I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Upper Harbour Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 19 March 2020

9:30am

Upper Harbour Local Board Office
30 Kell Drive
Albany

 

Upper Harbour Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Margaret Miles, QSM, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Lisa Whyte

 

Members

Anna Atkinson

 

 

Uzra Casuri Balouch, JP

 

 

Nicholas Mayne

 

 

Brian Neeson, JP

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Cindy Lynch

Democracy Advisor

 

13 March 2020

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 4142684

Email: Cindy.Lynch@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 20 February 2020                                                                                                                                 7

12        2019/2020 Regional Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund projects endorsement                                                                                                                27

13        Wasp Hangar: Community Recreation Facility                                                        35

14        Auckland Transport monthly update - March 2020                                                 53

15        Allocation of Upper Harbour Local Board Transport Capital Fund                       61

16        2019-2022 Community Facilities work programme addition: Bluebird Reserve playspace renewal                                                                                                       65

17        Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework - proposed changes                                                                                                                                       69

18        Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-controlled Organisations Review                                                                                                                                       75

19        Local board input into the Auckland Council submission on the Justice Committee's Inquiry into the 2019 Local Elections and Liquor Licensing Trust Elections, and Recent Energy Trust Elections                                                        81

20        Adoption of community forum meetings for May and June 2020                          85

21        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Upper Harbour Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020                                                                                                 87

22        Upper Harbour Quick Response round two 2019/2020 grant allocations           121

23        Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 13, 20 and 27 February, and 5 March 2020                                                                                191

24        Governance forward work calendar - April 2020 to March 2021                          201

25        Board members' reports - March 2020                                                                    205  

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

27        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               207

13        Wasp Hangar: Community Recreation Facility

f.      Proposed facility charges                                                                               207  

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chairperson opened the meeting and welcomed those present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy. The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

i)          a financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member

ii)         a non-financial conflict interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component. It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968. The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

Any questions relating to the code or the guidelines may be directed to the Relationship Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 20 February 2020, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Upper Harbour Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 20 February 2020

File No.: CP2020/01789

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board ordinary meeting held on Thursday, 20 February 2020, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the board only.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      note that the open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held on Thursday, 20 February 2020, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the board only and will be confirmed under item 4 of the agenda.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board open unconfirmed minutes - 20 February 2020

9

b

Upper Harbour Local Board minutes attachments - 20 February 2020

17

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

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19 March 2020

 

 

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19 March 2020

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

2019/2020 Regional Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund projects endorsement

File No.: CP2020/02645

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board endorsement of the following applications to the regionally contested Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund:

·        Windsor Park Community and Multisport Hub Incorporated facility development project

·        North Shore Rowing Club facility extension project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund (SRFIF) is a $120 million contestable fund allocated through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 that supports the development of regional and sub-regional community sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

3.       The fund looks to address gaps in provision and allow council to proactively respond to changing sport and recreation preferences.

4.       Applicants may seek investment in the planning, design, or capital development stages of a project.

5.       Decision-making for this regionally contested fund sits with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee. A workshop with the committee will be held in March 2020, with a business meeting to follow in April 2020 to enable decision-making around the SRFIF.

6.       Local boards are being asked to provide their views on applications from local groups who have applied for funding to ensure a regionally aligned approach.

7.       Fifty-eight expressions of interest were received. Of those, 21 projects aligned strongly with Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund criteria. Of those, 17 stage two proposals were submitted.

8.       There is $7 million available through the SRFIF in the 2019/2020 financial year. However, applicants can apply for funding from future years as the planning and investment required to deliver regional and sub-regional sport and recreation facilities is significant.

9.       It is unlikely that all the projects that have submitted a stage two application will be successful in securing funding from the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund.

10.     Windsor Park Community and Multisport Hub Incorporated and North Shore Rowing Club have applied for funding in the 2019/2020 funding round.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      endorse the following applications to be considered for investment through the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020:

i)        Windsor Park Community and Multisport Hub Incorporated: Windsor Park development

ii)       North Shore Rowing Club: Rame Road Boathouse redevelopment.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund (SRFIF) is a contestable fund that supports the development of regional and sub-regional community sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

12.     The fund looks to address gaps in provision across the Auckland region and allow council to proactively respond to changing sport and recreation preferences.

13.     Applicants may seek investment in the planning, design, or development stages of a project.

14.     The Long-term Plan 2018-2028 allocated $120 million to this fund over the next 10 years, including $7 million in 2019/2020, $7 million in 2020/2021, $13.4 million in 2021/2022 and $13.6 million in 2022/2023.

15.     Decision-making for this regionally contested fund sits with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee.

16.     The fund’s priorities align with the ‘Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039’ priorities:

High priority

Medium priority

Low priority

Core infrastructure (e.g. courts, fields, playing surfaces/structures and lighting) that is central to sport and recreation participation

Ancillary infrastructure (e.g. toilets, changing rooms, equipment storage and carparking) that enables safe and sanitary access for participants and spectators

Incidental infrastructure (e.g. clubrooms and administration facilities) that is not required for sports participation but exist for social and management purposes

17.     The fund prioritises investment into facility development projects over $500,000 and partnerships able to leverage additional investment, allowing more of the facilities Auckland needs to be built quicker and more effectively.

18.     Projects will be assessed in the context of ‘Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039’ and the following four investment principles:

Principle

Description

% of

assessment

Equity

Ensures equity of outcomes across the population regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status or location

40%

Outcome-focused

There is a clear ’line of sight’ between the investment and the outcomes it delivers

30%

Financial sustainability

Projects need to be financially viable and affordable for the public

20%

Accountability

Investment should be efficient, effective, transparent and consistent

10%

19.     The application process for the fund comprises two gateways:

·        Stage one (closed 1 November 2019) – Expression of interest (EOI). A one-page canvas that asked for key information about the problem and opportunity, the proposed intervention, where and who is involved, the funding required and the impact if delivered.

·        Stage two (closed 2 February 2020) – Full application. A formal application process asking the applicant to expand on their EOI with further detail, including evidence such as needs analyses, feasibility studies, business cases, detailed design, or other supporting information as relevant to their application.

20.     Fifty-eight EOIs were received. Of those, 21 projects aligned strongly with the fund criteria. Of those, 17 stage two submissions were made.

21.     An assessment panel comprised of Sport New Zealand and Auckland Council staff reviewed stage two applications and a workshop will be held with the PACE Committee in March 2020 with a business meeting to follow in April 2020.

22.     Aktive Auckland Sport and Recreation were originally on the assessment panel but have withdrawn for this round as they are making an application on behalf of the multi-code Regional Indoor Court Leadership group, to procure professional services.

23.     To capture local board views, the 17 projects will be workshopped with local boards to understand if the projects are supported by the relevant board. A formal resolution is required if the relevant board chooses to endorse the project(s).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options considered

24.     Two applications have been received from community groups in the Upper Harbour Local Board area:

Application

Summary

Total project cost

Windsor Park Community and Multisport Hub Incorporated – Windsor Park development

The Windsor Park Community and Multisport Hub Incorporated (WPCMH) are the landowners of Windsor Park. The proposed project is set out into five different stages:

Stage one: Sports field playing surfaces and floodlighting (core participation infrastructure).
The rugby need has been determined and cricket are supportive as it provides new scheduling options as well as less loading on the fields through spread usage.

Stage two: Changing rooms and storage – (ancillary infrastructure)
Current facilities no longer fit for purpose, particularly to accommodate for growing female participation. Suitable flexible facilities to cater for three playing fields minimum and potentially, a fourth playing field.

Stage three: Indoor training and recreation facility – (core/ancillary)
Flexible indoor space with cricket training as a primary user. Also includes provision of outdoor cricket training nets to replace those removed to accommodate the indoor facility.

Stage four: New clubrooms/social space – (incidental infrastructure)
Appropriate and flexible space suitable for cricket and rugby requirements but also wider community use.  The need for this will become clearer as the earlier stages provide new participation opportunities.

Stage five: Demolish existing clubrooms to free up site area for the development of an additional sports field.

WPCMH is unclear of the total project cost as it is currently at the investigation stage of the project. The current stage is investigation of ‘stage one’ which is expected to be approximately $80,000.

 

North Shore Rowing Club – Rame Road Boathouse Redevelopment

 

The North Shore Rowing Club’s Rame Road development project is the upgrade of the existing storage facility at the site. The project is to convert the current single-story building into a two-level boathouse to store rowing, safety and ancillary equipment, increasing the floor area from approximately 273m2 to 654m2. This is expected to more than double the existing skiff storage capacity from under 30, to 70+, allowing the club to increase membership by up to 40 per cent.

The project is currently at the investigation and design stage. However, preliminary costings estimate the total project cost to be $1.25m.

25.     Endorsement of an application means the local board supports the application being considered for investment through the SRFIF. No other commitment is sought from the Upper Harbour Local Board at this stage. 

26.     Three endorsement options have been considered:

Option one:  Endorse both applications

27.     The local board may elect to endorse both applications from within its local board area to the regional Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020.

28.     This option provides the highest level of support for applicants from within the Upper Harbour Local Board area

29.     Option one is recommended.

Option two:  Endorse one application

30.     The local board may elect to endorse one application only.

31.     This provides the local board with the opportunity to indicate an objection to a specific project.

32.     Option two is not recommended.

Option three:  Do not endorse the applications

33.     The local board may not endorse either application.

34.     This provides the local board with an opportunity to indicate its opposition to the projects and to investment of the fund in the Upper Harbour Local Board area. If the local board is not opposed to regional investment in the projects, there is no benefit in in not endorsing the applications.

35.     Option three is not recommended.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     Local board endorsement of the applications is not in itself considered to carry a climate impact.

37.     The potential climate impact of the three projects proposed in the applications is considered below; potential impacts are noted but are yet to be quantified:

Windsor Park Community and Multisport Hub Incorporated – Windsor Park development

·        The project is intended to attract increased visitation to the area, which may result in increased vehicle use regionally.

·        The project involves significant construction across all five stages proposed. Sustainable design principles are likely to be considered but emissions arising from the construction, maintenance, and associated ongoing operating costs are yet to be quantified.

North Shore Rowing Club Rame Road Boathouse Redevelopment

·        The project is intended to attract increased visitation to the area, which may result in increased vehicle use regionally.

·        The project involves construction of a significant building. Sustainable design principles are likely to be considered but emissions arising from the construction, maintenance, and associated ongoing operating costs are yet to be quantified.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     Decision-making for the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund sits with the PACE Committee.

Windsor Park Community and Multisport Hub Incorporated – Windsor Park development

39.     The Windsor Park Community and Multisport Hub Incorporated own the land on which the proposed facility is to be developed.

40.     Auckland Council currently maintain the sports fields and manage the bookings.

41.     Council’s Parks team will require increased communication during the implementation stage to manage any bookings and access to the fields by other user groups.

North Shore Rowing Club – Rame Road Boathouse Redevelopment

42.     The North Shore Rowing Club has a current lease for the site and the redevelopment is proposed to be within the leased area.

43.     The proposed redevelopment may have an impact on parking and access at the site so this will need to be considered during investigation and design phases.  

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

44.     The regional and sub-regional nature of sport and recreation facilities that are the target of the SRFIF mean there will likely be a multi-board impact across all projects.

45.     The operative Upper Harbour Local Board Plan has the following outcome, objective and key initiative:

·        Outcome: Healthy active communities

o   Objective: Upper Harbour has a range of world-class, multi-use sports and recreation facilities

o   Key initiative: Investigate improving sporting infrastructure through public and private partnerships.

Windsor Park Community and Multisport Hub Incorporated – Windsor Park development

46.     The Upper Harbour Local Board have allocated the following funds to Windsor Park Community and Multisport Hub Incorporated through their grants programme:

·        $2974 towards ball restraint netting (May 2019)

·        $2000 towards the project manager salary for the facility development (April 2019)

·        $8483 towards repair works of the steel trusses on the clubroom facility (October 2018)

·        $2000 towards the project manager salary for the facility development (June 2018)

·        $15,000 towards concept plans and project management fees for facility development (October 2017).

North Shore Rowing Club – Rame Road Boathouse Redevelopment

47.     In September 2019, the Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Upper Harbour Water Access Assessment which identified that the water access provision at Rame Road was fit for purpose and provides an acceptable level of geographic water access provision. The report did not investigate whether ancillary facilities, such as boat storage, were fit for purpose.

48.     The Upper Harbour Local Board received a deputation from North Shore Rowing Club on 19 September 2019 where the proposed facility development at Rame Road was outlined.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

49.     The assessment criteria developed for the SRFIF has a stronger weighting for projects that are Māori-led, have high collaboration with Māori organisations, prioritise strategically increased participation by Māori and/or involves activities with the likelihood of high Māori participation.

Windsor Park Community and Multisport Hub Incorporated – Windsor Park development

50.     Within the 5km catchment area of the facility, 4.7 per cent identify as Māori.

51.     The application provided an ethnic breakdown of participation trends in rugby:

52.     An increase in Māori and Pacifika participation can be seen in the senior membership data between 2014-2019.

North Shore Rowing Club – Rame Road Boathouse Redevelopment

53.     Within the 5km catchment area of the facility, 7.5 per cent identify as Māori.

54.     For Māori participants within the catchment area, rowing is ranked as the 60th most popular activity to participate in. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.     The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund is a regional budget allocated through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

56.     A total of $7 million is budgeted in 2019/2020, $7 million in 2020/2021, $13.4 million in 2021/2022 and $13.6 million in 2022/2023.

57.     A key objective of the SRFIF is to invest in significant capital development projects that will be delivered quickly to get Aucklanders active. The fund will also help to develop a pipeline of projects by advancing the investigation, planning and design stages of projects. The balance between planning and capital development investment will depend on the merits of the applications received.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

58.     The ability to deliver projects is a key weighting within the criteria to be used by the assessment panel. This includes:

·        having an achievable funding plan in place

·        having the necessary skills and expertise (in-house or procured) to deliver the project

·        having met any relevant key project milestones such as site tenure, consent, etc.

59.     Not all applications for projects will receive Sport and Recreation Facility Investment funding. Some organisations have already been redirected to other funding sources as appropriate (e.g. local board grants, Surf 10:20 Fund, Regional Facilities Auckland), whilst others may apply again in future rounds when their project is further developed.

60.     Some projects will not align strongly with the criteria used for the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund. However, there may be other local drivers as to why local boards and non-council funders invest in those projects. It is incumbent on all parties to set realistic expectations in regard to the funding mechanisms available.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

61.     Staff are seeking a resolution from the local board to endorse the projects.

62.     Staff will workshop the assessment panel’s recommendations with the PACE Committee in March 2020.

63.     The PACE Committee will consider decisions around the SRFIF at its business meeting in April 2020.

64.     Funding agreements with successful applicants will be developed in May/June 2020.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Laura Bertelsen - Sport & Recreation Lead

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Wasp Hangar: Community Recreation Facility

File No.: CP2020/02883

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement of the Wasp Hangar: Community Recreation Facility application to the regionally contested Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020, and to confirm allocation of local board funds for the project fit-out costs.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The proposed project is to implement a fit-out of the existing Wasp Hangar building in Hobsonville Point in order to deliver indoor community recreation opportunities in an area where there is an identified shortfall of provision. 

3.       Pānuku Development Auckland (Pānuku) have been receptive to conversations and investigations to deliver indoor community recreation at the site for a lease period of 10 years.

4.       The proposed indoor community recreation provision will consist of:

·        code delivered community sport, such as basketball and futsal

·        gym fitness provision

·        local delivery of recreation activities

·        casual participation and use of the facility.

5.       It is proposed that the Auckland Council Leisure Network operates the facility and enables community recreation participation to occur.

6.       The Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 aims to increase the level of community sport participation in Auckland and recommends a priority is placed on ‘core infrastructure’, i.e. playing surfaces such as indoor courts.

7.       Staff recommend the local board endorse the project, reallocate $500,000 of the locally driven initiative capital expenditure (LDI capex) budget to the project, and seek the remaining budget required from the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      endorse the Wasp Hangar: Community Recreation Facility Project application to the regional 2019/2020 Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund.

b)      reallocate $500,000 of locally driven initiative capital expenditure, currently allocated as the local board’s contribution towards the proposed ‘one local initiative’, to the Wasp Hangar: Community Recreation Facility Project, subject to:

i)        approval of a 10-year lease from the Pānuku Development Auckland Board

ii)       allocation of funding shortfall required for fit-out costs from the regional Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund

iii)      allocation of the operational funding to the facility by the Finance and Performance Committee

iv)      allocation from the Active Recreation Commercial Fund for the leisure equipment costs.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Wasp Hangar is a heritage building currently managed by Pānuku, located on Launch Road, Hobsonville Point, in the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

9.       The proposed project is to implement a fit-out of the existing Wasp Hangar building in order to deliver indoor community recreation opportunities in an area where there is an identified shortfall of provision. 

10.     Pānuku have been receptive to conversations and investigations to deliver indoor community recreation at the site for a lease period of 10 years.

11.     The Wasp Hangar facility lease will be based on either a cost recovery rate or a commercial market rate. Further detail on the proposed rates is provided in the confidential attachment to this report (refer Attachment A).

12.     The proposed indoor community recreation provision will consist of:

·        code delivered community sport, such as basketball and futsal

·        gym fitness provision

·        local delivery of recreation activities

·        casual participation and use of the facility.

13.     As the landlord, Pānuku will be responsible for the physical building structure. As the tenant, Auckland Council will be responsible for any fit-out costs of the facility.

14.     Estimated fit-out costs for the facility are $705,000, excluding leisure equipment costs.

15.     Leisure equipment costs are estimated to be $200,000 and are to be sought from the Active Recreation Commercial Fund.

16.     In order to deliver this facility, collaboration between Pānuku and Auckland Council departments will be required. Early collaboration is currently underway during the detailed planning stages.

17.     It is proposed that the Auckland Council Leisure Network operates the facility and enables community recreation participation to occur.

18.     Delivery and management of the facility by Auckland Council is proposed in order to utilise existing expertise and knowledge within the organisation, and to enable community groups to focus on areas of expertise, such as programming.

19.     The user groups that have identified an interest in programming at the facility are:

·        Hobsonville Point Residents Society

·        Northern Football Federation

·        Harbour Basketball

·        North Shore Table Tennis Association

·        Indoor Court Facility Project Leadership Group.

20.     The proposed facility, delivery model, and operational model is supported by the proposed user groups and letters of support are provided in Attachments A to E of this report. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Strategic alignment

21.     The Community Facility Network Plan identifies that a ‘local purpose’ indoor recreation facility should serve a catchment of 5km. However, a desktop review of the 5km catchment showed natural barriers, such as waterways, within the catchment. A reduced catchment area was produced to consider for real-time ‘local’ users of the facility. The population of this catchment area is 35,541.

22.     The 2018 census data and Sport New Zealand insights tool shows the following demographic breakdown of the 5km catchment population:

Demographic category

Percentage of population (35,541)

European ethnicity

55.3%

Asian ethnicity

39.6%

Māori ethnicity

5.1%

Pacifica ethnicity

2.4%

Male

49.4%

Female

50.7%

‘Young families’ life stage

24.1%

23.     The targeted participants for this facility are aligned to ‘The Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039’, key performance indicator (KPI) 3:

 

 

 

 

 

 


24.     The catchment demographic does not serve a high socio-economic deprivation area. However, the catchment has the fourth highest Asian population across the Auckland region, and since the 2013 Census, this ethnic group has increased by 9867 people, or 65.8 per cent. Therefore, the key targeted participants will be Asian communities and females within the catchment area. 

25.     The Sport New Zealand insights tool shows the following participation trends for the targeted participants demographic:

Asian community participants

Female participants

Only 63.9 per cent of the Asian community within the identified catchment area for the Wasp Hangar: Community Recreation Facility are currently physically active.

Only 66.3 per cent of the female community within the identified catchment area for the Wasp Hangar: Community Recreation Facility are currently physically active.

The most popular activity for this targeted community is ‘walking for sport or leisure’. ‘Individual workout’ is ranked the fourth most popular activity, behind ‘inactive’ and ‘jogging/running’.

The most popular activity for this targeted community is ‘walking for sport or leisure’. ‘Individual workout’ is ranked the fifth most popular activity, behind ‘jogging/running, ‘inactive’ and ‘playing games’.

The most popular organised sport for this targeted community is ‘basketball’ with participation in this sport 3.7 per cent higher than the Auckland regional rate, and 3.5 per cent higher than the national rate.

The most popular organised sport for this targeted community is ‘netball’, however participation in this sport is 0.5 per cent lower than the Auckland regional rate and 1.1 per cent lower than the national rate.

The top three organised sport activities are:

·   basketball

·   badminton

·   football.

The top three organised sport activities are:

·    netball

·    football

·    tennis.

26.     The Active New Zealand Survey 2018 shows that in the North Harbour region:

·    100 per cent of 5-17-year-old females that identify as Asian and are not currently active would like to be more active

·    30 per cent of these respondents stated that the fact that it was too hard to get to training, games and competitions was a barrier from them participating in more physical activity (26 per cent for those not active at all). 

27.     The Auckland Indoor Court Facility Plan and the Third-Party Opportunities Study identify that the North-West area has a gap of indoor recreation provision. Both documents also identify that access to facilities and travel distance create a barrier to participation.

28.     The Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 aims to increase the level of community sport participation in Auckland and recommends a priority is placed on ‘core infrastructure’ i.e. playing surfaces such as indoor courts.

29.     The accessibility to the Wasp Hangar is high as it has good walking connections to a high-density population, is located near the local primary school, and is located near the ferry terminal for commuting residents to access the facility and on a regular bus route:




 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Options Analysis

Option one: Endorse the project, reallocate $500,000 of LDI capex budget to the project, and seek the remaining budget required from the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund

30.     Staff recommend that the local board provide endorsement for the Wasp Hangar: Community Recreation Facility to be considered for funding through the regional Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund. 

31.     Staff also recommend that the local board reallocate $500,000 from the LDI capex budget which is currently allocated as the local board’s contribution towards the proposed ‘one local initiative: a destination four court facility in the Upper Harbour Local Board area’, towards fit-out costs for the Wasp Hangar.

Table 1:  Advantages and disadvantages of Option one

Advantages

Disadvantages

·   The independent assessment panel are in a better position to recommend to Parks, Arts, Community, and Events (PACE) committee to allocate funds towards the project.

·   Deliverability of the project becomes more likely.

·   Delivery of the project delivers indoor recreation provision in an area which has an identified need and aligns to The Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039.

·   The project is supported by residents’ groups and proposed facility user groups as seen in Attachments A to E to this report.

·   The estimates provided for the fit-out costs have not been able to be checked against the works being completed by Pānuku at the time of writing this report, so these costs may increase. There is still time to make any minor changes to the amount requested through the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund, if required.

·    The Upper Harbour Local Board will need to consider allocating $500,000 from its 2020/2021 LDI capex allotment in the long-term plan for the ‘one local initiative’ project.

·    Full funding of the project fit-out costs is reliant on the Parks, Art, Community and Events Committee allocating funding to cover the shortfall in funding for the project.

 

Option two: Do not endorse the project and proceed no further with the concept

32.     Under this option, the local board does not endorse the Wasp Hangar: Community Recreation Facility application to be considered for funding through the regional Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund. 

33.     The local board would, therefore, not reallocate $500,000 from the LDI capex budget which is currently allocated as the local board’s contribution towards the proposed ‘one local initiative: a destination four court facility in the Upper Harbour Local Board area’.

34.     The project does not progress any further.

Table 3:  Advantages and disadvantages of Option two

Advantages

Disadvantages

·   The Upper Harbour Local Board does not need to reallocate $500,000 from its LDI capex budget for the ‘one local initiative’ project.

·    A gap in provision of sport and recreation opportunities will remain in the north-west catchment area of the Upper Harbour Local Board.

·    Pānuku will lease the facility to another user group and the opportunity to retrofit an existing building will be lost.

·    The supportive user groups identified in Attachments A to E will not have access to a facility in order to deliver sport and recreation opportunities to the Upper Harbour community.

Recommendation

35.     Staff recommend option one as this delivers provision in an area of need, is supportive of community groups’ feedback, and also allows flexibility in fit-out costs once comparisons are made between Pānuku works completed and fit-out pricing completed to date.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     The proposed facility is an existing building on the site, which has heritage status. The Greenest Building: Quantifying the Environmental Value of Building Reuse1 concludes that building reuse almost always offers environmental savings over demolition and new construction.

37.     The Greenest Building: Quantifying the Environmental Value of Building Reuse also identifies that it takes 10 to 80 years for a new building to overcome the negative climate change impacts in relation to the construction process.

38.     There is no current provision at the facility, so any use is expected to have an impact on the emissions produced at the site.

39.     It is anticipated that some users would be driving to the facility which will increase car emissions in the area.

1 The Greenest Building: Quantifying the Environmental Value of Building Reuse is a report produced by Preservation Green Lab – National Trust for Historic Preservation 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     Decision-making for the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund sits with the Parks, Arts and Community Events (PACE) Committee.

41.     Staff have been working in collaboration with Pānuku with regard to the developments at Hobsonville Point.

42.     It is anticipated that the Pānuku Board will decide on the granting of a lease for the facility at their meeting in March 2020.

43.     Decision-making for the operational costs of the facility within the leisure network sits with the Finance and Performance Committee.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

44.     The regional and sub-regional nature of sport and recreation facilities that are the target of the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund means there will likely be a multi-board impact across all projects.

45.     The Upper Harbour Local Board Plan has the following outcome, objective and key initiative relevant to the Wasp Hangar project:

·    Outcome: Healthy active communities

Objective: Upper Harbour has a range of world-class, multi-use sports and recreation facilities

Key initiative: Investigate options for securing indoor sports and recreation facilities in Upper Harbour, including advocating to the Governing Body through the 10-year Budget process.

46.     The Upper Harbour Local Board approved a Third-Party Partnership Assessment which identified that the Wasp Hangar should be investigated for the delivery of indoor recreation and discussed with Pānuku.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.     The assessment criteria developed for the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund has a stronger weighting for projects that are Māori-led, have high collaboration with Māori organisations, prioritises strategically increased participation by Māori and/or involves activities with the likelihood of high Māori participation.

48.     The 5km catchment area shows a population of 35,541 with 5.1 per cent identifying as Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

49.     The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund is a regional budget allocated through The Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

50.     Seven million dollars is budgeted in 2019/2020, $7 million in 2020/2021, $13.4 million in 2021/2022 and $13.6 million in 2022/2023.

51.     A key objective of the fund is to invest in significant capital development projects that will be delivered quickly to get Aucklanders active. The fund will also help to develop a pipeline of projects by advancing the investigation, planning and design stages of projects. The balance between planning and capital development investment will depend on the merits of the applications received.

52.     An amount of $500,000 from the Upper Harbour Local Board’s LDI capex budget is currently allocated as the local board’s contribution towards the proposed ‘one local initiative: a destination four court facility in the Upper Harbour Local Board area’.

53.     If the local board reallocates $500,000 from LDI capex to the Wasp Hangar: Community Recreation Facility, the local board will need to consider allocating $500,000 from the 2021/2022 LDI capex allotment in the next long-term plan for the ‘one local initiative’ project.

54.     If the PACE Committee does not support the application to the regional Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund, the local board may be able to consider allocation of 2020/2021 LDI capex in order to fully fund the project. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     Due to the nature of the project, several decisions are required from various decision-makers for funding allocation. The following decisions have not been made prior to the writing of this report:

·        allocation of funding from the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund by the PACE Committee

·        allocation of funds for the leisure provision equipment in the facility through the Active Recreation Commercial Fund

·        a decision on operational funding of the site as an additional site within the leisure network by the Finance and Performance Committee.

56.     The Pānuku Board has not committed to a 10-year lease in order to activate the existing Wasp Hangar facility at the time of writing this report.

57.     The above risks have been considered by staff and have been mitigated through the recommendations provided.

58.    The estimates provided for the fit-out costs have not been able to be checked against the works being completed by Pānuku at the time of writing this report, therefore there is the possibility that fit-out costs may increase. There is still time to make any minor changes to the amount requested through the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund if required.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

59.     Staff are seeking a resolution from the local board to endorse the project and allocate funding towards fit-out costs.

60.     The PACE Committee business meeting is in April 2020 for the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund allocation decision.

61.     A business case has been assessed for the Active Recreation Commercial Fund allocation towards leisure equipment in the facility.

62.     A resolution will be sought from the Finance and Performance Committee for operational funding of the facility.

63.     The project will be added to the Community Facilities 2020/2021 work programme for delivery.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Letter of support - Hobsonville Point Residents Society

43

b

Letter of support - Northern Football Federation

45

c

Letter of support - North Harbour Basketball

47

d

Letter of support - North Shore Table Tennis Association

49

e

Minutes noting support: Indoor Court Facility Project Leadership Group

51

f

Proposed facility charges (Under Separate Cover) - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Laura Bertelsen - Sport & Recreation Lead

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport monthly update - March 2020

File No.: CP2020/01791

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on transport-related matters of specific application and interest to the Upper Harbour Local Board and its community, and an update on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Progress on the board’s LBTCF funded projects is noted in this report. The local board has $2,291,199 remaining in its LBTCF.

3.       Included is a list of the public consultations sent to the local board in February 2020 for comment and the decisions of AT’s Traffic Control Committee (TCC).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the monthly update report from Auckland Transport for March 2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       AT is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. AT reports on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in its Local Board Engagement Plan. This reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities.

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that are considered important but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·        be safe

·        not impede network efficiency

·        be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Update on Upper Harbour projects from the previous term

6.       The following table lists funds allocated to projects during the last term and carried forward into the 2019-2022 term for completion:


 

ID

Project name

Unspent allocation from previous term

Project update

552

Rame Road upgrade

$1,421,506

This project is on hold until the local board determines otherwise.

565

Kyle Road footpaths

$520,879

The project is currently still in the design phase.

At this stage, it is not possible to confirm a definitive construction timeline for the project. There is still preliminary design, consultation and consenting to be completed, and then final design.

Works will then be coordinated with the adjacent subdivision work which affects both Schnapper Rock Road and Kyle Road, and also a separate proposed road rehabilitation project by AT in Kyle Road itself.

The logistics of combining all three projects remain complex but will become clearer as works progress.

635

Upper Harbour Drive junction

$43,698

Proposed concept designs for the project are to be discussed further in a workshop with the local board.

692

Gills Road footpath extension

$38,955

AT is scheduled for a workshop in March 2020 to update the local board on progress.

$2,025,038

FUNDS AVAILABLE TO BE ALLOCATED IN THE 2019-2022 TERM

Total funds available in the current political term

$4,316,237

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$2,025,038

Remaining budget

$2,291,199

Community Safety Fund

7.       The Community Safety Fund (CSF) was established in the 2018 Regional Land Transport Plan and it allocated $20 million for local initiatives in road safety: $5 million in the 2019/2020 financial year and $15 million in the 2020/2021 financial year. It is apportioned to local board areas by a formula focused on numbers of deaths and serious injuries (DSI).

8.       The Upper Harbour Local Board was allocated $800,168 from the CSF over two years. The board developed a list of safety projects which were prioritised after an assessment and a rough order of costs was established.

9.       Currently projects are being further assessed and design work is in progress. It is expected that most projects will be delivered in year two of the programme.

10.     AT expects to report back on the progress of these projects in the first quarter of 2020.

CSF project update

Location

Update

Gills Road footpath extension

AT’s Capital Project Control Group approved $1.3 million (to add to the local board’s contribution of $800,000) for the footpath works on Gills Road on 26 September 2019.

AT has appointed a consultant to undertake the detailed design.

A workshop was held in late February 2020 with the local board where AT presented the design and an updated timeline. AT is currently lodging the necessary consents for the proposed work and will come back to the board once approved with the next steps on delivery.

Speed Management Bylaw

11.     At the end of October 2019, after consideration of almost 12,000 public submissions and reviewing technical reports, AT’s board approved a bylaw which will reduce speed limits on around 10 per cent of Auckland’s urban and rural roads.

12.     The greatest impact of the speed limit reductions will be on high-risk rural roads, town centre streets and Auckland’s central business district. There are roads in the Upper Harbour area that will be affected with the first suite of changes.

Consultation

13.     AT is fast-tracking implementation of a speed management plan for Auckland and delivering an ambitious $700 million safety infrastructure acceleration programme estimated to reduce DSI by up to 18 per cent over an initial three-year period, and by up to 60 per cent by 2028. It will deliver major, minor and mass action safety engineering projects, including speed management on high-risk routes and locations across the network.

14.     As part of this programme, AT is proposing to change speed limits across Auckland using the Speed Limits Bylaw. This is the legal process for changing speed limits as per Section 27.1 of the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017. This will affect approximately 10 per cent of Auckland’s local roads.

15.     In December 2018, AT’s board approved a public consultation on the bylaw. This is in accordance with the special consultative procedure under the Local Government Act 2002 and in accordance with the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017, with regard to the new speed limits themselves.

16.     The consultation will start on 28 February 2019 and last for approximately one month. The bylaw will contain a complete list of the roads proposed for speed limit changes and will include information on AT’s current speed limits and the new proposed speed limits.

17.     There are roads in the Upper Harbour area that are impacted by these changes, but residents are fully entitled to give feedback on the proposed changes in other areas of Auckland.

18.     Following consultation, the feedback will be analysed and any required changes made. The Auckland Transport Board will then make and pass the new bylaw with the recommended changes.

19.     Once consultation on the bylaw is complete and the bylaw is adopted, there will need to be changes of signage and sometimes supporting engineering measures to encourage driving at slower speeds. These measures could include installing raised zebra crossings, raised tables, speed humps and narrowing roads.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     AT engages closely with council to develop strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and council’s priorities.

21.     AT’s core role is to provide attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

22.     To this end, AT’s Statement of Intent contains three performance measures:

Measure

2019/2020

2020/2021

2021/2022

Number of buses in the Auckland bus fleet classified as low emission

5

25

55

Reduction in CO2e (emissions) generated annually by AT corporate operations (from 2017/18 baseline)

7%

9%

11%

Percentage of AT streetlights that are energy efficient LED

56%

66%

76%

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.       The impact of information in this report is confined to AT and does not impact on other parts of the council group. Any engagement with other parts of the council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Safety concerns: Buckley Avenue, Hobsonville

24.     AT is committed to an approach to manage parking that is sustainable in the long term. Therefore, the focus is to promote the efficient use of the existing public parking resource in the first instance, but it is the responsibility of the vehicle owner to ensure his/her vehicle is always parked in a safe and legal manner. Buckley Avenue is a public asset that exists for the use of all motorists and AT cannot prohibit the use of a public road to any group or collective.

25.     AT receives many requests to investigate issues relating to roads which have a width of less than 7m. Generally, such requests relate to difficulties in accessing properties or the ability of vehicles such as rubbish trucks or emergency vehicles to access a road which has vehicles parked on both sides.

26.     The most requested solution is the installation of ‘no stopping’ controls along all or sections of the street. In AT’s experience, proposals that result in loss of on-street parking are often not supported by the majority of stakeholders.

27.     To streamline this process and to reduce the possibility of future objections, AT is requesting that before investigating the issue, support is evidenced from at least three residents who would be affected by any change. Once the completed form is received, AT will carry out a site visit and investigate the problem.

Enforcement of parking issues: Keno Way and Craigs Way, Hobsonville

28.     AT has loaded these newly vested roads into its enforcement software and are now enforcing the illegal parking that is occurring on Kano Way and Craigs Way.

29.     Due to multiple other enforcement issues in the Auckland region and limited resources, AT cannot attend the area as often as desired. Should illegal parking be witnessed in this area, AT should be contacted, resulting in an investigation on a case-by-case basis.

Community concerns: Scott Point

30.     There are currently three active work sites in Scott Point where AT is working with the developer to ensure they are adhering to traffic management plans and that they are catering for pedestrians and in particular, school children.

Dangerous blind hill: Tauhinu Road to Pounamu Avenue, Greenhithe

31.     AT has investigated this request and several factors have been considered: 

·        traffic volumes and flows

·        road types

·        general roading environment and topography

·        police recorded crashes.

32.     AT has a limited budget for improvements, therefore funding these types of project must be prioritised:

Pounamu Avenue / Tauhinu Road

33.     Pounamu Avenue does have reduced sightlines due to the curve on the crest of the hill. However, given that this is a low-speed, residential environment, AT do not believe that this creates undue risk. In addition, there have been no reported crashes near the intersection of Pounamu Avenue and Tauhinu Road in the past five years which indicates they are functioning relatively safely.

Greenhithe Road / Churchouse Road / Isobel Road roundabout

34.     AT appreciates that there are reduced sightlines when exiting Isobel Road. This is exacerbated by a hedge on the boundary of 39 Greenhithe Road which is encroaching on road reserve. AT will pass this issue onto Auckland Council for further discussion with the property owners who may consider removal of the hedge, although this will not improve sightlines to the extent suggested. There has been only one incident reported to police at this roundabout over the past five years and additional works to improve the situation are not considered to be justifiable at this stage.

35.     With regard to the request for a convex mirror, AT no longer installs these. While it is appreciated that they may be useful in some circumstances, they can introduce unnecessary risk. Convex mirrors can give a false sense of the distance and speed of other vehicles and drivers have misinterpreted them in the past. The other difficulty is that these mirrors are initially expensive to purchase and install and are difficult to maintain. They frequently generate an ongoing maintenance liability due to theft and vandalism.

Missing macron on road sign: Weta Road, Hobsonville Point

36.     AT has referred this issue to Auckland Council as road naming is a local board delegation. Māori road names are checked with the relevant mana whenua and are approved by the area’s local board. 

Request for installation of safety measures: Schnapper Rock Road

37.     AT has investigated the request to install safety measures on Schnapper Rock Road. Installation of flexi-posts as suggested are not considered an appropriate solution for the issue of vehicles crossing the centre-line on this road. Vehicles are likely to make contact with these posts, causing damage and requiring ongoing repairs and maintenance. Two-wheeled vehicles such as motorcycles face additional risk as contact can cause them to lose control of their vehicle.

38.     AT will be installing safety measures on the road.

39.     AT have reviewed the site and to highlight the curve, will be installing new sets of raised reflective pavement markers (RRPMs). AT also noted that speeding is a pattern with the reported crashes at this location and therefore, will be raising this issue with the NZ Police to increase enforcement at this location.

Issues under investigation

40.     The local board has requested that the following issues be investigated, and these are still under investigation:

·        Kingsway Road bollards and chain request

·        Greenhithe Road safety concerns

·        roading issue on corner of Te Kawau Pass and William Pitcher Place, Greenhithe.

Local board workshops

41.     AT attended workshops in February and March 2020. The purpose of these workshops was to update the board on the following topics:

·        Gills Road footpath update

·        LBTCF potential projects

·        Upper Harbour Drive intersection improvements

·        Proposed changes to the bus network for Rosedale Station

·        Dairy Flat Highway/Gills Road update.

Consultation documents on proposed improvements

 

42.     Consultation documents for the following proposals have been provided to the Upper Harbour Local Board for feedback and are summarised below for information purposes only.

43.     After consultation, AT considers the feedback received and determines whether to proceed further with the proposal as consulted on or proceed with an amended proposal if changes are considered necessary:

·        20 Scott Road Hobsonville -– proposed ‘no stopping at all times’ (NSAAT), give-way control, speed table, footpath and traffic island.

AT’s Traffic Control Committee (TCC) report

44.     Decisions of the TCC during the months of January and February 2020 affecting the Upper Harbour Local Board area are listed below:

Date

Street/s and suburb

Report type

Restriction

Decision

1 Jan 20

Scott Road / Rapunga Drive / Cicada Road / Kano Way / Craigs Way, Hobsonville

Permanent traffic and parking changes

No stopping at all times (NSAAT) / cycle path / cycle lane / give-way control / road hump / pedestrian crossing / edge line

Withdrawn – needs further work

1 Feb 20

Marae Road, Greenhithe

Permanent traffic and parking changes

NSAAT

CARRIED

1 Feb 20

Pukatea Avenue / Northern Rata Place, Albany

Permanent traffic and parking changes combined

NSAAT / give-way control

CARRIED

1 Feb 20

Schnapper Rock Road, Schnapper Rock

Permanent traffic and parking changes combined

NSAAT / edge lines

CARRIED

 

Auckland Transport Major Capital Works in the Upper Harbour Area – Update as at 6 March 2020

Gills Road link project and Dairy Flat Highway / The Avenue project

The Gills Road Link and Dairy Flat Highway / The Avenue projects will be strategically re-evaluated, taking a more holistic view of the issues and opportunities to determine the most appropriate improvements required. This will also include the Albany village area.

Medallion Drive link project

 

The Medallion Drive link has been confirmed and is expected to be completed by the middle of 2021. Design has been completed. The construction phase will start in April 2020 and will take 18 months.

More information can be found about the Medallion Drive link project at: https://at.govt.nz/projects-roadworks/albany-developments/medallion-drive-link/

Pedestrian signal on Ōtehā Valley Road

AT has completed external consultation. The project is in the detailed design phase with construction expected to be completed by July 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

45.     The decision to receive this monthly update report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori or consideration of impacts and opportunities will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     The decision to receive this monthly update report has no financial implications.

47.     The following table gives the LBTCF financial summary for the Upper Harbour Local Board:

Upper Harbour LBTCF financial summary

Total funds available in current political term

$4,315,403

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$2,025,038

Remaining budget

$2,291,199

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     The decision to receive this monthly update report has no risks and mitigations.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

49.     AT will provide a further update report to the Upper Harbour Local Board in April 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Owena Schuster – Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Allocation of Upper Harbour Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2020/03181

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request a rough order of costs (ROCs) from Auckland Transport (AT) in order to make decisions on the allocation of its Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The next steps in this year’s LBTCF round are noted in this report, along with staff recommendations for projects that the local board has been considering taking forward to ROC stage.

3.       The board has $2,291,199 in its LBTCF in this political term. 

4.       The ROCs will be reported back to the board in May 2020. Decisions on the selection and allocation of funding to projects is expected to take place in June 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      request that Auckland Transport provide a rough order of costs for the following projects:

i)        Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park shared path

ii)       Ōtehā Valley Road (connecting existing shared paths to fill in the gaps)

iii)      shared path on Bush Road from the hockey stadium to Rosedale Road

iv)      improve safety between Albany shared path and the new SH18 shared path

v)      Scott Road footpath.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       AT is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. It reports on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in its Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role of local boards within and on behalf of their local communities. 

6.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that are considered important but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·   be safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Allocating Upper Harbour’s LBTCF in the new political term

7.       In the new political term, the board’s LBTCF budget stands at $2,291,199.

8.       During the 2016-2019 political term, all of the LBTCF was allocated. This has meant that the delivery of many of these projects is still in progress. By considering and making decisions early in the political term, the board will increase its ability to make positive impacts in the local board area before the next election.

9.       The board may choose to allocate all of the budget in this year’s LBTCF round, or part of it only. However, in order to get projects constructed in this political term, the board should aim to allocate at least half of its fund in 2020 and the remainder in 2021. 

10.     During February 2020, the board has been compiling and prioritising a list of LBTCF projects. These were discussed at a local board workshop on 23 February 2020.

11.     At its March 2020 business meeting, the board is requested to identify which projects it wishes to progress to the ROC stage. 

12.     AT will provide the local board with ROCs for the selected projects and any other relevant advice by the end of May 2020. After it has considered this information, the board will be requested to choose which projects it wishes to allocate funding toward. It is anticipated that at least half the fund will be allocated by the end of June 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

14.     One of AT’s core roles is providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

15.     To this end, Auckland Transport’s Statement of Intent contains three performance measures:

Measure

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Number of buses in the Auckland bus fleet classified as low emission

5

25

55

Reduction in CO2e (emissions) generated annually by Auckland Transport corporate operations (from 2017/18 baseline)

7%

9%

11%

Percentage of Auckland Transport streetlights that are energy efficient LED

56%

66%

76%

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     The impact of the information in this report is mainly confined to AT.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     AT attended one local board workshop in February 2020 to develop these project options and a list of possible projects for consideration and prioritisation.

18.     At the board’s workshop on 23 February 2020, AT provided high-level advice on the project lists and provided staff recommendations on which projects to take forward to ROC stage. These recommendations are noted in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The decision to receive this report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     There are no financial implications for the board in requesting ROCs from AT. Costs associated with providing a ROC, plus more detailed high-level advice, is borne by AT.

21.     The following table gives the LBTCF financial summary for the Upper Harbour Local Board which includes the budget available in the new political term:

Upper Harbour LBTCF financial summary

Total funds available in current political term

$4,315,403

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$2,025,038

Remaining budget

$2,291,199

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     The decision to receive this report and requesting ROCs for potential LBTCF projects has no risk for the local board.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

23.     AT will report back to a workshop in May 2020 with prepared ROCs. The local board is then requested to allocate funds to selected projects by the end of June 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Owena Schuster – Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

2019-2022 Community Facilities work programme addition: Bluebird Reserve playspace renewal

File No.: CP2020/03151

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Upper Harbour Local Board Community Facilities 2019-2022 work programme to include a new project, Bluebird Reserve playspace renewal.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The addition of a new project is proposed for the Upper Harbour Local Board Community Facilities 2019-2022 work programme to enable renewal of the Bluebird Reserve playspace.

3.       The reserve is located in Unsworth Heights and has been partially closed due to safety concerns relating to structural rust.

4.       The new project is required to be added to the work programme to renew the playspace at Bluebird Reserve. The estimated cost for renewal of the playspace to make it fit for purpose is $100,000.

5.       Other options available to the local board are to:

·        close the playspace

·        renew only a component of the playspace

·        full playspace renewal, or

·        complete a full renewal and enhance with locally driven initiatives funding as recommended in the recent ‘Strategic Play Provision Assessment – Upper Harbour Local Board Area’ dated June 2018.

6.       Staff propose that the design of the playground renewal commences, and once complete, staff will seek a resolution on the final design and provide options to the board should they wish to make any enhancements to the playground.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      agree to update the Upper Harbour Local Board Community Facilities work programme 2019-2022 to include the following project:

i)        activity name: Bluebird Reserve playspace renewal

ii)       activity description: Renew playspace at Bluebird Reserve to current standards providing an opportunity for a play experience for a wider range of children’s ages, financial year 19/20 – investigation and design, financial year 20/21 – physical works

iii)      budget and budget source: $100,000 of asset-based services: capital expenditure renewals funding

iv)      further decisions points: Final playground design and cost to be adopted by the local board at a business meeting.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The playspace at Bluebird Reserve has been partially out of commission due to safety concerns and poor condition of play equipment as a result of structural rust.

8.       The playspace is located fronting Bluebird Crescent as shown in the images below:

9.       As noted in the 2018 Strategic Play Provision Assessment – Upper Harbour Local Board Area:

‘Residential areas in north-west of Unsworth Heights have very little play provision, just one junior neighbourhood playspace at Bluebird Reserve. The existing Bluebird Reserve playspace requires creative renewal, and some further investment to diversify the play offering for junior/intermediate age group’. 

10.     This new project will address the partial loss of play facilities for residents due to closure of a play module and can be taken as an opportunity to undertake a full renewal of the playspace which will improve the play experience provided in Unsworth Heights.

11.     The Strategic Play Provision Assessment also identifies Bluebird Reserve as potential to improve the play provision in a neighbourhood that is not currently well provided for. The local board may use this opportunity to implement the recommendations from the assessment and provide contribution from the local board’s locally driven initiatives capital expenditure fund (LDI capex).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The 2018 Strategic Play Provision Assessment identified that the Bluebird Reserve playspace provides play experience to the surrounding residents, therefore there is a need for immediate renewal. There are several options available to the local board, including:

·        Option A – Do nothing: This option is not recommended as it will not provide the required play provision in this area. Additionally, there is the potential for the remaining playspace element to require renewal in the short term due to its condition.

·        Option B - Replace the closed junior module (single item): This option is not recommended as this approach does not deliver the best value for money from the renewal funding, because of the lost opportunity to provide updated playspace that reflects current best practice and provide the greatest possible play value to the area.

·        Option C - Prioritise a full renewal of the playspace at Bluebird Reserve: This is the recommended option as it will provide best value for money in terms of making the play provision fit for purpose at the time of renewal which will reflect current best practice.

·        Option D - Full renewal and enhancement of the playspace at Bluebird Reserve by utilising the local boards LDI capex fund: This option is valid and would be supported by staff as it would improve the service level provided and address identified gaps in the experiences provided for intermediate age children in the Unsworth Heights area, as noted in the 2018 Strategic Play Provision Assessment.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     In June 2019, Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and a commitment to the community to look at ways that council can consider climate implications in everything it does. Auckland faces risks such as heat waves, droughts and tropical storms.

14.     Provision of well-maintained playspaces will also encourage utilisation of council’s green spaces by community. Staff will further focus on sourcing play equipment options that are available from local play equipment suppliers and which can be maintained without requiring sourcing from offshore suppliers.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The Community Services team supports the project as it will provide improved services to the community.

16.     The Community Facilities Operational Management and Maintenance team support the renewal as it will improve the quality of the park.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     This project is in line with one of the outcomes of the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2017, ‘healthy and active communities and will provide access to well-maintained playspace’.

18.     The playspace is recognised as a key neighbourhood playspace within Unsworth Heights and the renewal will maintain play value and ensure conformity with today’s play compliance standards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     This project is a renewal of an existing asset. There will be benefit to Māori as well as the wider community by improving an asset that will encourage people to use the park and open space. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūteaas

Financial implications

20.     The project is estimated to cost $100,000 and, if approved by the local board, council will be responsible for future maintenance of the playspace.

21.     The project funding will come from the 2019/2020 financial year region-wide renewals funding savings.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     Due to the current state of the playspace, staff believe that this renewal will maintain and improve the provision of play in the area. If the proposal is not supported by the local board, it will lead to a loss of play provision in the area.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

23.     Following approval from the local board, staff will add this project to the Upper Harbour Local Board Community Facilities 2019-2022 work programme.

24.     A design and cost estimate will be prepared which will consider if there are any enhancements that could be made to the playground that could be funded from LDI capex.

25.     A business report will be prepared requesting formal adoption of the final design and cost.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Riya Seth - Democracy Advisor - Whau

Authorisers

Kris Bird - Manager Sports Parks Design & Programme

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework - proposed changes

File No.: CP2020/02821

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback on the changes to the draft Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region (resolution number ENV/2018/11).

3.       To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (ACAF) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors.

4.       In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved a consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

5.       In February 2020, a memorandum was circulated to share key findings from the public consultation (Attachments A and B).

6.       To address the feedback from the consultation, this report outlines key structural changes proposed for the framework, including:

·        introducing three pillars representing the core drivers to which all actions will align (i.e. a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change).

·        moving from 11 key moves to eight priorities to streamline actions and address feedback.

7.       It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against council’s climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regard to implementation.

8.       The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the changes to the draft Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, including:

i)        introducing three pillars representing the core drivers for climate action (i.e. a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change)

ii)       moving from 11 key moves to eight priorities

iii)      changing the title from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region, addressing both emissions reduction (i.e. mitigation) and preparing for the impacts of a changing climate (i.e. adaptation) (resolution number ENV/2018/11).

10.     To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework (ACAF) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors, reaching hundreds of Aucklanders.

11.     Local board engagement and insights were sought throughout development of the framework, including meetings and cluster workshops. A summary of feedback from local boards is available in Attachments C and D.

12.     In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved the consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

13.     In February 2020, a memo was circulated to all local boards to share key findings from the public consultation on the draft ACAF (Attachment A and B).

14.     This report provides an overview of key proposed changes to the draft ACAF to address the feedback received through the consultation. Local board views will be reflected in the final version, which will be reported to the Environment and Climate Change Committee in May 2020.

15.     More detailed changes reported in the consultation summary are not repeated here but will be reflected in text changes in the final version.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The proposed changes to ACAF have been informed by consultation feedback received on the draft document. Some key themes that arose include:

·        Urgency and scale of action needs to be better articulated.

·        Lack of clarity on how key moves work together and how they address council’s climate goals. In addition, it was felt that there are too many.

·        Need to be clearer about roles and responsibilities with a request for more information on who is responsible for actions at each level.

·        Need for partnership working across sectors and with central government and mana whenua in particular.

·        Greater focus on equity across feedback points.

·        Need for a strong Māori voice with widespread support for working with Māori, using mātauranga Māori and Māori practices in designing and implementing climate action.

·        Need for a system shift and scale of change required, and to better articulate this with Aucklanders.

·        Need for communication and behaviour change and a request for campaigns to raise awareness across the region and enable action at an individual level.

·        Need for a significant shift in transport (of all key moves) with the identified actions supported but a need for these to be delivered at pace and scale.

17.     To address this feedback a number of key structural changes are proposed.

18.     The first of these is establish three core drivers for action – the ‘pillars’ (Attachment E).  These provide greater clarity on the goals of the framework and all actions will align to how they deliver against these goals:

·        A Tāmaki response: This pillar reflects the uniqueness of Auckland and council’s place-based response to climate change. It is informed by learning from Māori principles and practice, provides a greater focus on equity and a better definition of roles and responsibilities and collective action across governance and sectors.

·        Reducing emissions: This pillar reflects the need to provide greater clarity on council’s emissions target and the need to halve emissions by 2030 and reach net zero emissions by 2050. It improves alignment with the actions and how council will deliver and prioritise emissions reductions.

·        Preparing for climate change: This pillar enables a greater focus on how council will approach climate change adaptation and take a precautionary approach for the region and also provides greater alignment with the actions.

19.     The second structural change is that the 11 key moves are streamlined into eight priorities (Attachment F). This proposed change is to address feedback on where areas are more foundational and therefore should be embedded throughout all priority areas, or where there is confusion and overlap. Proposed changes include:

·      Key move 3: Make development and infrastructure climate compatible and Key Move 4: Transform existing buildings and places are combined into a single built environment priority area. 

·      Key move 1: Lay the foundation is embedded into the three pillars in recognition of the cross-cutting nature of the actions.

·      Key move 9: Rangatahi (Youth & Inter-generational equity) is embedded into pillar 1 to reflect the need to consider actions across the framework.

20.     Actions contained within key moves 1 and 9 will still be maintained and reflected in the updated document.

21.     Actions contained within key moves 1-11 will be carried through into priorities 1-8 (Figure 2) and updated to:

·        clarify any ambiguities that were raised in consultation 

·        remove repetition or overlapping actions

·        make additions in response to consultation feedback

·        strengthen alignment to delivery of the three pillars.

22.     Overall, the intent of the actions between the key moves 1-11 and priority areas 1-8, remain the same. Attachment G briefly summarises how the actions have changed from the consultation document to the updated priority areas.

23.     It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against council’s climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regard to implementation.

24.     The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     The changes identified in this report have been made to reflect feedback received and updated emissions modelling. As such, they will further deliver and strengthen climate action already identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Regular meetings and workshops took place across the council group for development of the framework.

27.     In addition, a working group was established from the outset to provide expertise from across the council group, central government and district health boards.

28.     This group has continued to provide input post-consultation and has reviewed and provided input into the proposed changes.

29.     In addition, the team has been working closely across the council group in the development of costed actions for consideration in the long-term plan. This process is running concurrently with the finalisation of the plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The framework will have implications for all local boards.

31.     In June 2018, the Chief Sustainability Office attended workshops at 19 of the 21 local boards and obtained informal email feedback from the other two local boards to identify their main priorities related to climate change. This was followed up in September 2018 at cluster workshops to assess and test a series of ‘must haves’, which were the precursors to the actions included in the draft framework.

32.     Priorities included:

·        coastal erosion and inundation concerns

·        affordable and accessible transport

·        long-term infrastructure development to consider climate impacts

·        better stormwater management

·        climate-related education and awareness

·        building community resilience

·        for Auckland Council to lead by example.

33.     This report seeks local board formal views on proposed changes to the draft Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework outlined in this report. These views will be reflected in the final version.

34.     Local boards will be key in taking climate action at a local level. Support will be provided for local board planning and alignment with outcomes.

35.     The Chief Sustainability Office and Quality Advice Unit will implement a programme of work for the whole council family to provide guidance and training on how to embed climate action in local board plans and what to expect in climate impact statements.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Climate change impacts and associated policy and action will have significant impacts for Māori communities.

37.     A Tāmaki and climate change subject matter expert rōpū (group) was established in March 2019 which has been supporting and advising mana whenua and council on climate change issues for Māori and providing direct advice and narrative for the draft framework.

38.     A rangatahi Māori and Pasifika rōpū has also been working in partnership with council on this kaupapa to develop rangatahi-focused actions for the framework.

39.     A joint mana whenua and Māori expert task group is finalising a Tāmaki and climate change position paper, Te ora ō Tāmaki, which will be used as the bridging document to weave key anchor points into the climate action framework. 

40.     Anchor points include:

·       weaving the narrative into the framework, specifically the following sections: Climate change and Māori, Impacts on Māori, and Developing the Plan with Māori

·       a section developed by rangatahi (the youth and intergenerational equity key move)

·       a separate key move of Te puawaitanga o te tangata (resilient Māori communities).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Actions within the framework will result in budgetary implications for organisations across the region; identifying and unlocking appropriate funding and financing streams in the future will be critical. 

42.     Taking climate action will require a range of finance and/or funding mechanisms. For instance, green bonds have been a useful tool for financing council-owned assets such as electric trains but investment in clean tech may require crowd-sourcing, grants or venture capital.

43.     To support this, a climate finance work package is underway to identify partnerships and broader funding mechanisms across actions such as bonds, grants, equity instruments and public/private partnerships.

44.     The final framework and specific Auckland Council actions being developed will need to inform ongoing long-term plan discussions to support delivery and avoid costs associated with inaction, such as increased maintenance costs and infrastructure failures through to missed opportunities to Auckland’s economy in delivering the transition. 

45.     Not all actions within council’s remit will require additional budget. Some actions can result in long-term cost avoidance, for example, electrifying fleets can reduce fuel and maintenance costs. Some actions could require existing funds to be redirected if priorities change.

46.     In addition, not all actions will require funding, for example, those related to advocacy to central government or expert input into actions led by other organisations.

47.     The costs associated with different council-specific actions will consider funding sources as described above.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     No high or extreme risks have been identified with the proposed approach.

49.     Moderate risks exist, including:

·       preparing for the implications of climate change may not comply with current rules and regulations

·       potential strategic risk with non-alignment with New Zealand Government direction and policy

·       potential governance risk in shared leadership and ownership of the framework across sectors.

50.     A risk mitigation plan has been developed to address the above, including targeted engagement approaches, a legal review of the final framework, ongoing partnership with central government and establishment of clear governance structures for the implementation of the framework.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Workshops will be held in April 2020 with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Independent Māori Statutory Board to discuss updated framework text, and the final text will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for approval in May 2020.

52.     The draft digital plan layout will be workshopped with the Environment and Climate Change Committee in June 2020 and finalised in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland’s Climate Action Framework consultation summary memo (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Auckland’s Climate Action Framework consultation summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Auckland’s Climate Action Framework local board engagement summary - local board workshops June 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Auckland’s Climate Action Framework local board engagement summary - cluster workshops October 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Auckland’s Climate Action Framework proposed three pillars (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Auckland’s Climate Action Framework proposed eight priorities (Under Separate Cover)

 

g

Auckland’s Climate Action Framework proposed priority areas and actions (Under Separate Cover)

 

   

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Anderson - Principal Specialist Sustainability and Climate Resilence

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-controlled Organisations Review

File No.: CP2020/02949

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide formal feedback on the Council-controlled Organisations (CCO) Review to the Independent Panel.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governing Body approved the terms of reference for an Independent Panel to undertake a review of substantive CCOs at its meeting on 26 November 2019 [resolution number GB/2019/127].

3.       The review covers Auckland Transport, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development, Pānuku Development Auckland, Regional Facilities Auckland and Watercare.  The overall objectives are to examine:

•        whether CCOs are an effective and efficient model for delivering services to the council and Aucklanders, and

•        whether the CCO decision-making model provides sufficient political oversight, public transparency and accountability.

4.       The review asks the Independent Panel to examine three areas: the CCO model and its accompanying roles and responsibilities; the accountability of CCOs; and CCO culture.

5.       The Independent Panel is seeking the views of local boards on these areas.

6.       Local boards are advised that their views are requested by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations Review to the Independent Panel.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Governing Body approved the CCO review terms of reference on 26 November 2019 [resolution number GB/2019/127]. The Independent Panel was appointed by the Governing Body on 12 December 2019 and is comprised of Miriam Dean, Doug Martin and Leigh Auton. Miriam Dean has been appointed panel chair [resolution number GB/2019/149].

8.       Briefings on the CCO review were provided to local board chairs in December 2019 by staff and in February 2020, by panel member Leigh Auton. The panel wrote to local board chairs in February asking for advice on what constitutes good engagement between CCOs and local boards.  

9.       Monthly updates on the review are reported to the CCO Oversight Committee and circulated to all local boards.

10.     The Independent Panel is seeking comprehensive engagement to obtain a range of views about the issues forming the subject of the review (refer Attachment A). Community engagement on the review is occurring alongside the Annual Budget 2020/2021 in February/March 2020. An engagement document has been developed and a summary document has been translated into five languages and a New Zealand Sign Language video. A webpage[1] provides information on the review, including stakeholder updates, relevant documents (including the terms of reference) and a contact for further information.

11.     All feedback on the CCO review will be provided to the Independent Panel. The panel will report on the key issues and community and stakeholder feedback in May and will provide a final report and recommendations in July 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     To identify the scope of their work, the Independent Panel has distilled the essence of the review terms into a list of issues that forms the basis of the engagement and eventual report. The list and prompts at Attachment A provide a structure for local boards to give feedback.

13.     The three key areas of focus set out in the list of issues are:

Issue

Area of focus

CCO model, roles and responsibilities

The essential question here is whether the CCO model delivers council services with the maximum of operational efficiency, transparency and accountability, or whether there are better ways to deliver such services

CCO accountability

Here the key question is whether the council’s current approach to holding CCOs to account on behalf of Aucklanders could be improved

CCO culture

The central issue here is whether CCOs need to improve how they consult, engage with and respond to the wider community and council

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Local boards have an opportunity to consider suggestions that might improve climate change outcomes/mitigation in their feedback on the CCO review.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The Independent Panel is engaging across the council group on the review, including:

·        The chair of the Independent Panel wrote introducing the panel and the review objectives to all CCO chairs and chief executives, councillors, local board chairs, chief executive of the Independent Māori Statutory Board and the co-chairs of the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 20 December 2019.

·        The panel met briefly with the CCO chief executives and chairs on 28 January 2020 to discuss the proposed review process and CCO engagement. Each CCO was asked to provide the panel with key stakeholders/customers.

·        Individual meetings have taken place with CCO chief executives and board chairs over February and March 2020, and the panel is meeting with CCO stakeholders.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local board formal feedback on the CCO review, including issues experienced with CCOs, good practice and options for improvement, is sought by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

17.     Material on the CCO review was available at ‘Have Your Say’ local board events for the Annual Budget.

18.     Following the conclusion of the Independent Panel’s review, as part of the development of the next 10-year budget, local boards will have the opportunity to provide formal views on any proposals for change to the CCO model.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Staff presented to the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 19 December 2019. The panel met with one of the forum co-chairs and mana whenua are invited to provide feedback to the panel. Mana whenua have also been invited to a hui with panel members on 18 March 2020.

20.     The panel has met with the Independent Māori Statutory Board. 

21.     Panel members spoke on Radio Waatea to promote Māori interest and feedback on the CCO review. Material on the CCO review is being provided at mataawaka events for the Annual Budget and mataawaka organisations have been briefed on the review during the public engagement period. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There are no financial implications from this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are no risks associated with the recommendations in this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The Independent Panel is due to report on key issues, community and stakeholder feedback in May and to provide a final report, with recommendations, in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Independent Council-controlled Organisations Review list of issues

79

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Gomas - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Local board input into the Auckland Council submission on the Justice Committee's Inquiry into the 2019 Local Elections and Liquor Licensing Trust Elections, and Recent Energy Trust Elections

File No.: CP2020/02560

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive input into the Auckland Council submission on the Justice Committee’s Inquiry into the 2019 Local Elections and Liquor Licensing Trust Elections, and Recent Energy Trust Elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In December 2019, the Justice Committee notified its inquiry into the 2019 local elections. Submissions close on 29 February 2020.

3.       Local boards have the opportunity to provide input into the development of the Auckland Council submission on the Government’s proposals.

4.       At its 20 February 2020 business meeting, the local board delegated authority to Chairperson M Miles, Member N Mayne and Member U Casuri Balouch to provide written feedback on the submission by 27 February 2020 (resolution number UH/2020/10).

5.       A copy of the Upper Harbour Local Board feedback as submitted is set out in Attachment A of this report.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive input into the Auckland Council submission on the Justice Committee’s Inquiry into the 2019 Local Elections and Liquor Licensing Trust Elections, and Recent Energy Trust Election, as set out in Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board input into the Auckland Council submission on the Justice Committee's Inquiry into the 2019 Local Elections and Liquor Licensing Trust Elections, and Recent Energy Trust Elections

83

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Heather Skinner - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Adoption of community forum meetings for May and June 2020

File No.: CP2020/02418

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt Upper Harbour Local Board community forum meetings for May and June 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules. In particular, clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings requires the Chief Executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings. Sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of LGOIMA require that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting, and that local board meetings are open to the public.

3.       Adopting a community forum meeting schedule helps with meeting these requirements and allows for a planned approach to workloads, ensuring that local board members have clarity about their commitments.

4.       The following community forum meeting dates for May and June 2020 are recommended for adoption by the local board:

·        Wednesday, 6 May 2020 at 6.30pm, to be held at the Headquarters building, Buckley Avenue, Hobsonville Point

·        Thursday, 4 June 2020 at 6.30pm, to be held at the Upper Harbour Local Board office, 30 Kell Drive, Albany village.

5.       The remainder of the meeting schedule for 2020 will be formalised at the local board’s May 2020 business meeting once locations have been determined.

6.       Commencing the community forum meeting outside of normal business hours will enable community attendance and participation.

7.       One community forum meeting per month, in addition to the local board’s business meeting, gives the community one additional opportunity to engage with the local board. There may also be some instances for which the local board may need to use these Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) meetings as a mechanism to consider any items of business that need to be considered due to time constraints, or that are more appropriately dealt with at a community forum meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      adopt community forum meeting dates for May and June 2020 with the primary purpose of engaging with the public via deputation and reporting from community organisations, at one of the following:

i)        Wednesday, 6 May 2020 at 6.30pm, to be held at the Headquarters building, Buckley Avenue, Hobsonville Point

ii)       Thursday, 4 June 2020 at 6.30pm, to be held at the Upper Harbour Local Board office, 30 Kell Drive, Albany village.

b)      note that the remaining schedule of community forum meetings for 2020, including meeting locations, will be formalised at the local board’s May 2020 business meeting.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Upper Harbour Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/02211

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the financial and non-financial performance report for the second quarter of 2019/2020 financial year (1 October to 31 December 2019).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides a retrospective overview of the financial and non-financial performance of Auckland Council against the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Board Agreement for the period beginning 1 October 2019 to 31 December 2019 – quarter two (Q2).

3.       Key highlights for quarter two include:

·        car park to service Hobsonville Headquarters (ID3547) opened to the public in November 2019

·        integration of the Pest-Free Upper Harbour (ID438) project with the Healthy City Landscape Framework (funded regionally)

·        assessment underway of drinking fountain provision in the Upper Harbour Local Board area (ID1255)

·        the physical works contractor has been engaged to deliver the sustainability rating, design input and stage one works for the Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park (ID2074).

4.       Overall, 91 activities within the agreed 2019/2020 work programme are on track, six have some identified risk or issue which is being managed, and two have been identified as being behind delivery and having a significant risk. These two are:

·        Limeburners Reserve – develop esplanade with walkway (ID2430)

·        Upper Harbour – implement actions from the marine sport facility audit (ID2511, previously ID2124 in 2018/2019).

5.       No activities have been cancelled or merged.

6.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2019/2020 is attached to this report (Attachment A).

7.       Overall, the net operational financial performance of the board is tracking below revised budget for the year-to-date (96 per cent). Revenue is ahead of budget for the year-to-date and relates to fitness memberships and the learn-to-swim programme at Albany Stadium Pool.

8.       From the local board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) funding, the majority of projects are underway and on track to be completed during the year. Capital projects completed include the car park at Kell Park and renewal of Sunderland Lounge, while sustainable sports park development works at Scott Point are ongoing. There are also ongoing works on various small parks asset renewals across the local board area.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the quarterly performance report for the period corresponding to quarter two of the 2019/2020 financial year (1 October 2019 to 31 December 2019).

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Upper Harbour Local Board agreed key initiatives, budgets and levels of service for the 2019/2020 financial year with the Governing Body on 6 June 2019 through the adoption of its local board agreement.

10.     The annual local board agreement aims to meet the Upper Harbour Local Board priorities as identified through the 2017 Upper Harbour Local Board Plan outcomes:

·        Empowered, engaged and connected Upper Harbour communities

·        Efficient and effective transport links

·        Healthy and active communities

·        A thriving local economy

·        Our environment is valued, protected and enhanced.

11.     Specific activities and projects to be delivered every year against the agreed budgets are outlined in work programmes developed alongside local board agreements.

12.     The 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Board work programme was approved on 20 June 2019 and includes activities delivered by the following operating departments:

·        Arts, Community and Events

·        Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED)

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

·        Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Libraries

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation

·        Community Leases.

13.     The following graph (graph 1) shows how the work programme activities meet local board plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

14.     This report provides non-financial and financial performance information for the period between 1 October 2019 and 31 December 2019; the second financial quarter of the 2019/2020 year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local board work programme snapshot

15.     Quarterly performance of each agreed work programme activity is reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues which are being managed), grey (cancelled, deferred or merged), and red (behind delivery, significant risk) – the RAG (red/amber/green/grey) status.

16.     Graph 2 provides the percentage of activities by RAG status in Q2 of 2019/2020:

·        91.92 per cent of activities were identified to be on track (green)

·        6.6 per cent of activities were identified to be in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber)

·        2.2 per cent of activities were identified in Q2 to have significant issues.

17.     There are no cancelled, deferred or merged activities in Q2. 

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

18.     To complete the snapshot, and in addition to a RAG status, information on activity status is also collected for each quarter to show the stage of the activity.

19.     Activity status for Q2 of 2019/2020 is provided in graph 3 below. The number of activities differ by department as approved in the local board work programme. 

20.     The complete work programme with Q2 commentary from operating departments can be found in Attachment B.

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

Key activity updates from Q2

21.     Arts, Community and Events

·        Inclusion and Diversity - Age Friendly Upper Harbour (ID156) – an event to mark the International Day of the Older Person was delivered by the Salvation Army on Saturday 12 October 2019. The event responded to the need to reduce isolation among older people, particularly those living alone, and was well received by participants who showed support for similar events in the future. A new event focused on the Local Board Plan is expected to take place in quarter three.

·        Placemaking: Albany Place Making and Neighbourhood engagement (ID157) –activations focusing on the Albany Village area included a Christmas event outside the Albany Village Library. The event was well attended with residents staying for the afternoon. Positive feedback was received with support for similar activities in the village in future.

22.     Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

·        Hobsonville Headquarters redevelopment, exterior landscaping and car park construction (ID3547) – car park opened to the public in November 2019. 

·        Scott Point: develop sustainable sports park (ID2074) – resource consent for stage one design expected in quarter three; physical works contractor has been engaged to deliver the leading sustainability rating, design input and stage one works.

·        One local initiative (OLI) Upper Harbour: develop an indoor sports facility (ID2549) – assessment of long-list of sites took place in Q2, as well as stakeholder engagement on the facility service requirements with sports codes. Engagement with wider community and short-list with local board to take place in quarter three. 

·        Sunderland Lounge - exterior and interior renewal (ID3736) – acoustic issues identified and options investigated.

·        Upper Harbour – Northern parks improvements (ID3816) – this is the new project line added in quarter one as a placeholder for the compensation funding provided by the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) following their compulsory acquisition of open space land in the Upper Harbour Local Board area (resolution number FIN/2019/77). Design and costings investigations will be reported in quarter three for board decisions on this once the local board makes specific funding allocation decisions with regard to the individual projects identified.

23.     Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration

·        Upper Harbour Local Parks Management Plan (ID1220) – additional land parcel classification recommendations discussed and approved by the board (resolution number UH/2019/161). Analysis is underway for public submissions on first phase consultation and a total of $30,000 was identified as unspent and is available for the local board to reprioritise.

24.     Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Pest-Free Upper Harbour (ID438) – project integrated with the Healthy City Landscape Framework, a regionally funded ecological spatial analysis project to improve data gathering and informational availability.

25.     Libraries

·           Access to Library service (ID911) – the library continued to see an increase in visits in Q2, repeating the 6 per cent increase in visits from the previous quarter. Q2 also saw a 4 per cent increase in new registrations.

26.     Parks, Sport and Recreation

·        Upper Harbour: Drinking fountain service assessment (ID1255) – review underway of drinking fountain provision within the Upper Harbour Local Board area, which will identify recommendations to improve provision (including provision criteria, identification of new sites and delivery staging).

·        Hooton Reserve (east car park) parking assessment (ID3819) – traffic engineer has been engaged to prepare a report for the Auckland Transport Traffic Control Committee. 

Activities on Hold

27.     The following activities have been placed on hold and have a red RAG status:

·        Limeburners Reserve: develop esplanade with walkway (ID2430) – the level of funding is insufficient to progress to the detailed design stage.

·        Upper Harbour – implement actions from the marine sport facility audit (ID2511, previously ID2124 in 2018/2019) – this project has been placed on hold until the marine facility audit was completed. This has now been done but there is no budget available in the current financial year for implementation. This is expected in future financial years.

Activities to watch

28.     The following key activities have either been placed on hold or are progressing, but have an amber RAG status which indicates there is some risk or issues which are being managed:

·        Wharepapa Reserve: reconfigure playspace (ID2533) – the existing playspace is compliant and safe but the playground at Bluebird Reserve was closed off due to lack of compliance and safety. The reconfiguration of the playspace at Wharepapa was put on hold pending further discussions with the board.

·        Orchard Reserve timber bridge upgrade (ID2718) – progress on this project depends on approval of final design by Healthy Waters (expected January 2020).

·        Hooton Reserve: improvements (ID3534, previously ID2116 in 2018/2019) – project on hold pending information from Auckland Transport on works to be carried out in the area which may impact on this project.

·        Albany Pool: install disability amenities (ID3659) – budget increase resulting from a change of scope requires local board approval which is expected to be sought in quarter four.

·        Gills Reserve: install concrete walkway (ID3693, previously ID3002 in 2018/2019) – project was still on hold in Q2 awaiting results from Auckland Transport strategic re-evaluation of Gills Road.

·        Sediment related water quality testing – Upper Harbour (ID444) – delay due to contractor availability; delivery expected in quarter three.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

30.     Work programmes were approved in June 2019 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     When developing the work programmes, council group impacts and views are presented to local boards. As this is an information only report, there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     This report informs the Upper Harbour Local Board of the Auckland Council performance for the quarter starting 1 October 2019 and ending 31 December 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     The Upper Harbour Local Board allocated the balance of its Auckland Regional Services Trust (ARST) funding to the Manuhiri Kaitiaki Charitable Trust (MKCT) who designed a sculpture for installation in the Albany area in 2018/2019.

34.     The final design was presented to the local board at a workshop in July 2019 where there was also discussion on preferred location.

35.     A decision on location, landowner approval and installation costs is expected in quarter three.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     This report is provided to enable the Upper Harbour Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2019/2020 work programmes and to report this to the public. This report is for information only and therefore there are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

37.     Operating expenditure relating to asset-based services (ABS) is above budget by $224,000 for the year-to-date, while LDI operational projects are currently $192,000 below budget.  This is due to a variety of projects yet to draw down on financial allocations. 

38.     Capital spend of $1.2 million represents investment in renewals at Sunderland Lounge, car park development at Kell Park, sustainable sports park development at Scott Point, and various small parks asset renewals. The local board has also seen progress on a number of projects from their discretionary LDI capital fund.

39.     The complete Upper Harbour Local Board Financial Performance report can be found in Attachment A.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects, for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

41.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     A performance report for quarter three (1 January 2020 to 31 March 2020) will be prepared and provided to the local board once the quarter is completed. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board Financial Performance as at 31 December 2019

95

b

Upper Harbour Local Board Non-Financial Performance as at 31 December 2019

99

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rita Bento-Allpress - Senior Local Board Advisor Upper Harbour

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

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Upper Harbour Local Board

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Upper Harbour Local Board

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Upper Harbour Local Board

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Upper Harbour Local Board

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Upper Harbour Local Board

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Upper Harbour Local Board

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Upper Harbour Local Board

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19 March 2020

 

 

Upper Harbour Quick Response round two 2019/2020 grant allocations

File No.: CP2020/01562

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund, or decline applications received for the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Quick Response round two grants.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Quick Response round two grants (refer Attachment A).

3.       The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Grants Programme 2019/2020 on 21 March 2019 (refer Attachment B). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants submitted to the local board.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $159,883 for the 2019/2020 financial year, including $2443 carried forward from the 2018/2019 Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) filming revenue, leaving a total of $162,326 to be allocated.

5.       A total of $70,750 was allocated to local grants round one, and $10,000 was allocated for a parking investigation for Hooton Reserve (resolution number UH/2019/108). A total of $13,167 was allocated to quick response round one. This leaves a budget of $68,409 to be allocated to two quick response grant rounds and one local grant round.

6.       Fifteen applications were received for the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Quick Response round two grants, requesting a total of $54,663.31.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Quick Response round two grants listed in the following table:  

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2017-202

Kaipātiki Project Incorporated

Environment

Towards the costs of a compost system and installation at Hobsonville Point

 $5000

Eligible

QR2017-215

Windsor Park Community and Multisport Hub Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards an upgrade of the facility toilets

 $5000

Eligible

QR2017-214

Albany Badminton Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of 150 tubes of shuttlecocks for Albany Badminton Club

 $3150

Eligible

QR2017-217

Albany Chinese Association Incorporated

Community

Towards tutor costs and venue hire for the weekly Chinese cultural and social group from April 2020 to March 2021

 $5000

Eligible

QR2017-220

North Harbour Football and Sports Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the coach training fees and first aid courses for North Harbour Football and Sports Club

 $3966.52

Eligible

QR2017-205

Waitematā Badminton Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards tournament fees and uniforms

 $3,457.79

Eligible

QR2017-209

Auckland Unified Softball Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire for the ASA Easter Classic Softball Tournament 2020

 $5000

Eligible

QR2017-206

Badminton North Harbour Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards roof maintenance at Badminton North Harbour

 $2000

Eligible

QR2017-216

Harbour Sport Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire, catering, and uniforms for Secondary School Student Sports Leadership Day in May 2020

 $4500

Eligible

QR2017-222

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the overall costs to train, manage and supervise the volunteer counsellors

 $2500

Eligible

QR2017-223

North Harbour Synchronised Swimming Club

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of 10 jackets for synchronised swimmers to wear at competitions

 $929

Eligible

QR2017-201

East Coast Bays' and Districts Cricket Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the club treasurer's contract fee between April 2020 to August 2020

 $2000

Eligible

QR2017-207

Gym Kids Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards rental costs in Hobsonville from April to May 2020

 $5000

Eligible

QR2017-212

Pāremoremo Ratepayers and Residents Association Incorporated

Community

Towards stage two and three of the fencing project for Pāremoremo Ratepayers and Residents Association, including fencing towards the eastern boundary and the surveyor's costs

 $2160

Eligible

QR2017-213

North Harbour Budgeting Services Incorporated

Community

Towards the staff salaries at North Harbour Budgeting Services

 $5000

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

 $54,663.31

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities, and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

8.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

9.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements.

10.     The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted its grants programme for 2019/2020 on 21 March 2019 and will operate three quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year. 

11.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through support of projects that address food production and food waste, support alternative transport methods, support community energy efficiency education and behaviour change, build community resilience, and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     According to the main focus of the application, each one has received input from a subject matter expert from the relevant department. The main focuses are identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Upper Harbour Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     The board is requested to note that Section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states, ‘that staff will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

18.     A summary of each application received through 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Quick Response round two grants is provided at Attachment A.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improve Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

20.     Three applicants applying to quick response round two grants have indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted 2018-2028 Long-term Plan and local board agreements.

22.     The Upper Harbour Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $159,883. A total of $2443 was reallocated to the community grants budget from the 2018/2019 ATEED filming revenue. A total of $70,750 was allocated to local grants round one and $10,000 was allocated to a parking investigation for Hooton Reserve (resolution number UH/2019/108). The Upper Harbour Local Board then allocated $13,167 for quick response round one grants. This leaves a total of $68,409 to be allocated to two quick response grant rounds and one local grant round.

23.     In round two of the 2019/2020 Upper Harbour Quick Response grants, 15 applications were received requesting a total of $54,663.31.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Following the Upper Harbour Local Board allocating funding for round two of the quick response grants, staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2019/2020 Upper Harbour Quick Response round two grant applications

127

b

2019/2020 Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Programme

187

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Erin Shin - Community Grants Coordinator

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 13, 20 and 27 February, and 5 March 2020

File No.: CP2020/01794

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An Upper Harbour Local Board workshop was held on Thursday 13, 20 and 27 February, and 5 March 2020. Copies of the workshop records are attached (refer to Attachments A, B, C and D).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 13, 20 and 27 February, and 5 March 2020 (refer to Attachments A, B, C and D to the agenda report).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 13 February 2020

193

b

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 20 February 2020

195

c

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 27 February 2020

197

d

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 5 March 2020

199

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Governance forward work calendar - April 2020 to March 2021

File No.: CP2020/01795

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Upper Harbour Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·     ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·     clarifying what advice is expected and when

·     clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the Upper Harbour Local Board governance forward work calendar for the period April 2020 to March 2021, as set out in Attachment A to this agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar - April 2020 to March 2021

203

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Board members' reports - March 2020

File No.: CP2020/01796

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for members to update the Upper Harbour Local Board on projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

[Note: This is an information item and if the board wishes any action to be taken under this item, a written report must be provided for inclusion on the agenda.]

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal board members’ reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Cindy Lynch - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

     

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 March 2020

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Upper Harbour Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

13        Wasp Hangar: Community Recreation Facility - Attachment f - Proposed facility charges

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information.

In particular, the report contains proposed rental charges for the Wasp Hangar Facility. Should the facility not be used for the proposed community recreation provision, Panuku will need to go out to market to seek another tenant. .

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

   



[1] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/council-controlled-organisations/Pages/review-of-council-controlled-organisations.aspx