I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Manurewa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 19 March 2020

6:00pm

Manurewa Local Board Office
7 Hill Road
Manurewa

 

Manurewa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Joseph Allan

 

Deputy Chairperson

Melissa Atama

 

Members

Anne Candy

 

 

Tabetha Gorrie

 

 

Rangi McLean

 

 

Glenn Murphy

 

 

Ken Penney

 

 

Dave Pizzini

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Rohin Patel

Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

 

13 March 2020

 

Contact Telephone: 021 914 618

Email: rohin.patel@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Auckland Teaching Gardens Trust                                              5

8.2     Deputation - Counties Manukau Cricket Association                                      5

8.3     Deputation - The Rising Foundation Trust                                                        6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Manurewa Youth Council Quarter One Update                                                          9

12        Governing Body Members' Update                                                                            17

13        Members' Update                                                                                                         19

14        Chairperson's Update                                                                                                 29

15        Auckland Transport Reports March 2020                                                                 31

16        Manurewa War Memorial Park Detailed Business Case                                         47

17        Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund - application by Tōtara Park Mountain Bike Club.                                                                                                    67

18        Jellicoe Park Tennis Club: Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) Capital Funding for two new tennis courts                                                                                                        75

19        Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes                                                                                                                                       85

20        Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review                                                                                                                                     101

21        For Information: Reports referred to the Manurewa Local Board                       107

22        Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - March 2020      109

23        Manurewa Local Board Workshop Records                                                           113  

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

A board member will lead the meeting in prayer.

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 20 February 2020, as  true and correct.

 

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Manurewa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Auckland Teaching Gardens Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.         Graeme Hansen will provide the board with an update on the work of the Auckland Teaching Gardens Trust. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      thank Graeme Hansen for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Counties Manukau Cricket Association

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Trevor Gill and Serena Somlyai from Counties Manukau Cricket Association will speak to the board about their activities. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      thank Trevor Gill and Serena Somlyai for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation - The Rising Foundation Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Alex Tarrant and Jordan Tanielu from The Rising Foundation Trust will speak to the board to explain the work the charity does within the Manurewa community and the benefits and outcomes their programme has on youth and wider whanau members.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      thank Alex Tarrant and Jordan Tanielu for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 


 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Manurewa Youth Council Quarter One Update

File No.: CP2020/02707

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the opportunity for the Manurewa Youth Council to update the Manurewa Local Board on matters they have been involved in.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Manurewa Youth Council will provide a written update on their actions and achievements from the past three months.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the Manurewa Youth Council quarterly update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

9 March 2020, Manurewa Youth Council - Quarter One Update

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Governing Body Members' Update

File No.: CP2020/02677

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the local ward area Governing Body Members to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides for Governing Body Members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive verbal updates from Councillors Angela Dalton and Daniel Newman.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Members' Update

File No.: CP2020/02678

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for members to update the Manurewa Local Board on matters they have been involved in over the last month.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for members of the Manurewa Local Board to give a written or verbal update on their activities for the month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the update from members.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

9 March 2020, Manurewa Local Board - Members' Update Tabetha Gorrie

21

b

9 March 2020, Manurewa Local Board - Members' Update Glenn Murphy

23

c

9 March 2020, Manurewa Local Board - Members' Update Anne Candy

25

d

9 March 2020, Manurewa Local Board - Members' Update Melissa Atama

27

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Chairperson's Update

File No.: CP2020/02679

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson to update the local board on issues he has been involved in.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson to update the local board on his activities over the last month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal report from the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport Reports March 2020

File No.: CP2020/02680

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Auckland Transport reports to the Manurewa Local Board for March 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each month, Auckland Transport provides an update to the Manurewa Local Board on transport-related matters, relevant consultations in its area, Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects and decisions of Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee.

3.       Auckland Transport’s monthly update is attached to this report as attachment A.

4.       The Auckland Transport Allocation of Local Board Transport Capital Fund report is attached to this report as Attachment B.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport March 2020 update and Allocation of Local Board Transport Capital Fund reports.

b)      allocate $60,000 from its Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) to the Roys Road Speed Calming project to allow construction to proceed.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport update to the Manurewa Local Board March 2020

33

b

Allocation of Local Board Transport Capital Fund

43

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Manurewa War Memorial Park Detailed Business Case

File No.: CP2020/02850

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement and approval from the Manurewa Local Board to progress a funding request to the Finance and Performance Committee for $16.9 million to enable the development of Manurewa War Memorial Park, on the basis of the outcomes of the Manurewa War Memorial Park detailed business case.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The detailed business case has confirmed a strong case for change, investment and delivery of the Manurewa War Memorial Park field improvements and multiuse facility, with a dedicated community space from a strategic, economic and financial perspective.

3.       The indicative business case (IBC) for the project established a strong case for sports field improvements but not for a new community facility. This result was largely due to the under utilisation of the 12 community facilities identified within the study area and low population growth rates projected for Manurewa over the next 30 years. Largely due to the lack of projected growth, the report recommended the provision of a reduced scope option which included only the improvement of four full-size equivalent sport fields and no new community facility.

4.       The findings of the IBC were not supported by the local board and several actions requiring further investigation were identified during the preparation of the detailed business case (MR/2019/104). A review of assumptions and the analysis presented in the IBC resulted in a significant upward revision of the project benefits. The change resulted predominately from two points: -

·    The field improvement benefits accrued from the War Memorial Park doubled because planned field improvements at Mountfort Park were not implemented; and

·    The population projections based on extrapolations from the 2013 Census figures (by StatsNZ) were shown to be overly conservative. The 2018 Census results and high numbers of new building consents issued over the past three years (2017 to present) showed the population and growth of Manurewa to be much more rapid than forecast. The population of Manurewa in 2018 exceeded the population projected for the area in 2026. Correcting the low-growth or no growth assumptions in the benefit cost analysis led to a three to four-fold increase in benefits arising from both the multiuse facility and field improvements.

5.       In partnership with the resident clubs and the local board, a three-tier option identification and analysis process was completed. The preferred option had the following features: -

·    the provision of a new multiuse facility at the location of the current Manurewa Association Football Club (AFC) building;

·    accommodation of both cricket and football clubs within the new multiuse facility;

·    sand carpet treatment of Manurewa War Memorial Park (50,700 m2) and to apply a higher wearing hybrid turf to an extended area (17,960 m2);

·    inclusion of enough floodlighting to fully address the 49 hrs deficit of lit weekday hours for football in Manurewa;

·    removal of the existing cricket clubrooms;

·    removal of the existing toilet block and provision of a new public toilet facility within the multiuse facility;

·    retention and seismic strengthening of the existing grandstand seating; and

·    construction of the multiuse facility behind the existing grandstand, integrating a portion of grandstand seating and a building footprint extension to the eastern and western sides.

6.       Achievement of the anticipated multiuse facility benefits to the football and cricket clubs, local schools and residents relies on the establishment of a collaborative governance model between the cricket and football clubs.

7.       The governance model should identify key roles to define the purpose and desired outcomes to be achieved by the facility and fields, ensure the facility is used respectfully and maintained to a high standard, co-ordinate day to day activities and manage bookings and events, and to ensure the equitable sharing of the facility between user groups and the broader community. The employment of a facility manager has been included as a multiuse facility operational expense.

8.       A recommended governance model exists at Mountfort Park which is managed by Manurewa Community Facilities Charitable Trust.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      endorse the Manurewa War Memorial Park detailed business case

b)      approve the sports field layout (Attachment 1) and multiuse facility location at the site of the existing Manurewa Association Football Club clubrooms as the preferred development options for the Manurewa Memorial Park development

c)      support a report being progressed to the Finance and Performance Committee in May 2020 requesting $16.9 million from the One Local Initiative 10 Year Programme, to enable the development of Manurewa Memorial Park as outlined in the detailed business case

d)      request, subject to approval of funding, that staff progress the development of an independent facility governance model or affiliation to existing governance entity and report back to the local board on the outcomes.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The One Local Initiative 10 Year Programme (OLI) process was initiated through the 2018-2028 Long-term Plan in order to improve the local board advocacy process, including providing more comprehensive advice on local board advocacy projects. Whilst there was no guarantee of funding, the process was designed to give local board projects a better opportunity of being progressed through investigation, business cases and to be considered for funding.

10.     Through the development of the OLI programme local boards submitted their key advocacy project for inclusion within the programme.  The Manurewa Local Board resolved through decisions and input into the 10-year budget 2018-2018 to:

Resolution number MR/2018/18

b) approve the Manurewa Local Board advocacy initiatives, including its key advocacy project, for inclusion (as an appendix) to its 2018/2019 Local Board Agreement, as outlined in Attachment B to the report entitled Local board decisions and input into the 10-year Budget 2018-2028, draft Auckland Plan 2050 and draft Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 Manurewa”.

11.     During 2019 an IBC was prepared on the basis of three options:

·    Option one: Service improvements to two existing quarter-size sports fields (status quo).

·    Option two: A small local community centre, a new quarter-size floodlit artificial practice turf and service improvements to all other sports fields (4.5 full-size equivalent sports fields) (OLI).

·    Option three: Reduced scope with service improvements to four full-size equivalent sports fields.

12.     The findings of the IBC recommended: -

·    no support for the local board option to provide a new community facility, artificial practice turf, sand-carpeting and floodlights for 4.5 full-size equivalent fields; and

·    a reduced scope option where no new facility was provided, the existing football AFC building was demolished for safety reasons, and only four full-size equivalent sports fields with sand-carpeting and floodlights were to be provided.

 

13.     In June 2019, the Manurewa Local Board requested the development of a detailed business case and the further investigation of a number of factors and options. In July 2019, the development of a detailed business case was endorsed by the Environment and Community Committee.

Manurewa Local Board Resolution number MR/2019/104

f)          request that:

i)          staff develop a detailed business case for the Manurewa Local Board One Local Initiative, commencing in 2019, to renew the Manurewa AFC building to be used as a multi-purpose facility that supports existing sports users and community uses, a new floodlit artificial turf and service improvements to all other sports fields located on War Memorial Park, Manurewa, based on funding of $17 million earmarked for allocation as part of the 10-year Budget 2018-2028.

ii)         Community Facilities lead discussion with the local community, local schools, park users, sports clubs and other stakeholders and seek agreement with Manurewa AFC regarding the future of the Manurewa AFC building.

Environment and Community Committee Resolution number ENV/2019/101

b)      note that the development of a new local community centre has a weak case for change, moderate alignment with council strategic objectives, and would not deliver community benefits above the capital and operational costs.

c)      approve the development of a detailed business case commencing in 2019 for the Manurewa Local Board, One Local Initiative [resolution MR/2019/104: f (i) refers] to, to renew the Manurewa AFC building to be used as a multi-purpose facility that supports existing sports users and community uses, a new floodlit artificial turf and service improvements to all other sports fields located on War Memorial Park, Manurewa, based on funding of $17 million earmarked for allocation as part of the 10-year Budget 2018-2028.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     As a result of investigative work and consultation with project stakeholders the multiuse facility and field development options were progressed. The main drivers for decision making were: -

·    In 2017 the existing Manurewa AFC building was determined to be in very poor condition and in need of extensive repair work, estimated at a cost of $1,216,700, to bring the building back into compliance with the building code.

·    An Initial Seismic Assessment (ISA) was produced in November 2019 by Airey Consultants. The assessment revealed that the grandstand and existing Manurewa AFC building were structurally separate. The building had an assessed rating of 80% National Building Standard (NBS), and the grandstand had a rating of 19% NBS. The seismic grade given was Grade E Very High Risk. The report recommended a detailed seismic assessment be undertaken and that seismic strengthening of the grandstand to at least 34% NBS was required. Based on the information provided in the ISA a quantity surveyor provided a high-level cost estimate of $900,000 to seismically retrofit the grandstand to 34% NBS[1].

·    On 13th November 2019, an asbestos assessment team surveyed the cricket clubrooms and the Manurewa AFC building for asbestos. Asbestos was found in the canopy soffit and eave soffit of the cricket clubroom on all four sides of the building. No asbestos was found in the Manurewa AFC building.

15.     During the preparation of the detailed business case, the case for improving the provision of sports fields and a multiuse facility with a dedicated community space has been revisited and the recommendation has changed to recommending the provision of the multiuse facility, to apply sand-carpet surface improvements to the whole park (including areas of hybrid turf offering higher usage) as well as lighting.

16.     The key reasons for the changed recommendation are: -

·    At the time the IBC was written, two football fields at Mountfort Park were planned to be redeveloped and flood-lit, and War Memorial Park was only required to provide half of the flood-lit practice field deficit.

·    The redevelopment at Mountfort Park to improve and light two football fields did not happen and the benefit resulting from the provision of flood-lit practice fields was doubled.

·    The significant population growth of Manurewa above that predicted by StatsNZ.

17.     StatsNZ provides population forecasts for all areas in NZ and Manurewa was forecast to have a population growth rate below that of the Auckland average over the next 30 years.  The 2018 census showed the opposite to be true with the population of Manurewa shown to grow rapidly. The population of Manurewa was forecast to reach 95,609 residents in 2026, but the 2018 census showed that number had already been exceeded. The population growth rate of Manurewa was higher than expected and greater than the Auckland average.

18.     Given the higher than expected population growth rate, and the strong building consent data in the Manurewa Local Board area over the period of 2017 to the present, it is probable that the Manurewa population at the 2023 census will exceed the 2046 population forecast of 100,096 residents.

19.     Unfortunately, the StatsNZ population growth forecast has been used as a base for many other demand statistics and projections. The model was last updated in 2017 before the 2018 census data was available. The model is next due to be updated in 2020.

20.     Based on the low-growth projection, the IBC cost benefit analysis used a community facility user growth rate of 0.2% p.a. over the next 30 years, and assumed club growth to be 0% over the next 30 years, leading to significantly reduced benefits.

21.     The cost benefit analysis has been reviewed and was found to be very conservative. The analysis has been revised in the detailed business case. The value of project benefits was increased by over a factor of three and showed the economic case for investment in both a multiuse facility with a dedicated community space and field improvements to be strong.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     Subject to funding approval, climate impacts will be fully assessed and addressed for the Manurewa War Memorial Park development through planning, design and implementation.

23.     This will include due consideration of the usage of green building materials in the project and alternatives for and/or mitigation of any proposed activities that will use a lot of fossil fuels.

24.     Demolition materials will be recycled wherever possible and construction debris disposal will also be streamlined by careful site management and the use of materials that are quickly and efficiently recycled.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Collaboration across staff within Community Facilities and Parks, Sports and Recreation, will be ongoing to ensure that the Manurewa War Memorial project will be appropriately developed and integrated into operational maintenance and asset management systems once completed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     The OLI is the Manurewa Local Board’s key advocacy project identified through the 2018-2028 Long-term Plan and the development will deliver multiple benefits for the Manurewa community.

27.     Development of Manurewa War Memorial Park will address a shortfall in Manurewa of 49 training hours weekday floodlit football and create a facility for use by the resident clubs and broader community.

28.     The Manurewa Local Board held public consultation regarding their proposed priorities for 2018-2019. From this consultation, there were high levels of support to implement a new community facility in War Memorial Park. Fifty five per cent of submitters on this issue supported the local board's proposal, with a further 22% partially supportive, and 22% opposed.

29.     Most comments from those who partially supported the proposal, favored upgrading all parks and facilities, not just War Memorial Park. Common responses received from submitters who did not support this priority, highlighted other issues that were more important including homelessness and housing.

30.     The Manurewa Local Board has confirmed that the development of Manurewa War Memorial Park aligns with objectives, community aspirations and is a key priority in the 2017 Local Board Plan.

·    More people access and participate in multiuse facilities, spaces and activities

·    Meet future demand for facilities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     During the community needs consultation process conducted in 2016 by Buzz Channel, an invitation was sent to 10 Manurewa Mana whenua representatives on 21 May 2016. Due to a lack of response, an alternative approach was undertaken where Māori organisations operating in the area were interviewed one-on-one. Organisations consulted were: -

·    Manurewa Marae

·    Te Whare Oranga (integrated whanau community health care)

·    Taiohi Whai Oranga (a marae-based youth development initiative)

·    Te Whakaora Tangata (whanau restoration programmes)

·    Members of Te Ohu Rata o Aotearoa (Māori Medical Practitioners Association).

 

32.     The multiuse facility will be designed in accordance with the Te Aranga design principles. This will require mana whenua input and involvement during the design process and enabling Māori cultural expression within the building form and exterior.

33.     One of the outcomes sought from the project is to provide places and activities for local youth, via addressing the sporting facilities provision shortfall in the area. In Manurewa the proportion of Māori in the area is higher than the Auckland average and the proportion of youth is also higher. Māori youth (Rangatahi) will be one of the demographic groups which will benefit the most from this project.

34.     It is recommended that early engagement with mana whenua should occur during the initial stages of preliminary design.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     The estimated cost to deliver the project is $16.9 million. This value is comprised of: -

·    $5.6 million for the proposed field upgrades; and

·    $11.3 million for the proposed multiuse facility[2].

 

 

Field upgrades

Multiuse facility

Construction cost

$3,865,200           

$7,274,645

Contingency

$1,159,560 (30%)

$1,454,929 (20%)

Professional services, consents and other project delivery costs

$575,240           

$2,570,426

Total

$5,600,000

$11,300,000

 

36.     The estimated delivery cost is within the sum of $17 million. The funding for the delivery of the Manurewa War Memorial Park upgrade project will be solely from the 2018-2028 LTP OLI allocation for this project of $17 million.

37.     The maintenance and renewal costs for the sport fields will be provided for from operational budgets and are not included as a part of the operating costs of the multiuse facility.

38.     Hybrid turf fields combine natural grass with synthetic reinforcing fibres and are expected to produce an uplift in capacity of usage from existing natural turf fields by approximately 70% or provision of 30-35 use hours / week. The annual maintenance of a Hybrid Field is estimated between $28,000 – $35,000 with annual renovation costs estimated at $20,000-$40,000.

39.     Maintenance of a sand carpeted field costs $25,000 – $30,000 with annual renovations between $15,000 – $30,000.

40.     The field area in Manurewa War Memorial Park (68,660m2) currently provides space for 5.5 full-size equivalent (FSE) soil-based football fields. Current annual field maintenance and renewal (M&R) costs are estimated to be $104,500 or $1.52/m2. The proposed field upgrade will provide space for 3.5 FSE sand carpeted fields (50,700 m2) and two FSE hybrid turf fields (17,960 m2) at an estimated annual maintenance and renewal cost of $298,000; comprised of sand-carpet M&R at a rate of $3.45/m2 and hybrid turf at $6.84/m2.

41.     The estimated increase cost to the operational budgets to provide M&R for Manurewa War Memorial Park is $193,500.

 

War Memorial Park areas

Annual maintenance

Annual renovations

M&R cost

Current

68,660 m2 of soil turf (5.5 FSE)

$15,000/field

$2-6,000/field

$104,500

Field option 1b

50,700 m2 of sand carpeted turf (3.5 FSE)

17,960 m2 of hybrid turf (2 FSE)

$25-$30,000/field

$28-$35,000/field

$15-$30,000/field

$20-$40,000/field

$175,000 $123,000

Increased cost to operating budget

$193,500

 

42.     The multiuse facility is forecast to be financially self-sufficient and able to earn an annual surplus of $67,802 based on a forecast operating revenue of $145,874 and operating costs of $78,072.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     The following table provides an overview of the main risks associated with the proposal.

Risks Identified

Mitigation

Risk of delays with the consenting process and additional costs.

Investigate any possible constraints with developing the site at the start of the project, and incorporate these within the design and resource consent process.

Potential for project delays and cost increases.

Ensure a programme schedule is established and agreed upon early and the project manager manages the process closely, with regular reporting requirements and clearly defined lines of communication.

Budget allocated and fixed before the design has been developed / completed.

Appoint a QS to review costs at each stage of the design process.

Specifications and details of design are not clearly communicated to all parties prior to design contract commencement.

Limit bespoke elements, and if they are required, ensure communication of these elements are fully understood prior to engaging contractor.

Potential for both design and construction tenders to be lower than estimate, leading to under-pricing of the project and requirements, increasing the need for council input.

Address through the tender process. Potentially procure as a fixed price element, or through weighting of attributes focussed on relevant experience, team proposed etc.

Potential for both design and construction tenders to be higher than estimated, resulting in escalated costs.

Address through the tender process. Potentially procure as a fixed price element.

 

As a result of undefined OPEX costs, the asset owner is unable to fund ongoing OPEX costs. This will result in maintenance being below the expected level of service.

Ensure assets selected and constructed are compliant with Auckland Council standards and guidelines. Engage with the assets and maintenance team early in the process to identify and fund OPEX costs.

Surrounding residents and the resident clubs are unsupportive of the project.

Engage with the surrounding stakeholders and site tenants early in the project. Understand and manage their expectations.

Stakeholder and local board expectations for the project are high. Stakeholder and resident expectations might not be completely met.

Agree a communications strategy for engaging with stakeholders and the local board. Understand approval and sign off process and timeframes.

Maintain regular communication through a reliable medium.

The multiuse facility is not well used by the local community and schools.

 

Ensure there is effective communication and advertising to the public. Throughout the design process, provide updates as appropriate through social media channels and local community boards and shops.

There will be an increase in reputational risk if there is a further delay to the project.

Ensure there is transparency in communication with stakeholders to define why the decisions have been made. Maintain regular communication through a reliable medium.

The multiuse facility and fields are not equitably shared between the clubs, community and local schools.

Manage the facility and field usage under a neutral trust with an independent manager.

 


 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     The next steps are outlined below:

Gateway

 

Indicative milestone date (for completion)

Report to Finance and Performance Committee

May 2020

Design Team Procurement

June 2020

Preliminary design, Mana whenua and community engagement

October 2020

Detailed design

November 2020

Resource consent

November 2020

Building consent

February 2021

Construction (Staged)

Mid 2021 onwards*

Handover and completion

Late 2022

*Field upgrades can be staged and could start earlier than the multiuse facility

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment 1 - Field Layout Option

57

b

Attachment 2 - MWMP Detailed Business Case Summary

59

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Roscoe Webb - Programme Principal

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 



Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 



Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund - application by Tōtara Park Mountain Bike Club.

File No.: CP2020/02773

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse an application from the Tōtara Park Mountain Bike Club for $150,000, to the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund, to construct mountain bike tracks in Tōtara Park.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund is a $120 million contestable fund allocated through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.  It supports the development of regional and sub-regional community sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

3.       In 2019/2020, $7 million has been budgeted for projects that align with priorities identified in the Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019 – 2039. 

4.       Tōtara Park Mountain Bike Club has applied for $150,000 to construct new mountain bike tracks in Tōtara Park.  The park is identified in the Bike Facility Plan for the Auckland Region as a regional destination for mountain biking.

5.       At a workshop on 27 February 2020, the Manurewa Local Board supported this project as it aligns with the intention of the Tōtara Park Master Plan.

6.       The local board raised concern that there will be no consequential operational funding to maintain the proposed new tracks, once constructed. Council staff will need to address how the cost of maintenance and renewal of the proposed tracks will be paid for, prior to the transfer of grant funding to Totara Park Mountain Bike Club; this assumes the club’s application is approved by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.

7.       Following assessment of the project, staff recommend that the local board supports the project for consideration for funding by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.  The project is identified on the Tōtara Park Master Plan and aligns with a key initiative in the Manurewa Local Board Plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That Manurewa Local Board

a)      endorse an application from the Tōtara Park Mountain Bike Club for $150,000, to the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund, to construct mountain bike tracks in Tōtara Park.

 

Horopaki

Context

Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund

8.       The Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund is a contestable fund that supports development of regional and sub-regional community sport and recreation facilities in Auckland.

9.       The purpose of the fund is to support the implementation of Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 which aims to make Aucklanders more active, more often.

10.     A key outcome is that the fund supports the delivery of significant capital development projects. In addition, it is envisaged that a pipeline of projects will be developed from investing into investigation, planning and design stages.

11.     Council’s Long-term Plan 2018-2028 has $120 million allocated for this fund. This includes $7 million in 2019/2020, $7 million in 2020/2021, $13.4 million in 2021/2022 and 13.6 million in 2022/2023.

Funding priorities

12.     Core infrastructure such as courts, fields and playing surfaces and lighting are high priorities for investment. 

13.     A medium investment priority is ancillary infrastructure such as toilets, changing rooms, equipment storage and car parking for sport facilities.

14.     Low investment priorities include clubrooms and administration facilities not directly linked to sports participation but whereby they exist for social and management purposes.

15.     Further details about the funding priorities are in the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund Guidelines SRFIF Guidelines.

16.     Facility development projects over $500,000 and partnerships that enable a group to leverage additional investment will be a priority for investment. These projects will enable more of the facilities Auckland needs to be constructed faster and more effectively.

Application process and eligible projects

17.     The 2019/2020 grant application process was a two-stage process, as follows:

Stage 1: An expression of interest was received from 59 groups by 1 November 2019. Twenty-one applications aligned with the purpose of the fund. 

Stage 2: Seventeen groups applied in Stage 2. Applications included supplementary documents such as a needs assessment, feasibility study and business case if these have been completed.  

18.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee will consider 17 projects at its meeting in April 2020.  

Assessment principles

19.     A panel that included staff from Sport New Zealand and council assessed the projects.

20.     Auckland Sport (Aktive) did not participate in the assessment process as it applied for funding on behalf of the multi-code Regional Indoor Court Leadership Group.  

21.     Projects were assessed against criteria linked to the following principles stated in Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039. The principles were used during the decision making process to ensure investments are well balanced.

Table 1:  Investment principles for prioritising investment

 

Principle

Description

%

 

% of

Total

1

Equity

Ensures equity of outcomes across the population regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status or location

40%

 

 

 

 

80%

2

Outcome-focused

There is a clear ’line of sight’ between the investment and the outcomes it delivers

30%

3

Financial sustainability

Projects need to be financially viable and affordable for the public

20%

4

Accountability

Investment should be efficient, effective, transparent and consistent

10%

 

In addition to the above, the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund considers two principles that specifically relate to facility development considerations as follows:

Table 1a: Investment principles related to facility developments

 

Principle

Description

%

 

%

of Total

5

Fit-for-purpose

Ensures the proposal aligns with best practice, is flexible to meet future / changing needs and meets design standards to deliver the intended outcomes

 

10%

 

 

 

 

20%

6

Deliverability

Ensures the capital fundraising plan is realistic, the complexity of the project is achievable and the capability of the group leading the project is sufficient to deliver the intended outcomes 

 

10%

 

Manurewa Local Board Plan (2017)

22.     The local board plan has the following outcome, objective and key initiative.

Outcome 1: People in Manurewa are actively connecting everywhere, every day.

Objective: More people access and participate in multi-use facilities, spaces and activities.

Key Initiative: Partner with community organisations to implement the Tōtara Park masterplan as funding allows.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options considered

Option 1:  Endorse an application for $150,000 from Tōtara Park Mountain Bike Club, to the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund, to construct mountain bike tracks in Tōtara Park.

23.     Option 1 is to endorse Tōtara Park Mountain Bike Club’s application for investment of $150,000 into construction of mountain bike tracks at Tōtara Park. The application was part of a multi-board application to develop mountain bike tracks in Auckland.

24.     The club advised the project will cost $300,000 and that it will raise the balance of $150,000 to complete the project.

25.     The project involves construction of new tracks in four areas within the park as illustrated in Attachment 1.  Tracks will be known by the club as the Zebzag, Valley Y, Wairere South Exit and Anaconda Native tracks.

26.     In 2017, Manurewa Local Board adopted a masterplan for Tōtara Park.  Proposed track development aligns with the master plan. 

27.     Tōtara Park is identified as a regional mountain bike facility in the Bike Facility Plan for the Auckland Region. The action in the plan is “ongoing track development to extend the range of tracks available”.

28.     Developing and improving the accessibility of open spaces is a key initiative in the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan 2014 – 2024. Aside from Whitford Forest, the mountain bike tracks in Tōtara Park are the only tracks accessible to the public in the wider Manukau – Papakura area.

Table 2:  Advantages and Disadvantages of Option 1

Advantages

Disadvantages

Aligns with the Bike Facility Plan for the Auckland Region.  Tōtara Park is identified as a regional facility.

New tracks will be maintained as mountain bike tracks in accordance with the second priority in the Auckland Sport Sector Facilities Priorities Plan (to ensure the tracks are maintained as mountain bike tracks)

Aligns with a key initiative in the Manurewa Local Board Plan which is to partner with organisations to implement the Tōtara Park masterplan

Aligns with a key initiative in the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan, to develop and improve accessibility in open spaces

Evidence indicates that Tōtara Park Mountain Bike Club has the capability to raise the $150,000 balance required to complete the project

There is no ongoing consequential opex to maintain new tracks.

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

29.     Staff recommend endorsing Tōtara Park Mountain Bike Club’s application for $150,000 to construct mountain bike tracks at Tōtara Park.  

Option 2: Do not endorse an application for $150,000 from Tōtara Park Mountain Bike Club, to the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund, to construct mountain bike tracks in Tōtara Park

30.     Should the local board support Option 2, the Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee could approve investment in this project nevertheless. The committee is focusing on regional and sub regional facilities that will benefit Aucklanders.

31.     If the application is not approved by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee, completing proposed mountain bike tracks on the local board’s master plan for Tōtara Park is likely to take longer with Option 2. Tōtara Park Mountain Bike Club will be required to secure funding for track construction from external sources.

Table 3:  Advantages and Disadvantages of Option 2

Advantages

Disadvantages

No advantages

Actions for Tōtara Park in the in the Bike Facility Plan for the Auckland Region will take longer to implement

Implementing the intended mountain bike track development on the Tōtara Park masterplan will take longer

Does not support the initiative in the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan, to develop and improve accessibility in open spaces

 

Recommendation

32.     Staff do not recommend Option 2 as it will delay the implementation of the Tōtara Park Master Plan and the completion of track development, as recommended in the Bike Facility Plan for the Auckland Region.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     At this time there are no significant climate change impacts to be considered in relation to this project.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee is responsible for the allocation of funding from the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund.

35.     Council’s contractor, Citicare, maintains tracks in Tōtara Park. Should this project be approved by the committee, the Community Facilities Team will be tasked with the maintenance of more tracks and will not get corresponding operational funding for the maintenance required.

Council Controlled Organisations

36.     The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     Input and views of the local board were received at a workshop held on 27 February 2020.  The board was supportive of Option 1. 

38.     The board raised concern that riders come to Tōtara Park from other parts of Auckland but do not contribute to the cost of track maintenance. 

39.     The board identified that it could receive a funding request in future from the club, for maintenance of the proposed tracks. It does not wish to fund track maintenance from its locally driven initiatives budget. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     Within the Manurewa Local Board area, 26% of the population is Maori. 

41.     7.3% of Māori residing in Manurewa Local Board area participate in cycling / biking. 

42.     The impact on Māori is likely to be less than that of general participants.  Maori are 20% less likely to participate in cycling/ biking than other Manurewa residents.

43.     Auckland Transport has been delivering a learn to ride a bike programme in Manurewa schools and it is likely some Māori children have visited Tōtara Park to ride on the tracks. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     The recommendation gives rise to the financial risk that should the project be funded by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, there will be no consequential operational funding to maintain the proposed mountain bike tracks, once they are completed.

45.     Council staff will need to address how the cost of track maintenance and renewals will be paid for, prior to the transfer of grant funding to Totara Park Mountain Bike Club; this assumes the club’s application is approved by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.

46.     The economic return on investment in new mountain bike tracks includes fitter and healthier community members. This is due to the increased opportunity to provide a more extensive track network and more variety of tracks.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     Potential risks from supporting this project, should it be granted funds by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee will be mitigated by having a signed funding agreement with Tōtara Park Mountain Bike Club. The funding agreement will state how the funding is to be used. As the club will require additional funds to complete a project, the grant will be released once it provides confirmation that the balance has been secured to complete the project.

48.     The sport and recreation team has prepared and managed many similar funding agreements. The risk of not achieving the expected outcomes from the recommended grant funding is expected to be low.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

49.     Following local board feedback on the options, a report will be presented to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in April 2020 with recommendations for the allocation of $7m (not subject to GST).

50.     The successful organisations will be required to enter into a funding agreement which includes the terms and conditions of the grant funding.

51.     Staff from the Sport and Recreation Team will keep the local board informed on the project’s progress through the PACE reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed mountain bike track development at Tōtara Park

73

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rose Ward - Sport and Recreation Advisor

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

Dave Stewart - Manager Sport & Recreation

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Jellicoe Park Tennis Club: Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) Capital Funding for two new tennis courts

File No.: CP2020/01568

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request funding from the Manurewa Local Board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) capital budget for the development of two new tennis courts at Jellicoe Park Tennis Club in Manurewa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In 2018 the Jellicoe Park Tennis Club (JPTC) applied for landowner approval to redevelop and expand their facilities at Jellicoe Park.

3.       As a first stage, JPTC are seeking approval and funding for two new courts within their existing leased area as well as the associated fencing required.

4.       Their long-term proposal includes an additional four ‘hot shot’ courts within the existing car park area as well as any ancillary requirements such as fencing.

5.       In December 2018, staff recommended to proceed with a full project investigation and design in order to provide an accurate estimate of project costs prior to the local board deciding whether to proceed with the proposed redevelopment at Jellicoe Park

6.       On 24 January 2019, the local board resolved up to $25,000 from financial year 2018/2019 locally driven initiatives (LDI) capital funding budget to complete the project scope for the proposed redevelopment of tennis facilities at Jellicoe Park (resolution MR/2019/111).

7.       Staff returned to a local board workshop in July 2019 to provide a project update after consultation with the neighbouring property. The local board gave direction to progress the design six meters away from the property boundary line.

8.       This report seeks budget approval of $293,000 from the Manurewa Local Board’s LDI capex budget to deliver two tennis courts, fencing and relocate the existing pathway as part of the redevelopment of tennis facilities at Jellicoe Park.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      approve $293,000 from financial year 2020/2021 locally driven initiatives (LDI) capital funding budget to deliver two new tennis courts, fencing and to relocate the pathway as part of the redevelopment of tennis facilities at Jellicoe Park in Manurewa.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

Jellicoe Park Tennis Club proposal

9.       In June 2018, JPTC presented a proposal to the local board for the redevelopment of tennis facilities at Jellicoe Park

10.       The proposal included:

·    two new courts within their existing lease area

·    four hot shot courts within the existing car park area

·    a range of associated work such as fencing, vegetation clearance etc.

 

11.     JPTC applied to the local board for landowner approval and funding for the two proposed new tennis courts within their current lease area.

12.     JPTC provided a quote for the work of $145,544 plus GST. The provided quote is based on a number of assumptions relating to site conditions and work required and has a number of exclusions. The cost of exclusions and validity of the assumptions at the time was unclear.

13.     The quotation excluded several items which are identified in the JPTC proposal as needing to be completed by council, at council’s cost. These items include securing resource and/or building consents, removal of vegetation and associated works, and the appropriate reuse or disposal of material excavated from the site of the proposed new courts.

14.     The initial proposal from JPTC highlighted the club’s intention to align the two new courts next to the existing courts three and four. Fencing would be on the property boundary line of the park and neighbour’s property

15.     Building conditions in a residential area restrict building structures within six meters of a property boundary line. Signed permission from the adjacent neighbours would be required to obtain resource consent for delivery.

16.     In April and May 2019 staff conducted consultation with residents adjacent to the park to seek feedback and written permission. A letter with the club’s proposal was issued for consideration.

17.     Staff returned to a workshop in June 2019 to advise the board after consultation only 50 percent of the neighbours supported the scope. Neighbours who did not support the proposal raised concerns of increased noise and their privacy.

18.     Based on the results from the consultation the local board directed staff to progress the design six meters from the property boundary line.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Land tenure

19.     Jellicoe Park, sited at 40R Jellicoe Road, is formed by Lots 1 and 2 DP 43428 and is currently held in fee simple by the Auckland Council as a classified recreation reserve.

20.     JPTC has a ground lease with council and is due for final expiry on 31/07/2021. Staff assume the club will seek to renew their ground lease prior to expiry.

21.     The existing assets within the lease area are owned and maintained by the club.

Resource consent considerations

22.     The site adjoins the mixed housing suburban zone which has 2.5 meters and 45o height in relation to boundary standard. The proposed tennis fencing will exceed this standard if located within the height in relation to boundary extent.

23.     The front yard standard of five meters is likely to be infringed towards Jellicoe Road to enable two additional tennis courts to be installed.

24.     The side yard towards 44 Jellicoe Road will also be infringed if the fencing is placed within 6 meters of the side yard.

25.     As the full support from the neighbouring properties has not been secured, staff recommended fencing for the tennis courts is moved six meters away from the boundary so that it complies with zone requirements.

26.     Provided the proposed fencing complies with zone requirements, resource consent will only be required for earthworks in the flood plains, where the new tennis courts will be located. Vegetation will be added between the property boundary line and fencing to deter foot traffic.

27.     The existing pathway on the adjacent side of the park will also need to be moved over to accommodate the existing connecting pathway

28.     The design has considered the location of the proposed tennis courts is subject to both an overland flow path and flooding. Stormwater disposal requirements has been considered in the design.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     In June 2019, Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and a commitment to the community to look at ways on how we can consider climate implications in everything that we do.

30.      Synthetic turf has a lot of positive environmental credentials. The main ecological benefits of synthetic turf are

·    Water Conservation - artificial turf surfaces have a major advantage over natural grass for most sports. Irrigation is a key component in maintaining good quality natural grass, whereas, synthetic turf does not require irrigation in most situations. Although there are some types of synthetic turf that do perform better when watered, this water usage is generally significantly less than that needed to irrigate and maintain natural grass. 

·    No mowing - mowing grass uses fossil fuels and contribute carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.

·    Eliminates the use of toxic pesticides and fertilizers.

31.     All waste will be minimised and recycled wherever possible.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     Overall, council staff are supportive of an initiative to provide facilities that strongly supports local youth in tennis. Providing two new courts would further attract more local youth to the sport.

33.     Advice from the Parks, Sports and Recreation department is that the board consider the benefits in negotiating community access and options for a variety of uses at JPTC in the future.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     The JPTC proposal has been discussed at local board workshops throughout 2018 and 2019. The board has indicated their support for the club and the redevelopment proposal at those workshops.

35.     The local board expressed interest to learn JPTC have appointed a social coordinator to manage all club and public events and fundraisers which include public use. See attachment A, Jellicoe Tennis Club.

36.     Community members join the club to participate in social events, coaching and interclub competitions. Casual participants, non-members, are found at holiday programmes, senior coaching sessions and social events. All forms of participation contribute to improved personal and community well-being.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     The proposal has no specific impact on Māori. The increase in facilities will provide more tennis opportunities for all members of the club and residents of Manurewa.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     A preliminary estimate of $293,000 provided by a council Quantity Surveyor includes cost of consent, construction and contingency. Actual costs will be confirmed in tender, and any unused funds will be returned to the local board. The proposed design is provided as Attachment B: JPTC Proposed Design Final.

39.     The lease documentation states that JPTC is responsible for all maintenance of the current assets contained in the lease. The maintenance for the new courts will also be their responsibility. At the end of the current 10 year lease the assets will be returned to council, unless the lease is renewed.

 

Estimate costings excl GST

Totals

Physical works

$223,000

Design, consenting and professional fees

$42,965

Contingency

$27,000

Total expected estimate

$293,000

 

40.     The Manurewa Local Board has sufficient unallocated LDI capex to fund this initiative in financial year 2020-2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     Project progression and delivery is dependent on a decision from the local board.

42.     Two neighbouring properties did not support the initial proposal. The fence has been moved six meters from the property boundary in response to their feedback.

43.     Public expectation has been raised that the JPTC courts will be increased according to the feedback provided during consultation. If the delivery plan is not supported by the local board, it could cause disappointment for locals and club members as well as contribute to a drop in consultation engagement as part of future projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     Following approval from the board staff will apply for resource consent in order to progress delivery.

45.     Staff will update the local board and provide delivery time frames once resource consent is approved.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

JPTC Proposed Design Final

81

b

Jellicoe Park Tennis Club Activites 2020

83

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jasmine Samuel - Community Led & LDI Specialist

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes

File No.: CP2020/02843

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to outline key amendments to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework and to obtain the local board’s views.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region (ENV/2018/11).

3.       To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (ACAF) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors.

4.       In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved a consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

5.       In February 2020, a memorandum and consultation summary was circulated to share key findings from the public consultation as provided in Attachments A and B.

6.       To address the feedback from the consultation, this report outlines key structural changes proposed for the framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers to which all actions will align (i.e. a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change)

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities to streamline actions and address feedback.

7.       It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

8.       The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the changes to the draft Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers for climate action (i.e. a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change)

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities

·   changing the title from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region, addressing both emissions reduction (i.e. mitigation) and preparing for the impacts of a changing climate (i.e. adaptation) (ENV/2018/11).

10.     To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (ACAF) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors, reaching hundreds of Aucklanders.

11.     Local board engagement and insights were sought throughout development of the framework, including meetings and cluster workshops.   A summary of feedback from local boards is available in Attachments C and D.

12.     In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved the consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

13.     In February 2020, a memo and a consultation summary was circulated to all local boards to share key findings from the public consultation on the draft ACAF as provided in Attachments A and B.

14.     This report provides an overview of key proposed changes to the draft ACAF to address the feedback received through the consultation.  Local Board views will be reflected in the final version, which will be reported to the Environment and Climate Change Committee in May 2020.

15.     More detailed changes reported in the consultation summary are not repeated here but will be reflected in text changes in the final version.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The proposed changes to ACAF have been informed by consultation feedback received on the draft document.  Some key themes that arose include:

·   Urgency and scale of action needs to be better articulated

·   Lack of clarity on how key moves work together and how they address our climate goals. In addition it was felt that there are too many.

·   Need to be clearer about roles and responsibilities with a request for more information on who is responsible for actions at each level.

·   Need for partnership working across sectors and with central government and mana whenua in particular.

·   Greater focus on equity across feedback points.

·   Need for a strong Māori voice with widespread support for working with Māori, using mātauranga Māori and Māori practices in designing and implementing climate action.

·   Need for a system shift and scale of change required, and to better articulate this with Aucklanders.

·   Need for communication and behaviour change and a request for campaigns to raise awareness across the region and enable action at an individual level.

·   Need for a significant shift in transport (of all key moves) with the identified actions supported but a need for these to be delivered at pace and scale.

17.     To address this feedback a number of key structural changes are proposed.

18.     The first of these is establish three core drivers for action – our ‘pillars’ as provided in Attachment E.  These provide greater clarity on the goals of the framework and all actions will align to how they deliver against these goals:

·     A Tāmaki response: This pillar reflects the uniqueness of Auckland and our place-based response to climate change.  It is informed by learning from Māori principles and practice, provides a greater focus on equity and a better definition of roles and responsibilities and collective action across governance and sectors.

·   Reducing our emissions: This pillar reflects the need to provide greater clarity on our emissions target and the need to halve emissions by 2030 and reach net zero emissions by 2050.  It improves alignment with the actions and how we will deliver and prioritise emissions reductions.

·   Preparing for climate change: This pillar enables a greater focus on how we will approach climate change adaptation and take a precautionary approach for the region and also provides greater alignment with the actions.

19.     The second structural change is that the eleven key moves are streamlined into eight priorities as outlined in Attachment F. This proposed change is to address feedback on where areas are more foundational and therefore should be embedded throughout all priority areas, or where there is confusion and overlap.

·   It is proposed that Key Move 3: Make development and infrastructure climate compatible and Key Move 4: Transform existing buildings and places are combined into a single built environment priority area. 

·   It is proposed that Key Move 1: Lay the foundation is embedded into our three pillars in recognition of the cross-cutting nature of the actions.

·   Similarly, Key Move 9- Rangatahi (Youth & Inter-generational equity) is embedded into pillar 1 to reflect the need to consider actions across the framework.

20.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1 and 9 will still be maintained and reflected in the updated document.

21.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1-11 will be carried through into Priorities 1-8 (Figure 2) and updated to:

·   clarify any ambiguities that were raised in consultation 

·   remove repetition or overlapping actions

·   make additions in response to consultation feedback

·   strengthen alignment to delivery of the three pillars.

22.     Overall, the intent of the actions between the Key Moves 1-11 and Priority areas 1-8, remain the same. Attachment G briefly summarises how the actions have changed from the consultation document to the updated priority areas.

23.     It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

24.     The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     The changes identified in this report have been made to reflect feedback received and updated emissions modelling.  As such, they will further deliver and strengthen climate action already identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Regular meetings and workshops took place across the council group for development of the framework.

27.     In addition, a working group was established from the outset to provide expertise from across the council group, central government and district health boards.

28.     This group has continued to provide input post-consultation and has reviewed and provided input into the proposed changes.

29.     In addition, the team has been working closely across the Council group in the development of costed actions for consideration in the Long-term Plan. This process is running concurrently with the finalisation of the plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The framework will have implications for all local boards.

31.     In June 2018, the Chief Sustainability Office attended workshops of 19 of the 21 local boards and obtained informal email feedback from the other two local boards to identify their main priorities related to climate change.  This was followed up in September 2018 at cluster workshops to assess and test a series of ‘must haves’, which were the precursors to the actions included in the draft framework.

32.     Priorities included:

·   coastal erosion and inundation concerns

·   affordable and accessible transport

·   long-term infrastructure development to consider climate impacts

·   better stormwater management

·   climate-related education and awareness

·   building community resilience

·   for Auckland Council to lead by example.

33.     This report seeks Local Board formal views on proposed changes to the draft Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework outlined in this report. These views will be reflected in the final version.

34.     Local boards will be key in taking climate action at a local level. Support will be provided for local board planning and alignment with outcomes.

35.     The Chief Sustainability Office and Quality Advice Unit will implement a programme of work for the whole council family to provide guidance and training on how to embed climate action in Local Board plans and what to expect in climate impact statements.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Climate change impacts and associated policy and action will have significant impacts for Māori communities.

37.     A Tāmaki and climate change subject matter expert rōpū (group) was established in March 2019 which has been supporting and advising mana whenua and council on climate change issues for Māori and providing direct advice and narrative for the draft framework.

38.     A rangatahi Māori and Pasifika rōpū has also been working in partnership with council on this kaupapa to develop rangatahi-focused actions for the framework.

39.     A joint mana whenua and Māori expert task group is finalising a Tāmaki and climate change position paper, Te ora ō Tāmaki, which will be used as the bridging document to weave key anchor points into the climate action framework. 

40.     Anchor points include:

·   weaving the narrative into the framework, specifically the following sections: Climate change and Māori, Impacts on Māori and Developing the Plan with Māori

·   a section developed by rangatahi (the Youth and intergenerational equity key move)

·   a separate key move of Te puawaitanga o te tangata (Resilient Māori communities).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Actions within the framework will result in budgetary implications for organisations across the region. Identifying and unlocking appropriate funding and financing streams in the future will be critical. 

42.     Taking climate action will require a range of finance and/or funding mechanisms. For instance, green bonds have been a useful tool for financing council-owned assets such as electric trains but investment in clean tech may require crowd-sourcing, grants or venture capital.

43.     To support this, a climate finance work package is underway to identify partnerships and broader funding mechanisms across actions such as bonds, grants, equity instruments and public/private partnerships.

44.     The final framework and specific Auckland Council actions being developed will need to inform on-going Long-term Plan discussions to support delivery and avoid costs associated with inaction, such as increased maintenance costs and infrastructure failures through to missed opportunities to Auckland’s economy in delivering the transition. 

45.     Not all actions within council’s remit will require additional budget. Some actions can result in long-term cost avoidance – for example electrifying fleets can reduce fuel and maintenance costs. Some actions could require existing funds to be redirected if priorities change.

46.     Also, not all actions will require funding, for example those related to advocacy to central government or expert input into actions led by other organisations.

47.     The costs associated with different council-specific actions will consider funding sources as described above.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     No high or extreme risks have been identified with the proposed approach.

49.     Moderate risks exist, including:

·   preparing for the implications of climate change may not comply with current rules and regulations

·   potential strategic risk with non-alignment with New Zealand Government direction and policy

·   potential governance risk in shared leadership and ownership of the framework across sectors.

50.     A risk mitigation plan has been developed to address the above, including targeted engagement approaches, a legal review of the final framework, on-going partnership with central government and establishment of clear governance structures for the implementation of the framework.. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Workshops will be held in April 2020 with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Independent Māori Statutory Board to discuss updated framework text, and the final text will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for approval in May 2020.

52.     The draft digital plan layout will be workshopped with the Environment and Climate Change Committee in June 2020 and finalised in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ACAF Consultation Summary Memo

91

b

ACAF Consultation Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Engagement Summary - LB workshops June 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Engagement Summary - Clusters workshops Oct 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

ACAF Proposed Three Pillars

95

f

ACAF Proposed Eight Priorities

97

g

ACAF Proposed Priority Areas and Actions

99

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Anderson - Principal Specialist Sustainability and Climate Resilence

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review

File No.: CP2020/03002

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Review to the Independent Panel.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governing Body approved the Terms of Reference for an Independent Panel to undertake a review of substantive CCOs at its meeting on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127].

3.       The review covers Auckland Transport, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development, Panuku Development Auckland, Regional Facilities Auckland and Watercare.  The overall objectives are to examine:

·   whether CCOs are an effective and efficient model for delivering services to the council and Aucklanders, and

·   whether the CCO decision-making model provides sufficient political oversight, public transparency and accountability.

4.       The review asks the Independent Panel to examine three areas: the CCO model and its accompanying roles and responsibilities; the accountability of CCOs; and CCO culture.

5.       The Independent Panel is seeking the views of local boards on these areas.

6.       Local boards are advised that their views are requested by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations Review to the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Governing Body approved the CCO review Terms of Reference on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127]. The Independent Panel was appointed by the Governing Body on 12 December 2019 and is comprised of Miriam Dean, Doug Martin and Leigh Auton. Miriam Dean has been appointed panel chair [GB/2019/149].

8.       Briefings on the CCO Review were provided to local board chairs in December 2019 by staff and in February 2020 by panel member Leigh Auton.  The panel wrote to local board chairs in February asking for advice on what constitutes good engagement between CCOs and local boards.  

9.       Monthly updates on the review are reported to the CCO Oversight Committee and circulated to all local boards.

10.     The Independent Panel is seeking comprehensive engagement to obtain a range of views about the issues forming the subject of the review as outlined in Attachment A.  Community engagement on the review is occurring alongside the Annual Budget 2020/2021 in February/March 2020. An engagement document has been developed and a summary document has been translated into five languages and a New Zealand Sign Language video. A webpage[3] provides information on the review, including stakeholder updates, relevant documents (including the Terms of Reference) and a contact for further information.

11.     All feedback on the CCO Review will be provided to the Independent Panel.  The Panel will report on the key issues and community and stakeholder feedback in May and will provide a final report and recommendations in July 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     To identify the scope of their work, the Independent Panel has distilled the essence of the review terms into a list of issues, that forms the basis of the engagement and eventual report. The list and prompts, in Attachment A, provide a structure for local boards to give feedback.

13.     The three key areas of focus set out in the list of issues are:

Issue

Area of Focus

CCO model, roles and responsibilities

The essential question here is whether the CCO model delivers council services with the maximum of operational efficiency, transparency and accountability, or whether there are better ways to deliver such services

CCO accountability

Here the key question is whether the council’s current approach to holding CCOs to account on behalf of Aucklanders could be improved

CCO culture

The central issue here is whether CCOs need to improve how they consult, engage with and respond to the wider community and council

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Local boards have an opportunity to consider suggestions that might improve climate change outcomes/mitigation in their feedback on the CCO Review.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The Independent Panel is engaging across the council group on the review, including:

·   the chair of the independent panel wrote introducing the panel and the review objectives to all CCO chairs and chief executives, councillors, local board chairs, chief executive of IMSB and the co-chairs of the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 20 December 2019

·   the panel met briefly with the CCO chief executives and chairs on 28 January 2020 to discuss the proposed review process and CCO engagement. Each CCO was asked to provide the panel with key stakeholders/customers

·   individual meetings have taken place with CCO chief executives and board chairs over February and March 2020, and the panel is meeting with CCO stakeholders.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local board formal feedback on the CCO Review, including issues experienced with CCOs, good practice and options for improvement, is sought by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

17.     Material on the CCO Review was available at Have your Say local board events for the Annual Budget.

18.     Following the conclusion of the Independent Panel’s review, as part of the development of the next 10-year budget, local boards will have the opportunity to provide formal views on any proposals for change to the CCO model.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Staff presented to the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 19 December 2019. The panel met with one of the Forum co-chairs and mana whenua are invited to provide feedback to the panel.  Mana whenua have also been invited to a hui with panel members on 18 March 2020.

20.     The panel has met with the Independent Māori Statutory Board. 

21.     Panel members spoke on Radio Waatea to promote Māori interest and feedback on the CCO review. Material on the CCO review is being provided at mataawaka events for the Annual Budget and mataawaka organisations have been briefed on the review during the public engagement period. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There are no financial implications from this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are no risks associated with the recommendations in this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The Independent Panel is due to report on key issues, community and stakeholder feedback in May and to provide a final report, with recommendations, in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review list of issues

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Gomas - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

For Information: Reports referred to the Manurewa Local Board

File No.: CP2020/02693

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Manurewa Local Board to receive reports and resolutions that have been referred from the Governing Body committee meetings, Council Controlled Organisations, forums or other local boards for information.

2.       The following information was circulated to the local board:

No.

Report Title

Item no.

Meeting Date

Governing Body Committee or Council Controlled Organisation or Forum or Local Board

1

Puketāpapa Local Board feedback on the Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and Related Legislation

14

19 February 2020

Puketāpapa Local Board

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the following information from the following Governing Body committee meetings, Council Controlled Organisations, forums or other local board meetings:

No.

Report Title

Item no.

Meeting Date

Governing Body Committee or Council Controlled Organisation or Forum or Local Board

1

Puketāpapa Local Board feedback on the Review of the Burial and Cremation Act 1964 and Related Legislation

14

19 February 2020

Puketāpapa Local Board

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - March 2020

File No.: CP2020/02681

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Manurewa Local Board the three months Governance Forward Work Calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governance Forward Work Calendar is a schedule of items that will come before the local board at business meetings and workshops over the next three months. The Governance Forward Work Calendar for the Manurewa Local Board is included in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

i)    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

ii)   clarifying what advice is required and when

iii)   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month, be included on the agenda for business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar March 2020

111

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 



Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2020/02684

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Manurewa Local Board’s records for the workshops held on 5 February, 13 February and 27 February 2020. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Order 12.1.1 the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month. However, the proceedings of a workshop shall record the names of members attending, the general nature of the matters discussed and the proceedings of the workshop. Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion. This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      note the Manurewa Local Board workshop records held on:

i)        5 February 2020

ii)       13 February 2020

iii)      27 February 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

5 February 2020, Manurewa Local Board - Workshop Record

115

b

13 February 2020, Manurewa Local Board - Workshop Record

117

c

27 February 2020, Manurewa Local Board - Workshop Record

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor - Manurewa

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


Manurewa Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 

    

    



[1] Millard Construction Cost Consultants Limited. Manurewa War Memorial Park Multi Use Facility – Indicative cost review of the initial seismic assessment. Received 5 November 2019

[2] Millard Cost Consultants. Concept Estimate for MWMP Multi-Use Facility. 17 Feb 2020

[3] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/council-controlled-organisations/Pages/review-of-council-controlled-organisations.aspx