I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Emergency Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

 

Thursday, 30 April 2020

10.00am

These meetings will be held remotely and can be viewed on the Auckland Council website

https://councillive.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

 

Te Kāhui Ngārahu / Emergency Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Mayor

Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

 

Deputy Mayor

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

 

Councillors

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Pippa Coom

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Angela Dalton

IMSB Chair David Taipari

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr Paul Young

 

Cr Shane Henderson

IMSB Member TBC

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

(Quorum 2 members)

 

 

 

Sarndra O'Toole

Kaiarataki Kapa Tohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Team Leader Governance Advisors

 

24 April 2020

 

Contact Telephone: +64 9 890 8152

Email: sarndra.otoole@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


 

Terms of Reference

 

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee is an ad-hoc committee of the whole of the Governing Body which is established in times of emergency.  It will assume the functions and power of all governing body committees (and sub-committees), except for the Audit and Risk Committee, and its responsibilities include all the responsibilities of the Governing Body which can legally be delegated as well as the responsibilities of all the committees it assume the functions and power for.

 

Powers

(i) All the powers of the Governing Body which can legally be delegated, except those of the Audit and Risk Committee.

 

 


 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·           Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·           Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·           Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·           In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·           The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·           However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·           All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·           Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·           Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·           All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·           Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·           Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·           Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 

 


Emergency Committee

30 April 2020

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          7

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

8          COVID-19 briefing and Auckland Emergency Management status update            9

9          MOTAT Annual Plan 2020-2021                                                                                  11

10        Council Submission on Draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2021 and Draft National Rail Plan                                                                                       71

11        Appointment of the District Licensing Committee for 2020-2023                          95

12        Board Appointments - Tāmaki Redevelopment Company Limited                       99  

13        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

14        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               103

C1       CONFIDENTIAL:  Recommendation for the appointment of District Licensing Committee chairs and members for 2020-2023                                                     103

C2       CONFIDENTIAL: Reappointment of directors to Tāmaki Redevelopment Company Limited                                                                                                                        103  

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Emergency Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 23 April 2020, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 


Emergency Committee

30 April 2020

 

COVID-19 briefing and Auckland Emergency Management status update

File No.: CP2020/04910

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable the committee to be briefed on the COVID-19 pandemic, Auckland Emergency Management status and council’s response.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ian Maxwell, Director Executive Programmes and Kate Crawford and Mace Ward, Group Controllers, Auckland Emergency Management will provide a written and verbal briefing.  The report will be circulated prior to the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Emergency Committee:

a)      receive the report and thank Ian Maxwell, Director Executive Programmes, Kate Crawford and Mace Ward, Group Controllers, Auckland Emergency Management for the briefing on the COVID-19 pandemic and the Auckland Emergency Management status update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarndra O'Toole - Kaiarataki Kapa Tohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Team Leader Governance Advisors

Authoriser

Phil Wilson - Governance Director

 


Emergency Committee

30 April 2020

 

MOTAT Annual Plan 2020-2021

File No.: CP2020/03803

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider the 2020/2021 levy for the Museum of Transport and Technology (MOTAT). 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

The report was to be included on the Finance and Performance Committee 23 April 2020 meeting agenda (having been deferred from the Finance and Performance Committee meeting held on 19 March 2020); however, in light of COVID-19, it must now be considered by the Emergency Committee.

2.       MOTAT is one of Auckland’s cultural heritage institutions. 

3.       The Museum of Transport and Technology Act 2000 (the Act) allows MOTAT to levy Auckland Council for funding on an annual basis.  Auckland Council through Regional Facilities Auckland (RFA) can provide feedback on MOTAT’s draft Annual Plan. 

4.       MOTAT’s Board monitors outcomes and financial performance, with RFA and the council only having an indirect role in this.  The vision for MOTAT is to be a “must experience” museum that uses past, present and future kiwi technology and ingenuity to educate and inspire the next generation.  

5.       Prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, MOTAT had supplied RFA and council with its draft annual plan for 2020/2021.  This sought a levy increase of 8 per cent, or $17,087,900 in total, in order to continuing supporting its Approach 2 projects, and also the development of a new SciTech centre. 

6.       However, RFA (in consultation with council) asked MOTAT to revise its annual plan activities and its levy request in light of the likely financial pressures council will face in the coming financial year (Attachment A).  It has been significantly constructive in doing so, and has provided a new annual plan for consideration. 

7.       MOTAT has now revised its draft Annual Plan (Attachment B) and reduced its levy request to $14,890,578, which is 5.8 per cent less than 2019/2020. This reduction is achieved by:

·    Delaying new capital works originally planned for

·    Freezing salaries and restricting recruitment

·    Limiting Approach 2 capital works already underway.

8.       MOTAT’s plan does note that these projects will need to be completed in future years, however, as they reflect renewals and improvements to otherwise ageing infrastructure.

9.       MOTAT’s focus for the next two years will nonetheless still reflect its five-year strategic plan. These areas of focus are:

·    Entertaining and inspiring their audiences, which are primarily domestic (Auckland 60 per cent and New Zealand 28 per cent), with the various exhibition programmes

·    Tram infrastructure and collection care

·    Buildings and staffing

·    Environmental sustainability.

 

10.       MOTAT works closely with RFA as its draft Annual Plan develops, and is open about its cost structure and drivers. Council can be confident that the levy request reflects the cost of operating MOTAT. RFA has recommended that MOTAT’s revised levy be approved (Attachment C). 

11.       RFA has also noted the way in which MOTAT has been active in providing information to the cultural heritage sector not just in Auckland, but more generally within New Zealand, about how it was responding as an institution to the different alert levels. This leadership has been well received by many in the sector, with the information able to be used as templates for managing buildings, collections and staffing at different alert levels. 

12.     Staff recommend approval of the MOTAT levy request for 2020/2021, as it meets the purposes of MOTAT as set out in the Act, and the draft MOTAT Annual Plan for 2020/2021 clearly sets out MOTAT’s planned activities for the coming year. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Emergency Committee:

a)      approve the total levy applied for by the Museum of Transport and Technology of $14,890,578 for 2020/2021

b)      acknowledge the constructive role played by the Museum of Transport and Technology in reassessing its annual plan following the COVID-19 emergency, and the leadership it demonstrated in providing information about its response to the cultural heritage sector.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

Legislative framework

13.     MOTAT operates under the Museum of Transport and Technology Act 2000.  The Act requires the Board to maintain, manage, and develop MOTAT and its collections and provide for the recording and presentation of the history of transport and technology in Auckland and New Zealand.  The Board must also provide maximum community benefit, including providing for education which engages and entertains, promoting historical and scientific research and achieving customer satisfaction through continuous improvement. 

14.     Council is obliged to fund MOTAT under the levy provisions of the Act, which gives MOTAT security of public funding for its activities, including maintenance and development.  These provisions were originally developed in the pre-amalgamation context to ensure that all councils in the Auckland region contributed equitably to MOTAT. 

15.     The Act specifies that the levy must be set by 30 April 2020, either through agreement or arbitration. However, legal advice has indicated that an annual plan and levy set after this date is unlikely to be deemed invalid (if it was challenged) as long as best endeavours have been made to meet the date. In the current pandemic context, and given how quickly MOTAT has revised its draft plan, we are confident that ‘best endeavours’ can be demonstrated. 

Role of Regional Facilities Auckland (RFA)

16.     RFA and Auckland Council have an Advisory and Management Agreement under which RFA has been appointed council’s advisor for MOTAT’s annual funding process. 

17.     RFA has written to Auckland Council and recommends approval of the levy.  RFA’s advice, as expressed in the submission and the letter to council, has been incorporated into this report. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     MOTAT originally provided RFA and Auckland Council its draft Annual Plan and levy request in December 2019.  At that time, the levy request indicated 2020/2021 was $17.1 million.  The requested levy represented an 8 per cent increase over the 2019/2020 levy of $15.8 million.  This included additional funding for two specific projects – continuation of the ‘Approach 2’ works (a set of projects in the larger MOTAT masterplan), and a new request of $800,000 for each of the next two years, to develop a SciTech centre within MOTAT. 

19.     It is important to note that unlike Auckland Museum, MOTAT is not funded for depreciation through its levy and therefore cannot accrue funds year-on-year for capital works, which can then be expended.  This means that when it does make requests for such works, the levy increases can appear significant.  However, it does also mean that they are transparent, and council, through RFA, has the ability to work closely with MOTAT to ensure that the works are aligned with the strategic plan and can be managed appropriately. 

20.     Since the Covid-19 situation developed, it has become clear that MOTAT’s original plan would not accurately reflect its activities for 2020/2021, and furthermore that it would be difficult to justify an increase at a time when other council services would likely be under significant financial pressure.  Consequently, RFA (with council support) wrote to MOTAT to request a revision of its draft annual plan. MOTAT’s executive and board worked constructively and swiftly to consider afresh its activities, its draft plan, and new levy request. 

21.     MOTAT supplied RFA and council with its revised plan in mid-April 2020.

22.     The new levy request is for $14,890,578, which is 5.8 per cent less than 2019/2020. This reduction is achieved by:

·    Delaying projects originally planned for.  These were particularly for the SciTech centre. The centre would have been a big step up in MOTAT’s permanent offering to visitors, in terms of a hands-on experience and bringing the principles of Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics (STEAM) to life, including  showcasing heritage objects that reinforced the importance of past, present  and future Kiwi technology and innovation.

·    Freezing salaries for existing staff, and restricting recruitment for at least the next year.

·    Limiting Approach 2 capital works already underway to only those essential works already underway, such as the MOTAT 2 carpark project, which is related closely to Auckland Transport Meola Road works and cycleway. 

23.     MOTAT’s plan does note that these projects will need to be completed in future years, however, as they reflect renewals and improvements to otherwise ageing infrastructure, RFA has recommended that if Council is in a position to support these capital works as part of the Covid-19 recovery, then it should consider supporting MOTAT’s originally planned projects as part of this. 

24.     MOTAT’s focus for the next two years will nonetheless still reflect its five-year strategic plan. These areas of focus are:

·    Entertaining and inspiring their audiences, which are primarily domestic (Auckland 60 per cent and New Zealand 28 per cent), with the various exhibition programmes.  It is worth noting that MOTAT’s audience mix is quite similar to that of Auckland Zoo, and synergies around joint ticketing may still proceed and be able to support Auckland’s environmental, education, and cultural offer for residents and domestic visitors – particularly given that both attractions are significantly outdoors. 

·    Ageing tram infrastructure and collection care

·    Maintenance of buildings and ongoing development for the MOTAT staff team 

·    Environmental sustainability.

25.     MOTAT works closely with RFA as its draft Annual Plan develops and MOTAT is open about its cost structure and drivers. Council can be confident that the levy request reflects the cost of operating MOTAT. RFA has recommended that MOTAT’s revised levy be approved (Attachment B). 

26.     RFA has also noted the way in which MOTAT has been active in providing information to the cultural heritage sector not just in Auckland, but more generally within New Zealand, about how it was responding as an institution to the different alert levels. While the Covid-19 situation was developing, MOTAT put significant effort into thinking about what this meant for them as an institution, both in terms of their own staffing, maintaining essential building services, and also how and when they can host visitors (or be closed). 

27.     It prepared a number of clear and concise materials, and then distributed them through its networks in Auckland and around New Zealand for other institutions to use.  This leadership has been well received by many in the sector, with the information able to be used as templates for managing buildings, collections and staffing at different alert levels.  This report proposes that this contribution be acknowledged. 

28.     During the pandemic lockdown, MOTAT has also quickly developed a website with resources for children, parents, and teachers:  motat.fun. This website was developed in five days by staff working from home, and has attracted around 15,000 unique users since its launch on 3 April, with positive feedback from around New Zealand. It is an example of the kind of nimble organisation that MOTAT has become, and the positive impact it is having, especially in the STEAM space. 

Advice

29.     Staff recommend approval of the MOTAT levy request for 2020/2021, as it meets the purposes of MOTAT as set out in the Act, and the draft MOTAT Annual Plan for 2020/2021 clearly sets out MOTAT’s planned activities for the coming year.

30.     The other option is to dispute the levy amount and enter arbitration.  This is not recommended, for two reasons.  Firstly, we consider there are no grounds for disputing the levy amount, because the MOTAT levy request meets the purposes of the museum as set out in its legislation, and the draft Annual Plan 2020/2021 has clearly set out MOTAT’s planned activities for the coming year.  Secondly, MOTAT has made a significant and welcome effort to adjust its annual plan and levy request to reflect the likely challenging financial position of its main funder, despite being likely to be under financial pressure itself.  It has removed elements of spending which can be deferred, and taken steps to control costs.  As noted above, MOTAT has worked closely with RFA on the plan, and RFA has recommended to Auckland Council that it be approved. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     There are no particular climate implications in approving this levy. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     Regional Facilities Auckland agrees with the levy, as noted in the report. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     Regional museum levies are a matter for the governing body.  Local boards have therefore not been sought for this report. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     MOTAT is working towards promoting a bicultural approach within the museum. This is referred to on page 21 of the Plan. Approving the levy will allow MOTAT to continue developing itself in this regard.

35.     MOTAT is also a key contributor to the cultural heritage review.  A key aim of this review is for the Auckland cultural heritage sector to make a leading contribution to the Auckland Plan directions around Māori as Auckland’s point of difference in the world. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     The financial implications have been discussed in the main part of the report. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     There is one main risk for council.  In the longer-term, MOTAT will continue to require council to make decisions about its strategic role in the Auckland cultural heritage network, and its capital development plans.  While it has deferred capital works for 2020/2021, the need to resolve MOTAT’s long-term purpose in the group of council-funded institutions, and its capital needs to fulfil that role, does not go away. 

38.     This in turn demonstrates the ongoing likelihood that MOTAT will seek increases to its levy in the future.  Given the current levy systems imposed on council by legislation, there is little council can do to mitigate this risk except to work closely with MOTAT to minimise the ongoing requests and ensure that they are aligned with MOTAT’s likely strategic future role.  In this regard, RFA plays a key role.  The relationship between Auckland Council, RFA and MOTAT is strong and cooperative at present.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     If the levy is approved, it will be paid by Auckland Council on or before 1 July 2020. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

RFA letter to MOTAT, 9 April 2020

17

b

Draft MOTAT Annual Plan 2020-2021

21

c

RFA advice to Auckland Council on draft MOTAT Annual Plan 2020-2021

69

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Edward Siddle - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Kevin Ramsay - Chief Risk Officer (Acting)

Phil Wilson - Governance Director

 


Emergency Committee

30 April 2020

 


 


 


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30 April 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Emergency Committee

30 April 2020

 


 


Emergency Committee

30 April 2020

 

Council Submission on Draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2021 and Draft National Rail Plan

File No.: CP2020/04966

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of Auckland Council’s submission on the Draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2021/22 - 2031/32 and draft National Rail Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

The report would normally go before the Planning Committee, however, in light of COVID-19, it must now be considered by the Emergency Committee.

2.       The Draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2021/22 - 2031/32 (GPS 2021) sets out the Government’s strategy to guide land transport investment over the next 10 years, particularly through influencing how Waka Kotahi, the New Zealand Transport Agency (Waka Kotahi) invests across activity classes such as state highways and public transport. 

3.       Both the Auckland Council 2021-2031 Long-term Plan and Waka Kotahi’s work programme will be heavily influenced by this policy statement.

4.       The draft GPS 2021 was released on 19 March 2020, with feedback extended to 11 May 2020.

5.       The draft National Rail Plan (NRP) is open for public submission over the same period.

6.       It is proposed that Auckland Council lodges a submission responding to both the Draft GPS 2021 and the draft NRP, given they were advertised simultaneously and are closely related.

7.       GPS 2021 sets out the government’s priorities for expenditure from the National Land Transport Fund over the next 10 years.

8.       GPS 2021 builds on and consolidates the priorities of GPS 2018, identifying four strategic priorities for land transport:

·    Safety

·    Better Travel Options

·    Improving Freight Connections

·    Climate Change.

9.       These investment priorities are generally well aligned with Council’s priorities identified in the Auckland Plan 2050.

10.     The NRP sets a vision for rail planning and investment in New Zealand and is referred to multiple times in GPS 2021.  A new rail network activity class is included in GPS 2021.

11.     The draft submission makes the following main points in relation to the GPS:

·    support for the GPS 2021’s strategic direction but requests greater clarity around how the Climate Change priority is to be reflected in transport system investment and how the Better Travel Options priority is to be delivered

·    support for the increased funding allocation for road safety through the new activity class

·    support for the dedicated funding from the National Land Transport Fund for rail network maintenance and renewal as part of the integration of rail network planning into the land transport system

·    support for the Government’s confirmation that it will fund the Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP)

·    support for the mode neutral approach to transport planning and investment decisions

·    support for the suggested approach to better integrate land use and transport outcomes but requests greater clarity around how Auckland’s quality compact growth strategy will be enabled.

12.     The draft submission makes the following main points in relation to the NRP:

·    support for the longer-term outlook for rail planning and investment in New Zealand, including intent for funding for rail activities from the National Land Transport Fund

·    support for the establishment of metropolitan passenger service planning and investment as a strategic priority alongside freight

·    support for the references to ATAP as the guiding document for investment in Auckland’s transport system, including rail

·    recommend that the NRP is updated reflecting Council’s February 2020 submission pertaining to the Land Transport (Rail) Legislation Bill.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Emergency Committee:

a)      approve Auckland Council’s draft submission (Attachment A of the agenda report) on the draft Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2021/22 - 2031/32 and draft National Rail Plan, inclusive of any changes agreed by the committee

b)      delegate authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Planning Committee and an Independent Māori Statutory Board member to authorise any minor amendments and corrections to the submission prior to lodgement on 11 May 2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     It is proposed that Auckland Council lodges a submission responding to both the Draft GPS 2021 and the draft NRP, given they were advertised simultaneously and are closely related.

14.     On 19 March 2020 the government released a draft GPS 2021 for review and feedback by 11 May 2020. To view the draft GPS 2021, go to:

https://www.transport.govt.nz/assets/Import/Uploads/Our-Work/Documents/draft-government-policy-statement-land-transport-2021.pdf

15.     The GPS plays an important role in guiding transport investment decisions across New Zealand. It is the government’s key statutory transport strategy that guides how funding from Fuel Excise Duty, Road User Charges and vehicle licensing is allocated between activities such as state highways, local roads, public transport, active transport, and road policing. This investment is administered by Waka Kotahi.

16.     Waka Kotahi will be guided by the GPS 2021 into how it can invest in Auckland over the next 10 years. Much of the transport investment in Auckland is co-funded by Auckland Council and Waka Kotahi, particularly local roads and public transport.

17.     On 19 March 2020 the government also released the draft NRP, available for review and feedback by 11 May 2020 via the following link:

https://www.transport.govt.nz/assets/Import/Uploads/Rail/The-Draft-NZ-Rail-Plan-December-19.pdf

18.     The NRP establishes the government’s vision and strategic investment priorities for rail for the next 10 years. It provides the context for a Rail Network Investment Programme (RNIP) to be developed by KiwiRail. The NRP is referred to multiple times in the draft GPS 2021. 

19.     Both the Ministry of Transport’s Draft GPS 2021 and NRP are open for public submission from 19 March 2020 with an extended closing date of 11 May 2020. It is proposed that Auckland Council lodges a submission responding to both the Draft GPS 2021 and the draft NRP, given they were advertised simultaneously and are closely related.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     GPS 2021 builds on and consolidates the priorities of GPS 2018.  The strategic priorities for GPS 2021 are:

·    Safety: Develop a transport system where no-one is killed or seriously injured

·    Better Travel Options: Provide people with better travel options to access places for earning, learning, and participating in society

·    Improving Freight Connections: Improve freight connections to support economic development

·    Climate Change: Transform to a low carbon transport system that supports emission reductions aligned with national commitments, while improving safety and inclusive access.

21.     Safety remains a priority, with the wording updated to reflect the Road to Zero strategy. Access remains a priority but is now covered in two parts to provide clearer guidance. GPS 2021 continues to support better urban transport options and well-connected freight routes.  The environment remains a priority, with a focus on investments that align with Government’s greenhouse gas reduction targets.  Value for money is expressed as a principle that applies to all investments, rather than a strategic priority that could change as Government changes.

22.     To achieve these priorities, GPS 2021 allocates funding to focus investment on:

·    implementing the Road to Zero interventions through a specific Road to Zero activity class, which includes $1.2 billion additional investment in local roads

·    implementing freight and some inter-regional rail network investments defined in the draft New Zealand Rail Plan through a specific rail network activity class

·    implementing metropolitan rail network investment defined in the draft National Rail Plan and approved under the previous transition rail activity class through the public transport infrastructure activity class

·    shaping land use, urban form and street design in a way that reduces car dependency, making walking, wheeling, cycling and micro-mobility safe and attractive travel choices, and reduces emissions from transport

·    public transport in cities and expanding the public transport system to support new housing and interregional commuting

·    implementing mode shift plans to shape urban form, make shared and active modes more attractive, and influence travel demand and transport choices

·    improving mode choice for moving freight by coastal shipping

·    a transition to a low carbon transport system through reducing transport demand and inter-connected infrastructure encouraging walking, cycling and the use of public transport, and the use of rail and coastal shipping for moving freight.

23.     GPS 2021 confirms that the activity classes include enough funding to cover the central government share for government’s commitments:

·    Auckland Transport Alignment Project (ATAP) - $16.3 billion

·    Let’s Get Wellington Moving (LGWM) - $3.8 billion

·    Road to Zero - $10 billion

·    New Zealand Rail Plan - $1.2 billion.

24.     It confirms that ATAP will be the guiding document for investment in Auckland’s transport system.

25.     It also confirms that the Crown Funding of $6.8 billion to progress new infrastructure projects through the NZ Upgrade Programme (NZUP) is not included in the activity classes.  This brings the overall transport investment across the country to around $54 billion over the next 10 years. 

26.     To fund this investment the revenue for the National Land Transport Fund (NLTF) is projected to increase from around $4.4 billion in 2021/22 to $5.1 billion in 2030/31. The Government has indicated there will be no increase in fuel excise and road user charge to fund the first three years of this investment.  

Draft National Rail Plan

27.     The National Rail Plan (NRP) is a non-statutory document supporting the Government’s intent for a longer-term outlook for planning and funding for rail.

28.     Rail is to be considered as an integral part of the land transport system. Through inclusion in GPS 2021 and funding from the NLTF (in conjunction with Crown appropriations and track-user charges) implementation of the NRP will contribute to the New Zealand Government’s principle of mode neutrality.

29.     There are multiple references in the document to the ATAP and metropolitan passenger service enhancement is referred to as one of two investment priorities alongside freight.

30.     Amendments proposed to the Land Transport Management Act (LTMA) are referred to several times in the draft Plan. This is pursuant to the Land Transport (Rail) Legislation Bill that Auckland Council and Auckland Transport submitted on in February 2020.

31.     The NRP is consistent with the LTMA reform: it applies to heavy rail and excludes light rail. The GPS 2021 includes light rail in the public transport infrastructure activity class. 

Draft Submission

32.     A draft submission has been prepared containing the following main points:

          GPS 2021

33.     That Auckland Council:

·    support the GPS’s strategic direction but requests greater clarity around how the Climate Change priority is to be reflected in transport system investment and how the Better Travel Options priority is to be delivered

·    support the increased funding allocation for road safety through the new activity class

·    support the dedicated funding for rail network maintenance and renewal through the new rail network activity class, and investment in metropolitan rail through the public transport infrastructure activity class

·    support the government’s confirmation that it will fund the Auckland Transport Alignment Project and that it will be the guiding document for investment in Auckland’s transport system

·    support the mode neutral approach to transport planning and investment decisions

·    support better integrated land use and transport outcomes but requests greater clarity around how Auckland’s quality compact growth strategy will be enabled.

·    suggest minor wording changes for clarification and completeness purposes.

          NRP

34.     That Auckland Council:

·    support the longer-term outlook for rail planning and investment in New Zealand

·    support establishment of metropolitan passenger service planning and investment as a strategic priority alongside freight

·    support references to ATAP as the guiding document for investment in Auckland’s transport system, including rail

·    recommend that the NRP is updated reflecting council’s February 2020 submission pertaining to the Land Transport (Rail) Legislation Bill, particularly:

full integration of rail with other land transport is preferred strongly over partial integration

the integrity of the Auckland Network Access Agreement needs to be preserved

the Rail Network Investment Programme should have a ten-year duration (not just a ten-year outlook).

·    suggest minor wording changes for clarification and completeness purposes.

35.     The draft submission to the Ministry of Transport on draft GPS 2021 and the draft NRP is attached to this report for the Emergency Committee’s approval.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     The GPS 2021 will impact on greenhouse emissions and the approach to reduce emissions by influencing the allocation of funding to focus investment on a transition to a low carbon transport system.

37.     The inclusion of climate change as a new strategic priority in GPS 2021 is welcomed. Several other areas of focus within the document are also likely to be climate positive including:

·    the priority given to public transport, walking and cycling

·    the establishment of longer-term planning and funding processes

·    the integration of rail with other modes of transport via the GPS and NLTF.

38.     Over time there should be increasing potential for rail to substitute road-based transport and, in the context of Auckland, support more sustainable and resilient urban growth.

39.     There is, however, insufficient detail on how this strategic priority will be given effect to, particularly in terms of how it will be reflected in transport system investment.  Further direction needs to be given on what central and local government will have to do/invest in differently to enact a step-change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     GPS 2021 is a critically important policy for Auckland Transport (AT) in that it sets the parameters for the quantum of NLTF funds that can be invested across different transport activities. As such, it provides guidance for the development of Regional Transport Plans (RLTPs).

41.     Auckland Council’s proposed submission was informed by discussions with AT staff. AT is making a separate submission on the GPS and addresses similar matters. AT’s submission is anticipated to feature more detail than Auckland Council’s given AT is the road-controlling authority in Auckland.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     Under the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 provisions, Auckland local boards are responsible for decision-making on local issues, activities and services, have a direct role in placemaking, and provide input into regional strategies, policies, plans and decisions.

43.     The final GPS 2021 will influence Waka Kotahi’s transport investment. Projects identified to be funded from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund are potentially eligible for NZTA co-funding where they align with the GPS’s strategic direction and Waka Kotahi’s processes for assessing value for money.

44.     The new GPS 2021 will not be locally specific in that it will identify high-level funding allocations rather than individual projects that might be eligible for funding.  Council’s Long-term Plan and Regional Land Transport Plan are where local-specific decisions will be made and where local boards input into these decisions.

45.     Local board chairs have been provided a link to the new draft GPS 2021 and an opportunity to make comments to feed into the draft submission should they so wish.

46.     At the time of writing, feedback has been received from Whau Local Board and Albert-Eden Local Board, both supporting the general direction and the four strategic priorities.

47.     The Whau Local Board:

·    support the main principles underpinning the draft GPS and the strategic priorities

·    strongly support the inclusion of safety as a strategic direction but requests that the Transport Agency support and encourage Approved Organisations to take a less narrow technical definition of safety and to listen to local communities on localised safety concerns

·    support the inclusion of better travel options as a strategic priority but requests that the GPS be more explicit in acknowledging that Auckland requires attention because of its physical size and population

·    support the inclusion of climate change as a strategic priority and increased provision of safe walking and cycling infrastructure to encourage uptake of active modes. It requests, however, that the Transport Agency take a more directive approach in implementing this strategic direction to ensure that Approved Organisations actively seek to implement walking and cycling projects and initiatives.

48.     The Albert-Eden Local Board:

·    support the general direction and the four strategic priorities

·    support the principle of reducing deaths and serious injuries in the Road to Zero measures, but request greater funding allocation for Auckland

·    strongly support the move of freight from road to rail and coastal shipping, given the need to transition quickly to other freight moving models

·    strongly support the Climate Change priority and investment decisions supporting the rapid transition to a low carbon transport system

·    support the funding to Auckland Transport Alignment Project

·    support Auckland’s metropolitan passenger network priorities, including electrification between Papakura and Pukekohe, and the third main line between Wiri and Quay Park

·    support the focus on the interrelation of land use and transport

·    support the focus in the Transport Outcomes Framework on protecting people from transport related injuries, pollution, and psychological harm

·    support the focus on efficiently utilising the existing urban roading that we currently have

·    note that psychological wellbeing can be compromised by the transport system. We need to help people enjoy getting around by active transport and being in public spaces by reducing domination of roads by private motor vehicles.

49.     Any further local board comments received by 10 May will be attached to the council’s submission to Government.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

50.     Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board have been advised of the submission process.

51.     Mana whenua organisation chairs have been advised of the release of the new draft GPS 2021 so that they can make a direct submission if they so wish.

52.     The new draft GPS 2021 is a high-level indication of funding allocation across transport activity classes and does not include project or area-specific decisions.  The final policy statement will impact Māori as it will direct the New Zealand Transport Agency on how it can allocate funds to transport activities that have an impact on Māori communities.  The priority of specific projects will be determined through the upcoming Auckland Council Regional Land Transport Plan/Long-term Plan process.

53.     Some of the strategic priorities identified in GPS 2021 are of importance to Māori.  Māori are at a much higher risk of road traffic injury per population than other groups in Tāmaki Makaurau[1]. Maori are also overrepresented in low income areas to the south and west of Auckland that have relatively poor access to education and employment opportunities[2] and are more susceptible to the impacts of climate change[3].

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

54.     The GPS plays an important role in guiding transport investment decisions through its allocation of funding between activities such as state highways, local roads, public transport, active transport, and road policing. The Auckland Council 2021-2031 Long-term Plan will be heavily influenced by this policy statement.

55.     Establishment of a longer-term planning and funding outlook for rail and its integration into the broader land transport system would support development of a more sustainable and resilient passenger and freight network. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

56.     The risks are in not deciding to make a submission and not representing Council’s position.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

57.     The draft GPS 2021 indicates that the final GPS 2021 will be released in mid-2021 to inform the development of the Auckland Regional Land Transport Plan and the National Land Transport Plan.

58.     The draft NRP indicates that the final NRP will be released alongside the final GPS in the second half of 2020. The final Plan will also provide further information on funding sources and principles to facilitate the ongoing investment in the development of rail, including track user charges to support the NLTF.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Auckland Council Submission on draft GPS 2021

79

b

Whau Local Board feedback

89

c

Albert-Eden Local Board feedback

93

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jim Fraser - Principal Transport Planner

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

Phil Wilson - Governance Director

 


Emergency Committee

30 April 2020

 

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Emergency Committee

30 April 2020

 

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Emergency Committee

30 April 2020

 

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Emergency Committee

30 April 2020

 

Appointment of the District Licensing Committee for 2020-2023

File No.: CP2020/00233

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm the appointments to the Auckland District Licensing Committee for a three-year term, commencing 1 July 2020 and expiring on 30 June 2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

This report would normally go before the Regulatory Committee; however, in light of COVID-19, it must now be considered by the Emergency Committee.

2.       The Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 (the Act) requires each Territorial Authority to appoint one or more licensing committees (s186) and to establish, maintain and publish its own list of persons approved to be members of the territorial authority’s licensing committee (s192(1)).  

3.       The members of the Auckland District Licensing Committee hear and decide all applications related to alcohol licensing.  The contracts for the current members expire on 30 June 2020 and the new three-year term commences on 1 July 2020. 

4.       Information about the people being recommended for appointment as District Licensing Committee members will be provided in the confidential section of today’s Emergency Committee meeting agenda.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Emergency Committee:

a)      note that the information contained in this report on the appointment of District Licensing Committee members enables the public to understand the nature of discussion in the confidential report on today’s committee agenda on those appointments      

b)      note that the confidential report on today’s agenda contains private information about individuals.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 (the Act) requires each Territorial Authority to appoint one or more licensing committees (s186) and must establish, maintain and publish its own list of persons approved to be members of the territorial authority’s licensing committee (s192(1)).  

6.       In the confidential section of today’s meeting, the Emergency Committee is being asked to appoint the members of the District Licensing Committee approved to make decisions under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012. This is in line with this committee’s terms of reference and with Regulatory Committee Policy 3 - “Policy related to appointment of decision makers”.

7.       In November 2019, the Governing Body approved the recruitment process, timetable and selection panel for the District Licensing Committee.  Approval was granted to appoint a selection panel for District Licensing Committee interviews comprising two councillors, a member of the Independent Māori Statutory Board, two senior staff members and an independent District Licensing Committee chair from a location outside Auckland Council.

8.       The Governing Body resolved to appoint approximately five chairs and five to seven members to the District Licensing Committee.  They also resolved to appoint a chief commissioner to work with the Democracy Services department of Auckland Council and District Licensing Committee members to support committee performance (GB/2019/119). 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 aims to minimise harm from alcohol by managing the way it is sold, supplied and consumed.  The members of the District Licensing Committee must have good standing in the community, the highest standard of professional and personal integrity and the necessary knowledge, skill and experience relating to matters that are likely to come before the committee.  Decisions made by committees must enable the safe and responsible sale, supply and consumption of alcohol.

10.     In December 2019, 40 applicants responded to the expression of interest for positions on the District Licensing Committee.  During December, all applicants were assessed by the selection committee which shortlisted 24 candidates for interview, including all current chairs and members of the District Licensing Committee who applied.  23 interviews were held in February/ March 2020 and in March 2020. The selection panel considered all interviewed candidates and recommended five chairs and seven members for appointment to the District Licensing Committee for the new term commencing 1 July 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     There are no climatic or environmental impacts arising from the decision-making processes relating to this report. The minor impacts from the greenhouse gas emissions relating to travel associated with applications which are opposed or objected to under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 are mitigated by holding hearings as close as possible to the site relating to the application.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     The proposed decision to appoint District Licensing Committee members does not impact other parts of the council group.  The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     Local Board members provide input and feedback to applications for licences and appear at hearings to represent community views and interests. 

14.     The recommended appointments for the 2020-2023 term include people with former experience as local board members, community members with experience of alcohol licensing and initiatives to minimise harm, and members who represent the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     All District Licensing Committee members are expected to have an understanding of the Treaty of Waitangi and Te Ao Māori.  This expectation was built into the recruitment and selection process through shortlisting criteria and targeted interview questions.

16.     Independent Māori Statutory Board member, Glenn Wilcox, participated as a member of the selection panel.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

17.     The Minister of Justice sets the remuneration for District Licensing Committee members and this cost is recovered through alcohol licensing fees.  Members are selected from the pool when required for hearings and are paid for work completed. There is no cost impact associated with the number of members appointed to the District Licensing Committee. 

18.     The chief commissioner’s role is expected to require a commitment of up to 20 hours per month and will be funded from within existing budgets. Cost savings will be made as the functions of the role replace services that have previously been sourced externally. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     Successful candidates will undergo Ministry of Justice checks, which is a standard recruitment process requirement.  As appointments are subject to this check being satisfactory, appointments are not able to be made public until this process has been completed.  

20.     Applicants who were not successful must receive notice from the selection panel before the announcement of the 2020-2023 DLC appointments.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     When checks have been completed, successful candidates will be advised of their appointment, and be asked to confirm their acceptance. Unsuccessful candidates will also be notified.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jessica Carter - Principal Advisor Hearings

Authorisers

Rose Leonard – Acting General Manager Democracy Services

Craig Hobbs - Director Regulatory Services

Phil Wilson – Governance Director

 


Emergency Committee

30 April 2020

 

Board Appointments - Tāmaki Redevelopment Company Limited

File No.: CP2020/04362

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider the reappointment of three directors of the Tāmaki Redevelopment Company.  Two are jointly appointed by the Crown and Council, and the third is appointed by the Crown.     

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

The report would normally go before the Appointment and Performance Committee, however, in light of COVID-19, it must now be considered by the Emergency Committee.

2.       Tāmaki Redevelopment Company Limited (TRC) is a joint venture between Auckland Council and the Crown.

3.       One director on the board is appointed by Auckland Council, one director is appointed by the Crown, and the remaining directors are jointly appointed by the Crown and the Council.

4.       The terms of three of the current directors ends soon.  Decisions need to be made whether to reappoint these directors, or to look for new directors.

5.         A confidential report considers the reappointment of two Tāmaki Redevelopment Company Limited (TRC) directors jointly with the Crown.

6.         The Crown is also reappointing a director, and council has been asked to endorse this reappointment. This is in line with previous processes undertaken in 2012, 2016 and 2018.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Emergency Committee:

a)      note that there is a confidential report included on this committee agenda that provides information to:

i)        make decisions for appointing directors to Tāmaki Redevelopment Company Limited

ii)       note that the report is confidential due to the personal information contained in it.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       TRC is an urban regeneration company. It aims to transform Tāmaki (including Glen Innes, Point England and Panmure) in Auckland over the next 20-25 years through co-ordinated economic, social, and housing initiatives.

8.       TRC has partnered with Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities to replace around 2,500 old state homes with a mixture of new state, affordable and market houses. Since partnering with Kāinga Ora, TRC’s primary focus is now on transforming the Tāmaki community through social and economic regeneration and creating safe and connected neighborhoods.

9.       The board appointment process for appointing directors to any external partnership board is outlined in the table below: 

10.     Council’s policy sets a maximum tenure of six years for substantive CCO directors in order to achieve a balance of experience and fresh thinking on individual boards. 

11.     It is noted that TRC is not a substantive CCO, but that the same general policy considerations apply.

12.     The policy also recognises that there are sometimes good reasons to approve extensions beyond the two three-year terms, such as retaining the knowledge, skills and leadership on the board.  

13.     The confidential report on this agenda provides advice and options to assist the committee to make decisions regarding the appointment of directors to TRC. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     More detail is included in the confidential report attached to this agenda.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     The decision to reappoint directors to TRC does not have an impact on direct greenhouse gas emissions, and the effect on climate change over the lifetime of the decisions is considered minimal.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     There is no significant impact on other parts of the council group as a result of the appointments.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Board appointments to region-wide entities are the role of the Governing Body.  Local boards are not generally consulted for reappointment of current directors.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     Council’s policy aims to achieve a diverse range of directors to all CCO boards.

19.     This can have positive impacts for Māori by creating opportunities for Māori directors.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     There are no costs associated with the reappointment of the three directors on the TRC board. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     There are risks associated with all reappointments to external entities including:

i)        Reputational: all candidates are appropriately screened to meet the skill requirements for an entity such as this and have appropriate governance experience especially within public-facing entities.   

ii)       Reputational: breach of privacy if confidential candidate information is provided to media outlets prior to final decisions being made by the committee.  To mitigate the risk staff will continue to highlight the need for maintaining confidentiality during the appointment programme.    

iii)      Board imbalance - an opportunity for fresh thinking and skills will be considered once the current vacancy on this board can be filled later in 2020. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Following approval from this committee, staff from the CCO Governance department will advise the Crown of the decisions.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Josie Meuli - Senior Advisor CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Phil Wilson - Governance Director

      

 


Emergency Committee

30 April 2020

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Emergency Committee

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       CONFIDENTIAL:  Recommendation for the appointment of District Licensing Committee chairs and members for 2020-2023

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

In particular, the report contains the names of people recommended as District Licensing Committee chairs and members.  This information should not be made public until the Regulatory Committee endorses the recommendations and the successful applicants confirm their acceptance of the appointment.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C2       CONFIDENTIAL: Reappointment of directors to Tāmaki Redevelopment Company Limited

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

In particular, the report contains private information about the directors being appointed on the board of Tamaki Redevelopment Company Limited.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

   



[1] In the past five years 18 percent of all people who have lost their lives on our roads were Māori, a disproportionate level of harm as Māori make up 11 percent of the overall population in Tāmaki Makaurau.

[2] The ATAP Foundation Report highlighted significant accessibility challenges in west and south Auckland over the next 10 years, in part due to their distance from where employment growth is expected to occur.

[3] Climate change has significant implications for Māori. • Being predominantly coastal people, mana whenua relationships to ancestral taonga, cultural knowledge and practices are at risk. Sea rise is compromising wāhi tapu (sacred sites), Māori land holdings, marae and other significant sites. • There will also be potential socio-economic impacts on whānau (families). Proposed responses to climate may present a further disadvantage for Māori. • Whānau Māori (Māori families) who are already in a precarious financial position, have less access to resources to respond to rapidly worsening conditions. • Marae, urupā (burial grounds) and wāhi tapu (sacred sites) will be exposed to inundation and flooding. • The indigenous flora and fauna are under threat from a changing environment, particularly where those changes are so fast or significant that species cannot adapt or are overrun by exotic invasive species that can.