I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 17 March 2020

5.00pm

Totara Room
Level 1, Manukau Civic Building
31-33 Manukau Station Road
Manukau

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lotu Fuli

 

Deputy Chairperson

Dr Ashraf Choudhary, QSO, JP

 

Members

Apulu Reece Autagavaia

 

 

Dr Ofa Dewes

 

 

Swanie Nelson

 

 

Ross Robertson, QSO, JP

 

 

Dawn Trenberth

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Carol McGarry

Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

 

10 March 2020

 

Contact Telephone:  +64 27 591 5024

Email: carol.mcgarry@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Taeaofou i Puaseisei Preschool Trust, Aorere Park, 53R Raglan Street, Mangere East                                                                                            5

8.2     Deputation - Keys Down, Real Talk campaign                                                  5

8.3     Deputation - Women in Urbanism Aotearoa - introduction                             6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Public Forum - Ōtara Seniors’ Lounge 161 East Tamaki Road, Otara           6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Governing Body Member Update                                                                                9

12        Board Members' Report                                                                                              11

13        Chairperson's Announcements                                                                                 13

14        March 2020 - Auckland Transport monthly update report to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board                                                                                                                  15

15        New community lease for Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust Board (Ki Papatoetoe Whanau) for Middlemore Park, 67R Swaffield Road, Papatoetoe                          25

16        Classification of a portion of land located at Kohuora Park and the grant of two new community leases to Papatoetoe Panthers Rugby League Club Incorporated, at 40 Station Road, Papatoetoe                                                                                           35

17        New community lease for East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club Incorporated at East Tamaki Reserve, 244R East Tamaki Road, Ōtara                                                     45

18        Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund Project Endorsement  (Covering report)                                                                                                                            55

19        Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review                                                                                                                                       57

20        Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes                                                                                                                                       63

21        Public feedback on proposed new Food Safety Information Bylaw 2020            79

22        Local board resolution responses and information report                                  135

23        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      151

24        Record of Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes                                159  

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 18 February 2020, including the confidential section, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

 

8.1       Deputation - Taeaofou i Puaseisei Preschool Trust, Aorere Park, 53R Raglan Street, Mangere East

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank the Tupa’i K Apa and Victor Pouesi from the Taeaofou i Puaseisei Preschool Trust for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Keys Down, Real Talk campaign

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.         Noma Sio-Faiumu will be in attendance to present an update to the Board on the Keys Down, Real Talk campaign.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Noma Sio-Faiumu from the Keys Down, Real Talk campaign for her attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Women in Urbanism Aotearoa - introduction

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.         Ellie Craft from Women in Urbanism Aotearoa will be in attendance to introduce their work to the board.

2.         Women in Urbanism Aotearoa was founded in 2017 to support good urban outcomes by raising the voices of self-identifying women, girls, and non-binary women. They became an incorporated society in 2018.

3.         They provide a much-needed opportunity for women working in urban industries to connect with each other, and among our various activities and events they are particularly proud of their recent (and ongoing) campaign to draw attention to street harassment and how it affects women. They have been collating and publicising stories on social media to raise awareness of the issue and are developing plans to follow up this work with advocacy and other initiatives designed to improve women’s opportunities to use public space.

4.         Cities that work well for women and children work well for everybody.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Ellie Craft from Women in Urbanism Aotearoa for her attendance and presentation.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Ōtara Seniors’ Lounge 161 East Tamaki Road, Otara

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

Poto Turu, a resident of 163 East Tamaki Road, Otara will be in attendance to speak to the Board about the Ōtara Seniors’ Lounge at 161 East Tamaki Road.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Poto Turu for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Governing Body Member Update

 

File No.: CP2020/00022

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board on regional matters.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

a)      That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board receive the verbal reports from the Manukau Ward Councillors.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

Authorisers

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Board Members' Report

 

File No.: CP2020/00024

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board;

a)      receive the board members’ written and oral reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

Authorisers

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Chairperson's Announcements

 

File No.: CP2020/00014

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

This item gives the chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the chairperson’s verbal update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

Authorisers

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

March 2020 - Auckland Transport monthly update report to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

File No.: CP2020/02786

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board about transport related matters in its area including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This month’s report includes:

·   an update Dynamic Lanes for Redoubt Road, Manukau

·   summary of Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area;

·   a summary of the board’s Transport Capital Fund and Community Safety Fund projects;

·   a summary of general information items.

3.       This report also provides an update on Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the report entitled ‘March 2020 - Auckland Transport monthly update report to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board’.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play in the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

5.       This report updates the local board on AT projects and operations in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area, it summarises consultations and Traffic Control Committee decisions, and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and Community Safety Fund (CSF).

6.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects they believe are important to their communities but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·   be safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   be in the road corridor (although projects in parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

7.       AT’s Community Safety Fund (CSF) comprises $20 million in total allocated across all 21 local boards, with $5 million to be allocated during the 2019/2020 financial year and the balance of $15 million over the 2020/2021 financial year. This is a safety fund that sits within AT’s safety budget so the major component of the funding allocation formula is the number of Deaths and Serious Injuries (DSI) in a local board area. The purpose of the fund is to allow local communities to address long-standing road safety issues that have yet to become regional priorities and have therefore not been addressed by AT.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

8.       Through Auckland Council’s Long-Term Plan 2018-2028, LBTCF funding increased to a total of $20.8 million per annum across all 21 local boards.

9.       The allocation for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board also increased. The current allocations and balance are detailed in Table 1 below.

 

Table 1: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Ōtara Papatoetoe Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction including previous term

$3,198,127

 

Current 2020-2022 LBTCF allocation

$3,213,255

Allocated in the 2019-2020 term

$550,000

Total Funds Available in current political term

$2,830,259

 

10.     Updates on projects approved for design and/or construction are provided below. A series of workshops are currently being had with the local board to discuss possible projects the local board may wish to nominate using the balance of funding available this electoral term. The first of these was held on is 11 February with the follow up on 3 March 2020 where the Safe and Healthy Streets project presented a number of projects for the local boards consideration.

11.     A further workshop is booked for the 7 April for the local board to finalise the list of local boards priority projects for further investigation and rough order of costs requested. The local board can make this determination in the April AT report.

 

Table 2: Status update on current Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects

Project

Description

Current status

Status change

Funds allocated

Footpath link from Belinda Ave to the existing Preston Road Reserve  path north of Tangaroa College

Construct a new footpath link from Belinda Ave to existing footpath on Rongomai Park behind Tangaroa College

Previous status: Currently in the tender process with Community Facilities.

 

 

Yes

$176,000

Upgrade of Hunters Corner Streetscape

Improving the amenity of Great South Road at Hunters Corner through street furniture upgrades

Footpath work on North side is complete. New bins have been completed and new seats are to be completed with second phase of Hunters Corner project with construction on Southern side. 

 

Funding for south side of footpath (from Tui to Sutton Cres) approved by board in December 2019.

 

Current status: Works started on week of 23 February 2020 for southern side of footpath.

 

A safety review has been requested by the local board related to the removal of the fencing outside the Gt South Road entrance to the Hunters Plaza. The results will be reported back to the local board in due course, including the cost of fence replacement to be considered by the local board.

Yes

$1,575,000 (includes $550,000 for completion of southern side of Great South Road)

Completion of Rongomai Walkway

Complete footpath link from East Tamaki Road to Te Irirangi Road

Current status: Currently in the tender process with Community Facilities

Yes

 

 

 

$80,000

Canopy for Ōtara Town Centre

Canopy to provide all-weather access from eastern car park to the library

Current Status: Detailed design is underway with Community Facilities.

Yes

$382,000

 

All-weather footpath upgrade from East Tamaki Road to Lovegrove Crescent

Upgrade of the two paths connecting to the renewed Ōtara Creek Bridge - Greenway

COMPLETED

 

Current status: Shared paths have been completed connecting Hill St, Cosmo Place and East Tamaki Drive as part of a wider project including a new bridge across the Otara Creek from Lovegrove Crescent.

Yes

$480,000

Footpath upgrade at Ōtara Town Centre

Upgrade of the footpath at the Ōtara Town Centre (along the southern side of town centre including 15-17 Fair Mall)

COMPLETED

 

 

 

N/A

$203,000

Pedestrian Safety upgrades on East Tamaki Road

Upgrades to pedestrian crossing facilities to improve disability access crossing East Tamaki Road

COMPLETED

 

N/A

$100,000

A path through Milton Park to Papatoetoe North School

Provide an alternate all-weather access for students from Papatoetoe North School

COMPLETED

 

N/A

$112,000

Welcome to Ōtara signage

Place-making signage

COMPLETED

 

N/A

$55,000

Community Safety Fund

12.     At its meeting on 16 July, the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board resolved the following priority for projects nominated for construction using AT’s Community Safety Fund (CSF) monies (OP/2019/97):

·     Claude Ave – Conversion to raised pedestrian crossing

·     198 Preston Road – Conversion to raised pedestrian crossing

·     168 St. George Street (intersection with Carruth Road) – New raised pedestrian crossing

·     25 Graeme Ave – Safety improvements outside Papatoetoe North School

·     30 Wallace Road – New raised pedestrian crossing outside library.

13.     Design work is now progressing on these projects and it is anticipated that those funded through the CSF process will be completed during the 2020/2021 financial year.

14.     The CSF is a finite fund that must be spent by June 30, 2021. If final pricing for a particular project (post tender) exceeds the available budget, local boards will have the options of either re-allocating some of their CSF budget (meaning not doing another of the CSF projects chosen by the local board) or using their Local Board Transport Capital Fund to top-up the budget, as opposed to being unable to fund the project. This will allow each local allocation of the CSF to be fully utilised.

15.     All of the list projects are in progress. Design and consultation will be undertaken in 2020, except for 168 St. George Street, which is expected to be constructed this financial year.

 

Local projects and activities

Dynamic Lanes for Redoubt Road, Manukau

16.     In late December the local board and over 1500 residents in the affected area were updated with the project and construction progress. In that update the reasons for the delay for the ‘go live’ of the dynamic lane is now to occur in mid-2020, as opposed to March 2020. 

17.     The main reason for the delay is due to a decision to include a new pedestrian crossing on Redoubt Road following feedback from the public engagement phase. In late 2019, there was a fatal crash at this location where a pedestrian was hit while crossing the road.  The team engaged with the community where AT received several requests for safer road crossings along Redoubt Road.  As a result of this feedback AT has included a pedestrian crossing with traffic lights into the project scope.  This re-design means that we are unable to meet our original design timelines, impacting the overall project timeline.

18.     A secondary, and unanticipated, challenge relates to obtaining approval from Vector to work within close proximity of existing overhead power lines. Maintaining the minimum safe and clear distance to the overhead power lines impacted on the design of the gantries that were originally proposed.  This has largely been resolved by redesigning the position of the poles. 

19.     The final issue to resolve with Vector is the positioning of the new traffic light poles which could include a small section of undergrounding the powerlines adjacent to the new pedestrian crossing.

20.     Both these factors have led to a delay in construction times where we are now looking at mid-2020 for dynamic lanes to be operating on Redoubt Road.

21.     Construction Progress to date. Enabling works started on site in October and are now complete. This included:

•     Excavation to locate existing services (water, phone lines, electricity etc.)

•     Installing the ducting and chambers for the communications network required to control the dynamic lanes

•     The in-ground road LED lights have also been ordered from Europe.

22.     Construction will commence around May 2020 and will run over a period of two to three months (concrete curing) with minimal impact to traffic due to work being done in the berm or at night if road closures are needed.

23.     Further updates will be provided via the AT monthly report to the local board.

Pah Road, Papatoetoe Safety improvements

24.     The local board has requested that an investigation into safety improvements for the intersection of Pah and Ferndown Roads be undertaken as this intersection has been the site of a number of vehicle crashes.

25.     The request was referred to Traffic Operations team for investigation and a presentation of the findings will be made to the local board at the next available workshop.

26.     There are currently 4 options for the local board to consider ranging in cost from $7,000 for signage and road markings to $300,000 for a raised intersection.

27.     The local board currently has approximately $90,000 unallocated in its Community Safety Fund. The local board has the option of allocating this to one of the four options and use its LBTCF as a top-up if one if the local board chooses to proceed with one of the more expensive options.

Road safety programme - Bairds Road

28.     This project has completed 2 of the 4 cluster areas identified for pedestrian safety measures along Bairds Road and through Ōtara Town Centre.

29.     The changes proposed for Bairds Road will address missing links for pedestrians, and will improve connectivity by providing crucial pedestrian crossing facilities. Reductions in the speed limit and associated changes in the Otara town centre will reduce the likelihood and severity of accidents, and will increase driver and pedestrian awareness while traveling through the town centre.

30.     The northern sections of Bairds Road, specifically at intersections with Wymondley and Hellaby’s Road, were completed in the 3rd quarter of 2019, with the significant town centre section was due to begin in February 2020. This section was delayed in part by development on an adjacent property where entry and exit from the site could potentially impact on the safety of a proposed roundabout at the intersection of Bairds Road and Hayman Street.

31.     An update will be provided in next months report.

 

 

Puhinui Station Interchange

32.     The Puhinui Station Interchange is the first stage of the early improvements works associated with the A2B - Airport to Botany Rapid Transit project. This project is led by Auckland Transport and forms part of the wider Southwest Gateway programme.

33.     The existing station has been temporarily closed during construction, from Saturday, 28 September to early 2021.

34.     Detailed design has been completed. Early works are underway and piling has been completed.

35.     Completion of all the construction is scheduled for the 1st quarter 2021.

36.     The next workshop updating the local board is scheduled for the 31 March 2020.

Regional Impacts

City Centre bus routes change

37.     Most services in the city centre had route changes that took effect from Sunday, 23 February. These changes are needed so construction can start on what will be the country’s busiest train station, Aotea Station. The station will be built 15m underneath the city and will be 300m long. There will be entrances on Victoria Street and Wellesley Street, providing the option to connect to bus services.

38.    As a result of construction, the intersection of Wellesley Street, Albert Street and Mayoral Drive will be closed from 1 March until early 2021. At peak, currently 145 buses travel along Wellesley Street.

39.    The new routes for the 26 bus services currently using Wellesley Street will stay in place until the intersection reopens next year. The amended bus routes are designed to cause as little disruption as possible while keeping people moving through the city. Most new bus routes will be using Victoria Street or Mayoral Drive to cross the city, which means most passengers will only be one block away from their old stop.

40.    Aotea will be the busiest rail station in the country and will make a big contribution to Auckland’s future development when it opens. Link Alliance, which is building the station, acknowledges the impact the construction and the intersection closure will have on the immediate community and road users. While its central Auckland location means disruption during construction is unavoidable, Link Alliance will continue to work with AT and Auckland Council to minimise those impacts.

41.    The bus routes are being supported by new bus priority measures such as bus lanes and priority signaling at traffic lights.  AT staff will be on the ground to assist passengers before and during the closure.  

42.    To find out more about the bus changes and intersection closure, visit AT.govt.nz/BetterWay

43.    For information on Aotea Station, visit: https://www.cityraillink.co.nz/crl-stations-aotea

Extra seats on buses and trains 

44.    AT is providing extra capacity on buses and trains during March, the busiest time of the year as Aucklanders head back to work and study. An additional 5000 seats will be provided on buses at peak times and extra train cars will be added to accommodate demand.

45.    Last year public transport patronage totaled 103.2 million passenger boardings, an annual growth of eight per cent.

46.    The extra seats have been provided on the 15 busiest routes services, which include Onewa and Dominion Roads, and the 70 which run from Botany to Britomart.

47.    The very popular NX2 service has also been extended, with nine services to the city each weekday morning and eight return services to Hibiscus Coast Station in the afternoon peak. Late night options are also being added, with new services at 11.30 and midnight all the way to Hibiscus Coast Station.

48.    The first of AT’s new trains have arrived from Spain and these are being rolled out with more six car trains during the busy periods, providing 1200 extra seats in the morning peak and the same in the afternoon. 

49.    AT also has extra buses to provide additional capacity and address problems, scheduling extra services where necessary. There may be times when customers may not be able to board the first bus on high frequency routes but AT is aiming to keep the wait time to a minimum.

50.    All public transport routes will be busy but AT and its operators will do their best to manage the demand and, while the good weather continues, biking, scootering and walking are great alternative options, as is travelling outside the very busy peak periods.

Walking School Bus Month

 

51.    A reminder that March is ‘Walking School Bus Month’ and there are some great activities and prizes for the kids to win:

·   Week 1 is Hilarious Head Gear;

·   Week 2 is Fancy Feet;

·   Week 3 is Super Hero; and

·   Week 4 is Trolls World Tour.

52.    Find out more about the Walking School Bus scheme and (in March) Walking School Bus Month at: https://at.govt.nz/cycling-walking/travelwise-school-programme/walking-school-bus/how-a-walking-school-bus-works/.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

53.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

54.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

55.     To this end, Auckland Transport’s Statement of Intent contains three performance measures:

 

Measure

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Number of buses in the Auckland bus fleet classified as low emission

5

25

55

Reduction in CO2 (emissions) generated annually by Auckland Transport corporate operations (from 2017/18 baseline)

7%

9%

11%

Percentage of Auckland Transport streetlights that are energy efficient LED

56%

66%

76%

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

56.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report are confined to AT and does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Local Board consultations

57.     AT provides local boards with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.

58.     The local board’s views on any proposed schemes are taken into account during consultation on those proposals.

59.     In the reporting period from February 2020, no proposals were put forward for comment by the OPLB.

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

60.     Traffic Control Committee (TCC) decisions within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe local board area are reported on a monthly basis.

61.     There was no decisions in the local board area for the month of February.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

62.     There are no specific impacts on Māori for this reporting period. AT is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi-the Treaty of Waitangi-and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori.

63.     Our Maori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them.

This plan in full is available on the Auckland Transport Website -
https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

65.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

66.     AT will report next month to the local board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kenneth Tuai – Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathon Anyon – Elected member Relationship Team Leader

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

New community lease for Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust Board (Ki Papatoetoe Whanau) for Middlemore Park, 67R Swaffield Road, Papatoetoe

File No.: CP2020/02747

 

  

 

Te take te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek a new community ground-lease for Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust Board (Ki Papatoetoe Whanau) at Middlemore Park, 67R Swaffield Road, Papatoetoe.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Community leases are one of the ways in which the council provides support to local community organisations, assisting them to sustain the activities and experiences they provide in alignment with recognised local priorities.

3.       Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust Board entered into a lease with the former Manukau City Council in May 2009 for the group-owned building and surrounding playground at Middlemore Park that houses Te Kōhanga Reo Ki Papatoetoe Whanau.  The lease term was for 10 years with no right of renewal.  The lease finally expired on 30 June 2019 and is currently holding over on a month-by-month basis.

4.       Under council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, a group that owns its improvements has an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of the occupancy term.  The trust has exercised this right.

5.       Staff are satisfied that the group meets the standards specified and recommend the lease be granted in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         grant a new community ground lease under section 61 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 to Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust Board (Ki Papatoetoe Whanau) for the land at Middlemore Park, 67R Swaffield Road, Papatoetoe, (marked in red and hatched on the map attached as Attachment A), and described as Part Lot 237 Deposited Plan 43645 marked "A" on SO 65821, comprising 6421 square meters, CIR 637146; subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)          term – ten (10) years commencing 1 May 2019 with a single 10-year right-of-renewal and final expiry on 30 April 2039

ii)         rent – one dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum, if requested

iii)        permitted use – childcare and education facility for preschool children, teaching te reo Māori and ancillary activities

iv)        the approved community outcomes plan (Attachment B), to be included in the lease agreement as Schedule 3.

b)         all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012\ and the Reserves Act 1977.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       This report considers the application for a new community ground lease to Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust Board for the group-owned building and surrounds at Middlemore Park, 67R Swaffield Road, Papatoetoe, that operates as Te Kōhanga Reo Ki Papatoetoe Whānau.

7.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is the allocated authority for local, recreation, sport and community facilities; including community leasing matters.

Land

8.       The kōhanga reo is located on the north east corner of Middlemore Park on land described as Part Lot 237 Deposited Plan 43645 marked "A" on SO 65821, comprising 6421 square meters, CIR 637146.  The land is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified local purpose (marae) reserve.  The use of the land is consistent with this classification and no public consultation of the intention to grant the lease is required.

9.       The current lease is for land of approximately 810 square meters, encompassing the existing building and fenced outdoor area, as shown in the aerial plan (Attachment A).

Tenant

10.     Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust Board was incorporated with the New Zealand Companies Office as a charitable trust on 4 January 1984.  The aims of the trust are to promote, support and encourage the use and retention of Te Reo by total immersion in Te Reo Māori and administration of the national network of nga kōhanga reo.

11.     The aim of Te Kōhanga Reo Ki Papatoetoe Whānau is the rebirth of Te Reo Māori as an equal, but separate, element of New Zealand society.  Te kaupapa of nga kōhanga reo is education for life and covers cultural, social, economic and educational aspects.  Nga kōhanga reo looks to reaffirm tikanga Māori through whānau development, restoring Māori rangatiratanga.  It aims to achieve this goal through the organisation of kōhanga reo on a whānau model.

12.     Te Kōhanga Reo Ki Papatoetoe Whānau was established in 1986 with four tamariki.  The group moved to the current location some time later.  The kōhanga reo provides total immersion learning to tamariki aged from birth to five years old.  Whānau are encouraged to learn alongside the tamariki and understand wairua, tikanga and ahuatanga Māori.

13.     Currently 11 children are enrolled at the kōhanga reo, supported by 17 adult whanau.  Fifty percent of the roll is identified as Māori, 30% as Pacific Island and 20% European.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements.

15.     Under the guidelines, the kōhanga reo trust has an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of its occupancy term, a right which it is exercising.  It is recommended that a new lease be granted to Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust Board for a term of 10 years with one right of renewal for a further term of 10 years, in line with the guidelines.

16.     Local boards have discretion to vary the term of the lease if they wish.  The guidelines suggest that where a term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms contained in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

17.     Staff undertook a site visit of the premises on 29 May 2019.  The building appears well-maintained and managed.  A regular maintenance schedule for the building and grounds is in place and no major alterations are planned.

18.     After assessing the lease application and meeting with the tenant, staff have determined that the group qualifies for a new community lease because:

i)          the activity of the kōhanga reo supports the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2017 outcome: empowered, inclusive and prosperous communities

ii)         Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust Board are not in breach of the current occupancy agreement

iii)        the trust’s financial accounts have sufficient reserves to cover its operating costs with no declared contingent liabilities

v)         the kōhanga reo funds its activities mostly by way of whānau fees, charitable grants and government subsidies

vi)        the premises meet the needs of the local community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     There is no impact on greenhouse gas emissions as the proposal does not introduce any new source of emissions.

20.     Climate change has the potential to impact the lease as the site sits within a flooding plain in an area predicted to be covered by flood water as a result of a 1-in-100-year rainstorm event by river or surface flooding (as shown below):

Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust Board (Ki Papatoetoe Whānau),
Middlemore Park, 67R Swaffield Road, Papatoetoe

21.     Note:  A flood happens when heavy rainfall overwhelms the capacity of natural or designed drainage systems.  Floods become dangerous if the water is very deep or travelling very fast or if the flood waters have risen very quickly, or if they contain debris like tree branches and sheets of iron.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     Staff have obtained feedback from the local Parks and Places Specialist and the sport and recreation lead.  No issues or concerns regarding the group were raised.

23.     The proposed new lease has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group.  The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The recommendation within this report falls within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local recreation, sports and community facilities.

25.     The proposed new lease was discussed with the local board at the monthly Community Facilities Mahi Tahi workshop on 27 August 2019, there were no objections to the granting of a new lease.

26.     The recommendation supports the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2017 outcome of empowered, inclusive and prosperous communities with the board stating their commitment to strengthening Māori communities and their wellbeing.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader statutory obligations to Māori.  Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2018-2028, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.

28.     An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development.  This proposal seeks to improve access to facilities for all Aucklanders including Māori living in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.  Fifty percent of the children attending the centre are identified as Māori.

29.     The proposed new ground lease was conveyed to the South-Central Mana Whenua Forum for comment in August 2019, no obligations were exercised by the forum members.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     There are no financial implications associated with the granting of this community ground lease.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     If the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board resolve not to grant a new lease to Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust Board for the Ki Papatoetoe Whānau Te Kōhanga Reo, the centre’s ability to undertake its core activities will be affected, which in turn will have a negative impact on the desired local board outcomes.  In addition, the local Papatoetoe community will likely lose access to the services provided by the centre.

32.     As there is no significant departure from the current land use, or change in activities, there are no identified risks in granting the new lease.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Subject to the local board approval of the new lease, staff will prepare the lease agreement for the trust to sign.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site map - Middlemore Park, 67R Swaffield Road, Papatoetoe - Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust Board (Ki Papatoetoe Whanau)

31

b

Community Outcomes Plan - Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust Board (Ki Papatoetoe Whanau)

33

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jenny Young - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Classification of a portion of land located at Kohuora Park and the grant of two new community leases to Papatoetoe Panthers Rugby League Club Incorporated, at 40 Station Road, Papatoetoe

File No.: CP2020/03042

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To classify a portion of land, at Kohuroa Park, legally described as Lot 4 Deposited Plan 42909 comprising 1166 square metres, and contained in Record of Title 1845/74, as a recreation reserve, pursuant to Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

2.       To seek a new:

·    community ground lease for Papatoetoe Panthers Rugby League Club Incorporated clubrooms at Kohuora Park, 40 Station Road, Papatoetoe

·    community building lease for Papatoetoe Panthers Rugby League Club Incorporated depot building at Kohuora Park, 40 Station Road, Papatoetoe.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Community leases are one of the ways in which the council provides support to local community organisations, assisting them to sustain the activities and experiences they provide in alignment with recognized local priorities.

4.       Papatoetoe Panthers Rugby League Club Incorporated entered into a lease with the former Manukau City Council for the group-owned clubrooms in July 2006.  The club was granted a lease for additional premises for the council-owned former parks depot building from 1 April 2013.  Both leases finally expired on 30 June 2016 and are currently holding over on a month-by-month basis.  The club has submitted an application for a community lease for both sites they occupy.

5.       The parcel of land containing the clubrooms is currently an unclassified recreation reserve, the land requires classification prior to the issue of the lease.

6.       Staff are satisfied that the group meets the standards specified in the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and recommend that the leases be granted in accordance with the guidelines.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      approve, under Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, the classification of Lot 4 Deposited Plan 42909, comprising 1166 square metres, is contained in Record of Title 1845/74 (shown outlined in blue on Attachment A) as a recreation reserve.

b)      take note of the public notification of Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community lease to Papatoetoe Panthers Rugby League Football Club Incorporated.

c)      nominate a hearings panel to consider objections received, and to make a decision on the proposals to lease.

d)      grant, subject to any objections being resolved, under section 61 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, a new community ground lease to Papatoetoe Panthers Rugby League Club Incorporated for the land at Kohuora Park, 40 Station Road, Papatoetoe (as identified in Attachment A) and described as Lot 4 Deposited Plan 42909, comprising 1166 square metres, and is contained in Record of Title 1845/74; subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – ten (10) years commencing 1 May 2020 with a single 10-year right of renewal and final expiry on 31 April 2040

ii)       rent – one dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum, if requested

iii)      permitted use – for the purposes and activities of a rugby league club

iv)      the approved community outcomes plan (Attachment B), to be included in the lease agreement as Schedule 3.

e)      grant, subject to any objections being resolved, under section 61 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, a new community building lease to Papatoetoe Panthers Rugby League Club Incorporated for the building at Kohuora Park, 40 Station Road, Papatoetoe (as identified in Attachment A) and described as Allotment 547 Manurewa Parish, comprising 5.1197 hectares, within NA23A/818 (Cancelled); subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – five (5) years commending 1 May 2020 with a single five (5) year right of renewal and final expiry on 31 April 2030

ii)       rent – one dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum, if requested

iii)      permitted use – for the purposes and activities of a rugby league club

iv)      the approved community outcomes plan (Attachment B), to be included in the lease agreement as Schedule 3

f)       note that all other terms and conditions are in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, and the Reserves Act 1977.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       This report considers the classification of a portion of Kohuora Park as a recreation reserve and the application for two new community leases to Papatoetoe Panthers Rugby League Club Incorporated for the club-owned building and the council-owned depot building at Kohuora Park, 40 Station Road, Papatoetoe.

8.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is the delegated authority for local recreation, sport and community facilities; including community leasing matters.

The land

9.       Kohuora Park is located on the western outskirts of the Old Papatoetoe shopping precinct and in close proximity to the Papatoetoe Train Station on land described as:

i)          Depot building
Allotment 547 Manurewa Parish, comprising 5.1197 hectares, and within its parent title NA23A/818 (Cancelled).  Allotment 547 is currently held in fee simple by the Auckland Council as a classified recreation reserve and subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

ii)         Clubrooms
Lot 4 Deposited Plan 42909, comprising 1166 square
metres, is contained in Record of Title 1845/74.  Lot 4 is currently held in fee simple by the Auckland Council as an unclassified reserve and subject to the Reserves Act 1977.  When originally acquired in 1986 by the Papatoetoe City Council, Lot 4 was acquired “… for a reserve pursuant to the Reserves Act 1977”, and no particular reserve purpose was quoted.

10.     The board is being asked to classify, as a recreation reserve, the parcel of land detailed in paragraph 9. ii. above, before a lease agreement is executed.  Consequently, staff request that the local board classify this land by way of a resolution.

11.     The use of the land is consistent with the classification and although anticipated within the 2007 Kohuora Park Management Plan, the plan has not been adopted and remains a draft.  Therefore, iwi engagement and public consultation of the intention to grant the leases is required.

12.     The leases are for the group-owned clubrooms and the council-owned former park depot building on Kohuora Park.  The leased areas are detailed on the plan attached as Attachment A.

 

Papatoetoe Panthers clubrooms, and Depot building Kohuora Park, 40 Station Road, Papatoetoe

The club

13.     Papatoetoe Panthers Rugby League Club Incorporated registered with the New Zealand Companies office in May 1992 under the Incorporated Societies Act 1908.  The club’s aim is to promote, administer and play the game of rugby league football for senior, junior and mini/mod grades as played under the jurisdiction of the Auckland Rugby League (Incorporated).

14.     The club is affiliated with both Auckland Rugby League and New Zealand Rugby League.  There are currently around 470 members mostly primary school-aged and adults.  Sixty five percent of members identify as Pacific Island, 31% as Māori, 3% as European and 1% other.  Most members are aged between five and 13 years of age.

15.     From its formation in 1980 the club trained on school grounds and public parks; initially as a feeder club to the Mangere Rugby League Club, playing in Mangere East uniforms.  In 1988 Auckland Rugby League granted the club autonomy as a schoolboy-only club; with full senior status being granted in 1990.

16.     In 1991, the club was allocated one field at Station Road, with the first ‘home game’ played after 11 years without a permanent home.  The year 2000 saw the club build new clubrooms on Kohuora Park.  Next on the list was fundraising for training lights.  These were vested in Auckland Council in mid-2018.

17.     Schoolboy and junior teams remain strong with player numbers dropping off at the senior level.  A number of notable players started their football at the Panthers, these include Monty Betham, Iafeta Paleasina, Kylie Leuluai and Ali Lauiti’iti.  At one stage, the Warriors under‑19 squad of 26 players, was composed of 12 Panthers players.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the criteria for community occupancy agreements.  The procedure for a new lease of council-owned buildings is to call for expressions of interest from community groups.  This allows an assessment of proposals to ensure the best community outcomes are delivered.

19.     Local boards, however, have the discretion to forego seeking expressions of interest where suitable tenants are identified.  Papatoetoe Panthers Rugby League Club Incorporated satisfies the required criteria specified in the guidelines in the following ways:

i)       it is a not-for-profit incorporated society

ii)      it provides activities, services and programmes that align with, and promote strategic outcomes for the community as outlined in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2017 outcome of parks and facilities that meet people’s needs

iii)     it has a history of delivering services to the local rugby league community of Papatoetoe

iv)     it is managed appropriately, as evidenced by its longevity and financial accounts.

20.     Under the guidelines, it is recommended that leases over:

·    group-owned buildings be granted for a term of 10 (ten) years, plus one 10 (ten) year right of renewal and

·    council-owned buildings be granted for five (5) years with one five (5) year right of renewal, providing a total term of 10 (ten) years.

21.     The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes.  However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms within the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

22.     Where a community group occupies part of a council-owned building the guidelines state that an annual operational charge for the space occupied.  The amount charged is based on recovery of the direct costs to council of providing the premises and consists of the following components:

·     building insurance

·     share of overheads incurred (including electricity and water charges)

·     maintenance provided by council as outlined in the terms of the occupancy agreement.

23.     The annual charge to Papatoetoe Panthers Rugby League Club will be $500 (plus GST), invoiced annually.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     There is no impact on greenhouse gas emissions as the proposal does not introduce any new source of emissions.

25.     Climate change has the potential to impact the lease as the site sits above a flood plain within Kohuora Park.  These areas are predicted to be covered by flood water (river or surface flooding) as a result of a 1-in-100-year rainstorm event (as shown below):

Kohuora Park, 40R Station Road, Papatoetoe

26.     Note:  A flood happens when heavy rainfall overwhelms the capacity of natural or designed drainage systems.  Floods become dangerous if the water is very deep or travelling very fast or if the flood waters have risen very quickly, or if they contain debris like tree branches and sheets of iron.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     In compiling the recommendations, staff obtained input from the Parks, Sports and Recreation unit.  No concerns were raised, and new leases are supported.

28.     The proposed new leases have no identified impacts on other parts of the council group.  The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local recreation, sports and community facilities.

30.     The local board was updated on progress with the application in the monthly Mahi Tahi reports of March and May 2019.  The board considered the community outcomes plan at the 25 February 2020 workshop, no issues were raised.

31.     The recommendation supports the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2017 Outcome 2: parks and facilities that meet people’s needs.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader statutory obligations to Māori.  Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.

33.     An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development.  This proposal seeks to improve access to facilities for all Aucklanders including Māori living in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area.  Twenty-five percent of the members of the club identify as Māori.

34.     The proposed new ground lease and classification of a portion of the park was reported to the South-Central Mana Whenua Forum on 29 May 2019, no obligations were raised by forum members.  Formal consultation with iwi will take place alongside the public notification of the proposed lease.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     All costs relating to the advertising of the intention to lease and preparation of the lease agreement will be borne by Community Facilities.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     If the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board resolves not to grant the new lease to Papatoetoe Panthers Rugby League Club, the club’s ability to undertake its core activities will be materially affected, which in turn will have a negative impact on the desired local board outcome.

37.     If the rugby league club is not granted a ground-lease for the clubhouse and building-lease for the park depot building, then they would have to find an alternative venue to operate from. Also, an alternative tenant for the buildings would need to be sought.

38.     Additionally, the rugby league club’s operation on Kohuora Park is identified in the 1997 Kohuroa Park Management Plan and is specifically suited to activate the recreational potential of the park in a sustainable manner.  However, the plan has not been adopted, therefore formal consultation with iwi will take place alongside the public notification of the intended lease.  

39.     As there is no significant departure from the approved land use or change in activities there are no identified risks in granting the lease.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     Subject to the local board granting the leases, advertising of this intention will take place.  If any objections to the leases are received the local board hearings panel, as nominated, will meet to consider the objections and make a decision.  If no objections are received, the lease agreements will be sent to the group for signing.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Map - Papatoetoe Panthers Rugby League Football Club Incorporated, Kohuora Park, 40 Station Road, Papatoetoe

41

b

Community Outcomes Plan - Papatoetoe Panthers Rugby League Football Club Incorporated

43

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jenny Young - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

New community lease for East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club Incorporated at East Tamaki Reserve, 244R East Tamaki Road, Ōtara

File No.: CP2020/03046

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community ground-lease to East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club Incorporated for the premises situated at East Tamaki Reserve, 244R East Tamaki Road, Ōtara.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Community leases are one of the ways in which the council provides support to local community organisations, assisting them to sustain the activities and experiences they provide in alignment with recognised local priorities.

3.       For the recommended new lease, a process has been followed which includes a review of the tenant’s performance, ensuring that the organisation is sustainable, and the services and programmes offered are beneficial to the community.

4.       The lease with the New Zealand Tongan Tennis Association Incorporated (now the East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club Incorporated) was granted by the former Manukau City Council and commenced on 1 December 2009.  The lease was for a term of 10 years and expired on 30 November 2019.  The club has applied for a new ground lease for their building and tennis courts on East Tamaki Reserve (Attachment A).

5.       The tennis activity is contemplated in the Manukau City Council’s Sports Parks Management Plan adopted by the legacy council in May 2007 and, consequently, public notification is not required for this lease.

6.       A community outcomes plan has been agreed to by the club and will be attached to the new lease, subject to local board approval.  The club will report annually against the target performance measures.

7.       Staff recommend that the new ground lease be granted for the property under the terms and conditions stated in the recommendations below.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         grant, under Section 54 (1) (b) of the Reserves Act 1977, a community ground lease to East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club Incorporated for the land described as Lot 22 Deposited Plan 78211 and Part Lot 9 Deposited Plan 9824 at East Tamaki Reserve, 244R East Tamaki Road, Ōtara (outlined in red in Attachment A) under the following terms and conditions:

i)      term – 10 years commencing 1 April 2020, with one 10-year right of renewal, final expiry 31 March 2040

ii)     rent - $1.00 (plus GST) per annum if demanded

iii)     permitted use – tennis club and associated activities

iv)    community outcomes plan - (Attachment B) be attached to the lease agreement.

b)      note that all other terms and conditions are in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       This report considers the proposed new lease for part of East Tamaki Reserve to East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club Incorporated.

9.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is the delegated authority in matters relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Land

10.     East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club owns and maintains the building and four tennis courts at East Tamaki Reserve.

11.     The clubrooms and green are located at East Tamaki Reserve, 244R East Tamaki Road.  This land is described as Lot 22 Deposited Plan 78211 and Part Lot 9 Deposited Plan 9824 and is held by Auckland Council as a classified recreation reserve.

12.     This reserve has an operative management plan (adopted by the former Manukau City Council in May 2007) and the current use by the tennis club is contemplated within the plan

13.     This lease will be granted under Section 54 (1) (b) of the Reserves Act 1977 that allows for use of the reserve for both outdoor and indoor sports, games and other recreational activities.

East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club, East Tamaki Domain, 244R East Tamaki Road, Ōtara

East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club Incorporated

14.     East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club Incorporated (formerly the New Zealand Tongan Tennis Association Incorporated) became incorporated under the Incorporated Societies Act 1908 in September 2019.

15.     The club owns and maintains a two-storey clubroom building and four artificial surface tennis courts.  The club currently has eight teams playing in the Tennis Auckland competition.  Junior and senior beginners’ coaching is held on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.  The club has one of the lowest membership fees in Auckland, and offer this to encourage participation in sport, which can help reduce levels of obesity and resulting health problems.

16.     The membership is drawn from the greater East Tamaki suburbs.  Currently the club has 123 members aged from five years old upwards.  Women make up 32 per cent of the members and men 68 per cent. Ninety per cent of the members are of Pacific Island descent.

17.     The clubrooms are available to hire for meetings on request.  Use of the courts is for tennis only.  The club is looking to apply for a liquor licence for the clubrooms, to assist them with fundraising for the maintenance and improvements to the building and courts.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the criteria for groups wishing to enter into a community occupancy agreement, the application process and the standard terms and conditions of community leases.  The standard terms and conditions form the basis of the recommendations in this report.

19.     The local board may, at their discretion, choose to vary from the recommendations on a case-by-case basis as it deems appropriate.  Where the board wishes to vary the length of the term offered it may do so.  However, it is suggested that the varied terms align to one of the terms in the guidelines.

20.     Groups that own their buildings have an automatic right to re-apply at the end of their occupancy term without public notification.

21.     Staff have determined that the East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club Incorporated meets the requirements under the guidelines to qualify for a new community lease as follows, the club:

i)        is a registered incorporated society

ii)       complies with the terms of the current lease

iii)      has a history of delivering quality services to the local community

iv)      is managed appropriately as evidenced by its longevity and extent of the programmes offered.

22.     As a newly established entity, no financial accounts are available.  The local board may consider it appropriate to grant a shorter lease term.  The suggested term within the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 is a one-year term with a single one year right of renewal.  However, staff do not recommend this as the club has been operating from East Tamaki Reserve since at least 2008/2009.

23.     Staff completed a site visit on 10 December 2019.  The building appears to be well maintained and managed.  Over the past two years the club has undertaken routine maintenance of the building and has recently begun a refurbishment of the interior, including replacing water pipes and repainting.  Within the next two to three years, the club has plans to renovate the bathrooms and kitchen of the clubrooms and resurface the courts and replace the court lights.  In future they would like to build a grandstand.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     There is no impact on greenhouse gas emissions as the proposal does not introduce any new source of emissions.

25.     Climate change has limited potential to impact the lease as the site sits next to a flood plain area within East Tamaki Reserve.  This area is predicted to be covered by flood water (surface or river flooding) as a result of a 1‑in-100-year rainstorm event (as shown below):

East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club, East Tamaki Reserve, 244R East Tamaki Road, Ōtara

26.     Note:  A flood happens when heavy rainfall overwhelms the capacity of natural or designed drainage systems.  Floods become dangerous if the water is very deep or travelling very fast or if the flood waters have risen very quickly, or if they contain debris like tree branches and sheets of iron.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     In compiling the recommendations staff obtained input from the Parks, Sports and Recreation unit.  No concerns were raised, and new leases are supported.

28.     The proposed new lease has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group.  The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     The recommendations in this report fall under the local boards’ delegated authority relating to local recreation, sports and community facilities.

30.     This is an approved item on the Community Facilities 2018/2019 Work Programme adopted on 17 July 2018 (resolution number OP/2018/127).  The local board has expressed its support for the new leases through local board feedback at its workshops on 28 May and 25 June 2019.

31.     The local board also considered the draft community outcomes plan at the 25 February 2020 workshop.  Members raised no objections to the proposed plan (Attachment B).  The club will report each year on their achievements against the performance targets and measures.

32.     The recommendations also support the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2017 outcome of parks and facilities that meet people’s needs.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests and priorities.  East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club has a current membership of approximately 123 members with 2% identifying as Māori.

34.     Engagement was undertaken with mana whenua identified as having an interest in land in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area about the proposed new community lease, with a presentation at the Central-South Mana Whenua Forum held at Manukau on 26 February 2020.  Attendees at the forum had no obligations to the proposed lease.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     There are no other direct costs to council associated with the preparation of the new community lease agreement.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     If the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board resolves not to grant the new lease to East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club Incorporated, the club’s ability to undertake its core activities will be materially affected, which in turn will have a negative impact on the desired local board outcome.

37.     The new lease also affords the club security of tenure, enabling the club to attend to the planned maintenance of its facilities.  If the lease is not granted the club’s ability to maintain its building will be severely impacted.

38.     Additionally, the club’s East Tamaki Reserve clubrooms are identified in the reserve management plan and is specifically suited to activate the recreational potential of the park in a sustainable manner.

39.     If the new lease is not granted and the tennis club ceases to operate and, as the previous tenant (New Zealand Tongan Tennis Association) is no longer a legal entity, the building and courts would revert to council, as the landowner.  However, it would then mean that the building and courts would become a council asset and the cost to maintain and renew the asset would rest with the local board.

40.     As there is no significant departure from the approved land use or change in activities there are no identified risks in granting the lease.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     Subject to the local board granting the new community lease, council’s community leasing staff will work with the club to execute the lease agreement.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Map – East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club Incorporated, East Tamaki Reserve, 244R East Tamaki Road, Ōtara

51

b

Community Outcomes Plan - East Tamaki Domain Tennis Club Incorporated

53

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jenny Young - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund Project Endorsement  (Covering report)

File No.: CP2020/03375

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement of the Kolmar Charitable Trust (Kolmar) and Auckland Sport, trading as Aktive Auckland Sport and Recreation, (Aktive) applications to the regionally contested Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is a late covering report for the above item. The comprehensive agenda report was not available when the agenda went to print and will be provided prior to the 17 March 2020 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

The recommendations will be provided in the comprehensive agenda report.

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review

File No.: CP2020/02885

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Review to the Independent Panel.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governing Body approved the Terms of Reference for an Independent Panel to undertake a review of substantive CCOs at its meeting on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127].

3.       The review covers Auckland Transport, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development, Panuku Development Auckland, Regional Facilities Auckland and Watercare.  The overall objectives are to examine:

·   whether CCOs are an effective and efficient model for delivering services to the council and Aucklanders, and

·   whether the CCO decision-making model provides sufficient political oversight, public transparency and accountability.

4.       The review asks the Independent Panel to examine three areas: the CCO model and its accompanying roles and responsibilities; the accountability of CCOs; and CCO culture.

5.       The Independent Panel is seeking the views of local boards on these areas.

6.       Local boards are advised that their views are requested by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations Review to the Independent Panel.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Governing Body approved the CCO review Terms of Reference on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127]. The Independent Panel was appointed by the Governing Body on 12 December 2019 and is comprised of Miriam Dean, Doug Martin and Leigh Auton. Miriam Dean has been appointed panel chair [GB/2019/149].

8.       Briefings on the CCO Review were provided to local board chairs in December 2019 by staff and in February 2020 by panel member Leigh Auton.  The panel wrote to local board chairs in February asking for advice on what constitutes good engagement between CCOs and local boards.  

9.       Monthly updates on the review are reported to the CCO Oversight Committee and circulated to all local boards.

10.     The Independent Panel is seeking comprehensive engagement to obtain a range of views about the issues forming the subject of the review (Attachment A).  Community engagement on the review is occurring alongside the Annual Budget 2020/2021 in February/March 2020. An engagement document has been developed and a summary document has been translated into five languages and a New Zealand Sign Language video. A webpage[1] provides information on the review, including stakeholder updates, relevant documents (including the Terms of Reference) and a contact for further information.

11.     All feedback on the CCO Review will be provided to the Independent Panel.  The Panel will report on the key issues and community and stakeholder feedback in May and will provide a final report and recommendations in July 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     To identify the scope of their work, the Independent Panel has distilled the essence of the review terms into a list of issues, that forms the basis of the engagement and eventual report. The list and prompts, at Attachment A, provide a structure for local boards to give feedback.

13.     The three key areas of focus set out in the list of issues are:

CCO model, roles and responsibilities

The essential question here is whether the CCO model delivers council services with the maximum of operational efficiency, transparency and accountability, or whether there are better ways to deliver such services

CCO accountability

Here the key question is whether the council’s current approach to holding CCOs to account on behalf of Aucklanders could be improved

CCO culture

The central issue here is whether CCOs need to improve how they consult, engage with and respond to the wider community and council

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Local boards have an opportunity to consider suggestions that might improve climate change outcomes/mitigation in their feedback on the CCO Review.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The Independent Panel is engaging across the council group on the review, including:

·   the chair of the independent panel wrote introducing the panel and the review objectives to all CCO chairs and chief executives, councillors, local board chairs, chief executive of IMSB and the co-chairs of the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 20 December 2019

·   the panel met briefly with the CCO chief executives and chairs on 28 January 2020 to discuss the proposed review process and CCO engagement. Each CCO was asked to provide the panel with key stakeholders/customers

·   individual meetings have taken place with CCO chief executives and board chairs over February and March 2020, and the panel is meeting with CCO stakeholders.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local board formal feedback on the CCO Review, including issues experienced with CCOs, good practice and options for improvement, is sought by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

17.     Material on the CCO Review was available at Have your Say local board events for the Annual Budget.

18.     Following the conclusion of the Independent Panel’s review, as part of the development of the next 10-year budget, local boards will have the opportunity to provide formal views on any proposals for change to the CCO model.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Staff presented to the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 19 December 2019. The panel met with one of the Forum co-chairs and mana whenua are invited to provide feedback to the panel.  Mana whenua have also been invited to a hui with panel members on 18 March 2020.

20.     The panel has met with the Independent Māori Statutory Board. 

21.     Panel members spoke on Radio Waatea to promote Māori interest and feedback on the CCO review. Material on the CCO review is being provided at mataawaka events for the Annual Budget and mataawaka organisations have been briefed on the review during the public engagement period. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There are no financial implications from this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are no risks associated with the recommendations in this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The Independent Panel is due to report on key issues, community and stakeholder feedback in May and to provide a final report, with recommendations, in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review list of issues

61

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Gomas - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes

File No.: CP2020/02854

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to outline key amendments to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework and to obtain the local board’s views.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region (ENV/2018/11).

3.       To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (‘ACAF‘) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors.

4.       In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved a consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

5.       In February 2020, a memorandum was circulated to share key findings from the public consultation (Attachments A and B).

6.       To address the feedback from the consultation, this report outlines key structural changes proposed for the framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers to which all actions will align (i.e., a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change).

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities to streamline actions and address feedback.

7.       It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

8.       The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the changes to the draft Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers for climate action (i.e., a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change)

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities

·   changing the title from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region, addressing both emissions reduction (i.e. mitigation) and preparing for the impacts of a changing climate (i.e. adaptation) (ENV/2018/11).

10.     To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (‘ACAF‘) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors, reaching hundreds of Aucklanders.

11.     Local board engagement and insights were sought throughout development of the framework, including meetings and cluster workshops.   A summary of feedback from local boards is available in Attachments C and D.

12.     In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved the consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

13.     In February 2020, a memo was circulated to all local boards to share key findings from the public consultation on the draft ACAF (Attachment A and B).

14.     This report provides an overview of key proposed changes to the draft ACAF to address the feedback received through the consultation.  Local Board views will be reflected in the final version, which will be reported to the Environment and Climate Change Committee in May 2020.

15.     More detailed changes reported in the consultation summary are not repeated here but will be reflected in text changes in the final version.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The proposed changes to ACAF have been informed by consultation feedback received on the draft document.  Some key themes that arose include:

·   Urgency and scale of action needs to be better articulated

·   Lack of clarity on how key moves work together and how they address our climate goals. In addition it was felt that there are too many.

·   Need to be clearer about roles and responsibilities with a request for more information on who is responsible for actions at each level.

·   Need for partnership working across sectors and with central government and mana whenua in particular.

·   Greater focus on equity across feedback points.

·   Need for a strong Māori voice with widespread support for working with Māori, using mātauranga Māori and Māori practices in designing and implementing climate action.

·   Need for a system shift and scale of change required, and to better articulate this with Aucklanders.

·   Need for communication and behaviour change and a request for campaigns to raise awareness across the region and enable action at an individual level.

·   Need for a significant shift in transport (of all key moves) with the identified actions supported but a need for these to be delivered at pace and scale.

17.     To address this feedback a number of key structural changes are proposed.

18.     The first of these is establish three core drivers for action – our ‘pillars’ (Attachment E).  These provide greater clarity on the goals of the framework and all actions will align to how they deliver against these goals:

·     A Tāmaki response: This pillar reflects the uniqueness of Auckland and our place-based response to climate change.  It is informed by learning from Māori principles and practice, provides a greater focus on equity and a better definition of roles and responsibilities and collective action across governance and sectors.

·   Reducing our emissions: This pillar reflects the need to provide greater clarity on our emissions target and the need to halve emissions by 2030 and reach net zero emissions by 2050.  It improves alignment with the actions and how we will deliver and prioritise emissions reductions.

·   Preparing for climate change: This pillar enables a greater focus on how we will approach climate change adaptation and take a precautionary approach for the region and also provides greater alignment with the actions.

19.     The second structural change is that the eleven key moves are streamlined into eight priorities (Attachment F). This proposed change is to address feedback on where areas are more foundational and therefore should be embedded throughout all priority areas, or where there is confusion and overlap.

·   It is proposed that Key Move 3: Make development and infrastructure climate compatible and Key Move 4: Transform existing buildings and places are combined into a single built environment priority area. 

·   It is proposed that Key Move 1: Lay the foundation is embedded into our three pillars in recognition of the cross-cutting nature of the actions.

·   Similarly, Key Move 9- Rangatahi (Youth & Inter-generational equity) is embedded into pillar 1 to reflect the need to consider actions across the framework.

20.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1 and 9 will still be maintained and reflected in the updated document.

21.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1-11 will be carried through into Priorities 1-8 (Figure 2) and updated to:

·   clarify any ambiguities that were raised in consultation 

·   remove repetition or overlapping actions

·   make additions in response to consultation feedback

·   strengthen alignment to delivery of the three pillars.

22.     Overall, the intent of the actions between the Key Moves 1-11 and Priority areas 1-8, remain the same. Attachment G briefly summarises how the actions have changed from the consultation document to the updated priority areas.

23.     It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

24.     The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     The changes identified in this report have been made to reflect feedback received and updated emissions modelling.  As such, they will further deliver and strengthen climate action already identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Regular meetings and workshops took place across the council group for development of the framework.

27.     In addition, a working group was established from the outset to provide expertise from across the council group, central government and district health boards.

28.     This group has continued to provide input post-consultation and has reviewed and provided input into the proposed changes.

29.     In addition, the team has been working closely across the Council group in the development of costed actions for consideration in the Long-term Plan. This process is running concurrently with the finalisation of the plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The framework will have implications for all local boards.

31.     In June 2018, the Chief Sustainability Office attended workshops of 19 of the 21 local boards and obtained informal email feedback from the other two local boards to identify their main priorities related to climate change.  This was followed up in September 2018 at cluster workshops to assess and test a series of ‘must haves’, which were the precursors to the actions included in the draft framework.

32.     Priorities included:

·   coastal erosion and inundation concerns

·   affordable and accessible transport

·   long-term infrastructure development to consider climate impacts

·   better stormwater management

·   climate-related education and awareness

·   building community resilience

·   for Auckland Council to lead by example.

33.     This report seeks Local Board formal views on proposed changes to the draft Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework outlined in this report. These views will be reflected in the final version.

34.     Local boards will be key in taking climate action at a local level. Support will be provided for local board planning and alignment with outcomes.

35.     The Chief Sustainability Office and Quality Advice Unit will implement a programme of work for the whole council family to provide guidance and training on how to embed climate action in Local Board plans and what to expect in climate impact statements.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Climate change impacts and associated policy and action will have significant impacts for Māori communities.

37.     A Tāmaki and climate change subject matter expert rōpū (group) was established in March 2019 which has been supporting and advising mana whenua and council on climate change issues for Māori and providing direct advice and narrative for the draft framework.

38.     A rangatahi Māori and Pasifika rōpū has also been working in partnership with council on this kaupapa to develop rangatahi-focused actions for the framework.

39.     A joint mana whenua and Māori expert task group is finalising a Tāmaki and climate change position paper, Te ora ō Tāmaki, which will be used as the bridging document to weave key anchor points into the climate action framework. 

40.     Anchor points include:

·   weaving the narrative into the framework, specifically the following sections: Climate change and Māori, Impacts on Māori and Developing the Plan with Māori

·   a section developed by rangatahi (the Youth and intergenerational equity key move)

·   a separate key move of Te puawaitanga o te tangata (Resilient Māori communities).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Actions within the framework will result in budgetary implications for organisations across the region; identifying and unlocking appropriate funding and financing streams in the future will be critical. 

42.     Taking climate action will require a range of finance and/or funding mechanisms. For instance, green bonds have been a useful tool for financing council-owned assets such as electric trains but investment in clean tech may require crowd-sourcing, grants or venture capital.

43.     To support this, a climate finance work package is underway to identify partnerships and broader funding mechanisms across actions such as bonds, grants, equity instruments and public/private partnerships.

44.     The final framework and specific Auckland Council actions being developed will need to inform on-going Long-term Plan discussions to support delivery and avoid costs associated with inaction, such as increased maintenance costs and infrastructure failures through to missed opportunities to Auckland’s economy in delivering the transition. 

45.     Not all actions within council’s remit will require additional budget. Some actions can result in long-term cost avoidance – for example electrifying fleets can reduce fuel and maintenance costs. Some actions could require existing funds to be redirected if priorities change.

46.     Also, not all actions will require funding, for example those related to advocacy to central government or expert input into actions led by other organisations.

47.     The costs associated with different council-specific actions will consider funding sources as described above.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     No high or extreme risks have been identified with the proposed approach.

49.     Moderate risks exist, including:

·   preparing for the implications of climate change may not comply with current rules and regulations

·   potential strategic risk with non-alignment with New Zealand Government direction and policy

·   potential governance risk in shared leadership and ownership of the framework across sectors.

50.     A risk mitigation plan has been developed to address the above, including targeted engagement approaches, a legal review of the final framework, on-going partnership with central government and establishment of clear governance structures for the implementation of the framework.. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Workshops will be held in April 2020 with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Independent Māori Statutory Board to discuss updated framework text, and the final text will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for approval in May 2020.

52.     The draft digital plan layout will be workshopped with the Environment and Climate Change Committee in June 2020 and finalised in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ACAF Consultation Summary Memo

69

b

ACAF Consultation Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Engagement Summary - LB workshops June 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Engagement Summary - Clusters workshops Oct 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

ACAF Proposed Three Pillars

73

f

ACAF Proposed Eight Priorities

75

g

ACAF Proposed Priority Areas and Actions

77

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Anderson - Principal Specialist Sustainability and Climate Resilence

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Public feedback on proposed new Food Safety Information Bylaw 2020

File No.: CP2020/02748

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek input on public feedback to the proposed new Food Safety Information Bylaw 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To help the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board decide whether to input into deliberations on public feedback to the proposed new Food Safety Information Bylaw 2020 (proposal), staff have summarised and attached all feedback from people in the local board’s area.

3.       The proposal continues to require the same food businesses as in the existing Food Safety Bylaw 2013 to display a food safety information certificate (food grade) and contains new rules about the physical and online food grade display.

4.       Staff recommend that the local board consider providing input into deliberations on public feedback to the proposal by resolution by 20 March 2020, and by presenting those views to the Bylaw Panel on 30 March 2020.

5.       There is a reputational risk for the local board that feedback from the local board area is from a limited group of people and does not reflect the views of the whole local board area. This report mitigates this risk by providing local boards with a summary of all public feedback (including by local board area and demographic) for comparison and transparency.

6.       The Bylaw Panel will consider all formal local board input and public feedback, deliberate and make recommendations on 30 March 2020. A final decision on any new bylaw will be made at the Governing Body meeting on 30 April 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)   note the public feedback to the proposed new Food Safety Information Bylaw 2020 by people from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area contained in this agenda report.

[Recommendations (b), (c) and (d) are optional]

b)   adopt the following views on the public feedback in (a) to assist the Bylaw Panel in its deliberations on all public feedback to the proposal:

i)          [local board to determine at meeting]

c)   appoint [insert one or more local board members] to present the views in (b) to the Bylaw Panel on Monday 30 March 2020.

d)   delegate authority to the local board chair to make replacement appointment(s) to the persons in (c) if a member is unavailable.

 

Horopaki

Context

The local board can input into deliberations on proposed new food bylaw

7.       The local board can input into deliberations on public feedback to the proposal to make a new Food Safety Information Bylaw 2020 at its meeting in March 2020.

8.       The local board can also choose to present those views to the Bylaw Panel on 30 March.

9.       The nature of the input is at the discretion of the local board. Any input must however remain inside the scope of the proposal and public feedback. For example, the local board could:

·   indicate support for public feedback by people from the local board area

·   recommend how the Bylaw Panel should address matters raised in public feedback.

The proposed new food bylaw aims to better protect public health

10.     On 25 July 2019 the Governing Body adopted a proposal for public consultation to make a new Food Safety Information Bylaw 2020 (GB/2019/70, Attachment A).

11.     The proposal arose from the review of the existing Food Safety Bylaw 2013 (Figure 1), and aims to better protect public health by improving food grade display rules to:

·   clarify that the requirement to display a food grade applies to all food businesses that operate under a Template Food Control Plan[2], serve the public and are registered and verified by council (meaning most Auckland-only cafés, restaurants and takeaways)

·   specify physical locations for food grade display

·   introduce a new rule for food grade display on the homepage or similar of online platforms that the food business has control over (for example a café website managed by the café owner).

          Figure 1: Decisions leading to the proposal


 

Feedback on the proposal was received from 1498 people from across Auckland

12.     The proposal was publicly notified for feedback from 2 December 2019 to 2 February 2020. During that period, council had received feedback from 1498 people (Table 1).

Table 1: Summary of public feedback

Consultation reach (number of responses)

·    Online and written feedback provided by 1300 people, including:

188 via the online ‘Have Your Say’ feedback form, including 80 from food business operators and organisations. Five of those organisations also provided feedback by email (Attachment B)

1112 via an online feedback form by a representative People’s Panel sample (Attachment C).

·    Attendee feedback at ‘Have Your Say’[3] events by 198 people (Attachment E)

·    Key stakeholders were invited to provide feedback in person to the Bylaw Panel. No stakeholders however opted to provide feedback in this manner.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The majority of feedback from people in the local board area support the proposal

13.     A total of 31 people from the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area provided feedback to the proposal via online and written feedback.[4] The majority agreed with the proposal, which is consistent with the total support from all people who provided feedback (Table 2).

          Table 2: Percentage support of proposal in Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area

Proposal

Total support from local board area

Total support from all people who provided feedback

1: Food grade display by certain food businesses

100 per cent

96.4 per cent

2: Food grade display at physical and online sites

83.9 per cent

84.6 per cent

3: Physical display location

96.8 per cent

89.7 per cent

4: Online display location

76.7 per cent

75.3 per cent

14.     Key themes from public feedback include:

·    grade display is useful for the public

·    proposal is reasonable and important

·    require display at specific preferred physical location/s

·    require display on online platforms regardless of control by the food business.

15.     Attachments B, C and D contain a summary of all public feedback (including by local board area). A copy of all public feedback related to the local board is in Attachment D.

The local board should consider whether to provide input into deliberations

16.     Staff recommend that the local board note the public feedback, and consider whether it wishes to input into deliberations on the proposal by:

·   adopting views on the public feedback by Friday 20 March 2020

·   presenting those views to the Bylaw Panel on Monday 30 March 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The impacts of a “business-as-usual” climate change scenario over the next five years[5] will impact food in terms of food resilience and a continued need for food waste minimisation.

18.     The above impacts will not however impact the proposed requirement for certain food businesses to continue to display a food grade. This means that the proposal is not inconsistent with the aims to reduce emissions in the Low Carbon Strategic Action Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The proposal impacts the operation of the Environmental Health Unit. Input was sought during the review of the existing Food Safety Bylaw 2013. Council units are aware of the impacts of the proposal and their implementation role.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     Local board member views were sought in June 2019 as part of the review of the current Food Safety Bylaw 2013.

21.     Generally, local board members supported the current Bylaw and food grading scheme. Key concerns included public confusion, for example about how not all Auckland food businesses that serve the public are required to display a food grade and display requirements for market stalls and mobile shops.

22.     The proposal addresses concerns about public confusion by clarifying requirements. Display for other Auckland food businesses may be inconsistent with the Food Act 2014.

23.     This report provides an opportunity for the local board to input into deliberations on public feedback to the proposal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     Kai is significant for Māori as it is embedded in the tikanga of manaakitanga. There is specific tikanga around its preparation and consumption. The sharing of kai with manuhiri is an essential part of marae tikanga. Marae are exempt from verification under the Food Act 2014 where kai is prepared for customary purposes (for example, at a tangi).

25.     Marae committees that responded to staff requests for feedback in mid-2019 support food grading for businesses that sell food to the public. The proposal supports this view by continuing to require most food businesses to display a food grade.

26.     One marae committee provided feedback on the proposal. The Makaurau Marae Trust – Te Ahiwaru agrees with the proposal and notes the importance of food grades being current.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     Local board input into deliberations will be met within existing budgets.


 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     There is a reputational risk for the local board that feedback from the local board area is from a limited group of people and does not reflect the views of the whole local board area. This report mitigates this risk by providing local boards with a summary of all public feedback (including by local board area and demographic) for comparison and transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     A Bylaw Panel on 30 March 2020 will consider all formal local board input and public feedback, deliberate and make recommendations. A final decision on any new bylaw will be made at the Governing Body meeting on 30 April 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Statement of Proposal

85

b

Overview of public feedback - online feedback form

107

c

Overview of public feedback - People's Panel online feedback form

119

d

Online, email and hardcopy feedback from people in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

'Have Your Say' event feedback

131

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Osborne - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Paul Wilson - Team Leader Bylaws

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Local board resolution responses and information report

 

File No.: CP2020/02599

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides a summary of resolution responses and information reports for circulation to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board.

Information reports for the local board:

2.       The board delegated their feedback on the Proposed new Food Safety By Law to the Chair at the 18 February business meeting.  A copy of the feedback is attachment A.

3.       The board delegated their feedback on the He Kura Koiora i hokia: A discussion document on a proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity to the Chair at the 18 February business meeting.  A copy of the feedback is attachment B.

4.       The board delegated their feedback on the Auckland Council Submission on Water Services Regulator Bill - Taumata Arowai to the Chair at the 18 February business meeting.  A copy of the feedback is attachment C.

5.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board wish to place on record a Statement of Correction for the Resource Consent to the Mahitahi Trust.  The Statement of Correction with three attachments is attachment D.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/sThat the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note  the feedback on the Proposed new Food Safety By Law information, Attachment A.

b)      note the feedback on the He Kura Koiora i hokia: A discussion document on a proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity, Attachment B.

c)      note the feedback on the Auckland Council Submission on Water Services Regulator Bill - Taumata Arowai, Attachment C.

d)      note the Statement of Correction for the Resource Consent to the Mahitahi Trust, Attachment D.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Feedback 'Proposed new Food Safety By Law information

137

b

Feedback He Kura Koiora i hokia: A discussion document on a proposed National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity

139

c

Feedback - Auckland Council Submission on Water Services Regulator Bill - Taumata Arowai

141

d

Statement of Correction for the Resource Consent to the Mahitahi Trust

143

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2020/00027

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Work Calendar

153

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Record of Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2020/00017

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board (the Board) workshop notes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The attached summary of workshop notes provides a record of the Board’s workshops held in February 2020.

3.       These sessions are held to give informal opportunity for board members and officers to discuss issues and projects and note that no binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board workshop notes for: 4 February, 11 February and 25 February 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 4 February 2020

161

b

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 11 February 2020

163

c

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 25 February 2020

165

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor Otara-Papatoetoe

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


 

    

    



[1] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/council-controlled-organisations/Pages/review-of-council-controlled-organisations.aspx

[2] Food Act 2014, section 39 template food control plans.  

[3]     ‘Have Your Say’ events were drop-in opportunities for the public to learn more about the proposal, ask questions and provide feedback to council officers and panel members. ‘Have Your Say’ events were held at Avondale Market on 8 December 2019, Otara Market on 14 December 2019, Henderson Night Market on 16 January 2020, Pakuranga Night Market on 18 January 2020 and Glenfield Night Market on 19 January 2020.

[4]     Local board information of people who gave feedback at ‘Have Your Say’ events is unknown.

[5]     Auckland’s temperature is expected to increase and seasonal distribution of rainfall to change. Auckland region climate change projections and impacts, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), 2018.