I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitematā Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 17 March 2020

1:00pm

Waitematā Local Board Office
Ground Floor
52 Swanson Street
Auckland

 

Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Richard Northey, (ONZM)

 

Deputy Chairperson

Kerrin Leoni

 

Members

Adriana Avendaño Christie

 

 

Alexandra Bonham

 

 

Graeme Gunthorp

 

 

Julie  Sandilands

 

 

Sarah Trotman, (ONZM)

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Liz Clemm

Democracy Advisor - Waitematā

 

12 March 2020

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 353 9654

Email: liz.clemm@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

7.1     Petition for traffic calming on Collingwood Street, Ponsonby                       5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     5G cellular network                                                                                              6

8.2     Building community climate change resilience                                               6

8.3     Proposal for a special rate for seniors using the Parnell Pool                       6

8.4     Funding partnership for The Auckland Performing Arts Centre (TAPAC)    6

8.5     Western Springs Pine Forest                                                                              7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

9.1     Public Forum                                                                                                        7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

11        Councillor's report                                                                                                       11

12        Western Springs Park Pine Tree Removal                                                                27

13        Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes                                                                                                                                       37

14        Sport and Recreation Facilitiy Investment Fund project endorsement                53

15        Auckland Transport March 2020 Update                                                                  59

16        Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review                                                                                                                                       73

17        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020                                                                                                 79

18        Addition to the 2019-2022 Waitematā Local Board Meetings Schedule             127

19        Urgent Decision: Temporary Alcohol Ban Request for My Chemical Romance concert at Western Springs Stadium on 25 March 2020                                       131

20        Chair's Report                                                                                                            155

21        Board member reports                                                                                              175

22        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      193

23        Waitematā Local Board Workshop Records                                                          197  

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 18 February 2020 and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 25 February 2020, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

7.1       Petition for traffic calming on Collingwood Street, Ponsonby

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present a petition about traffic issues in Freemans Bay.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the petition

b)      thank Hamish Hopkinson, Chair of Freemans Bay School Board of Trustees, for the presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

 


 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       5G cellular network

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To present views opposing the 5G wireless rollout.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Stephanie Honeychurch of 5G-free Waiheke for the presentation and attendance at the business meeting.

 

 

 

8.2       Building community climate change resilience

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To present recommendations for building community climate change resilience.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Thomas Peters for the presentation and attendance at the business meeting.

 

 

 

8.3       Proposal for a special rate for seniors using the Parnell Pool

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To present a proposal for a reduced tariff for aged persons who use the public swimming pool in Parnell.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Phil Doyle for the presentation and attendance at the business meeting.

 

 


 

 

8.4       Funding partnership for The Auckland Performing Arts Centre (TAPAC)

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To present the outcomes of the two-year funding partnership between Waitematā Local Board and The Auckland Performing Arts Centre (TAPAC).

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Sally-Anne Kerr and Trisha Reid of TAPAC for the presentation and attendance at the business meeting.

 

 

 

8.5       Western Springs Pine Forest

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To present options for the management of Western Springs pines for consideration.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Wendy Gray and Steve Abel for the presentation and attendance at the business meeting.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Public forum provides an opportunity for a member of the public to address a meeting and share an opinion to elected representatives.

2.       Formal approval from the Chairperson is not required.

Time

3.       A period of up to 30 minutes, or such other time as the local board or any of its committees may determine, will be set aside for a public forum at the commencement of meetings of the local board which are open to the public.

4.       Each speaker during the public forum section of a meeting may speak for three minutes.

5.       Standing orders may be suspended on a vote of not less than 75 per cent of those present to extend the period of public participation or the period any speaker is allowed to speak.

6.       This Standing Order does not apply to inaugural meetings and, where not appropriate, extraordinary meetings or a special consultative procedure.

Subjects of public forum

7.       The public forum is to be confined to those items falling within the scope or functions of that local board or committee. Speakers must not speak about a matter that is under judicial consideration or subject to a quasi-judicial process.

Questions of speakers during public forum

8.       With the permission of the chairperson, members may ask questions of speakers during the period reserved for public forum. Questions by members, if permitted, are to be confined to obtaining information or clarification on matters raised by the speaker.

9.       Members may not debate any matter raised during the public forum session that is not on the agenda for the meeting, or take any action in relation to it, other than through the usual procedures for extraordinary business if the matter is urgent.

10.     The meeting may not make any resolution on issues raised in public forum except to refer the matter to a future meeting, or to another committee, or to the chief executive for investigation.

[Note: s 76 – 81, LGA 2002, regarding decision-making]

Language for speeches

A member of the public may address a meeting in English, Māori or New Zealand Sign Language. However, the person should advise the chairperson of their intention to speak in a language other than English at least two clear working days before the meeting.

11.     Where practical, Auckland Council will arrange for a translator to be present at the meeting. The chairperson may also order the speech and any accompanying documents to be translated and printed in English or Māori or another language.


 

Chairperson’s discretion

The chairperson may:

·    direct a speaker to a different committee if they consider this more appropriate, given the proposed subject matter

·    prohibit a speaker from speaking if they are offensive, repetitious or vexatious, or otherwise breach these standing orders.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank all those who presented for their attendance at the meeting.

 

 


 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Councillor's report

 

File No.: CP2020/00596

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor Pippa Coom, Ōrākei Ward Councillor Desley Simpson and Albert-Eden Roskill Ward Councillors Christine Fletcher and Cathy Casey with an opportunity to update the Waitematā Local Board on regional issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written report update from the Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Pippa Coom and the verbal or tabled Ward Councillor reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Councillor P Coom report - March 2020

13

      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Liz Clemm - Democracy Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Western Springs Park Pine Tree Removal

File No.: CP2020/03391

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board approval for the removal of a whole stand of pine trees at Western Springs Lakeside Park in accordance with the recently granted resource consent obtained for the purposes of delivering the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration’ project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Since 2005 Council has been monitoring a stand of approximately 95-year old radiata pine trees in Western Springs Lakeside Park. The stand has reduced in size from approximately 700 pines in 1988 (this includes the Western Springs Lakeside Reserve and neighbouring Auckland Zoo land) to approximately 177 live standing trees and approximately 23 dead standing trees as at 22 August 2019.[1]

3.       In October 2015 the Waitematā Local Board approved the commencement of the ‘Western Springs Native Bush Restoration’ project with the aim of restoring the area to native bush and achieving the long-term aspiration of returning the area to native podocarp forest as described in the Western Springs Lakeside Park Plan 1995.

4.       The stand was closed to the public in April 2018 due to concerns for the safety of council’s workers and to members of the public from falling trees. 

5.       In May 2019, following a publicly notified process, council was granted resource consent to remove the remaining pine trees and restore the area with native vegetation.

6.       The decision to grant resource consent was appealed to the Environment Court.  The parties subsequently engaged in mediation. 

7.       The parties agreed to dispose of the appeal proceeding by way of consent and agreed that the resource consent should be granted with conditions.  On 27 September 2019, the Environment Court formalised the settlement and the resource consent was granted (refer Attachment A – 279(1)(b) of the Resource management Act 1991).

8.       Staff are seeking approval to commence work at the earliest opportunity to progress the restoration project.

9.       The estimated cost of the project work is $760,000, including contingency and estimated cost of maintenance, pest control and reporting for 15 years is $57,500. The local board’s budget allocation for the current financial year will be increased as required to meet the costs associated with the works.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the removal of the whole stand of pine trees at Western Springs Lakeside Park in accordance with the approved resource consent to deliver the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration Project

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     In the late 1920s, an extensive stand of radiata pine was planted on the northern slopes of Western Springs Lakeside Reserve and neighbouring Auckland Zoo.

11.     Over the past twenty years the stand has progressively reduced from approximately 700 trees in 1988, to approximately 177 live standing trees and approximately 23 dead standing trees as at 22 August 2019.

12.     Discussion on the future management of the trees and the restoration of the site to native bush has been progressing for a number of years. In 2015, the Waitematā Local Board resolved to approve the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration Project and the recommended work programme for pine management, to commence 3rd quarter financial year 2016 following community engagement. (Resolution number WTM/2015/161).

13.     Following the removal, a major planting and restoration effort will follow in accordance with an updated Ecological Management Plan prepared in consultation with the Auckland Zoo and the Society for the Protection of Western Springs Forest Incorporated’s ecological expert.

14.     Site preparation will be a key factor in the successful implementation of this project. It is estimated that the planting will take around three weeks. The maintenance will include control of pest plants and replacement of plants that do not survive.

15.     Planting will turn the site into a healthy podocarp-broadleaf forest dominated by kauri, puriri, taraire and tanekaha, along with a native understorey. The project’s native bush objectives also provide the chance to expand the track network through the area bordered by West View Road, the zoo, stadium and Western Springs Lakeside Park.

16.     The reserve has been closed to the public since April 2018 due to concerns over the safety of reserve users from possible falling limbs or trees.

17.     In early June 2018, a resource consent application for the removal of the trees, in order to proceed with the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration Project, was submitted.

18.     The application was publicly notified, with hearings held in December 2018, and further submissions of information required in early 2019.

19.     Resource consent was granted in May 2019 and appealed to the Environment Court in June 2019.

20.     Court assisted mediation was undertaken over a number of months.  As part of the mediation between the parties to the appeal, on 22 August 2019, five expert arborists took part in an expert conference and agreed to a Joint Expert Witness Statement which recorded agreement amongst the experts that:

·        tree numbers had reduced from an estimated 700 in 1988 to 177 standing live trees;

·        as tree density reduces to the extent that remaining live trees lose the protection afforded by other trees, the remaining trees have an increased likelihood of failure;

·        there are 5 types of targets that could potentially be affected by trees if they were to fall in an uncontrolled way:

o   10 dwellings/studios on West View Road

o   key infrastructure, including wastewater sewer, footbridge, powerlines and zoo fence

o   other structures, e.g. fences, walls, garden sheds, zoo buildings, stadium grandstand and stormwater pipes

o   anywhere people may be present including backyards, in the Special Ecological Area (SEA) (on and off track), stadium open space and depot area.

21.     The experts agreed that further information would be required before an informed decision could be made on the most appropriate way to proceed. Expert opinion varied on the probability of failure, likelihood of impact and level of urgency, and the extent of the further assessment that would be required before an informed decision between options could be made.

22.     They did agree that:

·        Some trees need to be removed

·        Further assessment of many trees through the stand is required, in addition to further assessment of some of the 17 trees

·        Natural attrition and tree failure are likely to continue within the stand

·        Canopy health of some trees is likely to deteriorate and the extent to which this occurs depends on the timeframe to be considered.

23.     Subsequently, joint expert conferencing of the arborists and ecologists took place on 28 August 2019, which addressed the ecological impacts of methods for managing the stand of pines including the status quo and whole of stand removal.

24.     Following the expert conferencing, and as a result of resumed mediation, the parties agreed to dispose of the appeal by consent and agreed that the resource consent for whole stand removal should be granted with strengthened conditions.  On 27 September 2019, the Environment Court formalised the settlement and ordered that the resource consent was granted.

25.     The consent order issued by the Environment Court on 27 September 2019 granting consent to the whole stand removal has comprehensive conditions such as:

·    Establishing a Community Liaison Group - represented by all interested parties with two meetings already been held on the 5 November 2019 and 10 December 2019.

·    Project Website – specific project website for the project.

·    Updated Ecological Management Plan – prior to works commencing the consent holder shall provide the Council Team Leader Monitoring the updated plan for certification.

·    Updated Geotechnical Report – provided to the Council Team Leader Monitoring prior to commencing work.

·    Independent Arborist and Ecologist – consent holder to employ suitably qualified independent ecologist and arborist to monitor project.

·    Project Management Contract – a contract has been awarded to undertake and deliver the required plans for the consent. Plans will be made available to the Community Liaison Group simultaneously when submitting to consent authority.

·    Conditions of consent provide for greater community input into the consent implementation process and are designed to achieve improved ecological outcomes.

26.     Staff are now seeking the board’s approval to implement the resource consent to deliver of the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration project.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

27.     The objective of the decision is to give effect to the 2015 decision of the Waitematā Local Board (WTM/2015/161) to deliver the Western Springs native Bush Restoration Project.  Three options open to the local board are identified below.

Fully implement the consent

28.     Fully implementing the consent enables the council to proceed with the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration Project as planned without further delay and is therefore the recommended option.

29.     This option also completely addresses the health and safety concerns outlined below. Given the information council now holds on fall targets, council would need to review the exclusion zones if a decision was taken not to fully implement the consent.

30.     As agreed in the Ecologists Joint Witness Statement of 28 August 2019, whole stand removal will provide greater certainty of ecological outcomes through management. Further, the adverse effects caused by whole stand removal will be short lived and the removal will allow rapid growth of native vegetation and faster transition to a native forest ecosystem.  Against these advantages, the ecologists agreed that whole stand removal would cause a high magnitude of disturbance to and the sudden transition from pine forest to high light/open shrubland could have consequences to the fauna.  It is noted that while the ecologists agreed on the substance of these advantages and disadvantages of whole stand removal, they differed on the weighting and significance of them.

31.     Implementing the consent and removing the trees will allow the site to be opened up to the public sooner.

32.     This option is fully consented and no further approvals are required.

33.     The costs of fully implementing the consent at this stage are known and can be appropriately budgeted for.

Do not implement the consent

34.     The council could choose not to implement the consent and take no further action at this stage.

35.     Not implementing the consent would not enable the delivery of the Western Springs Native Bush Project and may result in the area remaining closed to the public indefinitely.

36.     It would also result in the health and safety risks outlined below remaining for the foreseeable future. Given the information we now hold on fall targets, we would need to review the exclusion zones around the stand.

37.     As agreed in the Ecologists Joint Witness Statement of 28 August 2019, maintaining the status quo would allow a gradual change in structure, habitat and micro-climate which would be more akin to the natural forest dynamics.  It would also result in a more localised and lower magnitude of disturbance.  Further, the mature pines would continue to provide a habitat for birds and invertebrates.  Against these advantages, the ecologists agreed that management of at status quo would be more complex than whole stand removal.  It would also provide uncertainty of long-term ecological outcome.  They also noted that the pine trees suppress native canopy components.  Again, it should be noted that while the ecologists agreed on the substance of these advantages and disadvantages of whole stand removal, they differed on the weighting and significance of them.

Further assessment and delayed partial implementation of the consent

38.     The Society for the Protection of Western Springs Forest Incorporated (the Society) has suggested that the local board consider delaying the implementation of the resource consent to undertake further assessment of trees in the stand. Further assessment may result in partial or staged implementation of the resource consent.

39.     This would delay delivery of the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration Project.

40.     The Society has estimated that further investigations will cost approximately $20,000-30,000. Council has not independently assessed the Society’s cost estimate. The costs of undertaking partial or staged implementation of the consent are estimated by the Society at $200,000 over 15 years. This estimate also has not been independently assessed.

41.     The removal of the pines needs to take place during earthworks season in a given year. If further assessment is undertaken the reserve will remain closed to the public.

42.     If this option was adopted, further advice would be needed to determine whether the conditions of consent can be complied with or whether a variation to the existing consent or a new consent is required.

43.     This approach does not immediately alleviate the health and safety concerns outlined below.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

44.     Staff have sought advice on the potential climate impacts from Nick Goldwater, a principal ecologist at Wildland Consultants Ltd and council’s ecological expert in the mediation. Mr Goldwater has provided the following information:

There is general consensus that the stand of pine trees is approximately 100 years old. Mature pines that aren’t growing anymore may store a lot of carbon, however, they continue to sequester only small amounts given that they only require carbon to maintain metabolic processes.

Once the pines are felled, it is likely that most of the below ground biomass/roots decomposes into the soil carbon pool with not much atmospheric exchange (unless soils are disturbed). Above the ground (i.e. where logs are left to decay), it is likely that most carbon is actually cycled back to the atmosphere albeit very slowly through decomposition by insects and microbes and released via respiration. Some fraction of the carbon from felled logs may enter the soil carbon pool, although soil accumulation rates are natural low in most terrestrial forests. The felled logs will provide habitat and food resources for indigenous fauna, plants, lichens, and fungi.

It is acknowledged that the indigenous plantings will sequester nominal amounts of carbon for the first decade or so. However, over the medium term of 30 – 40 years, the quantity of carbon stored in high productivity manuka/kanuka forests can exceed the quantity of carbon stored in harvested Pinus radiata forests (Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment. Seeding the carbon storage opportunity in indigenous forests Comments on the draft Climate Change (Forestry Sector) Regulations 2008. 26 June 2008).

The same report also suggests that if a landowner was to fence off one hectare of land having optimal soil fertility and rainfall, and allow it to revert to manuka / kanuka, the site could accumulate 200 tons of carbon in a 20-year period.

Given that the proposed revegetation plantings at Western Springs will contain a high proportion of kanuka and other fast-growing species such as karamu (Coprosma robusta) and kohuhu (Pittosporum tenuifolium), it is reasonable to assume that a similar amount of carbon will be sequestered at the site after 20 years, as long as post-planting maintenance is properly implemented.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

45.     Staff from the Auckland Zoo, Auckland Stadiums, the Museum for Transport and Technology, and Auckland Councils Parks Sport and Recreation Department have been consulted and are supportive of the approved consent for the whole stand removal of the radiata pines.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

46.     The Western Springs Native Bush Restoration project was consulted on as part of the development of the 2015-2025 Long-term Plan, as a priority project of the local board.  Consultation was undertaken between 23 January 2015 to 16 March 2015 to inform the Long-term Plan 2015-2025.  In general, there was strong support for environmental projects, which included the Western Springs Native Bush Restoration project.  Of the 73 responses received, 89 per cent supported the Western Springs proposal.

47.     Council subsequently engaged with the community in relation to the project in the following ways:

·    presentation of the project at Mana Whenua Parks Hui in November 2017

·    discussions with MOTAT, Auckland Zoo and Western Springs Stadium in December 2017

·    listing the project information listed on Our Auckland and Facebook, in April 2018

·    delivering a letter outlining the project including frequently asked questions to all immediate neighbours, in April 2018.

48.     Mana Whenua, Auckland Zoo, Auckland Stadiums, and Museum for Transport and Technology were supportive of the removal of the trees.

49.     Further engagement with the public was undertaken through the publicly notified resource consent application in 2018 and 2019.  There were approximately 50 individual responses from the public on the resource consent application. The responses opposed the removal of the trees.

50.     The local board has heard the views of part of the community represented by the Society for Protection of Western Springs Forest Incorporated and Friends of Western Springs.  The preferred approach by those in opposition is for further assessment of the trees and, if necessary, partial or staged removal.

51.     The potential for impacts on residents, particularly the potential impacts of noise and vibration during the removal works, have been recognised and addressed through the resource consent conditions.

52.     Mitigation measures are set out in the Construction Noise and Vibration Management Plan which forms part of the consented documentation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

53.     In November 2017 council presented the project at the Mana Whenua Parks hui.

54.     Representatives of six iwi attended the hui and supported the proposal to remove the pines.

55.     In June 2018, project information was sent to nine iwi who were not able to attend the hui.  Seven of the iwi responded that either they supported the removal proposal, or deferred to another iwi. Two iwi did not attend the hui or respond to the June 2018 letter.

56.     Attachment B provides a full schedule of responses.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

57.     Table 1 below provides a summary of the estimated project cost.

Table 1 – Estimated project cost

Description

Estimated cost

Conditions of consent, consultant services, and community liaison person under condition 8 of the Resource Consent

$250,000

Arboricultural contractor

$370,000

Restoration – plants and planting

$80,000

Contingency

$60,000

 

58.     The proposed removal of the pine trees at Western Springs currently requires project budget allocation of $760,000, including contingency.

 

Table 2 – Estimated maintenance, pest control and reporting cost (15 years)

Description

Estimated cost

Maintenance

$33,000

Pest Control

$19,500

Reporting

$5,000

 

59.     The proposed maintenance, pest control and reporting budget for 15 years requires $57,500.  The required works will be included in the annual Ecological Maintenance Contracts.

60.     The local boards budget allocation for the current financial year will be increased as required to meet the costs associated with the works.

61.     Should the Western Springs Park pine removal project not be supported, the additional capital funding for tree removal and operational funding for ongoing maintenance cannot be reallocated to other local projects.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

62.     Council has obligations under the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 (HSWA) to take all reasonable steps to prevent harm to the public.  If council breaches its key duties under the HSWA it could be fined up to $3,000,000.

63.     In terms of the health and safety risk, council’s risk assessment completed in November 2019, took into account its obligations under the HSWA and followed the Corporate Standard 3 (Attachment C - CSTD3 Risk Assessment) protocols.

64.     In carrying out its risk assessment, council had available to it expert reports over a number of years detailing the condition of the Western Springs’ pine trees. Council also had access to the Joint Expert Witness Statement dated 22 August 2019.

65.     The council has now also had the benefit of Craig Webb’s December 2019 report. This report has used a different methodology for assessing risk and has assessed the risk in relation to individual trees (based on a visual inspection) whereas council has assessed the overall risk posed by all of the pine trees in the stand. This adopts a different methodology from that used by council. Having reviewed the report, staff remain concerned about the ongoing health and safety risk arising from the pines.

66.     At present council has taken action to isolate and mitigate the risk by closing the stand to members of the public, and controlling the access of workers accessing the park for monitoring and other work by requiring that workers obtain approval from Community Facilities before commencing work in the stand and requiring the use of personal protective equipment. However, despite imposing these controls the residual risk remains. It is noted that these controls do not prevent the risk of trees falling onto neighboring property or onto people in those properties.  If a decision is taken not to implement the consent and eliminate the risk then council will need to reconsider whether it is appropriate to expand the exclusion zone. We also note that people have continued to climb over the barriers even while the track has been closed, therefore the risk of trees falling on people in the stand.

67.     The November 2019 council’s risk assessment records that council must first consider elimination of the risk, and that to do this it recommends removal of the whole stand of pines as soon as possible. The council has adopted a risk-based approach with the aim of eliminating the risk.

68.     Council also has obligations outside of the HSWA.  As a landowner, council owes a duty of care to its neighbours to ensure that no hazards occurring on its land cause foreseeable loss or harm, therefore the council is required to take reasonable steps to remove or reduce these hazards.

69.     If council does not fully implement the consent then the risk will not be eliminated.

70.     The Fire Hazard Report recommendations will be incorporated into the construction management plan and planting schedule. (Attachment E)

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

71.     Subject to local board approval, staff propose to implement the tree removal and restoration works as soon as possible, in accordance with the granted resource consent conditions. As outlined above, the resource consent conditions require plans to be made available to the Community Liaison Group simultaneously when submitting to the consent authority. Staff will provide these plans to the local board at the same time as they are provided to the Community Liaison Group.

72.     Once the pine trees have been felled and it is deemed safe enough for contractors to work in the area, pest plant and animal control will be reinstated, and planting will be undertaken to achieve 90 per cent cover of woody vegetation within five years, as per an approved final Ecological Management Plan set out in the approved consent conditions. The native plantings will be maintained on a regular basis in order to maximise survival.

73.     The proposed revegetation with indigenous plant species, together with the control of pest plants and animals will, in the medium to long-term, substantially improve the current ecological values of the site and provide important local habitat for indigenous birds, lizards, invertebrates, and plants. In addition, the felled pine material to remain on site will provide useful habitat for invertebrates, epiphytic vascular plants, lichens, and fungi, as well as return nutrients to the soil.

Public Communication Plan

74.     A specific website for the project will be established which will contain daily project information for the initial part of the works and thereafter on a weekly basis. The website will include access to all the updated plans.

75.     An interested parties’ database will be created. Prior to the works commencing an email database of submitters, interested stakeholders and residents will be established and notifications and project updates will be sent daily for the initial part of the works and thereafter weekly.

76.     Staff will engage a community liaison contact who will be a readily accessible point of contact and available from 8am to 8pm on each workday for the duration of the project.

77.     There will be letter drops prior to the commencement of works to local residents.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Environmental Court Consent (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Mana Whenua Engagement (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

CSTD3 Risk assessment 01102019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Risk manager (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Fire Hazard Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

                                                        

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Paul Amaral - Head of Area Operations 1

Authorisers

Rob Cairns - Manager Parks and Recreation Policy

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework -  Proposed changes

File No.: CP2020/02845

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to outline key amendments to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework and to obtain the local board’s views.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region (ENV/2018/11).

3.       To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (‘ACAF‘) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors.

4.       In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved a consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

5.       In February 2020, a memorandum was circulated to share key findings from the public consultation (Attachments A and B).

6.       To address the feedback from the consultation, this report outlines key structural changes proposed for the framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers to which all actions will align (i.e., a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change).

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities to streamline actions and address feedback.

7.       It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

8.       The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the changes to the draft Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers for climate action (i.e., a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change)

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities

·   changing the title from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region, addressing both emissions reduction (i.e. mitigation) and preparing for the impacts of a changing climate (i.e. adaptation) (ENV/2018/11).

10.     To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (‘ACAF‘) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors, reaching hundreds of Aucklanders.

11.     Local board engagement and insights were sought throughout development of the framework, including meetings and cluster workshops.   A summary of feedback from local boards is available in Attachments C and D.

12.     In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved the consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

13.     In February 2020, a memo was circulated to all local boards to share key findings from the public consultation on the draft ACAF (Attachment A and B).

14.     This report provides an overview of key proposed changes to the draft ACAF to address the feedback received through the consultation.  Local Board views will be reflected in the final version, which will be reported to the Environment and Climate Change Committee in May 2020.

15.     More detailed changes reported in the consultation summary are not repeated here but will be reflected in text changes in the final version.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The proposed changes to ACAF have been informed by consultation feedback received on the draft document.  Some key themes that arose include:

·   Urgency and scale of action needs to be better articulated

·   Lack of clarity on how key moves work together and how they address our climate goals. In addition, it was felt that there are too many.

·   Need to be clearer about roles and responsibilities with a request for more information on who is responsible for actions at each level.

·   Need for partnership working across sectors and with central government and mana whenua in particular.

·   Greater focus on equity across feedback points.

·   Need for a strong Māori voice with widespread support for working with Māori, using mātauranga Māori and Māori practices in designing and implementing climate action.

·   Need for a system shift and scale of change required, and to better articulate this with Aucklanders.

·   Need for communication and behaviour change and a request for campaigns to raise awareness across the region and enable action at an individual level.

·   Need for a significant shift in transport (of all key moves) with the identified actions supported but a need for these to be delivered at pace and scale.

17.     To address this feedback a number of key structural changes are proposed.

18.     The first of these is establish three core drivers for action – our ‘pillars’ (Attachment E).  These provide greater clarity on the goals of the framework and all actions will align to how they deliver against these goals:

·   A Tāmaki response: This pillar reflects the uniqueness of Auckland and our place-based response to climate change.  It is informed by learning from Māori principles and practice, provides a greater focus on equity and a better definition of roles and responsibilities and collective action across governance and sectors.

·   Reducing our emissions: This pillar reflects the need to provide greater clarity on our emissions target and the need to halve emissions by 2030 and reach net zero emissions by 2050.  It improves alignment with the actions and how we will deliver and prioritise emissions reductions.

·   Preparing for climate change: This pillar enables a greater focus on how we will approach climate change adaptation and take a precautionary approach for the region and also provides greater alignment with the actions.

19.     The second structural change is that the eleven key moves are streamlined into eight priorities (Attachment F). This proposed change is to address feedback on where areas are more foundational and therefore should be embedded throughout all priority areas, or where there is confusion and overlap.

·   It is proposed that Key Move 3: Make development and infrastructure climate compatible and Key Move 4: Transform existing buildings and places are combined into a single built environment priority area. 

·   It is proposed that Key Move 1: Lay the foundation is embedded into our three pillars in recognition of the cross-cutting nature of the actions.

·   Similarly, Key Move 9- Rangatahi (Youth & Inter-generational equity) is embedded into pillar 1 to reflect the need to consider actions across the framework.

20.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1 and 9 will still be maintained and reflected in the updated document.

21.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1-11 will be carried through into Priorities 1-8 (Figure 2) and updated to:

·   clarify any ambiguities that were raised in consultation 

·   remove repetition or overlapping actions

·   make additions in response to consultation feedback

·   strengthen alignment to delivery of the three pillars.

22.     Overall, the intent of the actions between the Key Moves 1-11 and Priority areas 1-8, remain the same. Attachment G briefly summarises how the actions have changed from the consultation document to the updated priority areas.

23.     It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

24.     The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     The changes identified in this report have been made to reflect feedback received and updated emissions modelling.  As such, they will further deliver and strengthen climate action already identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Regular meetings and workshops took place across the council group for development of the framework.

27.     In addition, a working group was established from the outset to provide expertise from across the council group, central government and district health boards.

28.     This group has continued to provide input post-consultation and has reviewed and provided input into the proposed changes.

29.     In addition, the team has been working closely across the Council group in the development of costed actions for consideration in the Long-term Plan. This process is running concurrently with the finalisation of the plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The framework will have implications for all local boards.

31.     In June 2018, the Chief Sustainability Office attended workshops of 19 of the 21 local boards and obtained informal email feedback from the other two local boards to identify their main priorities related to climate change.  This was followed up in September 2018 at cluster workshops to assess and test a series of ‘must haves’, which were the precursors to the actions included in the draft framework.

32.     Priorities included:

·   coastal erosion and inundation concerns

·   affordable and accessible transport

·   long-term infrastructure development to consider climate impacts

·   better stormwater management

·   climate-related education and awareness

·   building community resilience

·   for Auckland Council to lead by example.

33.     This report seeks Local Board formal views on proposed changes to the draft Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework outlined in this report. These views will be reflected in the final version.

34.     Local boards will be key in taking climate action at a local level. Support will be provided for local board planning and alignment with outcomes.

35.     The Chief Sustainability Office and Quality Advice Unit will implement a programme of work for the whole council family to provide guidance and training on how to embed climate action in Local Board Plans and what to expect in climate impact statements.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Climate change impacts and associated policy and action will have significant impacts for Māori communities.

37.     A Tāmaki and climate change subject matter expert rōpū (group) was established in March 2019 which has been supporting and advising mana whenua and council on climate change issues for Māori and providing direct advice and narrative for the draft framework.

38.     A rangatahi Māori and Pasifika rōpū has also been working in partnership with council on this kaupapa to develop rangatahi-focused actions for the framework.

39.     A joint mana whenua and Māori expert task group is finalising a Tāmaki and climate change position paper, Te ora ō Tāmaki, which will be used as the bridging document to weave key anchor points into the climate action framework.

40.     Anchor points include:

·   weaving the narrative into the framework, specifically the following sections: Climate change and Māori, Impacts on Māori and Developing the Plan with Māori

·   a section developed by rangatahi (the Youth and intergenerational equity key move)

·   a separate key move of Te puawaitanga o te tangata (Resilient Māori communities).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Actions within the framework will result in budgetary implications for organisations across the region; identifying and unlocking appropriate funding and financing streams in the future will be critical. 

42.     Taking climate action will require a range of finance and/or funding mechanisms. For instance, green bonds have been a useful tool for financing council-owned assets such as electric trains but investment in clean tech may require crowd-sourcing, grants or venture capital.

43.     To support this, a climate finance work package is underway to identify partnerships and broader funding mechanisms across actions such as bonds, grants, equity instruments and public/private partnerships.

44.     The final framework and specific Auckland Council actions being developed will need to inform on-going Long-term Plan discussions to support delivery and avoid costs associated with inaction, such as increased maintenance costs and infrastructure failures through to missed opportunities to Auckland’s economy in delivering the transition. 

45.     Not all actions within council’s remit will require additional budget. Some actions can result in long-term cost avoidance – for example electrifying fleets can reduce fuel and maintenance costs. Some actions could require existing funds to be redirected if priorities change.

46.     Also, not all actions will require funding, for example those related to advocacy to central government or expert input into actions led by other organisations.

47.     The costs associated with different council-specific actions will consider funding sources as described above.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     No high or extreme risks have been identified with the proposed approach.

49.     Moderate risks exist, including:

·   preparing for the implications of climate change may not comply with current rules and regulations

·   potential strategic risk with non-alignment with New Zealand Government direction and policy

·   potential governance risk in shared leadership and ownership of the framework across sectors.

50.     A risk mitigation plan has been developed to address the above, including targeted engagement approaches, a legal review of the final framework, on-going partnership with central government and establishment of clear governance structures for the implementation of the framework. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Workshops will be held in April 2020 with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Independent Māori Statutory Board to discuss updated framework text, and the final text will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for approval in May 2020.

52.     The draft digital plan layout will be workshopped with the Environment and Climate Change Committee in June 2020 and finalised in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ACAF Consultation Summary Memo

43

b

ACAF Consultation Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Engagement Summary - LB workshops June 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Engagement Summary - Clusters workshops Oct 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

ACAF Proposed Three Pillars

47

f

ACAF Proposed Eight Priorities

49

g

ACAF Proposed Priority Areas and Actions

51

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Anderson - Principal Specialist Sustainability and Climate Resilence

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Sport and Recreation Facilitiy Investment Fund project endorsement

File No.: CP2020/03219

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement of the Western Springs College Ngā Puna o Waiōrea application to the regionally contested Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund (SRFIF) is a $120 million contestable fund allocated through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028, that supports the development of regional and sub-regional community sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

3.       The fund looks to address gaps in provision and allow the council to proactively respond to changing trends in sport and recreation.

4.       There is $7 million available in the 2019/2020 financial year. However, applicants can apply for funding from future years, as the planning and investment required to deliver regional and sub-regional facilities is significant.

5.       Decision making for this regionally contested fund sits with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee. A workshop with the committee will be held in March 2020, with a committee meeting to follow in April 2020.

6.       Local boards are being asked to endorse projects/groups who have applied for SRFIF funding to ensure a regionally aligned approach.

7.       Western Springs College Ngā Puna o Waiōrea have applied for funding in the 2019/2020 Stage 2 funding round.

8.       Western Springs College have completed an $85 million redevelopment of school facilities where one new indoor court was built. A second stage of redevelopment is planned to commence in 2020 (design) and build in 2021/2022 to include a second indoor court.

9.       The opportunity exists to develop two further indoor courts and an artificial turf to meet both school and community needs.

10.     The project is seeking $17.5 million of Auckland Council funding split over financial years 2022 and 2023.

11.     A commitment of $2 million has already been made from a regional fund in 2018 for site options analysis, needs assessment, feasibility study, business case, concept design, and quantity surveying.

12.     This is a prime opportunity for Auckland Council to partner and deliver two additional indoor courts (plus changing rooms and storage).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      endorse the Western Springs College Ngā Puna o Waiōrea application to the regionally contested Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2019/2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund is a contestable fund that supports the development of regional and sub-regional community sport and recreation facilities across Auckland.

14.     It looks to address gaps in provision and allow the council to proactively respond to changing trends in sport and recreation.

15.     A key objective of the fund is to support the delivery of significant capital development projects, but also to develop a pipeline of projects by investing into the investigation, planning, design stages of projects. The balance between planning and capital investment will depend on the merits of the applications received.

16.     The Long-term Plan 2018-2028 allocated $120 million to this fund over the next ten years, including $7 million in 2019/2020, $7 million in 2020/2021, $13.4 million in 2021/2022 and $13.6 million in 2022/2023.

17.     Decision making for this regionally contested fund is delegated to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.

18.     The fund prioritises investment into core infrastructure (e.g. courts, fields, playing surfaces/structures and lighting) that is central to sport and recreation participation. See the SRFIF Guidelines for more detail about investment priorities

19.     A medium funding priority is investment into ancillary infrastructure (e.g. toilets, changing rooms, equipment storage and carparking) that enables safe and sanitary access for participants and spectators.

20.     A low funding priority is investment into incidental infrastructure (e.g. clubrooms and administration facilities) that is not required for sports participation but exist for social and management purposes.

21.     The deliverability/achievability of projects is another key weighting within the assessment criteria.

22.     The fund prioritises investment into facility development projects over $500,000 and partnerships able to leverage additional investment, allowing more of the facilities Auckland needs to be built quicker and more effectively.

23.     Projects will be assessed in the context of ‘Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039’ (page 20), using the following four investment principles:

·    Equity (40 percent of assessment): ensures equity of outcomes across the population regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status or location.

·    Outcome-focused (30 percent of assessment): there is a clear ’line of sight’ between the investment and the outcomes it delivers.

·    Financial sustainability (20 percent of assessment): projects need to be financially viable and affordable for the public.

·    Accountability (10 percent of assessment): investment should be efficient, effective, transparent and consistent.

24.     The application process for the Fund comprises two gateways:

·        Stage 1 (closed 1 November 2019) – Expression of Interest. A one-page canvas that asked for key information about the problem and opportunity, the proposed intervention, where and who is involved, the funding required and the impact if delivered.

·        Stage 2 (closed 2 February 2020) – Detailed application. A formal application process asking the applicant to expand on their EOI with further detail, including evidence such as needs analyses, feasibility studies, business cases, detailed design or, other supporting information as relevant to their application.

25.     A total of 59 expressions of interests were received. Of those, 21 projects aligned strongly with Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund criteria. Of those 21, 17 Stage 2 submissions were received.

26.     An assessment panel comprised of Sport New Zealand and Auckland Council staff will review Stage 2 applications and a workshop will be held with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in March 2020, with a committee meeting to follow in April 2020.

27.     Aktive Auckland Sport & Recreation have withdrawn from the assessment panel for this round as they are making an application on behalf of the multi-code Regional Indoor Court Leadership group, to procure professional services.

28.     To capture local board views the 17 projects will be workshopped with local boards to understand if the projects are supported by the relevant board. A formal resolution is required if the board endorse the project.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

29.     The Western Springs College Ngā Puna o Waiōrea project has high alignment with the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund guidelines criteria. The fund prioritises new/ emerging sports with high growth potential and/or that sustain high-growth participation; gaps in provision, and strategic alignment.

30.     The Western Springs College Ngā Puna o Waiōrea project has strong alignment with The Regional Indoor Court Facility Plan (2019). This shows there is strong evidence on the need for more indoor courts and sport field hours particularly in the central city area.

31.     The project aligns with The Facility Partnership Policy (2017). This policy recommends investment in community facilities which are (or will be) owned or operated by others, to create a better facility network for all Aucklanders.

32.     Western Springs College was the top option in site analysis (2017), Governing Body have since allocated $2 million based on the presentation for investigation and design.

33.     There is a high level of demand from indoor court sports including:

a)   Basketball. Within Auckland schools, 6.9 percent of students participate in basketball, with 2.2 percent growth in 2019. In the Auckland region, 2 percent of adults 18 years+ and 12 percent of young people 5-17 years participate in basketball both competitively and informally. Basketball associations report access to indoor courts is limited and scheduling constraints mean there is limited scope to increase basketball participation.

b)   Futsal. There is a consistent growth in the code across the region however there is a lack of Futsal facilities across the region to grow junior and youth Futsal. Projected growth in Futsal is 13-29 percent according to the Auckland Regional Indoor Court Plan 2019.

c)   Netball. There are approximately 48,000 netball participants in the Auckland region, with the majority of players being primary and secondary aged females. The Auckland Regional Netball Facilities Strategy (2015) promotes future access to indoor courts.

d)   Volleyball. Principal playing age is primary and secondary school age children with a 1.2 percent growth in 2019. Other volleyball providers estimate around 1,020 players. There is insufficient court space and cost of court hire is a barrier. It is projected in The Auckland Indoor Court Facility Study that Volleyball participation will increase by 10-26 percent.

e)   Badminton. Badminton across the region have reported a growth in participation however badminton facilities in Newmarket and the north shore are at capacity at peak times. Growth for badminton is forecasted at around 15-32 percent depending on population growth.

34.     Endorsement of the Western Springs College Ngā Puna o Waiōrea project proposal is recommended.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     The Western Springs College Ngā Puna o Waiōrea project could result in an increase in greenhouse emissions at construction stages of the project, and at completion due to increase in traffic at Western Springs College.

36.     This can be mitigated to an extent by inclusion of a consideration to how emissions can be minimised stipulated in the funding agreements. 

37.     Waitematā Local Board have requested additional car parking be kept at a minimum to reduce any increase in greenhouse emissions.

38.     At this time of local board endorsement there are no significant climate impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     Auckland Council recognise this is a prime opportunity to partner and deliver two additional indoor courts (plus changing rooms and storage).

40.     The facility is on Ministry of Education (MOE) land, there are no implications for council-owned land.

41.     There are no other anticipated council group impacts at this time.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     The project was workshopped with the Waitematā Local Board in February 2020.

43.     The board recognised the need for more indoor courts and the positive impact this would have at a sub-regional and regional level.

44.     The Waitematā Local Board provided direction that they’d like to see community usage of this facility maximised.

45.     The regional and sub-regional nature of sport and recreation facilities that are the target of this fund mean there will likely be a multi-board impact across all projects.

46.     Given the location of the proposed development the local board do not need to provide land-owner approval for the project. To date all investigation funding has come from regional funding and Ministry of Education.

47.     The new facility will have a positive impact on the community. There will be an increased provision of community indoor courts of 10,864 court hours per year for community use and an increased participation in indoor court sports – between 188,000 and 244,000 community visits per year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.     The assessment criteria developed for this fund has a stronger weighting for projects that are Māori-led, have high collaboration with Māori organisations, prioritises strategically increased participation by Māori and/or involves activities with the likelihood of high Māori participation.

49.     The project has high levels of Māori engagement. Western Springs College and Ngā Puna O Waiōrea operate a co-governance kura-within-a-kura model from one location.

50.     The school’s Board of Trustees formally adopted a co-governance constitution in 2019, and Ngā Whātau marae operates on the school site.

51.     Ngā Puna O Waiōrea has a current roll of 350 which is forecast to grow to 600 in the next five years. The indoor courts would be used for the successful Kapa Haka programme and growth of traditional Māori games.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

52.     The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund is a regional budget allocated through The Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

53.     An objective of the fund is to invest into significant capital development projects that will be delivered quickly to get Aucklanders active. The fund will also develop a pipeline of projects by investing into the investigation, planning and design stages of projects. The balance between planning and capital development investment will depend on the merits of the applications received.

54.     There is an identified risk in that this is a significant amount requested (14 percent of the overall SRFIF budget). However it should be noted that the project has a strong funding partner (Ministry of Education).

55.     There are no financial implications to Waitematā Local Board as there is no funding requested from the local board at this time. Ongoing maintenance has been factored into the business plan and facility will be run by Western Springs College.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

56.     The deliverability of projects is a key weighting within the criteria to be used by the assessment panel. This includes:

·        having an achievable funding plan in place

·        having the necessary skills and expertise (in-house or procured) to deliver the project

·        having ticked off any relevant key project milestones such as site tenure, consent, etc

57.     Not all projects that apply will receive Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Funding. Some organisations have already been redirected to other funding sources as appropriate (e.g. Local Board Grants, Surf 10:20 Fund, RFA), whilst others may apply again in future rounds when their project is further developed.

58.     Some projects will not align strongly with the criteria used for the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund. However, there may be other local drivers as to why local boards and non-council funders invest in those projects. It is incumbent on all parties to set realistic expectations in regard the funding mechanisms available.

59.     The application for $17.5 million represents a very significant portion of the $120 million Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund. There may be a view that this places a greater investment risk into one project.

60.     There may be opportunity for Western Springs College (as the likely asset owner) to apply to the Lotteries Significant Projects Fund for capital development funding to mitigate large investment risk into one project.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

61.     All the stage 2 projects will be workshopped with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee in March 2020.

62.     A report will be tabled at the Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee meeting in April 2020.

63.     Should Western Springs College Ngā Puna o Waiōrea be allocated funding from SRFIF, a funding agreement will be developed in May-June 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Marissa Holland - Sport and Recreation Advisor

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport March 2020 Update

File No.: CP2020/03216

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on Auckland Transport activities in the Waitematā Local Board area and a summary on the local board transport funds

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report covers:

·    a summary of Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area

·    a summary of the local board’s Transport Capital Fund and Community Safety Fund

·    a summary of general information items sent to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport March 2020 report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       AT is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. As set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan, we report on a monthly basis to local boards. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important role local boards play within the governance of Auckland Council on behalf of their local communities. 

4.       This report updates the Waitematā Local Board on Auckland Transport (AT) projects and operations in the local board area, it updates the local board on their advocacy and consultations and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and Community Safety Fund (CSF).

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme.

6.       The CSF is a capital budget established by Auckland Transport for use by local boards to fund local road safety initiatives. The purpose of this fund is to allow elected members to address long-standing local road safety issues that are not regional priorities and are therefore not being addressed by the Auckland Transport programme.


 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area

7.       The table below has a general summary of projects and activities of interest to the local board with their current status. Please note that all timings are indicative and are subject to change:

Item

Update

City Gateway Treatments – works to signal to drivers as they enter the City that they are entering a slower speed zone.

Consultation underway.

Connected Communities

·    Ponsonby to Crummer (Great North Road Corridor);

·    New North Road Corridor;

·    Symonds Street to Hillside Crescent (Mt Eden Corridor); and

·    Park Road to Broadway and St Marks (Newmarket to Onehunga Corridor).

Project to improve travel choice by providing an enhanced street environment, dedicated bus priority measures, separated cycle lanes, and improved road and pedestrian safety.

The project team is meeting with the local board in early March. Wider public consultation will follow this.

Grafton Road – midblock pedestrian signal outside of University of Auckland.

The construction contract has been awarded and construction has started. We expect the works to be complete by early May 2020.

Grey Lynn parking scheme extension - proposed extension to the existing parking scheme to Prime Road and Elgin Street.

External stakeholder consultation is underway.

Herne Bay cycling and walking improvements – proposed changes to encourage slower driving speeds and improve routes for people walking and cycling.

Construction is underway.

Karangahape Road Enhancements Project – streetscape upgrade.

Following a road safety audit, the Left-Hand Turn from Karangahape Road into Mercury Lane has been removed.  Mercury Lane is not being closed and there are still multiple alternate ways to access it. As such the impact is noted as being minor as general vehicles will quickly learn to use these alternative routes.

Nelson Street Phase 3 - a cycling facility linking Nelson Street via Market Place into the Viaduct.

Public consultation is underway and to close out on 8 March 2020. Detailed design to be completed by July and construction to complete by Dec 2020.

Newmarket and Remuera Residential Parking Zone (RPZ)- proposed permit scheme for residents and businesses

We expect to have this RPZ implemented and up and running by mid-year, most likely end of June.

Parnell East Residential Parking Zone (RPZ) – project to install a residential parking zone and safety improvements on St Stephens Avenue, Lichfield Road and Crescent Road.

The consultation report on the project has been published and the parking resolution report has been submitted to the Traffic Control Committee for consideration. The team is aiming for the zone to go live in early April.

Princes Street and Eden Crescent intersection - upgrade including raised zebra crossings.

Construction is almost complete (90%).

Pt Chevalier to Westmere cycleway - A dedicated cycle route along Pt Chevalier Road and Meola Road ending near the Westmere Shops. 

No update this month, previous update:

Public consultation ended on the 20th December 2019. This included three drop-in sessions at the Pt Chev library.

The project team are currently working through public feedback and intend to workshop the results with the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Tamaki Drive cycle route (Quay Street to Ngapipi Bridge)

Construction for the section between Solent Street and Ngapipi Bridge has started.

The scheme design for the section between The Strand and Solent Street has been completed and is on track to issue for construction in May 2020.

Discussions with Ports of Auckland on the Solent Street intersection is ongoing.

The Strand intersection – road safety improvements to the intersections at Tamaki Drive and Gladstone Road

No update this month, previous update:

Currently in discussion with NZTA to start the public consultation. once agreed, public consultation is expected to take place in March/April 2020.

Victoria Street East-West cycleway - dedicated cycle route along Victoria Street West, from the Beaumont Street intersection to the Hobson Street intersection.

Traffic lanes are now back to two lanes each way on Victoria Street between Nelson Street and Beaumont Street.

80% of the physical works have been completed by the end of February.

There will be works to be completed post 1 March on the Victoria Park Market side of the road. We will complete these works in small sections during night time only, meaning less disruption to traffic.

We are on track to complete the project by mid-2020

Waitematā Safe Routes project, the two routes open for feedback are Route 1: Surrey Crescent to Garnet Road and Route 2: Richmond Road.

The public feedback report is available to view on the AT project website.

The consultation design is currently being updated with consideration to the feedback received. It is anticipated that the revised design will be presented back to the community in April 2020.  

Wellesley Street and Sale Street – new intersection signals.

Detailed Design is now in the very final stages and it is still intended to coordinate this project with an AC Healthy Waters Stormwater Diversion project at the same location.

We are concurrently working on the procurement tasks associated with the project and will aim to engage a contractor by April/May 2020 as planned however there are several issues outside of AT control such as utility conflicts which could potentially extend the start date.

Wellesley Street Bus Improvement Project (formerly Midtown bus route) – Improving how city centre buses operate.

The project team is currently refining options for a staged delivery of the Wellesley Street bus improvements project. An update will be brought to the Waitematā Local Board ahead of public consultation, which is expected in the middle of the year.

Wynyard Quarter street and park upgrades – central construction package.

Daldy Street is now partially open with some works continuing on the footpaths and linear park.

Work on Gaunt Street and within the Wynyard Commons continues to progress well.

 

8.       The table below has an update on the Downtown Infrastructure programme.

Item

Update

Downtown Infrastructure Improvement Programme

This includes:

·    Quay Street Strengthening 

·    Quay Street Enhancement

·    Britomart East

·    Lower Albert

·    Downtown Ferry

·    Waterfront Park

·    Mooring dolphin

·    Galway Street Enhancement

Overall the Programme remains on target for completion of all major works by December 2020.

Seawall Strengthening

 

Section 1: Palisade Wall between Queens to Marsden - Wharf is complete with 104 piles in the ground

 

Section 2: Vertical Anchoring between Ferry Building and Princes Wharf - The capping beam and vertical re-bars have been installed. 134 inclined anchors will be installed between mid-March and mid-August 2020.

 

Section 3: Jet grouting from Princes Wharf to the Ferry Basin - 46 out of 153 columns have been installed and are currently undergoing QA inspections.

 

There have been some delays due to ground conditions under the Princes Wharf entrance. The programme has been reviewed and readjusted and is now targeting completion mid-June 2020.

 

This means Quay Street Enhancements will commence as planned, in late June 2020. We are on target but timing is tight.

Ferry Basin Redevelopment

There are six new berths being built as part of the Ferry Basin Redevelopment programme to develop a modern, future proofed, high capacity ferry terminal in time for America’s Cup 2021.

 

Berth six has been installed and is now operating as Pier 1D for Pine Harbour passengers. Access to the berth is via a 33 by 6 metre gangway at the southern end of Queens Wharf, this is the first of three gangways which will service the six new berths..

 

Though operational, we still need to add handrails, glass balustrades and a canopy to the gangway. The handrails and balustrades are expected to be complete by late April, and the canopy towards year end.

 

The gangway will also service pier 5, which is due for installation at the end of April and also expected to be fully complete by mid-May.

 

Key benchmarks and dates.

·      On target for Project Completion December 2020.

·      Berth (pontoon) 3 and 4 fabrication in progress – due in Auckland mid-June.

·      Berths (pontoons) 1 and 2 are due in Auckland early September

·      Pontoon five due Auckland end March

Downtown Public Space

 

Works on the Downtown Public Space began on 2 December 2019 and are on target for completion December 2020.

 

Over the next seven months there will be 49 new piles installed from the jack up barge. These works are progressing on time with 8 out of 49 piles complete.

 

Other DPS works are also contingent on the Seawall strengthening works being complete with 134 anchors to be installed between mid-March and mid-August 2020.

 

The project is progressing well.

Lower Albert Street Bus Interchange

 

Lower Albert Street is closed to vehicles until 29 March when the Birkenhead buses return to allow for completion of further works. Works are progressing well and slightly ahead of schedule.

 

The Eastern Footpath will be opened in late March to coincide with the Commercial Bay opening on the 28th of March.

 

The Birkenhead Bus Service will return to Lower Albert Street on March 30.

 

Works are progressing well and we are optimistic of an earlier delivery date than December 2020.

 

Quay Street Enhancements

 

Over all the enhancements programme is on time and progressing well. Works continues on the southern side of Quay Street on the construction of the pavement and kerb lines between Lower Hobson and Lower Queen Street.

Southern footpath side is programmed for completion in March 2020 and the Northern side December 2020.

Individual sections

 

Lower Hobson Street intersection - Lower Hobson street works have now rolled to the western side. Stop-Go is in place during peak commuter hours to help ease congestion.

 

Lower Hobson Street to Lower Albert Street - Paving works for the new footpaths are progressing well, the cycleway has moved back to the Northern side.

 

Lower Albert Street to Lower Queen Street - The newly paved areas are now being completed with the final works underway targeting completion mid-March

 

Lower Queen Street to Commerce Street - Pavement slabs are now being poured and new footpaths are being opened up along building frontages.

 

Galway Street - Galway Street remains closed between Gore Street & Commerce Street. Gore Street is currently operating under a one way traffic management plan.

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

9.       Please see Attachment A which outlines decisions made in the Waitematā Local Board area in February 2020. Auckland Transport's resolution and approval process ensures the most appropriate controls and restrictions are put in place and can be legally enforced.

Community Safety Fund

10.     All local boards have finalised their prioritised lists of projects, received rough orders of cost, and approved the allocation of funds. The programme in total now stands at just under 100 projects.

11.     The table below has a general summary of Waitematā Local Board Community Safety Fund projects with their current status. Please note that all timings are indicative and are subject to change:

Project

Approved funding

Update

Safe Schools Toolbox - Newton Central School 

$615,000

As a result of further investigation, the project team recommends the following interventions: include a new one way street system, widening of footpaths, traffic calming measures, crossings and changes to parking. Initial designs are underway.

Pedestrian Crossings - on West End Road / Fife St by the bus stops next to the Westend tennis club

$300,000

Initial designs underway, project team is collecting AT-wide feedback on the new raised zebra crossing at West End Rd/ Fife Street intersection to resolve any barriers that might occur.

Pedestrian crossings formalised on Lower Domain Drive at Lovers Lane and at Domain Drive

$75,000

Initial designs for the raised zebra crossings at Lovers Lane and Domain Drive are currently being developed.

Pedestrian crossing outside ACG Campus on Davis Cres to Olympic Reserve

$260,000

Scheme design for raised pedestrian crossing on Davis Cres has been completed. Consultation expected to start prior to Easter.

Hopetoun Street Improvements

$200,000

On Hold. Designs have been completed and consultation was anticipated for January 2020 to align with the maintenance renewal works for Hopetoun Street. Revised timing is to be determined as scheduling has been delayed as a result of construction traffic for CRL. An update will be provided to the Board later in the year.

Total

$1,450,000

 

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

12.     The previous local board had a total allocation of $3,073,725 for the 2016-2019 electoral period. From this sum they approved:

Project Name

Allocation

Status

Greenway connection through Cox’s Bay Reserve to Wharf Road via Bayfield Park

$825,000

Being delivered by Community Facilities.

Current status is that the draft concept option will be shared publicly for consultation purposes.  Once complete, feedback will be used to refine the concept option and advance the recommended concept plan.   

Next steps:  Once consultation is complete and the draft concept plan is refined, a recommended concept plan will be presented to the local board at the next available workshop.

Auckland Domain:

·    connection from the Titoki Street carpark to Football Road footpath.

·    connection from the corner of the Winter Garden through to The Crescent.

·    connection from Centennial Path to Grafton Mews.

·    connection from Parnell Station to Lovers Lane.

 

$198,275

 

 

$160,485

 

 

$88,484

 

$518,215

Being delivered by Community Facilities. Current status: Auckland Council staff have initiated the procurement process for a lead consultant.  Once awarded, the site investigation and design effort will commence.  

Next steps:  The Project Manager will award the contract to a lead consultant and site investigations will begin.   

Western Springs Greenway Project - Motions Road: Option 2

$690,000

Currently in procurement for design consultant.

Western Springs Greenway – MOTAT2 walking and cycling connection

$130,000

Funding Agreement has been set up with Regional Facilities Auckland who are delivering the project.

Newmarket wayfinding and signage enhancements

$50,000

Funding Agreement has been set up with Scentre Group Ltd who are delivering the project.

Improvements to wayfinding and signage throughout the Waitematā Local Board

$80,000

Assessment and design work is currently underway.

Total

$3,097,759

 

 

13.     The current Local Board has a total allocation of $3,896,643 for the 2019 – 2022 electoral period.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

15.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

16.     To this end, Auckland Transport’s Statement of Intent contains three performance measures:

Measure

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Number of buses in the Auckland bus fleet classified as low emission

5

25

55

Reduction in CO2e (emissions) generated annually by Auckland Transport corporate operations (from 2017/18 baseline)

7%

9%

11%

Percentage of Auckland Transport streetlights that are energy efficient LED

56%

66%

76%

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The impact of the information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

18.     Any engagement with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no local, sub-regional or regional impacts.

Local Board Workshops

20.     Auckland Transport attended workshops with the Local Board on the 3rd March, the subjects discussed were:

·    An update on the Connected Communities programme including the Great North Road project.

·    An update on the Pt Chevalier to Westmere cycleway and Herne Bay cycling and walking improvements projects.

General information items sent to the board:

21.     Please see below for a summary of items sent to the local board for their information or feedback:

Item

Date sent to Board

FYI: Tamaki Drive cycle way

05/05/20

FYI: Wellesley/Albert/Mayoral intersection closure - Bus changes & network impact

05/02/20

FYI: Lower Albert Street

10/02/20

FYI: Local Board CRM Report

13/02/20

Update: Newmarket and Remuera Residential Parking Zone (RPZ)

13/02/20

FYI: New bus stop 239 Queen St from 23 February

14/02/20

Outcome: Kent Street - Shared Parking Space

17/02/20

FYI: Prime Road and Elgin Street - P120 Residential Parking Zone

20/02/20

Feedback: University of Auckland - Park Avenue

20/02/20

Outcome: Tyler Street - Shared Parking Space and Restrictions

24/02/20

FYI: Walking School Bus Month 2020

24/02/20

FYI: England Street - Removal of mobile library parking

25/02/20

Update: Victoria Street Cycleway

25/02/20

FYI: Connected Communities memo

25/02/20

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The proposed decision of receiving this report has financial implications as outlined in the resolutions, analysis and advice.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri                                   

Next steps

25.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board next month.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

February Traffic Control Committee Decisions

71

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ben Halliwell - Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon - Team Leader Elected Member Relationship Managers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review

File No.: CP2020/02998

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Review to the Independent Panel.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governing Body approved the Terms of Reference for an Independent Panel to undertake a review of substantive CCOs at its meeting on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127].

3.       The review covers Auckland Transport, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development, Panuku Development Auckland, Regional Facilities Auckland and Watercare.  The overall objectives are to examine:

·   whether CCOs are an effective and efficient model for delivering services to the council and Aucklanders, and

·   whether the CCO decision-making model provides sufficient political oversight, public transparency and accountability.

4.       The review asks the Independent Panel to examine three areas: the CCO model and its accompanying roles and responsibilities; the accountability of CCOs; and CCO culture.

5.       The Independent Panel is seeking the views of local boards on these areas.

6.       Local boards are advised that their views are requested by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations Review to the Independent Panel.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Governing Body approved the CCO review Terms of Reference on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127]. The Independent Panel was appointed by the Governing Body on 12 December 2019 and is comprised of Miriam Dean, Doug Martin and Leigh Auton. Miriam Dean has been appointed panel chair [GB/2019/149].

8.       Briefings on the CCO Review were provided to local board chairs in December 2019 by staff and in February 2020 by panel member Leigh Auton.  The panel wrote to local board chairs in February asking for advice on what constitutes good engagement between CCOs and local boards.

9.       Monthly updates on the review are reported to the CCO Oversight Committee and circulated to all local boards.

10.     The Independent Panel is seeking comprehensive engagement to obtain a range of views about the issues forming the subject of the review (Attachment A).  Community engagement on the review is occurring alongside the Annual Budget 2020/2021 in February/March 2020. An engagement document has been developed and a summary document has been translated into five languages and a New Zealand Sign Language video. A webpage[2] provides information on the review, including stakeholder updates, relevant documents (including the Terms of Reference) and a contact for further information.

11.     All feedback on the CCO Review will be provided to the Independent Panel.  The Panel will report on the key issues and community and stakeholder feedback in May and will provide a final report and recommendations in July 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     To identify the scope of their work, the Independent Panel has distilled the essence of the review terms into a list of issues, that forms the basis of the engagement and eventual report. The list and prompts, at Attachment A, provide a structure for local boards to give feedback.

13.     The three key areas of focus set out in the list of issues are:

Issue

Area of Focus

CCO model, roles and responsibilities

The essential question here is whether the CCO model delivers council services with the maximum of operational efficiency, transparency and accountability, or whether there are better ways to deliver such services

CCO accountability

Here the key question is whether the council’s current approach to holding CCOs to account on behalf of Aucklanders could be improved

CCO culture

The central issue here is whether CCOs need to improve how they consult, engage with and respond to the wider community and council

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Local boards have an opportunity to consider suggestions that might improve climate change outcomes/mitigation in their feedback on the CCO Review.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The Independent Panel is engaging across the council group on the review, including:

·   the chair of the independent panel wrote introducing the panel and the review objectives to all CCO chairs and chief executives, councillors, local board chairs, chief executive of IMSB and the co-chairs of the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 20 December 2019

·   the panel met briefly with the CCO chief executives and chairs on 28 January 2020 to discuss the proposed review process and CCO engagement. Each CCO was asked to provide the panel with key stakeholders/customers

·   individual meetings have taken place with CCO chief executives and board chairs over February and March 2020, and the panel is meeting with CCO stakeholders.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local board formal feedback on the CCO Review, including issues experienced with CCOs, good practice and options for improvement, is sought by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

17.     Material on the CCO Review was available at Have your Say local board events for the Annual Budget.

18.     Following the conclusion of the Independent Panel’s review, as part of the development of the next 10-year budget, local boards will have the opportunity to provide formal views on any proposals for change to the CCO model.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Staff presented to the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 19 December 2019. The panel met with one of the Forum co-chairs and mana whenua are invited to provide feedback to the panel.  Mana whenua have also been invited to a hui with panel members on 18 March 2020.

20.     The panel has met with the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

21.     Panel members spoke on Radio Waatea to promote Māori interest and feedback on the CCO review. Material on the CCO review is being provided at mataawaka events for the Annual Budget and mataawaka organisations have been briefed on the review during the public engagement period.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There are no financial implications from this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are no risks associated with the recommendations in this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The Independent Panel is due to report on key issues, community and stakeholder feedback in May and to provide a final report, with recommendations, in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review list of issues

77

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Gomas - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for quarter two 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/01210

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter two 1 October – 31 December 2019 of the Waitematā Local Board Work Programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2019/2020 work programme.

3.       The work programme is adopted by the local board annually and aligns with the Waitematā Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

WP Ref

Activity

Update

RAG

3304

(OLI) Ponsonby Park - develop civic park space

In progress

 

745

Operational Grant - TAPAC

In progress

 

3228

Arts Space Coordinator

In progress

 

1990

Cox's Bay to Wharf Rd Greenway - new pathway and bridge renewal

In progress

 

2077

Grey Lynn Park - develop new changing rooms

In progress

 

2218

Pt Erin Pool - comprehensive renewal

In progress

 

2245

Western Springs Lakeside Park - renew and upgrade playground

In progress

 

2327

Myers Park Caretakers Cottage and shed - renew and restore

In progress

 

2415

Home Reserve - renew playground

In progress

 

3274

Auckland Domain – develop pathway connections

In progress

 

3278

Heard Park - review concept plan for park improvements

In progress

 

3283

Outhwaite Park - renew playground and adjacent carpark

In progress

 

650

New project: Te Wai Ōrea restoration plan

In progress

 

930

Additional hours to network standard: Central Library - Waitematā

In progress

 

2053

Parnell Baths – comprehensive renewal

Complete

 

2408   

Grey Lynn Library - refurbish facility

Complete

 

3280

Waitematā- Agrichemical Free Parks

In progress

 

3286   

Victoria Park - develop greenway

In progress

 

 

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). There are no activities with a red status this quarter.

6.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2019/2020 is attached.

7.       Overall, the net operating expenditure of $13.7 million is over budget by $1 million at the halfway point of the 2019/2020 financial year.  The operating revenue of $1.6 million is greater than budget for the year to date.

8.       From the board’s Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) funding, projects are under budget by $58,000 for the year to date.  Projects to keep track of progress at this stage include Community placemaking initiatives, Western Springs native bush restoration plan and Gully planting and maintenance.

9.       West End Cup was funded $10,000 through the Event Partnership Fund to deliver the event in 2019/2020 (WTM/2017/157).  The event organisers have confirmed that West End Cup will not be delivered during 2019/2020 and have returned $10,000 to the Event Partnership Fund.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter two ending 31 December 2019

b)      note that West End Cup will not be delivered during 2019/2020 and organisers have returned $10,000 to the Event Partnership Fund.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Waitematā Local Board has an approved 2019/2020 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Arts, Community and Events;

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation;

·        Libraries and Information;

·        Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration;

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew;

·        Community Leases;

·        External Partnerships;

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        ATEED.

11.     Work programmes are produced annually, to meet the Waitematā Local Board outcomes identified in the three-year 2017 Waitematā Local Board Plan. The local board plan outcomes are:

·        Outcome 1: Inclusive communities that are vibrant, healthy and connected

·        Outcome 2: Attractive and versatile public places that meet our communities’ needs

·        Outcome 3: The natural environment is valued, protected and enhanced

·        Outcome 4: A high-quality built environment that embraces our heritage

·        Outcome 5: An accessible, connected and safe transport network with well-designed streets

·        Outcome 6: An innovative, productive and resilient local economy.

12.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

13.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

 

14.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter two

15.     Updates for the following key activities for quarter two is as follows:

·    3304 (OLI) Ponsonby Park - develop civic park space

The detailed business case progresses with ongoing engagement through the Ponsonby Park Ponsonby Community Steering Group. Community consultation for selection preferences from three shortlisted design options closed on 9 December 2019 and an update workshop with the full local board was held on 10 December 2019. A preferred design option has been selected and the completion of the detailed business case is underway.

·    745 Operational Grant – TAPAC

During quarter 2 there were 1,046 programme sessions at TAPAC attracting 34,055 participants and 52,280 visitors in total. Highlights were productions Aesop, in Russian, Alice in Wonderland attended by 2700 plus 600 children from Otara schools, five student performing arts productions and the premiere of Au Ko Tuvalu about the impact of climate change. Education highlights included Actor’s Equity workshops led by Jessie Griffin and Jennifer Ward Lealand, Lisa Chappell and Jodie Rimmer leading term workshops. Stage Skills and dance outreach to Otara was well received and Western Springs College held a 5-day Junior Arts Festival to encourage Year 9 participation in the performing arts.

·    3228 Arts Space Coordinator

The Arts Space project was further scoped with staff and with the contracted coordinator, Monster Valley, who also met with stakeholders including Studio One Toi Tū and the business sector - especially along K' road. An attractive and fun website, Space Hub, with a sub logo Find Your Creative Space was designed to be the central mechanism to appeal to target users and was tested in quarter 2. This has made a soft live appearance under www.spacehub.co.nz and will make a physical appearance on 13 February at the Monster Valley relaunch event to increase awareness and coordination of spaces.


 

·    1990 Cox's Bay to Wharf Rd Greenway - new pathway and bridge renewal

The public engagement period has come to a close and all collected feedback has been shared with the Consultant for use in updating the concept option. Staff will present a summary of the feedback and the consequential changes to the concept option to the local board in quarter 3.

·    2077 Grey Lynn Park - develop new changing rooms

Physical works tenders have been evaluated and contract should be awarded shortly. Date to start physical works to be confirmed with contractor.

·    2218 Pt Erin Pool - comprehensive renewal

Required maintenance works have been completed in advance of the summer season.  Consultant to prepare preliminary plan and engineer's estimate.

·    2245 Western Springs Lakeside Park - renew and upgrade playground

The detailed design has been completed and consents have been lodged. Tender documentation is being prepared for physical works procurement.  Project timelines have been moved to allow for construction after Pasifika Festival in March 2020. Playground upgrade is expected to be completed by end of August 2020.

·    2327 Myers Park Caretakers Cottage and shed - renew and restore

The Council Leasing team has progressed the Expression of Interest. Project delivery is appointing consultants (heritage architect, electrical and structural engineer, arborist, archaeologist) during the investigation and design phase.

·    2415 Home Reserve - renew playground

Concept design has been finalised and approved by the local board. Detailed design completed. Works in the road reserve have been placed on hold due to concerns raised by residents in King Street and Home Street about the lack of parking once the road has been converted into open space. The delays relate to the Auckland Transport funded road component and the playground renewal component is unaffected.  Physical works for the reserve is still planned to be delivered by end of May 2020.

·    3274 Auckland Domain – develop pathway connections

The lead consultant has been appointed to prepare designs. Commence investigation and design phase in January 2020.

·    3278 Heard Park - review concept plan for park improvements

Park improvements were identified.  Business case has now been finalised along with progression of the concept design to present to local board for their consideration/ approval in quarter 3.

·    3283 Outhwaite Park - renew playground and adjacent carpark

Design changes have been made to meet the local boards request/requirements (Oct) in order to retain trees that were proposed for removal in the developed design. Car park changes are being explored to ensure turning arc for cars parking can be achieved safely.  This will be reviewed internally and be incorporated into the detailed design.

The next step is to complete the detailed design for consenting purposes.

·    650 Te Wai Ōrea restoration plan

The draft riparian restoration plan was received from the contractor in early December 2019. The plan is currently being peer reviewed and once finalised will be presented to the local board in quarter three. The contractor has noted that community planting days are outlined in the plan for the next three years, covering the lake edge with predominantly low growing species. Additional planting options further from the lake edge are also included. Plant lists for these areas have not been prepared but can be added to the final plan if the local board are in agreement. The draft Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Park Development Plan finalisation is expected to be adopted by the local board in April 2020. The community planting day is scheduled for quarter four.

·    930 Additional hours to network standard: Central Library – Waitematā

The extra hour on the weekend days at the Central City library has been an opportunity for community groups to use the space for afternoon activities. In November and December a children's chess class was held in the Makerspace on Sunday afternoons, focusing on game basics, tips and tricks with the kids staying after the class had finished to put what they learned into practice. 3D print enthusiasts are also able to use the extra hour to print larger projects while the library is open - handy when you are printing an intricate replica of the Colosseum! Throughout the quarter the 3D printer has been booked 25 times on the weekend.

·    2053 Parnell Baths – comprehensive renewal

Project completed November 2019

·    2408 Grey Lynn Library - refurbish facility

Project completed December 2019

·    3280 Waitematā- Agrichemical Free Parks

Agrichemicals are no longer being used in Albert Park, Grey Lynn Park, Myers Park, Victoria Park (garden beds and amenity areas) and Western Park. The contractor is carrying out weed control by hand and using mechanical methods to maintain edging. The results are positive, and the contractor is managing the areas well without agrichemicals.

The contractor is continuing to investigate alternative options for Victoria Park sport fields – once results are in and analysed, these will be provided to the local board

Activities with issues

16.     There are no work programme activities identified as having significant risk for this quarter.

17.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as having some risk (amber status):

·    3787 Waitematā - Western Springs native bush restoration plan

Currently staff are finalising the contract with the project management company. The company will be responsible for working with the various subject matter specialists required to carry out the plans for the works as per the approved resource consent. 

·    187 Community Disaster Resilience Building

Auckland Emergency Management contracted Community Waitākere to facilitate In Case of Emergency (ICE) workshops for the Ponsonby, Parnell and Grey Lynn community centres. The workshops were not delivered due to an insufficient number of attendees.  Staff are working with Auckland Emergency Management to determine alternative ways to deliver the workshops with the centre managers.

·    3276 Myers Park Mayoral Drive access way - renew stairway access to the park

Investigation and design has been deferred. Development Programme Office and Community Facilities staff will be seeking input from the local board for this project in early 2020.

·    3284 St Stephens Cemetery - renew walkway (on hold)

Renewal of paths are opposed by Heritage NZ and Council Heritage. Current budget allocation is insufficient for the required investigation and redesign.  Project on hold while awaiting decision and due to lack of budget.

·    3729 Olympic Pool - replace main pool sparge line

A complete seismic assessment is to be done on the building.  The consultant’s report has been received and will need to be discussed with the Aquatic Team and the Centre Management.

·    3745 Waitematā - Parks Improvement Projects – LDI

Panuku and Liquor King were not in support of the original proposed location for the Community noticeboard on Ponsonby Road.  A new location has been identified.

·    3755 Highwic House - renew roads and car parks

Scope of works yet to be confirmed but meetings with Stakeholders and the Planner have been productive.  Planning assessment has been completed and concept design is underway.

·    3757 Albert Park - reinstate Zig Zag track FY17

Delay in obtaining Resource Consent due to impact of Regional Facilities Auckland stormwater investigation and design works.  All necessary consents are now approved. Business case and scope are being progressed.

·    3765 Waitematā - renew utilities and furniture FY17

The renewal of the drinking fountains and signage is on hold pending final adoption of Western Springs Development Plan. Delays due to wider changes to park development that effect the scoped renewal assets.

·    357         WTM: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) FY20

The overlapping interest step in the process will require longer than initially planned - this will push this process out across Q3 and Q4, and the gifting of names process into Q1 2020/2021.

Mana whenua received the new tranche list in December 2019.

Activities on hold

18.     The following work programme activity have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        3284 St Stephens Cemetery - renew walkway (amber status)

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

19.     No activities have been deferred from the 2019/2020 work programme this quarter.

Cancelled activities

20.     No activities have been cancelled in this quarter.

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

21.     No activities have been merged with other activities for efficient delivery in this quarter.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

23.     Work programmes were approved in June 2019 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

24.     The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

·        184 Community-led placemaking: Waitematā gardens, food and sustainability

·        544 Waitematā Sustainability Kick Start Programme

·        3279 Ngahere (Urban Forest) Strategy - Waitematā Action Plan Delivery FY19/20

·        3281 Waitematā - Urban Forest Restoration

·        3787 Waitematā - Western Springs native bush restoration plan

·        458 Low Carbon Lifestyles

·        459 Waitematā Low Carbon Network

·        460 Low Carbon Multi-Unit Dwellings

·        470 Low Carbon Schools

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     This report informs the Waitematā Local Board of the performance for quarter two ending 31 December 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Several key projects set out in this report have involved direct engagement with iwi and the projects themselves have been refined as a result of this engagement.  For example, the Western Springs Te Wai Ōrea Development Plan involved consultation with iwi for direction and refinement.

28.     The Waitematā Local Board will continue to ensure mana whenua have input into local board projects and that projects are refined in response to this valued input.

29.     The Waitematā Local Board supports the use of traditional iwi names and dual names for public spaces as a standard approach to Māori responsiveness and to reflect the history of the local board area and this will be reflected in the outcomes of Te Kete Rukuruku and for other naming opportunities.

30.     Mana whenua customary practices continue to be embedded into the opening events for the local board’s projects.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     In August 2017, the Waitematā Local Board approved funding West End Cup $10,000 each year for three years through the Event Partnership Fund (WTM/2017/157).  The event was delivered in the previous two years, but the organisers have confirmed that West End Cup will not be delivered during 2019/2020.  The amount granted for this year’s delivery ($10,000) has been returned to the Event Partnership Fund.  Staff are exploring options to reallocate the funds and recommendations will be provided to the board prior to the end of the financial year.

Financial Performance

32.     The net operating expenditure of $13.7 million is over budget by $1 million at the halfway point of the 2019/2020 financial year. 

33.     The operating revenue of $1.6 million is greater than budget for the year to date.  Slightly more revenue than budget has been generated from community leases and commercial properties. This has been offset by less revenue than budget generated from operations at Tepid Baths and Studio One Toi Tū.

34.     Operating Expenditure of $15.3 million is above budget by $1.1 million for the year to date. Larger spend areas are the full facilities parks contract, operations of facilities across the local board area, and various BID grants.

35.     Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) projects are under budget by $58,000 for the year to date.  Projects to keep track of progress at this stage include:

·    Community placemaking initiatives - In quarter 3 staff will investigate further collaborations with Compass Housing and work with ACE colleagues on activating Albert Park cottage.

·    Western Springs native bush restoration plan. Currently staff are finalising the contract with the project management company. The company will be responsible for working with the various subject matter specialists required to carry out the plans for the works as per the approved resource consent

·    Gully planting and maintenance - Next steps: Inform the local board of feasibility outcomes for their direction and consideration.

36.     The local board capital delivery is at $2.6 million against a year to date budget of $4.4 million for the 2019/2020 financial year. Major projects in progress or completed are listed below:

·    Grey Lynn Community Centre - comprehensive renewal. Main hall interior works have been progressed and are near completion. Next steps are to deliver works for the exterior decking, garden room and accessible toilet.

·    Central Library roof renewals. Documentation has been completed for the top roof and we are commencing design for lower roofs, based on replacement of existing membrane system with new.

·    Central Library - renew boiler. Two new boilers have been fully installed and are operational. The contractor is currently preparing as-built drawings and Operational & Maintenance manuals for submission to Council.

·    Symonds St Cemetery - develop pathways. Project was completed in September 2019Victoria Park - develop greenway. The lighting work project is complete and next steps is for landscape improvement to start in April 2020.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

38.     Community Facilities are currently going through a departmental restructure to provide better support and guidance for decision makers.  There is a risk that the work programmes could be disrupted or delayed. To mitigate this risk a transition plan is in place to ensure that your work programmes are delivered, and disruptions are kept to a minimum. The local board will be kept informed throughout the transition

39.     The approved Community Facilities 2019/2020 work programme and 2020-2022 indicative work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the 2019/2020 financial year, by ensuring that if projects intended for delivery in the 2019/2020 financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances, that other projects can be progressed while the causes for delays are addressed.

40.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter three, (31 March 2020).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Q2 2019 Financial Appendix

89

b

Waitematā Q2 2019 Work Programme

95

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                           

 


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17 March 2020

 

 

Addition to the 2019-2022 Waitematā Local Board Meetings Schedule

File No.: CP2020/03232

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for an additional meeting date to be added to the 2019-2022 Waitematā Local Board meeting schedule in order to accommodate the Annual Budget 2020/2021 timeframes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waitematā Local Board adopted the 2019-2022 meeting schedule on 3 December 2019.

3.       At that time the specific times and dates were unknown for meetings for local board decision making in relation to the local board agreement as part of the Annual Budget 2020/2021. 

4.       The local board is being asked to approve an addition to the Waitematā Local Board meeting schedule so that the Annual Budget 2020/2021 timeframes can be met.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve one meeting date to be added to the 2019-2022 Waitematā Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate the Annual Budget 2020/2021 timeframes as follows:

i)   Tuesday, 5 May 2020

b)      note the venue for the meeting will be at the Waitematā Local Board office, 52 Swanson Street, Auckland Central, starting at 4.30pm.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

6.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·    clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·    sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

7.       The Waitematā Local Board adopted its business meeting schedule at its 3 December 2019 business meeting.

8.       The timeframes for local board decision making in relation to the local board agreement which is part of the Annual Budget 2020/2021 were unavailable when the meeting schedule was originally adopted.

9.       The local board is being asked to make decisions between 5 May and 7 May to feed into the Annual Budget 2020/2021 process.  This timeframe is outside the board’s normal meeting cycle.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The local board has two choices:

i)        add the meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule

or

ii)       add the meeting as an extraordinary meeting.

11.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for the meeting to be scheduled as an addition to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. There is a risk that if the Annual Budget 2020/2021 timeframes change or the information is not ready there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled.

12.     For option two, only the specific topic Annual Budget 2020/2021 may be considered for which the meeting is being held. There is a risk that other policies or plans with similar timeframes to that of the Annual Budget 2020/2021 process would not be able to be considered at this meeting.

13.     Since there is enough time to meet statutory requirements, staff recommend approving the meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule as it allows more flexibility for the local board to consider a range of issues.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards have a statutory responsibility to develop an annual local board agreement, which forms part of the annual budget and is adopted by the Governing Body. At the May business meeting the local board will agree their feedback and advocacy on the Annual Budget 2020/2021.

17.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule one additional meeting and consider whether to approve it as an extraordinary meeting or an addition to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     There is no specific impact for Māori arising from this report.  Local boards work with Māori on projects and initiatives of shared interest.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     There are no significant risks associated with this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     The local board democracy advisor will implement the processes associated with preparing for business meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision: Temporary Alcohol Ban Request for My Chemical Romance concert at Western Springs Stadium on 25 March 2020

File No.: CP2020/03052

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the local board to receive the decision made under urgency to adopt a temporary alcohol ban for the My Chemical Romance concert at Western Springs Stadium on 25 March 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On the 3 February 2020 a request was received from the New Zealand Police to put in place a temporary alcohol ban for the My Chemical Romance concert at Western Springs Stadium from 7am on 25 March 2020 (concert day) to 7am on 26 March 2020 (day after concert).

3.       The area that was proposed for applying a temporary alcohol ban included Western Springs Stadium, Western Springs Lakeside Park, Western Springs Outer Fields and surrounding streets as outlined in Attachment A.

4.       The request sought to prevent alcohol related crime and disorder caused by concert attendees that could impact residents and other attendees as they travel to and from Western Springs Stadium.

5.       The agreed urgent decision process was followed (WTM/2019/259) due to there not being enough time between receiving the request from New Zealand Police and the February local board agenda meeting deadlines.  The local board meeting on 17 March 2020 would also not have left enough time to ensure the required 14 days public notification is in place before the concert on Wednesday 25 March 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the approved urgent decision dated 5 March 2020 for adopting a temporary alcohol ban for the My Chemical Romance concert at Western Springs Stadium on 25 March 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent Decision Memo and Attachments

133

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Carlos Rahman - Senior Engagement Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Chair's Report

 

File No.: CP2020/00619

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Chair’s report for the period February – March 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair R Northey board report March 2020

157

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Liz Clemm - Democracy Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Board member reports

 

File No.: CP2020/00630

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for board members to update the board on projects/issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written reports from members A Bonham and G Gunthorp, and the verbal board member reports for the period February – March 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Member G Gunthorp report for February-March 2020

177

b

Member A Bonham report for February-March 2020

181

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Liz Clemm - Democracy Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

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17 March 2020

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2020/00659

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

1.       Attached is a copy of the governance forward work calendar for the Waitematā Local Board which is a schedule of items that will come before the local board at future business meetings.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work calendar March 2020 attached to the agenda.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar

195

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Liz Clemm - Democracy Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

Waitematā Local Board Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2020/03095

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to present the Waitematā Local Board workshop records to the board.  Attached are copies of the proceeding records taken from the workshops held on:

·        25 February 2020

·        3 March 2020

·        10 March 2020

         

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

·        receive the workshop proceeding records for the meetings held on 25 February, 3 March and 10 March 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Board workshop record 25 February 2020

199

b

Waitematā Local Board workshop record 3 March 2020

201

c

Waitematā Local Board workshop record 10 March 2020

203

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Liz Clemm - Democracy Advisor - Waitematā

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Waitematā Local Board

17 March 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator

    

    



[1] Joint Witness Statement of the Arborists, ENV-1018-AKL000104, 22-23 August 2019.

[2] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/council-controlled-organisations/Pages/review-of-council-controlled-organisations.aspx