I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 19 March 2020

3.00pm

St Chads Church and Community Centre
38 St Johns Road
Meadowbank

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Mr Scott Milne, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Sarah Powrie

 

Members

Troy Churton

 

 

Colin Davis, JP

 

 

Troy Elliott

 

 

Margaret Voyce

 

 

David Wong, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Kim  Lawgun

Democracy Advisor

 

11 March 2020

 

Contact Telephone: 021 302 163

Email: kim.lawgun@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Public Forum - Russell Glenister - Shared cycleways                                     5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Body Members' update                                                                              7

12        Liston Park - Request for Proposals                                                                           9

13        Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund Project Endorsement                 15

14        Classification and Agreement to Lease for proposed Community Centre 30 Tephra Boulevard Stonefields                                                                                                 21

15        Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes                                                                                                                                       37

16        Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review                                                                                                                                       53

17        Auckland Transport March 2020 report to the Ōrākei Local Board                       59

18        Additions to the 2019-2022 Ōrākei Local Board meeting schedule                       73

19        Chairman and Board Member March 2020 report                                                    77

20        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                        87

21        Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Proceedings                                                            99

22        Resolutions Pending Action                                                                                     107  

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the minutes of the Ōrākei Local Board meeting, held on Thursday, 20 February 2020, be confirmed  as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōrākei Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum - Russell Glenister - Shared cycleways

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Russell Glenister will be in attendance to present to the Board on pedestrian issues regarding the shared cycleway between Mission Bay and St Heliers.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Russell Glenister for his attendance.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Governing Body Members' update

File No.: CP2020/03445

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Ōrākei Local Board on activities that the local ward Governing Body Members have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To provide an opportunity for the local ward Governing Body Members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Members’ verbal update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Liston Park - Request for Proposals

File No.: CP2019/21645

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to undertake a Request for Proposals (RFP) process for Liston Park. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The existing facilities at Liston Park are not fit-for-purpose and require significant investment.

3.       The lack of changing rooms and toilets and the soil-based fields are not meeting the service needs of the community. There is a shortfall in sports fields within the Ōrākei Local Board and surrounding board areas.

4.       There is currently no local or regional budget allocated for increasing the service level of the site. However, a number of sports clubs and organisations have expressed an interest in developing in the site.  

5.       Staff recommend a public/private partnership as the option most likely to achieve the best outcomes at the lowest cost to ratepayers. 

6.       A Request for Proposals (RFP) process will identify if there is a suitable proposal to increase the service levels of Liston Park.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve a Request for Proposals process to seek a development partner(s) for Liston Park.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Liston Park (71-77 Abbotts Way) was purchased in 2011 with the intention that it would provide additional capacity for community sports fields and active recreation in the Ellerslie area.

8.       Liston Park is made up of eight separately defined land parcels held by Auckland Council. Seven parcels are held in fee simple under the Local Government Act 2002. One is held under the Reserves Act 1977, as an unclassified local purpose (community and open space use) reserve.

9.       The park covers approximately 4.4 hectares and is made up of two full-size floodlit sports fields, a smaller training area, large clubrooms, associated amenities and a car park. Two cell towers are located on the park.

10.     The park provides an important service outcome in terms of connecting spaces. The space provides an important pedestrian link between Abbotts Way and Michaels Avenue.

11.     The club room facility at Liston Park is currently in very poor condition and has been vacant for a number of years.

12.     There is no existing provision in the 2018-2028 Long-term Plan for any further development of the site.

The sports fields are not meeting the service need 

13.     Liston Park provides an important service outcome in terms of sports field provision.

14.     There is a significant shortfall in supply of sports fields within the Ōrākei Local Board catchment and surrounding board areas. Football provision is especially low and the shortfall is expected to worsen. Sports field capacity projects are underway, but they are unlikely to fully address demand.

The buildings are not fit-for-purpose

15.     The building complex at Liston Park comprises clubrooms, changing rooms, shower rooms and toilets. There is also office accommodation, a kitchen and toilet. Adjacent to the main building there is a separate double garage.

16.     The building in its present state is unusable. It is not ‘wind and watertight’.

17.     It is also not secure and subsequent to the tenant vacating the building it had been broken into and the interior and exterior has been vandalised.

18.     If left for much longer the building will deteriorate to a state where the damage may begin to affect the structural integrity of elements of the building and costly structural work may be required.

19.     The roof is largely original and is reaching the end of its useful life. It may be possible to extend its life by careful, albeit costly, repairs.

20.     An Asset Assessment Option Summary Report was prepared in May 2019. This summarised the three main options for the buildings (Table 1).

Option

Pros

Cons

Investment Required

Do nothing

Initially no/low cost.

Further and accelerated deterioration of the defective areas.

$0 initially

$2M potentially

To carry out recommended works

The facilities will continue to be in use to provide services to the communities.

High up-front cost to spend.

 

$800,000 - $1.5M

To demolish the building

Lower cost than fixing the buildings defective areas.

Ensures health and safety compliance within the environment.

May lose a community facility

$200,000

Table 1- Options for the buildings on Liston Park

The site is sought after by sports clubs and organisations 

21.     Since 2014 several sports groups, representing various sports codes, have approached the local board about developing Liston Park in partnership with the council.

22.     In 2017 the Ōrākei Local Board undertook a Request for Proposals (RFP) process, inviting expressions of interest from organisations for the development and use of the park.

23.     The Winston Reid Foundation (WRF) was selected as the preferred organisation to enter into exclusive negotiations for the development of the park.

24.     The WRF proposal was a football academy at Liston Park that included the upgrade and use of existing buildings as well as development of the wider park.

25.     Between 2017 and 2018 council staff liaised with WRF to present a number of options for the local board to consider.

26.     After some time, the local board was not satisfied that the plans would deliver the outcomes originally sought in the 2017 Request for Proposals.

27.     In November 2018, the Ōrākei Local Board advised WRF that exclusive dealings were at an end.

28.     Since the WRF proposal has fallen through, a number of groups have again expressed an interest in developing Liston Park.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

There are a number of constraints when developing the site

29.     Staff have been assessing the constraints of the site as part of due diligence.

30.     There are a number of constraints for any potential development. These include: resource consent costs, existing cell towers, and the reserve status of one land parcel.

31.     Staff advise that the constraints are not likely to prohibit development, but there is a risk that a development partner may not be found.

32.     If a development partner cannot be found another option will be pursued, most likely council-led development. Due to budget constraints, this is likely to mean that developing the park to meet the service need will take a number of years.

Securing community access is key for the RFP

33.     Staff recommend that the local board accept proposals that may involve the entire site, or one or more parts of the site. Single, joint or consortium applications will be considered for the development.

34.     Staff recommend the following outcomes are included in the RFP document:

Sports fields requirements

35.     Based on current and future forecast demand, staff recommend upgrading the level of service to allow:

·   between 40 and 50 hours per week of community capacity over the two fields, achieved via sand carpet, hybrid or artificial surfaces

·   a dedicated training area

·   improvement in the flood lighting to consistent 200 lux

·   the majority of the community capacity/use will be between 3pm to 9.30pm, Monday to Friday and 7am to 5pm on Saturdays.

Changing Rooms and Public Toilets

36.     Auckland Council’s guidelines for changing rooms indicate the following is required:

·   2 x changing rooms with showers

·   3 x public toilets (e.g. accessible directly from the exterior of the facility)

·   1 x accessible public toilet 

·   1 x storage room 

·   1 x referee’s room with shower

·   Plant and gas storage rooms.

37.     The important pedestrian link between Abbotts Way and Michaels Avenue will be retained and the ability for continued passive recreation use will be sought.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Staff will be able to assess the anticipated climate impact once proposals have been received.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     Staff from the Council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation department have worked closely with the Procurement team and Community Facilities staff to test and develop options.

40.     Staff will look to minimise ongoing maintenance costs for the council for any proposal.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     The community showed support for the development of Liston Park when the initiative was consulted on as part of the 2017-2020 draft Local Board Plan.

42.     The project was later included in the final Local Board Plan. The local board is supportive of developing Liston Park in order to provide an increased level of service to their community.

43.     Ensuring community access to the use of the park and connectivity to the wider network of sportsfields and facilities is of high importance to the local board.

44.     Developing the fields at Liston Park will help to address the growing demand for sport fields in the local board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

45.     Staff will be able to assess the anticipated impact on Māori once proposals have been received.

46.     Increasing the level of service at Liston Park will benefit all park users, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

47.     The RFP process and subsequent negotiations with development partners will be led by council staff. There is no associated LDI funding requested.

48.     The RFP process will seek developments that are not contingent on council funding.

49.     Staff will seek to minimise ongoing maintenance costs to council associated with any development.

50.     If the RFP process does not find a suitable development partner, alternative options will need to be explored further. Council-led development is the most likely option. Due to budget constraints, this may mean that the park is not developed for a number of years.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

51.     There is a risk that a suitable development partner will not be found through this process.

52.     Staff have assessed the overall viability of the site for third party development. Staff believe that despite constraints, there are options for viable development.

53.     Staff will mitigate the risk by ensuring that any potential parties who have shown interest are contacted and the RFP is publicised through the correct channels.

54.     Another risk is that a proposal is accepted which is not viable or successful in meeting the service requirements set out above.

55.     Staff have mitigated this risk by designing a robust application and assessment process.  The RFP documentation will better describe the constraints of the site and aims to accurately determine the viability of proposals.

56.     If a development partner(s) is found, staff will work closely with them to broker the relationship with the local board and ensure all the requirements set out above are met.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

57.     Should the local board approve the process, the RFP document will be released the following week (week beginning 23 March 2020).

58.     The tender will be open until 1 May 2020. Staff will then assess the applications.

59.     Staff will table a report to the July 2020 business meeting to seek a decision on a preferred development partner.

60.     If there is a successful proposal, staff will enter into exclusive negotiations with the partner/partners.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rob Gear - PSR Portfolio Manager

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund Project Endorsement

File No.: CP2020/03340

 

  

 

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement of the two applications from the Ōrākei local board area to the regionally contested Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund (SRFIF) is a $120 million contestable fund allocated through The Long-term Plan 2018-2028, that supports the development of regional and sub-regional community sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

3.       The fund looks to address gaps in provision and allow the council to proactively respond to changing trends in sport and recreation.

4.       There is $7 million available in the 2019/2020 financial year. However, applicants can apply for funding from future years, as the planning and investment required to deliver regional and sub-regional facilities is significant.

5.       Decision making for this regionally contested fund sits with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee. A workshop with the committee will be held in March 2020, with the business meeting to follow in April 2020.

6.       Local boards are being asked to endorse projects/groups who have applied for SRFIF funding to ensure a regionally aligned approach.

7.       In the 2019/2020 funding round, Auckland Hockey, and Auckland Netball/Auckland Basketball Services Limited have applied for investment from the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund.

8.       Auckland Hockey have applied for $2 million from SRFIF for the development of two artificial hockey turfs at Colin Maiden Park.

9.       An Auckland Netball – Auckland Basketball Services Limited partnership seeks $100,000 to investigate expanding the current netball facilities and building new indoor courts at Colin Maiden Park.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      endorse Auckland Hockey’s application to the regionally contested Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020.

b)      endorse Auckland Netball/Auckland Basketball Services Limited application to the regionally contested Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund is a contestable fund that supports the development of regional and sub-regional community sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

11.     It looks to address gaps in provision and allows the council to proactively respond to changing trends in sport and recreation.

12.     A key objective of the fund is to support the delivery of significant capital development projects, but also to develop a pipeline of projects by investing into the investigation, planning and design stages of projects. The balance between planning and capital investment will depend on the merits of the applications received.

13.     The Long-term Plan 2018-2028 allocated $120 million to this fund over the next ten years, including $7 million in 2019/2020, $7 million in 2020/2021, $13.4 million in 2021/2022 and $13.6 million in 2022/2023.

14.     Decision making for this regionally contested fund sits with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.

15.     The fund prioritises investment into core infrastructure (e.g. courts, fields, playing surfaces/structures and lighting) that is central to sport and recreation participation. See the SRFIF Guidelines for more detail about investment priorities

16.     A medium funding priority is investment into ancillary infrastructure (e.g. toilets, changing rooms, equipment storage and carparking) that enables safe and sanitary access for participants and spectators.

17.     A low funding priority is investment into incidental infrastructure (e.g. clubrooms and administration facilities) that is not required for sports participation but exist for social and management purposes.

18.     The deliverability/achievability of projects is another key weighting within the assessment criteria.

19.     The fund prioritises investment into facility development projects over $500,000 and partnerships able to leverage additional investment, allowing more of the facilities Auckland needs to be built quicker and more effectively.

20.     Projects will be assessed in the context of ‘Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039’ (page 20), using the following four investment principles:

·    Equity (40 per cent of assessment): ensures equity of outcomes across the population regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status or location.

·    Outcome-focused (30 per cent of assessment): there is a clear ’line of sight’ between the investment and the outcomes it delivers.

·    Financial sustainability (20 per cent of assessment): projects need to be financially viable and affordable for the public.

·    Accountability (10 per cent of assessment): investment should be efficient, effective, transparent and consistent.

21.     The application process for the Fund comprises two gateways:

·   Stage 1 (closed 1 November 2019) – Expression of Interest. A one-page canvas that asked for key information about the problem and opportunity, the proposed intervention, where and who is involved, the funding required and the impact if delivered.

·   Stage 2 (closed 2 February 2020) – Detailed application. A formal application process asking the applicant to expand on their EOI with further detail, including evidence such as needs analyses, feasibility studies, business cases, detailed design or, other supporting information as relevant to their application.

22.     A total of 59 expressions of interests were received. Of those, 21 projects aligned strongly with Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund criteria. Of those 21, 17 Stage 2 submissions were received.

23.     An assessment panel comprised of Sport New Zealand and Auckland Council staff will review Stage 2 applications and a workshop will be held with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in March 2020, with a business meeting to follow in April 2020.

24.     Aktive Auckland Sport & Recreation have withdrawn from the assessment panel for this round as they are making an application on behalf of the multi-code Regional Indoor Court Leadership group, to procure professional services.

25.     To capture local board views the 17 projects will be workshopped with local boards to understand if the projects are supported by the relevant board. A formal resolution is required if the board endorse the project.

Auckland Hockey

26.     Auckland Hockey has applied for $2 million from the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund for the development of two artificial hockey turfs at Colin Maiden Park.

27.     The total project cost is $7.2 million. Auckland Hockey and University Hockey Club have contributed $100,000 for professional fees. Auckland Council has previously indicated support of $2 million.

28.     Auckland Hockey has applied to external funders for the remaining project costs.

Auckland Netball in partnership with Auckland Basketball Services Limited

29.     An Auckland Netball - Auckland Basketball Services Limited partnership aims to expand current indoor netball facilities and construct basketball and other indoor sport courts and facilities.

30.     The partnership seeks $100,000 for geotechnical work to be undertaken this financial year.

31.     A geotechnical report will determine the viability of a subsequent feasibility study to be undertaken in the next financial year (a further $100,000 in 2021).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland Hockey

32.     The project is the top facility priority for Auckland Hockey and will operate as a regional community hub.

33.     The project proposal is included in the Colin Maiden Precinct Masterplan (2016).

34.     The board approved an agreement to lease in December, the documentation is currently being processed for the club to sign.

35.     The development of two artificial turfs will be a multi-user asset providing year-round increased capacity.

36.     The development of two artificial hockey turfs will address the immediate and growing demand for hockey turfs across greater Auckland, with existing facilities already pushed to capacity. It will also address the geographic imbalance of hockey turfs in Auckland. 

37.     The Auckland region will benefit from the facility as it will host club level hockey and regional tournaments. The facility will host participation and development programme users.

Auckland Netball in partnership with Auckland Basketball Services Limited

38.     The proposal has a high alignment with the Indoor Court Facility Strategy 2019 and was identified at key priority for the region.

39.     As Ngahue Reserve is a closed landfill it is known that the site may have some geotechnical issues that will impact the feasibility of further development. Pending the result of a geotechnical study a full feasibility study would be required to provide analysis of all related factors in regard to the feasibility of the development. These two stages are separate due to the known geotechnical risk at the site.

40.     There will be possibility for collaboration with other indoor sports usage at this stage for future use. 

41.     The proposed development is indicatively shown in the Colin Maiden Park masterplan and is in the Auckland Netball Centre existing leased area.

42.     Staff recommend the local board endorse both applications from within its local board area to the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020. This provides the highest level of support for applicants from the Ōrākei Local Board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

43.     If both projects from the Ōrākei Local Board area were to be completed there would be an increase in cars travelling into Colin Maiden Park. The increase in traffic, congestion, and vehicles coming in/out of the park will increase the emission of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.

44.     Local board endorsement at this stage will have no direct significant climate impact in relation to either project.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

Auckland Hockey

45.     As this is a council owned land, an agreement to lease is required. At the December 2019 Ōrākei Local Board meeting a resolution was passed to grant an agreement to lease to Auckland Hockey at Colin Maiden Park for a footprint including two artificial turfs.

46.     Stakeholder and Land Advisory leasing specialists have been working on an agreement to lease for Auckland Hockey.

47.     Staff support the initiative as it is in alignments with Colin Maiden Masterplan 2016.

48.     There are no other anticipated council group impacts. 

49.     Annual maintenance for the hockey turfs have been built in to project business models so there is no reliance on the local board for operational funding.

Auckland Netball in partnership with Auckland Basketball Services Limited

50.     Staff support the initiative as it is in alignment with Colin Maiden Masterplan 2016, however the development would require landowner approval at a later stage.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

51.     Both projects have been identified within the 2016 Colin Maiden Park Precinct Master Plan, accepted and endorsed by the Ōrākei Local Board.

52.     The Ōrākei Local Board granted a lease to Auckland Hockey at 5 December 2019 business meeting.

53.     Due to projected growth in the local board area of nearly 20 per cent by 2028, the addition of these facilities to Colin Maiden Park will help alleviate regional pressure on facilities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

54.     The assessment criteria developed for this fund has a stronger weighting for projects that are Māori-led, have high collaboration with Māori organisations, prioritises strategically increased participation by Māori and/or involves activities with the likelihood of high Māori participation.

Auckland Hockey

55.     Hockey New Zealand are a key collaborative partner in which New Zealand Māori Hockey is an affiliated incorporated society.

56.     The key driver of the New Zealand Māori Hockey. is to drive Māori participation and eliminate existing barriers such as cost.

Auckland Netball in partnership with Auckland Basketball Services Limited

57.     At this stage of geotechnical work there is limited Māori impact, however future use of the indoor court spaces would have significant Māori impact. On-going conversations and discussions are being held with local iwi

58.     Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei have expressed support for the project during initial engagement with Auckland Netball.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

59.     The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund is a regional budget allocated through The Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

60.     $7 million is budgeted in 2019/2020, $7 million in 2020/2021, $13.4 million in 2021/2022 and $13.6 million in 2022/2023.

61.     An objective of the fund is to invest into significant capital development projects that will be delivered quickly to get Aucklanders active. But also, to develop a pipeline of projects by investing into the investigation, planning and design stages of projects. The balance between planning and capital development investment will depend on the merits of the applications received.

Auckland Hockey

62.     The total project cost is $7.2 million. $100,000 has been contributed by Auckland Hockey and University Hockey Club for professional fees. Auckland Council have previously indicated support of $2 million also.

63.     There is a remaining shortfall and Auckland Hockey are currently applying to external funders.

64.     Financial modelling for the facility shows that the facility is sustainable long term with self-sustainable generating income through turf hire.

Auckland Netball in partnership with Auckland Basketball Services Limited

65.     Auckland Netball – Auckland Basketball Services Limited partnership seek $100,000 for geotechnical work to be undertaken this financial year.

66.     If the geotechnical results are unfavorable for future use the project will not go further.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

67.     The deliverability of projects is a key weighting within the criteria to be used by the assessment panel. This includes:

·   having an achievable funding plan in place

·   having the necessary skills and expertise (in-house or procured) to deliver the project

·   having ticked off any relevant key project milestones such as site tenure, consent, etc.

68.     Not all projects that apply will receive Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Funding. Some organisations have already been redirected to other funding sources as appropriate (e.g. Local Board Grants, Surf 10:20 Fund, RFA), whilst others may apply again in future rounds when their project is further developed.

69.     Some projects will not align strongly with the criteria used for the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund. However, there may be other local drivers as to why local boards and non-council funders invest in those projects. It is incumbent on all parties to set realistic expectations in regard the funding mechanisms available.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

70.     All the stage 2 projects will be workshopped with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in March 2020.

71.     A report will be tabled at the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee business meeting in April 2020.

72.     Should the projects be allocated funding from SRFIF, a funding agreement will be developed in May-June 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Marissa Holland - Sport and Recreation Advisor

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Classification and Agreement to Lease for proposed Community Centre 30 Tephra Boulevard Stonefields

File No.: CP2020/03131

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to classify a portion of the land at 30 Tephra Boulevard to allow for a Community Centre and to approve an Agreement to Lease to the community group who are promoting the project. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In 2018, the Ōrākei Local Board (the Local Board resolved in part to “support the community initiative for a community space within Stonefields suburb”.

3.       The proposed community centre is being progressed by an incorporated society, the Stonefields Community Centre Incorporated (the group). The group has already been gifted a building which is temporarily stored at Ngāhue Reserve until the local board considers this report.

4.       This report deals with the classification of part of the land at 30 Tephra Boulevard. It also deals with approving an Agreement to Lease for a community centre building to be located within the area being classified.

5.       Staff were tasked with assessing the proposal as an initial candidate for the Partnership model defined in the draft Auckland Council Facility Partnership Policy.

6.       Staff investigated the proposal and reported to the Local Board in August 2019 recommending against the proposal, but the Board chose to continue the support and asked staff to undertake the procedures to allow the community centre to be located on the land. The investigation showed there was no reserve or park within Stonefields that could accommodate a community facility without impacting significantly on the combined park and wider community outcomes.

7.       A survey of the land has been undertaken to define the land area to be classified.  The survey plan has been lodged and approved by Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) (attachment A).

8.       Although staff recommended against the proposal, the Local Board has supported the proposal on two occasions.  This report therefore recommends the Board approve the classification of a portion of the land at 30 Tephra Boulevard Stonefields as local purpose (community buildings) reserve, and the granting of an agreement to lease subject to conditions to allow the location of a community centre building on the land.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve, pursuant to Section 162(A) of the Reserves Act 1977, that 765m2 of the land at 30 Tephra Boulevard Stonefields described as Section 1 on survey office (SO) plan 545176 being shown as attachment A of this report, be classified as local purpose (community buildings) reserve.

b)      approve the granting of an agreement to lease to the Stonefields Community Centre Incorporated for it to establish a community centre within the area described in a) above subject to the following conditions:

i)        the successful classification of Section 1 on the survey office (SO) plan 545176 as local purpose (community buildings) reserve

ii)       a successful consultation with iwi groups with an interest in the Stonefields area

iii)      the agreement to lease commencing on 19 March 2020 for a term of two years, during which the Stonefields Community Centre Incorporated shall undertake fundraising, seek and obtain resource, building and other approvals including land owner approval, and locate the building on the site and obtaining code compliance.    

c)      subject to the criteria described in b) above being satisfied, grant a community lease to the Stonefields Community Centre Incorporated on the following terms and conditions:

i)        an initial term of 10 years with one right of renewal of 10 years

ii)       rent of one dollar ($1.00) plus GST per annum, if demanded

iii)      the commencement date of the lease to be the same day that all the criteria in b) are satisfied

iv)      a community outcomes plan be negotiated with the group and approved by the chair and deputy chair of the Ōrākei Local Board

v)      all other terms and conditions to be in accord with the council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.  

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In 2018, the Ōrākei Local Board supported the location of a community centre building on land at 30 Tephra Boulevard, Stonefields.

10.     As the land is held under the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977, the land must be classified to allow a lease to be issued for the occupation of the land.

11.     This report deals with the classification of the land and the granting of an agreement to lease to allow for the location of a community centre on the land.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Decisions to date

12.     Following a presentation from members of the Stonefields community in November 2018, the Ōrākei Local Board resolved as follows:

Resolution number OR/2018/224

MOVED by Deputy Chairman C Claridge, seconded by Member C Davis:

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a) receive the presentation and thank David Ealson and Barry Goodey for their attendance.

b) support the community initiative for a community space within Stonefields suburb.

c) request Community and Social Policy staff to examine Stonefields Community Group’s proposal for a community space within Stonefields as being an initial candidate for the Partnership model as defined in the draft Auckland Council Facility Partnership Policy.

d) request Community and Social Policy staff to assist Stonefields Community Group’s proposal for a community space within Stonefields by assigning the Board’s Strategic Broker to act as liaison, and conduit for obtaining the necessary documentation and access to people and resources as per the draft policy.

e) request the Manager Land Advisory Services to update the Board on the classification of all reserves in the Stonefields area, including the reserve area located at 130R Barbarich Drive, Stonefields contained in Lot 903 DP440854, in order to facilitate this land for use as a community building site.

f) request the Community Lease Advisor to prepare an appropriate community lease agreement if the site is agreed for a community space within Stonefields suburb.

g) request that this work to examine the Stonefields Community Group’s proposal for a community space within Stonefields be completed by the end of this financial year.

CARRIED

13.     Following the presentation of a staff report (Attachment B) at the August 2019 business meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board, the Board approved the following resolution:

Resolution number OR/2019/151

MOVED by Member C Davis, seconded by Member T Churton:

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a) confirm its resolution of 15 November 2018 to “support the community initiative for locating a community-owned community space within Stonefields suburb”.

b) request staff to engage a survey of the western end of Lot 903 and to define a suitable portion of that allotment on which to site the building, owned by the Stonefields Community Centre Inc. and to be used as a community facility, and which is presently and temporarily located on Council-owned Ngahue Reserve.

c) request staff to initiate the required statutory process to effect the classification of part of the western end of the Council-owned reserve at 30 Tephra Boulevard (formerly known as 130R Barbarich Drive), legally described as Lot 903 DP 440854, for this purpose.

d) request staff to initiate the required consultation with local iwi and other stakeholders, prior to reporting to the Board any recommendation to declare the land to be classified as a Local Purpose (Community Buildings) Reserve.

e) request that the building's owner, Stonefields Community Centre Inc., fully fund the survey process, noting that the Board has already allocated its 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme and that the proposal for a community space is not consistent with the Council's Community Facilities Network Action Plan.

f) note this is the first step in the statutory process before the community building can be located on the surveyed site and before a community lease can be granted for the surveyed part of Lot 903.

CARRIED

The Land

14.     The property at 30 Tephra Boulevard, Stonefields, is legally described as Lot 903 DP 440854 and comprises of a total area of 2.0791 hectares. Lot 903 is currently held in fee simple by Auckland Council as an unclassified recreation reserve, subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

15.     The land was acquired with the intention of providing recreational open space for the community. The classification proposal has arisen from a community group-led initiative rather than a council project, and as such, the council would not ordinarily classify part of 30 Tephra Boulevard as a local purpose (community buildings) reserve.

16.     Lot 903 was originally vested on the deposit of plan DP 440854 as a recreation reserve, pursuant to Section 239 (1) (a) of the Resource Management Act 1991. To enable a community building to be sited on Lot 903 and to also meet the requirements of the Reserves Act, the portion of Lot 903 to be occupied by the building must be classified as a local purpose (community buildings) reserve. This portion of the reserve amounts to 765m2.

17.     Local boards have been delegated the powers of Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act. The Ōrākei Local Board can resolve, pursuant to Section 16 (2A), to classify the required portion of Lot 903 as a local purpose (community buildings) reserve.

18.     A survey office plan has been approved to define the area to be classified as local purpose reserve (attachment A).

The Agreement to Lease

19.     The group promoting the proposal is the Stonefields Community Centre Incorporated (the group).

20.     The group has already been gifted a building which is temporarily stored at Ngāhue Reserve until the local board considers this report.

21.     The group is optimistic that it will be able to begin the construction phase of the project shortly after approval is given and the statutory processes are undertaken. 

22.     An agreement to lease provides time for the group to meet obligations ahead of a lease commencing. In this case, agreement to lease can allow for fundraising, seeking and obtaining resource, building and other approvals, assessing the suitability of the building and locating the building to the site and obtaining code compliance.

23.     As noted, the group is confident that it will be able to commence development of the site soon after approvals are given. However, to accommodate any unknown consequences that may be identified during the fundraising, approval, and works process and to avoid having to seek approval of time extensions, a timeframe for the agreement to lease longer than anticipated is recommended. In this case, a timeframe of two years is recommended. 

24.     If the group can meet the agreement to lease criteria ahead of the deadline, then the lease can commence earlier.

25.     A draft template of the lease will be appended to the agreement to lease. Provided the group meet the provisions of the agreement to lease as noted above a community lease can commence.

26.     The council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 provides for community group-owned building on council-owned land to have an initial lease term of 10 years with one right of renewal of 10 years.

27.     A community outcomes plan should be negotiated with the group. This can specify the expected community benefits that will be delivered by the group. The community outcomes plan will be attached to the lease and the report recommends that the outcomes plan be negotiated with the group and a delegation to the chair and deputy chair of the Ōrākei Local Board be provided to approve the plan.    

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     The anticipated contribution to greenhouse gases from the proposed redevelopment is minimal.

29.     A narrow flood path crosses the site and may affect the siting or level of the floor of the building. Any required measures will be identified and dealt with as part of the resource and building consent process.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     Staff have investigated the proposal and consider that there is no reserve or park within Stonefields that can accommodate a community facility without impacting significantly on the combined park and wider community outcomes.

31.     Parks and Places staff further advised that any community building must meet the outcomes of the Auckland Community Facilities Network Action Plan (CFNP), which include that a community building is:

·   Accessible – universally accessible

·   Best Placed – easy to find and get to, and well-placed to serve the community and catchment

·   Flexible – able to respond and adapt to the changing needs of the community and support continued growth in participation

·   Functional – designed to accommodate the intended range of functions and activities, and utilise the outdoor environment to support participation

·   High Quality – well-maintained, safe and provides an enjoyable customer experience

·   Sustainable – capitalise on opportunities to deliver value for money for the ratepayer and user, minimise environmental impact and balance the needs of present and future generations.

32.     The CFNP criteria listed above provide direction for investment in community facilities. It signals the preferred approach for future investment in integrated, fit-for-purpose facilities, rather than stand-alone facilities. To deliver on the CFNP criteria, staff are currently progressing work on the Meadowbank Community Centre in partnership with Panuku, to provide for the growth needs of Stonefields and other surrounding communities.

33.     This report has been prepared by staff from Land Advisory Services and Community Leasing.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     The previous Local Board supported the proposal for the community centre on two occasions.

35.     As noted earlier in the report the network priorities for community facilities are for the Meadowbank Community Centre to provide community space for the Stonefields area. By placing this facility at this location results in the loss of 765m2 of recreation reserve area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Consultation has been undertaken relating to the classification with no adverse comments or submissions. Iwi consultation relating to the lease is still to be undertaken and will be part of the approvals process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     There are no financial implications for the board in either classifying the land or granting the agreement to lease.

38.     The cost of the survey to define the classified area and lodging of the plan with LINZ and publication of the gazette notice has been borne by the group.

39.     Public advertising costs are met by the Community Facilities Department. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     The quality, compliance and appearance of the proposed community building to be located on 30 Tephra Boulevard is also to be assessed. A condition report by Community Facilities prior to the building’s relocation, or the granting of a community lease to the group, will be required.

41.     The condition report will assess structure, cladding, materials, life expectancy and whether there are any asbestos containing materials in the building. This report will project maintenance and renewal costs and can be utilised by the group in the production of a ten-year renewals programme for the maintenance of its building.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     On approval of the recommendations in this report, staff will prepare the Agreement to Lease and work with the group to progress establishment of the centre.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Site Plan

27

b

Attachment B August 2019 Board Report

29

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ron Johnson - Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes

File No.: CP2020/02826

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to outline key amendments to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework and to obtain the local board’s views.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region (ENV/2018/11).

3.       To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (‘ACAF‘) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors.

4.       In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved a consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

5.       In February 2020, a memorandum was circulated to share key findings from the public consultation (Attachments A and B).

6.       To address the feedback from the consultation, this report outlines key structural changes proposed for the framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers to which all actions will align (i.e., a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change).

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities to streamline actions and address feedback.

7.       It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

8.       The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the changes to the draft Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers for climate action (i.e., a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change)

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities

·   changing the title from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region, addressing both emissions reduction (i.e. mitigation) and preparing for the impacts of a changing climate (i.e. adaptation) (ENV/2018/11).

10.     To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (‘ACAF‘) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors, reaching hundreds of Aucklanders.

11.     Local board engagement and insights were sought throughout development of the framework, including meetings and cluster workshops.   A summary of feedback from local boards is available in Attachments C and D.

12.     In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved the consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

13.     In February 2020, a memo was circulated to all local boards to share key findings from the public consultation on the draft ACAF (Attachment A and B).

14.     This report provides an overview of key proposed changes to the draft ACAF to address the feedback received through the consultation.  Local Board views will be reflected in the final version, which will be reported to the Environment and Climate Change Committee in May 2020.

15.     More detailed changes reported in the consultation summary are not repeated here but will be reflected in text changes in the final version.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The proposed changes to ACAF have been informed by consultation feedback received on the draft document.  Some key themes that arose include:

·   Urgency and scale of action needs to be better articulated

·   Lack of clarity on how key moves work together and how they address our climate goals. In addition it was felt that there are too many.

·   Need to be clearer about roles and responsibilities with a request for more information on who is responsible for actions at each level.

·   Need for partnership working across sectors and with central government and mana whenua in particular.

·   Greater focus on equity across feedback points.

·   Need for a strong Māori voice with widespread support for working with Māori, using mātauranga Māori and Māori practices in designing and implementing climate action.

·   Need for a system shift and scale of change required, and to better articulate this with Aucklanders.

·   Need for communication and behaviour change and a request for campaigns to raise awareness across the region and enable action at an individual level.

·   Need for a significant shift in transport (of all key moves) with the identified actions supported but a need for these to be delivered at pace and scale.

17.     To address this feedback a number of key structural changes are proposed.

18.     The first of these is establish three core drivers for action – our ‘pillars’ (Attachment E).  These provide greater clarity on the goals of the framework and all actions will align to how they deliver against these goals:

·   A Tāmaki response: This pillar reflects the uniqueness of Auckland and our place-based response to climate change.  It is informed by learning from Māori principles and practice, provides a greater focus on equity and a better definition of roles and responsibilities and collective action across governance and sectors.

·   Reducing our emissions: This pillar reflects the need to provide greater clarity on our emissions target and the need to halve emissions by 2030 and reach net zero emissions by 2050.  It improves alignment with the actions and how we will deliver and prioritise emissions reductions.

·   Preparing for climate change: This pillar enables a greater focus on how we will approach climate change adaptation and take a precautionary approach for the region and also provides greater alignment with the actions.

19.     The second structural change is that the eleven key moves are streamlined into eight priorities (Attachment F). This proposed change is to address feedback on where areas are more foundational and therefore should be embedded throughout all priority areas, or where there is confusion and overlap.

·   It is proposed that Key Move 3: Make development and infrastructure climate compatible and Key Move 4: Transform existing buildings and places are combined into a single built environment priority area. 

·   It is proposed that Key Move 1: Lay the foundation is embedded into our three pillars in recognition of the cross-cutting nature of the actions.

·   Similarly, Key Move 9- Rangatahi (Youth & Inter-generational equity) is embedded into pillar 1 to reflect the need to consider actions across the framework.

20.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1 and 9 will still be maintained and reflected in the updated document.

21.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1-11 will be carried through into Priorities 1-8 (Figure 2) and updated to:

·   clarify any ambiguities that were raised in consultation 

·   remove repetition or overlapping actions

·   make additions in response to consultation feedback

·   strengthen alignment to delivery of the three pillars.

22.     Overall, the intent of the actions between the Key Moves 1-11 and Priority areas 1-8, remain the same. Attachment G briefly summarises how the actions have changed from the consultation document to the updated priority areas.

23.     It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

24.     The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     The changes identified in this report have been made to reflect feedback received and updated emissions modelling.  As such, they will further deliver and strengthen climate action already identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Regular meetings and workshops took place across the council group for development of the framework.

27.     In addition, a working group was established from the outset to provide expertise from across the council group, central government and district health boards.

28.     This group has continued to provide input post-consultation and has reviewed and provided input into the proposed changes.

29.     In addition, the team has been working closely across the Council group in the development of costed actions for consideration in the Long-term Plan. This process is running concurrently with the finalisation of the plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The framework will have implications for all local boards.

31.     In June 2018, the Chief Sustainability Office attended workshops of 19 of the 21 local boards and obtained informal email feedback from the other two local boards to identify their main priorities related to climate change.  This was followed up in September 2018 at cluster workshops to assess and test a series of ‘must haves’, which were the precursors to the actions included in the draft framework.

32.     Priorities included:

·   coastal erosion and inundation concerns

·   affordable and accessible transport

·   long-term infrastructure development to consider climate impacts

·   better stormwater management

·   climate-related education and awareness

·   building community resilience

·   for Auckland Council to lead by example.

33.     This report seeks Local Board formal views on proposed changes to the draft Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework outlined in this report. These views will be reflected in the final version.

34.     Local boards will be key in taking climate action at a local level. Support will be provided for local board planning and alignment with outcomes.

35.     The Chief Sustainability Office and Quality Advice Unit will implement a programme of work for the whole council family to provide guidance and training on how to embed climate action in Local Board plans and what to expect in climate impact statements.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Climate change impacts and associated policy and action will have significant impacts for Māori communities.

37.     A Tāmaki and climate change subject matter expert rōpū (group) was established in March 2019 which has been supporting and advising mana whenua and council on climate change issues for Māori and providing direct advice and narrative for the draft framework.

38.     A rangatahi Māori and Pasifika rōpū has also been working in partnership with council on this kaupapa to develop rangatahi-focused actions for the framework.

39.     A joint mana whenua and Māori expert task group is finalising a Tāmaki and climate change position paper, Te ora ō Tāmaki, which will be used as the bridging document to weave key anchor points into the climate action framework. 

40.     Anchor points include:

·   weaving the narrative into the framework, specifically the following sections: Climate change and Māori, Impacts on Māori and Developing the Plan with Māori

·   a section developed by rangatahi (the Youth and intergenerational equity key move)

·   a separate key move of Te puawaitanga o te tangata (Resilient Māori communities).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Actions within the framework will result in budgetary implications for organisations across the region; identifying and unlocking appropriate funding and financing streams in the future will be critical. 

42.     Taking climate action will require a range of finance and/or funding mechanisms. For instance, green bonds have been a useful tool for financing council-owned assets such as electric trains but investment in clean tech may require crowd-sourcing, grants or venture capital.

43.     To support this, a climate finance work package is underway to identify partnerships and broader funding mechanisms across actions such as bonds, grants, equity instruments and public/private partnerships.

44.     The final framework and specific Auckland Council actions being developed will need to inform on-going Long-term Plan discussions to support delivery and avoid costs associated with inaction, such as increased maintenance costs and infrastructure failures through to missed opportunities to Auckland’s economy in delivering the transition. 

45.     Not all actions within council’s remit will require additional budget. Some actions can result in long-term cost avoidance – for example electrifying fleets can reduce fuel and maintenance costs. Some actions could require existing funds to be redirected if priorities change.

46.     Also, not all actions will require funding, for example those related to advocacy to central government or expert input into actions led by other organisations.

47.     The costs associated with different council-specific actions will consider funding sources as described above.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     No high or extreme risks have been identified with the proposed approach.

49.     Moderate risks exist, including:

·   preparing for the implications of climate change may not comply with current rules and regulations

·   potential strategic risk with non-alignment with New Zealand Government direction and policy

·   potential governance risk in shared leadership and ownership of the framework across sectors.

50.     A risk mitigation plan has been developed to address the above, including targeted engagement approaches, a legal review of the final framework, on-going partnership with central government and establishment of clear governance structures for the implementation of the framework.. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Workshops will be held in April 2020 with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Independent Māori Statutory Board to discuss updated framework text, and the final text will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for approval in May 2020.

52.     The draft digital plan layout will be workshopped with the Environment and Climate Change Committee in June 2020 and finalised in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ACAF Consultation Summary Memo

43

b

ACAF Consultation Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Engagement Summary - LB workshops June 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Engagement Summary - Clusters workshops Oct 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

ACAF Proposed Three Pillars

47

f

ACAF Proposed Eight Priorities

49

g

ACAF Proposed Priority Areas and Actions

51

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Anderson - Principal Specialist Sustainability and Climate Resilence

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review

File No.: CP2020/02956

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Review to the Independent Panel.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governing Body approved the Terms of Reference for an Independent Panel to undertake a review of substantive CCOs at its meeting on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127].

3.       The review covers Auckland Transport, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development, Panuku Development Auckland, Regional Facilities Auckland and Watercare.  The overall objectives are to examine:

·   whether CCOs are an effective and efficient model for delivering services to the council and Aucklanders, and

·   whether the CCO decision-making model provides sufficient political oversight, public transparency and accountability.

4.       The review asks the Independent Panel to examine three areas: the CCO model and its accompanying roles and responsibilities; the accountability of CCOs; and CCO culture.

5.       The Independent Panel is seeking the views of local boards on these areas.

6.       Local boards are advised that their views are requested by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations Review to the Independent Panel.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Governing Body approved the CCO review Terms of Reference on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127]. The Independent Panel was appointed by the Governing Body on 12 December 2019 and is comprised of Miriam Dean, Doug Martin and Leigh Auton. Miriam Dean has been appointed panel chair [GB/2019/149].

8.       Briefings on the CCO Review were provided to local board chairs in December 2019 by staff and in February 2020 by panel member Leigh Auton.  The panel wrote to local board chairs in February asking for advice on what constitutes good engagement between CCOs and local boards.  

9.       Monthly updates on the review are reported to the CCO Oversight Committee and circulated to all local boards.

10.     The Independent Panel is seeking comprehensive engagement to obtain a range of views about the issues forming the subject of the review (Attachment A).  Community engagement on the review is occurring alongside the Annual Budget 2020/2021 in February/March 2020. An engagement document has been developed and a summary document has been translated into five languages and a New Zealand Sign Language video. A webpage[1] provides information on the review, including stakeholder updates, relevant documents (including the Terms of Reference) and a contact for further information.

11.     All feedback on the CCO Review will be provided to the Independent Panel.  The Panel will report on the key issues and community and stakeholder feedback in May and will provide a final report and recommendations in July 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     To identify the scope of their work, the Independent Panel has distilled the essence of the review terms into a list of issues, that forms the basis of the engagement and eventual report. The list and prompts, at Attachment A, provide a structure for local boards to give feedback.

13.     The three key areas of focus set out in the list of issues are:

Issue

Area of Focus

CCO model, roles and responsibilities

The essential question here is whether the CCO model delivers council services with the maximum of operational efficiency, transparency and accountability, or whether there are better ways to deliver such services

CCO accountability

Here the key question is whether the council’s current approach to holding CCOs to account on behalf of Aucklanders could be improved

CCO culture

The central issue here is whether CCOs need to improve how they consult, engage with and respond to the wider community and council

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Local boards have an opportunity to consider suggestions that might improve climate change outcomes/mitigation in their feedback on the CCO Review.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The Independent Panel is engaging across the council group on the review, including:

·   the chair of the independent panel wrote introducing the panel and the review objectives to all CCO chairs and chief executives, councillors, local board chairs, chief executive of IMSB and the co-chairs of the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 20 December 2019

·   the panel met briefly with the CCO chief executives and chairs on 28 January 2020 to discuss the proposed review process and CCO engagement. Each CCO was asked to provide the panel with key stakeholders/customers

·   individual meetings have taken place with CCO chief executives and board chairs over February and March 2020, and the panel is meeting with CCO stakeholders.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local board formal feedback on the CCO Review, including issues experienced with CCOs, good practice and options for improvement, is sought by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

17.     Material on the CCO Review was available at Have your Say local board events for the Annual Budget.

18.     Following the conclusion of the Independent Panel’s review, as part of the development of the next 10-year budget, local boards will have the opportunity to provide formal views on any proposals for change to the CCO model.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Staff presented to the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 19 December 2019. The panel met with one of the Forum co-chairs and mana whenua are invited to provide feedback to the panel.  Mana whenua have also been invited to a hui with panel members on 18 March 2020.

20.     The panel has met with the Independent Māori Statutory Board. 

21.     Panel members spoke on Radio Waatea to promote Māori interest and feedback on the CCO review. Material on the CCO review is being provided at mataawaka events for the Annual Budget and mataawaka organisations have been briefed on the review during the public engagement period. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There are no financial implications from this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are no risks associated with the recommendations in this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The Independent Panel is due to report on key issues, community and stakeholder feedback in May and to provide a final report, with recommendations, in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review list of issues

57

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Gomas - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport March 2020 report to the Ōrākei Local Board

File No.: CP2020/03125

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Auckland Transport report to the Ōrākei Local Board for March 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each month, Auckland Transport provides an update to the Ōrākei Local Board on transport-related matters and relevant consultations in its area, Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects and decisions of Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee.

3.       The Auckland Transport update for March 2020 report is attached to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport March 2020 update report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport March 2020 update report

61

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Additions to the 2019-2022 Ōrākei Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2020/01286

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for one meeting date to be added to the 2019-2022 Ōrākei Local Board business meeting schedule in order to accommodate Annual Plan 2020/2021 reporting timeframes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ōrākei Local Board adopted its business meeting schedule for the 2019-2022 electoral term on Thursday, 5 December 2019.

3.       At that time, the specific times and dates for meetings for local board decision making in relation to the local board agreement as part of the Annual Plan 2020/2021 were unknown. 

4.       The Board is being asked to approve one meeting date as an addition to the Ōrākei Local Board meeting schedule so that the Annual Budget 2020/2021 timeframes can be met

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve one meeting date to be added to the 2019-2022 Ōrākei Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate the Annual Budget 2020/2021:

·   Thursday, 5 May 2020 at 5.00pm.

b)      note the venue for this meeting will be the Ōrākei Local Board office, 25 St Johns Road, St Johns.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·   Schedule 7, clause 19 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·   Part 7, sections 46, 46(A) and 47 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.       The Ōrākei Local Board adopted its business meeting schedule at its 5 December 2019. business meeting.

8.       The timeframes for local board decision making in relation to the local board agreement which is part of the Annual Budget 2020/2021 was unavailable when the meeting schedule was originally adopted.

9.       The Board is being asked to make decisions in early May 2020 to feed into the Annual Budget 2020/2021. This timeframe is outside the Board’s normal meeting cycle

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Board has two options:

i)        Add the meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule.

or

ii)       Add the meeting as an extraordinary meeting.

11.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for this meeting to be scheduled as an addition to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However there is a risk that if the Annual Budget 2020/2021 is not ready for the meeting there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled anyway.

12.     For option two, only the specific topic Annual Budget 2020/2021 may be considered for which the meeting is being held. There is a risk that no other policies or plans with similar timeframes or running in relation to the Annual Budget 2020/2021 could be considered at this meeting.

13.     Since there is enough time to meet statutory requirements, staff recommend approving this meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule as it allows more flexibility for the Board to consider a range of issues.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     This report requests the Board’s decision to schedule an additional meeting and consider whether to approve this as an extraordinary meeting or an addition to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     There is no specific impact for Māori arising from this report. Local boards work with Māori on projects and initiatives of shared interest.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     There are no significant risks associated with this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     Implement the processes associated with preparing for business meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Chairman and Board Member March 2020 report

File No.: CP2020/03403

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board Chairman and Members with the opportunity to provide an update on projects, activities and issues in the local board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

a)      That the Chairman and Board Member March 2020 report be received.

b)      That the attached feedback on the Tūpuna Maunga Authority’s Draft Operational Plan 2020/2021 be endorsed.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairman and Board Member March 2020 report

79

b

Ōrākei Local Board feedback: Tūpuna Maunga Authority’s Draft Operational Plan 2020/202

85

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2020/03143

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Ōrākei Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Ōrākei Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the draft governance forward work calendar as at March 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar - March 2020

89

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Proceedings

File No.: CP2020/03137

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the records for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held following the previous business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local Board workshops are an informal forum held primarily for information or discussion purposes, as the case may be, and at which no resolutions or decisions are made.

3.       Attached are copies of the records for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held on 30 January 2020, 13 and 27 February 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board records for the workshops held on 30 January 2020, 13 and 27 February 2020 be noted.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop proceedings - 30 January 2020

101

b

Workshop proceedings - 13 February 2020

103

c

Workshop proceedings - 27 February 2020

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Resolutions Pending Action

File No.: CP2020/03149

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an opportunity to track reports that have been requested from staff.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board resolutions pending action report be noted.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resolution pending action register - March 2020

109

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kim  Lawgun - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Relationship Manager - Albert-Eden & Orakei Local Boards

 



Ōrākei Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 




[1] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/council-controlled-organisations/Pages/review-of-council-controlled-organisations.aspx