oversees coordination for both Māngere Neighbourhood Support and Māngere Community Patrols New Zealand. The group provide resources and support the public regarding crime prevention and community safety.

22.     Māngere Connect group wish to use the building as an office to display resources for the public, the vetting of community patrol members, meetings with public members regarding crime prevention and community safety, connecting with the most vulnerable, for instance the youth, homeless and beggars, and a space for the community patrol team when on duty.

22.     The society indicated that the building will be utilised most days of the week and will allow the local community to use premises when not in use. The Māngere Town Centre BID Incorporated would act as the “umbrella group” for the Māngere Connect group.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Assessment of applications

23.     All applications received were assessed against the criteria contained in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

24.     During the assessment of the applications, Samoa Atia’e I Magele Incorporated scored well against the following criteria:

·    Group sustainability - The society is fully self-supporting

·    Extent of usage - The premises is to be used approximately 40 hours per week

·    Alignment with Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2017 - 

Outcome two: We are the heart of Māori and Pasifika culture - is achieved through maintaining and sharing local Pasifika culture and heritage.

Outcome six: A place where everyone thrives and belongs - the society will ensure they are actively involved in the local community and promoting safe neighbourhoods.

25.     Māngere Town Centre BID Incorporated scored well against the following criteria:

·    Financial stability, accounts and funding - the society maintains multiple sources of revenue

·    Building size, configuration location - the premises meets the needs of the society.

26.     However, the society did not perform well under the group sustainability criteria as some outside support is required. Additionally, the society will act as the holder of the lease with the activities and programmes being provided by the Māngere Connect group, who would otherwise not qualify for a community lease.

Community lease

27.     This report recommends that a lease be granted to Samoa Atia’e I Magele Incorporated as the preferred applicant, following assessment against the criteria stated in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

28.     The term recommended for the lease is for a period of two years with one two-year right of renewal. This is to allow the new lessee time to implement initiatives and strategies to increase delivery of services while maintaining a regular review.

29.     A community outcomes plan will be negotiated with the lessee, to be approved by a nominated member of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and attached to the lease document.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.     There is no impact on greenhouse gas emissions as the proposal does not introduce any new source of emissions.

31.     Climate change has limited potential to impact the lease as the site sits above a flood area. These areas are predicted to be covered by flood water (river or surface flooding) as a result of a 1-in-100 year rainstorm event (as shown below):

Former Constable Room circled in red

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     Staff have obtained support from colleagues in Community Empowerment and Operational Management and Maintenance Units. No concerns were raised regarding the new lease to Samoa Atia’e I Magele Incorporated.

33.     The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     The assessment of the applications was workshopped with the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on 20 November 2019 and 5 March 2020. The local board supported a shorter term community lease.

35.     The recommendations within this report fall within local board’s allocated authority to grant leases within local community facilities in line with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

36.     The recommendations within this report support the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes of:

·    we are the heart of Māori and Pasifika cultures (Outcome 2)

·    facilities to meet diverse needs (Outcome 5).

37.     There is a large Samoan population within the local community that benefit directly from the activities of Samoa Atia’e I Magele Incorporated. The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area is one of the most ethnically diverse within the region and has the highest proportion of residents identifying as ethnically Pasifika. The largest number of overseas born residents were born in Samoa, followed by Tonga, Fiji and the Cook Islands.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi which are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.

39.     The services that are offered by Samoa Atia’e I Magele Incorporated are targeted to the Samoan community. However, some of the services provide additional benefits to all local pacific communities, including Māori living within the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.

40.     To fulfil the statutory requirements, staff emailed iwi representatives on 5 February 2020 who have an interest in the land to advise of the proposed lease, allowing 20 working days to respond. On 7 February 2020, staff received feedback from Te Ahiwaru Waiohua mentioned below:

·    Has the proposed leaseholder and Māngere Maori Wardens Trust met to discuss the shared tenancy cultural sensitivities, this should be put forward as a recommendation from yourselves. I appreciate knowing that Māngere Town Centre is a very culturally diverse space for Māori, Samoan, Cook Island and Tongan communities. There are often conflicts between each tikanga (customary practices). If a response returns that this hui between the heads has taken place and each tikanga acknowledged with contentment, I will consider the approval of this lease.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     All costs involved in the preparation of lease documents are borne by Auckland Council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     Should the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board resolve not to grant a lease, the building will remain vacant and will not be utilised for community purposes. There is also a risk that the vacant building may be vandalized, which is less likely to occur if the building is occupied.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     Subject to the local board’s approval, staff will work with Samoa Atia’e I Magele Incorporated to finalise the lease documentations and arrange a meeting with Māngere Māori Wardens Trust to discuss the shared tenancy cultural sensitivities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan

53

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tai Stirling - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes

File No.: CP2020/03059

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to outline key amendments to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework and to obtain the local board’s views.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region (ENV/2018/11).

3.       To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (‘ACAF‘) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors.

4.       In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved a consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

5.       In February 2020, a memorandum was circulated to share key findings from the public consultation (Attachments A and B).

6.       To address the feedback from the consultation, this report outlines key structural changes proposed for the framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers to which all actions will align (i.e., a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change).

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities to streamline actions and address feedback.

7.       It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

8.       The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the changes to the draft Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers for climate action (i.e., a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change)

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities

·   changing the title from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region, addressing both emissions reduction (i.e. mitigation) and preparing for the impacts of a changing climate (i.e. adaptation) (ENV/2018/11).

10.     To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (‘ACAF‘) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors, reaching hundreds of Aucklanders.

11.     Local board engagement and insights were sought throughout development of the framework, including meetings and cluster workshops.   A summary of feedback from local boards is available in Attachments C and D.

12.     In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved the consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

13.     In February 2020, a memo was circulated to all local boards to share key findings from the public consultation on the draft ACAF (Attachment A and B).

14.     This report provides an overview of key proposed changes to the draft ACAF to address the feedback received through the consultation.  Local Board views will be reflected in the final version, which will be reported to the Environment and Climate Change Committee in May 2020.

15.     More detailed changes reported in the consultation summary are not repeated here but will be reflected in text changes in the final version.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The proposed changes to ACAF have been informed by consultation feedback received on the draft document.  Some key themes that arose include:

·   Urgency and scale of action needs to be better articulated

·   Lack of clarity on how key moves work together and how they address our climate goals. In addition it was felt that there are too many.

·   Need to be clearer about roles and responsibilities with a request for more information on who is responsible for actions at each level.

·   Need for partnership working across sectors and with central government and mana whenua in particular.

·   Greater focus on equity across feedback points.

·   Need for a strong Māori voice with widespread support for working with Māori, using mātauranga Māori and Māori practices in designing and implementing climate action.

·   Need for a system shift and scale of change required, and to better articulate this with Aucklanders.

·   Need for communication and behaviour change and a request for campaigns to raise awareness across the region and enable action at an individual level.

·   Need for a significant shift in transport (of all key moves) with the identified actions supported but a need for these to be delivered at pace and scale.

17.     To address this feedback a number of key structural changes are proposed.

18.     The first of these is establish three core drivers for action – our ‘pillars’ (Attachment E).  These provide greater clarity on the goals of the framework and all actions will align to how they deliver against these goals:

·   A Tāmaki response: This pillar reflects the uniqueness of Auckland and our place-based response to climate change.  It is informed by learning from Māori principles and practice, provides a greater focus on equity and a better definition of roles and responsibilities and collective action across governance and sectors.

·   Reducing our emissions: This pillar reflects the need to provide greater clarity on our emissions target and the need to halve emissions by 2030 and reach net zero emissions by 2050.  It improves alignment with the actions and how we will deliver and prioritise emissions reductions.

·   Preparing for climate change: This pillar enables a greater focus on how we will approach climate change adaptation and take a precautionary approach for the region and also provides greater alignment with the actions.

19.     The second structural change is that the eleven key moves are streamlined into eight priorities (Attachment F). This proposed change is to address feedback on where areas are more foundational and therefore should be embedded throughout all priority areas, or where there is confusion and overlap.

·   It is proposed that Key Move 3: Make development and infrastructure climate compatible and Key Move 4: Transform existing buildings and places are combined into a single built environment priority area. 

·   It is proposed that Key Move 1: Lay the foundation is embedded into our three pillars in recognition of the cross-cutting nature of the actions.

·   Similarly, Key Move 9- Rangatahi (Youth & Inter-generational equity) is embedded into pillar 1 to reflect the need to consider actions across the framework.

20.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1 and 9 will still be maintained and reflected in the updated document.

21.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1-11 will be carried through into Priorities 1-8 (Figure 2) and updated to:

·   clarify any ambiguities that were raised in consultation 

·   remove repetition or overlapping actions

·   make additions in response to consultation feedback

·   strengthen alignment to delivery of the three pillars.

22.     Overall, the intent of the actions between the Key Moves 1-11 and Priority areas 1-8, remain the same. Attachment G briefly summarises how the actions have changed from the consultation document to the updated priority areas.

23.     It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

24.     The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     The changes identified in this report have been made to reflect feedback received and updated emissions modelling.  As such, they will further deliver and strengthen climate action already identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Regular meetings and workshops took place across the council group for development of the framework.

27.     In addition, a working group was established from the outset to provide expertise from across the council group, central government and district health boards.

28.     This group has continued to provide input post-consultation and has reviewed and provided input into the proposed changes.

29.     In addition, the team has been working closely across the Council group in the development of costed actions for consideration in the Long-term Plan. This process is running concurrently with the finalisation of the plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The framework will have implications for all local boards.

31.     In June 2018, the Chief Sustainability Office attended workshops of 19 of the 21 local boards and obtained informal email feedback from the other two local boards to identify their main priorities related to climate change.  This was followed up in September 2018 at cluster workshops to assess and test a series of ‘must haves’, which were the precursors to the actions included in the draft framework.

32.     Priorities included:

·   coastal erosion and inundation concerns

·   affordable and accessible transport

·   long-term infrastructure development to consider climate impacts

·   better stormwater management

·   climate-related education and awareness

·   building community resilience

·   for Auckland Council to lead by example.

33.     This report seeks Local Board formal views on proposed changes to the draft Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework outlined in this report. These views will be reflected in the final version.

34.     Local boards will be key in taking climate action at a local level. Support will be provided for local board planning and alignment with outcomes.

35.     The Chief Sustainability Office and Quality Advice Unit will implement a programme of work for the whole council family to provide guidance and training on how to embed climate action in Local Board plans and what to expect in climate impact statements.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Climate change impacts and associated policy and action will have significant impacts for Māori communities.

37.     A Tāmaki and climate change subject matter expert rōpū (group) was established in March 2019 which has been supporting and advising mana whenua and council on climate change issues for Māori and providing direct advice and narrative for the draft framework.

38.     A rangatahi Māori and Pasifika rōpū has also been working in partnership with council on this kaupapa to develop rangatahi-focused actions for the framework.

39.     A joint mana whenua and Māori expert task group is finalising a Tāmaki and climate change position paper, Te ora ō Tāmaki, which will be used as the bridging document to weave key anchor points into the climate action framework. 

40.     Anchor points include:

·   weaving the narrative into the framework, specifically the following sections: Climate change and Māori, Impacts on Māori and Developing the Plan with Māori

·   a section developed by rangatahi (the Youth and intergenerational equity key move)

·   a separate key move of Te puawaitanga o te tangata (Resilient Māori communities).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Actions within the framework will result in budgetary implications for organisations across the region; identifying and unlocking appropriate funding and financing streams in the future will be critical. 

42.     Taking climate action will require a range of finance and/or funding mechanisms. For instance, green bonds have been a useful tool for financing council-owned assets such as electric trains but investment in clean tech may require crowd-sourcing, grants or venture capital.

43.     To support this, a climate finance work package is underway to identify partnerships and broader funding mechanisms across actions such as bonds, grants, equity instruments and public/private partnerships.

44.     The final framework and specific Auckland Council actions being developed will need to inform on-going Long-term Plan discussions to support delivery and avoid costs associated with inaction, such as increased maintenance costs and infrastructure failures through to missed opportunities to Auckland’s economy in delivering the transition. 

45.     Not all actions within council’s remit will require additional budget. Some actions can result in long-term cost avoidance – for example electrifying fleets can reduce fuel and maintenance costs. Some actions could require existing funds to be redirected if priorities change.

46.     Also, not all actions will require funding, for example those related to advocacy to central government or expert input into actions led by other organisations.

47.     The costs associated with different council-specific actions will consider funding sources as described above.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     No high or extreme risks have been identified with the proposed approach.

49.     Moderate risks exist, including:

·   preparing for the implications of climate change may not comply with current rules and regulations

·   potential strategic risk with non-alignment with New Zealand Government direction and policy

·   potential governance risk in shared leadership and ownership of the framework across sectors.

50.     A risk mitigation plan has been developed to address the above, including targeted engagement approaches, a legal review of the final framework, on-going partnership with central government and establishment of clear governance structures for the implementation of the framework.. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Workshops will be held in April 2020 with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Independent Māori Statutory Board to discuss updated framework text, and the final text will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for approval in May 2020.

52.     The draft digital plan layout will be workshopped with the Environment and Climate Change Committee in June 2020 and finalised in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ACAF Consultation Summary Memo

61

b

ACAF Consultation Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Engagement Summary - LB workshops June 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Engagement Summary - Clusters workshops Oct 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

ACAF Proposed Three Pillars

65

f

ACAF Proposed Eight Priorities

67

g

ACAF Proposed Priority Areas and Actions

69

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Anderson - Principal Specialist Sustainability and Climate Resilence

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review

File No.: CP2020/03058

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Review to the Independent Panel.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governing Body approved the Terms of Reference for an Independent Panel to undertake a review of substantive CCOs at its meeting on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127].

3.       The review covers Auckland Transport, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development, Panuku Development Auckland, Regional Facilities Auckland and Watercare.  The overall objectives are to examine:

·   whether CCOs are an effective and efficient model for delivering services to the council and Aucklanders, and

·   whether the CCO decision-making model provides sufficient political oversight, public transparency and accountability.

4.       The review asks the Independent Panel to examine three areas: the CCO model and its accompanying roles and responsibilities; the accountability of CCOs; and CCO culture.

5.       The Independent Panel is seeking the views of local boards on these areas.

6.       Local boards are advised that their views are requested by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations Review to the Independent Panel.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Governing Body approved the CCO review Terms of Reference on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127]. The Independent Panel was appointed by the Governing Body on 12 December 2019 and is comprised of Miriam Dean, Doug Martin and Leigh Auton. Miriam Dean has been appointed panel chair [GB/2019/149].

8.       Briefings on the CCO Review were provided to local board chairs in December 2019 by staff and in February 2020 by panel member Leigh Auton.  The panel wrote to local board chairs in February asking for advice on what constitutes good engagement between CCOs and local boards.  

9.       Monthly updates on the review are reported to the CCO Oversight Committee and circulated to all local boards.

10.     The Independent Panel is seeking comprehensive engagement to obtain a range of views about the issues forming the subject of the review (Attachment A).  Community engagement on the review is occurring alongside the Annual Budget 2020/2021 in February/March 2020. An engagement document has been developed and a summary document has been translated into five languages and a New Zealand Sign Language video. A webpage[1] provides information on the review, including stakeholder updates, relevant documents (including the Terms of Reference) and a contact for further information.

11.     All feedback on the CCO Review will be provided to the Independent Panel.  The Panel will report on the key issues and community and stakeholder feedback in May and will provide a final report and recommendations in July 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     To identify the scope of their work, the Independent Panel has distilled the essence of the review terms into a list of issues, that forms the basis of the engagement and eventual report. The list and prompts, at Attachment A, provide a structure for local boards to give feedback.

13.     The three key areas of focus set out in the list of issues are:

Issue

Area of Focus

CCO model, roles and responsibilities

The essential question here is whether the CCO model delivers council services with the maximum of operational efficiency, transparency and accountability, or whether there are better ways to deliver such services

CCO accountability

Here the key question is whether the council’s current approach to holding CCOs to account on behalf of Aucklanders could be improved

CCO culture

The central issue here is whether CCOs need to improve how they consult, engage with and respond to the wider community and council

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Local boards have an opportunity to consider suggestions that might improve climate change outcomes/mitigation in their feedback on the CCO Review.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The Independent Panel is engaging across the council group on the review, including:

·   the chair of the independent panel wrote introducing the panel and the review objectives to all CCO chairs and chief executives, councillors, local board chairs, chief executive of IMSB and the co-chairs of the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 20 December 2019

·   the panel met briefly with the CCO chief executives and chairs on 28 January 2020 to discuss the proposed review process and CCO engagement. Each CCO was asked to provide the panel with key stakeholders/customers

·   individual meetings have taken place with CCO chief executives and board chairs over February and March 2020, and the panel is meeting with CCO stakeholders.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local board formal feedback on the CCO Review, including issues experienced with CCOs, good practice and options for improvement, is sought by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

17.     Material on the CCO Review was available at Have your Say local board events for the Annual Budget.

18.     Following the conclusion of the Independent Panel’s review, as part of the development of the next 10-year budget, local boards will have the opportunity to provide formal views on any proposals for change to the CCO model.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Staff presented to the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 19 December 2019. The panel met with one of the Forum co-chairs and mana whenua are invited to provide feedback to the panel.  Mana whenua have also been invited to a hui with panel members on 18 March 2020.

20.     The panel has met with the Independent Māori Statutory Board. 

21.     Panel members spoke on Radio Waatea to promote Māori interest and feedback on the CCO review. Material on the CCO review is being provided at mataawaka events for the Annual Budget and mataawaka organisations have been briefed on the review during the public engagement period. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There are no financial implications from this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are no risks associated with the recommendations in this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The Independent Panel is due to report on key issues, community and stakeholder feedback in May and to provide a final report, with recommendations, in July 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review list of issues

75

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Gomas - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Local board resolution responses and information report

File No.: CP2020/02232

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

 

1.       This report provides a summary of resolution responses, feedback from the board and information reports for circulation to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board.

 

Feedback reports for the local board:

 

2.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board submission on Taumata Arowai – Water Services Regulator Bill is Attachment A to this report.

3.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board input into the Death, Funerals, Burial and Cremation: a Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and Related Legislation is Attachment B to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      note the local board’s submission on Taumata Arowai – Water Services Regulator Bill.

b)      note the local board’s input into the Death, Funerals, Burial and Cremation: a Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and Related Legislation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Submission on Taumata Arowai - Water Services Regulator Bill

79

b

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board input into the Death, Funerals, Burial and Cremation: a Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and Related Legislation

81

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2020/02218

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      notes the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Calendar March

85

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2020/02219

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are the notes from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board workshops held on 5th, 12th and 26th February 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the workshop notes from the workshops held on 5th, 12th and 26th February 2020.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Notes 5 February

91

b

Workshop Notes 12 February

93

c

Workshop Notes 26 February

95

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

18 March 2020

 

 

Acquisition of land for open space and exchanges of reserve land - Māngere East and West

File No.: CP2020/02527

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek the local board’s views on the acquisition of land for open space and two proposed land exchanges in Māngere East and West.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board’s views are sought to inform decision-making about the proposed acquisition of approximately 3336m² of land for open space and two proposed land exchanges under section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977.

3.       Staff recommend that the local board supports:

·     acquisition of approximately 2451m2 of land on Molesworth Street for a neighbourhood park

·     acquisition of 855m2 of land on Ventura Street for connection/linkage open space that will connect to the above neighbourhood park and Tararata Creek

·     notification of a proposed exchange of 101m2 reserve land on Watchfield Close, which is used as a walkway to Moyle Park for a new walkway of 336m2 on Watchfield Close, including capital investment by Kāinga Ora in the development of the new walkway

·     notification of a proposed exchange of Mayflower Park (1619m2) for a new park (1620m2), including capital investment by Kāinga Ora, up to a maximum of $290,000 (excluding GST), in the development of the new park.

4.       The acquisition of a neighbourhood park and connection/linage open space have been assessed against council policy and are deemed to be high priorities.

5.       The two proposed land exchanges are also high priorities because they will improve the amenity values and functionality of the existing reserves. The two land exchanges are supported by capital investment by Kāinga Ora.

6.       There is a low legal risk to council if it manages the land exchanges in accordance with section 15(2) of the Reserves Act 1977. Key aspects of this process include public and mana whenua consultation.

7.       Kāinga Ora will manage delivery risk and any risk associated with their redevelopment projects in Māngere East and West.

8.       The local board’s views on the open space acquisitions and proposed land exchanges will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Culture and Environment Committee on 9 April 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      support the acquisition of approximately 2451m2 of land on Molesworth Street (lots 111 DP 6159, 110 DP 65159 and 109 DP 65159) for a neighbourhood park

b)      support the acquisition of 855m2 of land on Ventura Street (Lot 29 DP 57785) for connection/linkage open space that will connect to the above neighbourhood park and Tararata Creek

c)      support notification under section 15(2) of the Reserves Act 1977 of a proposed exchange of 101m2 of reserve land on Watchfield Close (Lot 36 DP 66356), which is used as a walkway to Moyle Park for a new walkway of 336m2 on Watchfield Close (LOT 39 DP 66356), including capital investment by Kāinga Ora in the development of the new walkway

d)      support notification under section 15(2) of the Reserves Act 1977 of a proposed exchange of Mayflower Park (1619m2 / LOT 167 DP 55383) for a new park (1620m2 / lots 134 and 160 DP 55383 and land from adjoining lots), including capital investment by Kāinga Ora, up to a maximum of $290,000 (excluding GST), in the development of the new park.

 

Horopaki

Context

There are opportunities to acquire open space and to enhance existing open space

9.       Kāinga Ora is undertaking a major redevelopment in Māngere West. It is planning to replace 228 dwellings with approximately 930 new dwellings. This will provide housing for approximately 2106 additional residents. [2]

10.     Kāinga Ora is also redeveloping the Aorere Park area in Māngere East. It will replace 136 dwellings with approximately 486 new dwellings and in so doing provide housing for approximately 1050 additional residents.

11.     Both developments present an opportunity to address gaps in open space provision and to redevelop existing open space to increase amenity values and improve functionality.

12.     Staff have worked with Kāinga Ora to identify four opportunities:

·     acquisition of approximately 2451m2 of land on Molesworth Street for a neighbourhood park

·     acquisition of 855m2 of land on Ventura Street for connection/linkage open space that will connect to the above neighbourhood park and Tararata Creek

·     an exchange of 101m2 reserve land on Watchfield Close, which is used as a walkway to Moyle Park for a new walkway of 336m2 on Watchfield Close

·     an exchange of Mayflower Park (1619m2) for a new park (1620m2).

13.     The two land exchanges are supported by capital investment by Kāinga Ora in the development of the new walkway and park.

There is shared decision-making for the acquisition of open space

14.     The decision-making allocations for the acquisition of land for parks and open space is set out in Volume Two of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

15.     The governing body is responsible for:

·     the number and general location of all new parks and the prioritisation of major upgrades to existing parks (including sports fields within parks)

·     acquisition and divestment of all park land, including the disposal or surplus parks, excluding any disposals and reinvestment made in accordance with the Service Property Optimisation Approach.

16.     Local boards are responsible for the specific location of new local parks (including the prioritisation for acquisition) within budget parameters agreed with the Governing Body.

The land exchange process is set out in the Reserves Act 1977

17.     Section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977 prescribes the process for a land exchange between reserves and other land. The process has four key steps:

·    the administering body (in this case the Auckland Council) publicly notifies its intention to undertake the land exchange and calls for objections in writing, allowing a period of at least one month for objections to be received

·    after a period of at least one month following public notification the administering body considers all objections to the proposed land exchange

·    the administering body passes a resolution supporting the land exchange if it considers it appropriate to do so in light of the objections received

·    a copy of the resolution supporting the land exchange is forwarded to the Minister of Conservation or their delegate along with the objections for authorisation.

18.     Relevant mana whenua must also be consulted.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

There is an opportunity to acquire open space to address a gap in provision

19.     Working with Kāinga Ora staff have identified an opportunity to acquire approximately 2451m2 of land on Molesworth Street, Māngere West, adjacent to the esplanade reserve that runs along Tararata Creek.

20.     This land could meet open space requirements for a neighbourhood park in this area. It would address a gap identified using the provision metrics in the Open Space Provision Policy (2016).

Figure 1: Proposed open space acquisitions

21.     The acquisition of 885m2 of land on Ventura Street, also next to the Tararata Creek esplanade reserve, could provide pedestrian/cycling connections and links to Moyle Park.

22.     The proposed location of these open space acquisitions is shown in Figure 1 above.

Proposed acquisitions are assessed against council policy

23.     Acquisition opportunities are formally assessed against the Parks and Open Space Acquisition Policy (2013) and the Open Space Provision Policy (2016). They are prioritised according to the highest rating achieved.

24.     The following table provides a summary of the assessment of the proposed neighbourhood park acquisition.

Table 1: Neighbourhood park open space assessment summary

1.        

1.        

1.        

Park type: Neighbourhood Park

Number of new lots: Approximately 702

Density: Medium

Number of new residents: Approximately 2106

Unitary plan zone: Residential - Mixed Housing Urban

Proposed size of acquisition: 2451m²

Independent valuation:

Settlement: 2020/21 – budget available for acquisition

 

Potential future features:

Informal recreation

    

 

Playground

Acquisition Criteria

Comment

Overall Rating

Meeting community needs, now and in the future

High priority as there is a gap in open space provision in Māngere West (north of Elmdon Street and east and west of Tararata Creek).

High priority
ü





High priority
ü





High priority
ü





High priority
ü





ü

High priority for acquisition

Connecting parks and open spaces

Medium priority as the land connects to an esplanade reserve. Acquisition of land on the other side of the creek is being recommended to form local connections.

Protecting and restoring Auckland’s unique features and meanings

Not a priority as there are no known ecological, historic heritage, landscape, geological or cultural values of significance.

Improving the parks and open spaces we already have

High priority as the proposed new park is connected to existing park land.

Development Costs:

Operational Costs:

Local boards decide how local open space is developed.

Capital expenditure is allocated through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

Median consequential operational costs for the undeveloped park is estimated at $5156 per annum.

Allocated as a percentage of the acquisition cost through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

 


 

25.     The table below provides a summary of the assessment of the proposed connection/linkage open space.

Table :2 Connection/Linkage open space assessment summary

1.      

1.      

1.      

Park type: Connection/Linkage

Number of new lots: Approximately 702

Density: Medium

Number of new residents: Approximately 2106

Unitary plan zone: Residential - Mixed Housing Urban

Proposed size of acquisition: 885m2

Independent valuation:

Settlement: 2020/21 – budget available for acquisition

Potential future features:

 walkway/cycleway

Trees

Acquisition Criteria

Comment

Overall Rating

Meeting community needs, now and in the future

High priority as the subject site will increase accessibility of the proposed new neighbourhood park and contribute to meeting the open space provision targets.

High priority
ü





High priority
ü





High priority
ü





High priority
ü





ü

High priority for acquisition

Connecting parks and open spaces

Medium priority as the subject site will provide a walkway/cycleway connection to an existing esplanade reserve and a link to a proposed neighbourhood park (subject to construction of a bridge).

Protecting and restoring Auckland’s unique features and meanings

Not a priority as there are no known ecological, historic heritage, landscape, geological or cultural values of significance.

Improving the parks and open spaces we already have

High priority as the subject site will provide access to an esplanade reserve in a medium density area.

Development Costs:

Operational Costs:

Local boards decide how local open space is developed.

Capital expenditure is allocated through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

Funding for a bridge to connect to the neighbourhood park will need to be allocated. Potentially it could be funded by development contributions.

Median consequential operational costs for the undeveloped park is estimated at $1861 per annum.

Allocated as a percentage of the acquisition cost through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

Staff recommend the acquisition of both open spaces

26.     Acquisition of the neighbourhood park and connection/linkage open space are both assessed as high priorities.

27.     There is a gap in neighbourhood park provision in this area.

28.     Staff recommend the acquisition of approximately 2451m2 of land on Molesworth Street (lots 111 DP 6159, 110 DP 65159 and 109 DP 65159) for a neighbourhood park. It would provide access to recreation for current and future residents in an area that will be intensified.

29.     The neighbourhood park will enable the community to gather, socialise and recreate in a well-connected, highly-visible neighbourhood park. The park will also increase pedestrian use of the esplanade reserve and improve safety through increased passive surveillance.

30.     Staff also recommend the acquisition of 855m2 of land on Ventura Street (Lot 29 DP 57785) for connection/linkage open space that will connect to the above neighbourhood park and Tararata Creek.

31.     This open space will connect the community to recreation opportunities at the proposed neighbourhood park and forms part of the local board’s Greenways Plan to provide off-road walking and cycling connectivity.

Kāinga Ora proposes a land exchange to enlarge and improve a walkway into Moyle Park

32.     Kāinga Ora proposes an exchange, under section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977, of a walkway from Watchfield Close to Moyle Park (101m²) for a new walkway to be developed by Kāinga Ora from Watchfield Close to Moyle Park (336m²).

33.     As part of its proposal, Kāinga Ora has agreed to meet the capital costs of developing the new walkway. This will include the following amenities:

·     landscaping

·     specimen trees

·     hard surface treatments

·     bollards

·     LED lighting.

34.     The images below show the existing walkway and an artist’s impression of the new walkway.

Figure 2: Existing walkway and concept design of the new walkway

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


35.     If the land exchange proceeds all aspects of the design and development of the reserve will be approved by the local board.

The proposed land exchange is deemed to be a high priority

36.     Land exchanges are assessed against the criteria in the council’s Parks and Open Space Acquisition Policy 2013 and Parks and Open Space Provision Policy 2016. Proposed land exchanges are prioritised according to the highest rating achieved.

37.     Table 3 below provides a summary of the assessment of the proposed land exchange.


 

Table 3: Initial assessment of the proposed land exchange (Watchfield Close)

Acquisition criteria

Comment

Rating

Meeting community needs, now and in the future

High priority as the proposed land exchange would increase the accessibility and capacity of a reserve that serves an area of high growth.

High priority

Connecting parks and open spaces

Not priority as it will not connect existing open spaces.

Protecting and restoring Auckland’s unique features and meanings

Not a priority as there are no known heritage, cultural or natural values of significance located within the areas proposed for exchange.

Improving the parks and open spaces we already have

High priority as the proposed land exchange will improve the accessibility and functionality of existing open space.

38.     Staff recommend that the local board supports public notification of the proposed exchange of the existing walkway on Watchfield Close (Lot 36 DP 66356), for a new walkway of 336m2 on Watchfield Close (LOT 39 DP 66356). It is a high priority when assessed against council policy.

39.     The proposed land exchange is expected to have positive benefits to the community, including improved access into Moyle Park and increased amenity values. It would also deliver increase in open space (235m2) as well as a safer, more visible walkway for current and future residents and the wider community.

Kāinga Ora proposes a land exchange to improve Mayflower Park

40.     Kāinga Ora also proposes an exchange, under with section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977, of Mayflower Park (1619m2) with a new park (1620m2) to be located between Mayflower Close and Winthrop Way (see Figure 3 below).

Figure 3: Proposed land exchange of Mayflower Park

 

41.     Mayflower Park is an undeveloped pocket park in Māngere East.

42.     Kāinga Ora proposes to provide a new park. The proposed park will be located on a new road between Mayflower Close and Winthrop Way.

43.     As part of its proposal, Kāinga Ora has agreed to meet the capital costs of developing the new park up to a maximum of $290,000 (excluding GST). This will include the following amenities:

·     landscaping

·     specimen trees

·     hard surface treatments

·     bollards

·     LED lighting.

44.     If the land exchange proceeds all aspects of the design and development of the reserve will be approved by the local board.

The proposed land exchange is deemed to be a high priority

45.     The proposed proposed land exchange is a high priority when assessed against council policy as illustrated in Table 4 below.

Table 4: Initial assessment of the proposed land exchange (Mayflower Park)

Acquisition criteria

Comment

Rating

Meeting community needs, now and in the future

High priority as the proposed land exchange would increase the accessibility of the park that serves an area of high growth.

High priority

Connecting parks and open spaces

Not priority as it will not connect existing open spaces.

Protecting and restoring Auckland’s unique features and meanings

Not a priority as there are no known heritage, cultural or natural values of significance located within the areas proposed for exchange.

Improving the parks and open spaces we already have

High priority as the proposed land exchange will improve the accessibility and functionality of existing open space.

46.     Staff recommend that the local board supports public notification of the exchange of Mayflower Park (1619m2 / Lot 167 DP 55383) for a new park (1620m2 / lots 134 and 160 DP 55383 and land from adjoining lots).

47.     The land exchange would result in a 1m² increase in council land. Accessibility will be markedly increased with road frontages on three sides. Development of the park by Kāinga Ora will improve amenity values and functionality.

48.     The other benefits of the proposed land exchange are improved access and sightlines into the new reserve. Crime prevention through environmental design will create a safer, more visible space for the enjoyment of current and future residents and the wider community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

49.     Vegetation on parks and open space can serve as temperature regulators through shade and evapotranspiration. Plants and woodlands can also process and store carbon, helping to offset the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

50.     Parks and open space also act as collection points for surface and run-off water, reducing flood risks during storms.

51.     Climate change is expected to bring increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns. Park development proposals will need to reflect these effects and take into consideration the environmentally sensitive ways parks and open space must be managed to achieve their benefits. This includes energy and waste reduction and conserving water resources.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

52.     Auckland Transport has actively supported the acquisition opportunity in Māngere West, through road stopping and an asset transfer in accordance with council policy.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     A gap in provision of open space has been identified in Māngere West. Provision of open space will provide recreation opportunities and community benefits.

54.     The Māngere-Otahuhu Open Space Network Plan 2016 identified the area as a high priority area for creating public access from Molesworth Place to Tararata Creek Reserve.

55.     Local board views are sought through this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

56.     The provision of quality parks and open spaces has broad benefits for Māori, including:

·     helping facilitate Māori participation in outdoor recreational activity

·     helping make Auckland a green, resilient and healthy environment consistent with the Māori world view of the natural world and their role as kaitiaki of the natural environment.

57.     The proposed land acquisitions do not contain any known sites or places of significance to mana whenua.

58.     Mana whenua will be consulted on the land exchanges and about the development of the open space.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

59.     There is sufficient funding available in the Open Space Acquisition Budget to acquire the neighbourhood park and connection/linkage open space.

60.     Funding for a bridge to connect to the neighbourhood park will need to be allocated. Potentially it could be funded by development contributions.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

61.     There is a low legal risk to council if it manages the land exchanges in accordance with section 15 of the Reserves Act 1977. Key aspects of this process include public and mana whenua consultation. Approval is sought to undertake this consultation.

62.     Some delivery risks sit with Kāinga Ora, as there is no guarantee that the proposed land exchanges will be:

·    approved by the governing body for notification

·    supported by mana whenua through the consultation process

·    supported by the public through the consultation process

·    supported by the governing body following consultation

·    authorised by the Minister of Conservation or their delegate.

63.     Kāinga Ora will also manage any risks associated with their redevelopment projects in Māngere East and West.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

64.     The local board’s views on the open space acquisitions and the land exchanges will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Culture and Events Committee on 9 April 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Maclean Grindell - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

     

    



[1] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/council-controlled-organisations/Pages/review-of-council-controlled-organisations.aspx

[2] Based on the average household size of 3.0 in Auckland at Census 2013.