I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 23 April 2020

4.00pm

This meeting will proceed via Skype for Business. Either a recording or written summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website.

 

Waitākere Ranges Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Greg Presland

 

Deputy Chairperson

Saffron Toms

 

Members

Mark Allen

 

 

Michelle Clayton

 

 

Sandra Coney, QSO

 

 

Ken Turner

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Elizabeth Stewart

Democracy Advisor, Waitākere Ranges Local Board

 

18 April 2020

 

Contact Telephone: 021 194 6808

Email: elizabeth.stewart@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Waitākere Ward Councillors' Update                                                                          7

12        Attendance at local board meetings during the Epidemic Preparedness (COVID-19) Notice period                                                                                                                  9

13        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Waitākere Ranges Local Board for Quarter Two 2019/2020                                                                                          17

14        Panuku Development Auckland Local Board Six Monthly Update 1 August 2019 to 29 February 2020                                                                                                         25

15        Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework - Proposed changes                                                                                                                                       31

16        Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review                                                                                                                                       37

17        Chair's Report - March 2020                                                                                       41

18        Chair's Report - April 2020                                                                                          49

19        Local Board Member Report - Member Coney                                                         53

20        Confirmation of Workshop Records                                                                          59

21        Governance Forward Work Programme                                                                   63  

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

Specifically, members are asked to identify any new interests they have not previously disclosed, an interest that might be considered as a conflict of interest with a matter on the agenda.

The following are declared interests of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

Board Member

Organisation/Position

Mark Allen

-   Community Waitākere – Executive Officer

-   Bethells Valley Fire – Senior Fire Fighter

Michelle Clayton

-   Glen Eden Community House – Treasurer

-   Glen Eden Residents’ Association – Treasurer

-   Waitākere Community Organisation Grants Scheme (COGS) – Committee Member

-   The Personal Advocacy and Safeguarding Adults Trust – Trustee

-   Glen Eden Returned Services Association (RSA) – Member

-   Glen Eden Railway Trust – Member

Sandra Coney

-   Waitematā District Health Board – Elected Member

-   Women’s Health Action Trust – Patron

-   New Zealand Society of Genealogists – Member

-   New Zealand Military Defence Society – Member

-   Cartwright Collective – Member

-   Community Waitākere – family member has contract

Greg Presland

-   Whau Coastal Walkway Environmental Trust – Trustee

-   Combined Youth Services Trust – Trustee

-   Glen Eden Bid – Member

-   Titirangi Ratepayers and Residents Association – Member

-   Waitākere Ranges Protection Society - Member

-   Titirangi RSA - Member

-   Maungakiekie Golf ClubMember

Saffron Toms

-   Titirangi Community House – Secretary

Ken Turner

Nil

Member appointments

Board members are appointed to the following bodies. In these appointments the board members represent Auckland Council:

Board

Organisation/Position

 

-   Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Trustee

 

-   Friends of Arataki Incorporated – Trustee

-   Rural Advisory Panel - Member

 

-   Glen Eden Business Improvement District - Member

-   Aircraft Noise Consultative Committee Group - Member

-   Local Government New Zealand Zone One Committee - Member

 

-   Glen Eden Business Improvement District (alternate)

 

-   Ark in the Park

-   Manukau Harbour Forum - Chair

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 27 February 2020, as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 


 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2020

 

 

Waitākere Ward Councillors' Update

File No.: CP2020/03728

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive a verbal update from the Waitākere Ward Councillors.

2.       A period of 10 minutes has been set aside for the Waitākere Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Waitākere Ranges Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga                                       

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      thank Waitākere Ward Councillors Linda Cooper and Shane Henderson for their update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Stewart - Democracy Advisor, Waitākere Ranges Local Board

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitākere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2020

 

 

Attendance at local board meetings during the Epidemic Preparedness (COVID-19) Notice period

File No.: CP2020/04488

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To recommend an amendment to the local board’s standing orders in order to provide for attendance of non-members at local board meetings via audio or audio-visual link.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report updates the local board on the temporary arrangements for local board meetings enabled by the COVID-19 Response (Urgent Management Measures) Act 2020 and provides options for implementing similar arrangements for non-members.

3.       The COVID-19 Response (Urgent Management Measures) Act 2020 temporarily amends the existing legislative restrictions for local government on remote attendance for elected members and minimum quorum at local board meetings. This now enables meetings to proceed by audio-visual link, changes how meetings can be open to the public and how members of the public receive the agenda and minutes.

4.       The current local board standing orders do not provide for non-members, specifically members of the public and Māori, to give input via audio or audio-visual link.

5.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) requires that a person other than a member of the local board may participate by means of audio link or audio-visual link if the standing orders of the local authority permit this and if the chair is satisfied that all conditions and requirements in the standing orders are met. (Clause 25A(2), Schedule 7, LGA). Local board standing orders do not currently allow for this.

6.       Auckland Council will be using Skype for Business for local board meetings. Attendance by members and non-members (if approved) will be facilitated by phone (audio only) or Skype video (audio-visual) via Skype for Business application.

7.       An amendment to Standing Orders to enable electronic attendance can either be reversed at a future date or maintained to support that attendance in the future, where it is available.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      note the temporary amendments pursuant to the COVID-19 Response (Urgent Management Measures) Act 2020 which allows members to attend meetings by audio link or audio-visual link, as of right and despite anything to the contrary in standing orders and to be counted for the purposes of quorum.

b)      amend its standing orders by including a new Standing Order 3.3.10 that reads as follows:

Attendance of non-members by electronic link

A person other than a member of the local board may participate in a meeting of the local board by means of audio link or audio-visual link if the person is otherwise approved to participate in accordance with Standing Orders Sections 6 and 7.

c)      amend its Standing Order 7.8.5 to provide discretion to the chair of the meeting to decline Public Forum requests via audio or audio-visual link.

 

Horopaki

Context

COVID-19 Response (Urgent Management Measures) Act 2020

8.       In late March 2020, central government enacted an omnibus bill that amended various acts of parliament including the LGA and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA).

9.       The amendments to the LGA and LGOIMA enable local authorities to have meetings by audio-visual link (given the restrictions regarding physical distancing and Alert Level 4) and support the effective operation of those meetings by removing conditions associated with the right to attend meetings by audio or audio-visual link.

10.     These amendments only apply while the Epidemic Preparedness (COVID-19) Notice 2020 is in force and will be repealed when that notice expires or is revoked.

Amendments to LGA

11.     The amendments to the LGA modify Clause 25A, Schedule 7 so that a member of a local authority has the right to attend any meeting by audio or audio-visual link, regardless of what is provided for in the local authority’s standing orders. It also modifies clause 25A so that a member attending by audio link or audio-visual link is counted for the purposes of quorum.

Amendments to LGOIMA

12.     The amendments to LGOIMA include modifying s 47 so that the requirement for meetings of local authorities to be ‘open to the public’ may be met during Alert Level 4 and other restrictions on physical distancing. The amendment redefines ‘open to the public’ to mean that the local authority:

a)   if it is reasonably practicable, enables access to the meeting by broadcasting live the audio or video of the meeting (for example, by broadcasting it on an Internet site); and

b)   does 1 or both of the following as soon as practicable after the meeting ends:

i.   makes an audio or a video recording of the meeting available on its Internet site

ii.  makes a written summary of the business of the meeting available on its Internet site.

13.     This amendment does not anticipate public involvement as part of the meeting itself but ensures the public can access or view meeting proceedings online (either live or after the meeting) or through reviewing the summary.  

14.     Other amendments to LGOIMA include:

·   Modifying s 46A so that agendas and reports for the meetings may be made available on the local authority’s internet site instead of at offices and other physical locations.

·   Modifying s 51 so that minutes of meetings may be made available on the local authority’s internet site instead of at offices and other physical locations.

·   The changes made by the COVID-19 Response (Urgent Management Measures) Act 2020 now supersede some of the provisions in the local board standing orders and the restrictions on physical distancing and from Alert Level 4 now limit the opportunity for public input.


 

Local Board Standing Orders

15.     The LGA requires local authorities to adopt a set of standing orders for the conduct of its meetings and those of its committees (Clause 27, Sch 7). Each local board has adopted its standing orders which have been developed from a template.

16.     As a result of the statutory amendments listed in this report, the follow standing orders have been temporarily superseded:

·   3.3.2 Member’s status – quorum and vote

·   3.3.3 Conditions for attending by electronic link

·   3.3.4 Request to attend by electronic link

·   7.3.1 Information to be available to the public

·   7.3.2 Availability of agendas and reports

·   8.2.1 Inspection of minute books

17.     There are additional provisions in standing orders that may require further consideration if the local board wishes to enable these to continue during the Epidemic Preparedness (COVID-19) Notice period. These relate to input and participation by Māori and the public.

18.     Clause 25A(2), Schedule 7 of the LGA requires that a person other than a member of the local authority may participate by audio link or audio-visual link if the standing orders of the local authority permit this and if the chair is satisfied that all conditions and requirements in the standing orders are met.

19.     The current standing orders do not currently provide for non-members, if required and approved to do so, to give input by means of audio link or audio-visual link.

20.     Other participants at local board meetings include Governing Body members and staff. The LGA and the recent amendment provide the right for any member of a local authority or committee to attend any meeting of a local authority by audio-visual link (unless lawfully excluded). This can be interpreted broadly to extend to meetings where the elected member may not be a decision-maker or be participating in the decision at all. As such, Governing Body members participation may be by audio or audio-visual link and the process for providing them with speaking rights remains under standing orders.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     In performing their role, local boards are required to act in accordance with the principles contained in s 14(1) of the LGA including the requirement for the council to conduct its business in an open, transparent and democratically accountable manner and make itself aware of and have regard to the views of all of its communities.

22.     While the LGA does not specifically require public input to be provided for at local board meetings, the standing orders approved by the local board reflects the principles in s 14 LGA by providing for public attendance and enabling public input at meetings.

23.     In order to continue to provide this opportunity as well as facilitate input by Māori and the public, the standing orders require amending.

Standing Orders Section 6 Māori Input

24.     Speaking rights for Māori organisations or their nominees are granted under standing orders for the purpose of enabling Māori input, if any, to any item on the agenda of a meeting.

25.     To ensure this right can be exercised during the Epidemic Preparedness (COVID-19) Notice period, provision needs to be made enabling any input to be given by audio or audio-visual link.


 

Standing Orders 7.7 Deputations and 7.8 Public Forum

26.     The provisions for public input in standing orders are one of the ways that local boards give effect to the requirements of the LGA (s 78 and s 79).

27.     The LGA provides that in the course of its decision-making, a local authority must consider the views and preferences of persons likely to be affected by or have an interest in the matter. The LGA does not specify how those views are to be obtained or what form that consideration should take. It does not require a public forum at meetings.

28.     However, the LGA gives local authorities discretion as to how to comply with s 78 and what to consider. Through their standing orders, local boards and the Governing Body have chosen to enable public input through deputations and public forum at their meetings as one way to obtain community views, among other things.

29.     To ensure this opportunity can continue to be made available during the Epidemic Preparedness (COVID-19) Notice period, provision must be made in standing orders to receive this by audio or audio-visual link.

Proposed amendment

30.     This report recommends that input from non-members continue to be enabled during the Epidemic Preparedness (COVID-19) Notice period. This requires an amendment to the standing orders.

31.     An amendment to standing orders requires a 75% majority vote.

32.     A similar amendment has been made by the Governing Body to their standing orders. It is desirable to ensure consistency across the governance arms of Auckland Council. The Governing Body resolutions are as follows:

Resolution GB/2020/33 (n) That the Governing Body amend standing orders by inserting a new Standing Order 3.3.10 as follows:

Attendance of non-members by electronic link A person other than a member of the Governing Body, or the relevant committee, may participate in a meeting of the Governing Body or committee by means of audio link or audio-visual link in emergencies if the person is otherwise approved to participate under these standing orders (such as under Standing Order 6.2 “Local board input” or 7.7 “Public input”.)

Resolution GB/2020/33 (p) That the Governing Body agree to change Auckland Council’s Standing Orders to provide full discretion to the chair of the Emergency Committee to decline public input requests

33.     The local board’s standing orders currently gives discretion to the chair to decline deputations but not public forum requests. Giving discretion to the chair to manage requests for public forum during this time can ensure the requirements of the LGA regarding the provision of the technology requirements, can be supported.

Technology options available

34.     Where attendance by audio or audio-visual link is permitted, the LGA requires that the chair of the meeting ensures:

·   that the technology for the audio link or audio-visual link is available and of suitable quality

·   that the procedure for use of the technology will ensure that participants can hear and be heard by each other.

35.     The chair’s discretion will need to be exercised where the technology and quality cannot be guaranteed.

36.     The audio and audio-visual link options available for non-member input are provided by Auckland Council through Skype for Business:

Option

Ability

Audio link only

Attend Skype for Business meeting via phone.

·     No ability to see presentations being shared or to see and be seen by local board members attending the meeting

·     Only technical equipment required is a landline or mobile telephone

Audio-visual link

Video and audio attend Skype for Business meeting

·     Allows non-member to see both presentations being shared and to see and be seen by the local board members attending

·     Requires a mobile phone or a computer device with an internet connection

37.     If enabled under standing orders, non-members who wish to give input would need to contact the local board with a request to attend. If approved by the chair, information on how to join the meeting using audio and audio-visual link options above will be sent out to the attendee by staff.

Summary of meeting

38.     Where it is not reasonably practicable for the public to attend the meeting through a broadcast and/or peruse a recording after it has happened, a summary of the meeting will need to be provided by staff.

39.     A summary in this context would be different from the content of agendas, reports and minutes which are all separately required to be publicly available. It should contain the thrust or key points of the discussion or debate at the meeting keeping in mind that its purpose is to provide an alternative to an audio or video recording of the meeting, in a situation where the public is not able to attend and hear this discussion themselves.

40.     The ordinary definition of a summary is a brief statement or account of the main points of something. While the appropriate level of detail is likely to vary depending on what is being discussed at meetings, a summary is not expected to include verbatim notes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

42.     Staff attendance at meetings, while not specifically provided for, is a necessary part of local board meetings and as such is expected to take place using audio-visual link.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

43.     This report seeks to amend the local boards standing orders to enable public input and Māori input at meetings.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     This report seeks a decision that will ensure Māori input can continue to be given during the Epidemic Preparedness (COVID-19) Notice period.

45.     This will ensure Māori are not prevented from giving input at a meeting on any matter that may be of interest to them.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     The decision to amend standing orders is of a procedural nature and is not considered to have financial implications on Auckland Council.

47.     The scaling up of technology to ensure compliance with COVID-19 Response (Urgent Management Measures) Act 2020 is being done at a cost to the council. The costs are not known at this stage and will be factored into operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     The objective of the recent legislative changes is to reduce public health risks and ensure compliance with social distancing measures and other restrictions in New Zealand’s COVID-19 alert levels response plan.

49.     While this is not specifically required by legislation, permitting public input by audio or audio-visual link, if practicable, can ensure the local board can receive and consider views of its constituents on decisions that they are making.

50.     There is a risk that the audio-visual option would only be taken up by a small number of constituents as this would only be available to those who have the technical devices and internet access. The software that will be used for meetings is Skype for Business which is free to download and use. However, the internet access costs, or availability of technology/devices can be a limiting factor for some constituents. Constituents who do not have internet access can participate, if approved, by phone.

51.     The report is seeking discretion for the local board chair to decline public forum requests. This delegation should be exercised with caution so as to not undermine the intention of standing orders (which currently provided some limited grounds to decline public input). There will be instances where it is reasonable to decline (noting these examples are not intended to be exhaustive), such as:

·   where the technology cannot be provided, or quality cannot be assured

·   a need to manage time allocations for the agenda

·   the matter is neither urgent nor the subject of a decision to be made at the meeting

·   the request is offensive, repetitious, or vexatious.


 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

52.     If approved, the amendments to standing orders can, if the local board chooses, continue beyond the Epidemic Preparedness (COVID-19) Notice period. Enabling these changes gives maximum flexibility for attendance of non-members at future meetings, including those with underlying health issues or compromised immune systems that may need to take extra precaution even after the Epidemic Preparedness (COVID-19) Notice period has ended.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Updated Auckland Council Standing Orders of the Waitākere Ranges Local Board

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Polly Kenrick - Business Manager, Local Board Services

Shirley Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitākere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2020

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Waitākere Ranges Local Board for Quarter Two 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/03902

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Waitākere Ranges Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter two, 1 October – 31 December 2019.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2019/2020 work programme.

3.       It is noted that since the half-yearly report information was prepared the situation will have changed significantly with the COVID-19 lockdown where only essential services have been operating, and the financial impacts on local board budgets are not yet known.

4.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan outcomes.

5.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        grants of $52,924 were awarded to support community activities, such as events, arts, restoration and pest control[1].

·        art exhibitions, programmes and events run by community art partners attracted a reported 25,576 visitors over the period. Highlights include Te Uru marking its fifth birthday since opening the doors of the new contemporary gallery, and the Open Studio Waitākere event in November.

·        the West Auckland Heritage Conference was held in 20 October 2019 with attendance at full capacity.

·        the Waitākere Ranges Greenways Plan was finalised.

·        play equipment replaced at Titirangi Beach ($45,000)

6.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). There are no activities with a red status this quarter.

7.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2019/2020 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note:

·        $698,000 has been invested in capital projects, although that is $667,000 below forecast.

·        operating expenditure on locally driven initiatives of $807,000 is over the forecast budget by $53,000 (7%).

·        operating revenue of $401,000 is $19,000 (5%) above the forecast mainly due to filming revenue and library sales and service charges.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter two ending 31 December 2019.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Waitākere Ranges Local Board has an approved 2019/2020 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Arts, Community and Events

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation

·        Libraries and Information

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew

·        Community Leases

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Plans and Places

·        The West Worx

9.       Work programmes are produced annually, to meet the Waitākere Ranges Local Board outcomes identified in the three-year Waitākere Ranges Local Board Plan. The local board plan outcomes are:

·        People actively protect the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area;

·        Our unique natural habitats are protected and enhanced;

·        Local communities feel good about where they live;

·        People experience local arts and culture and recognise our heritage;

·        Our urban centres are enjoyable places to be; and

·        Our community spaces, parks, sports and recreation facilities meet local needs and are easy to get to.

10.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.


 

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

11.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

 

12.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 


 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter two

13.     Key activity updates for this quarter include:

Arts, Community and Events

·        grants of $52,924 were awarded to support community activities, such as events, arts, restoration and pest control[2].

·        collectively the local board supported community art galleries, Lopdell Precinct, and art events report attracting 25,576 visitors over the period.

·        Te Uru marked its fifth birthday since opening the doors of the new contemporary gallery. November saw the start of the annual Portage Ceramic Awards exhibition, and the Open Studio Waitākere event was held.

·        The West Auckland Heritage Conference was held in 20 October 2019 with attendance at full capacity.

·        Glen Eden Community House in collaboration with the local Hare Krishna Group held a free monthly community dinner as a pilot which is now set to continue.

·        West Auckland Pasifika Forum reaches a milestone in becoming a legal entity

·        Draft Resilient Piha Plan circulated to interested parties

·        Supporting South Titirangi Neighbourhood Network with advice and funding to grow their outreach and impact across the community.

·        the Kaiwhakaawe (ori Broker) role based at Hoani Waititi Marae

·        Six citizenship ceremonies were held with 118 residents of the area becoming New Zealand citizens.   

·        The Waitākere Ranges Greenways Plan was completed with final updates to reflect the approval decision.


 

Community facilities: build, maintain, renew

·        $698,000 has been invested in capital projects, which is $667,000 below forecast. This is a three-year programme, with many projects still in the planning phase.

·        Of the 70 renewals projects and programmes of work, 15 have been completed in the first half year.

·        Renewal works at Bethells Beach and Karekare Reserve carparks completed in December;

·        Titirangi Beach play equipment replaced ($45,000);

·        Planning is underway for other projects, including:

o    Lopdell House external steps, footpath and landscaping – draft concept prepared for upgrading the South Titirangi Road corner roadside reserve. This will be the subject of a future report to the local board.

o    Glen Eden town square

Community Facilities maintenance contracts

·        The parks and facilities maintenance regime under the full facilities, arboriculture and ecological restoration contracts highlighted:

o   a strong audit performance with the full facilities contract averaging a score of 86% in 300 audits

o   reduced backlog of arboricultural work

o   first stage of pest plant visits undertaken, and pest animal control visits increased in high value reserves; aftercare of recent plantings;

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        434 – coastal and marine project - a seabird survey was completed with several new seabird locations found and mapped around Te Henga and Piha; a shorebird survey got underway; two community workshops were held.

·        465 – Waitākere weed action project – control of climbing asparagus and ginger on private properties in Cornwallis, Huia, Karekare, Piha and Anawhata continued this quarter, with Cornwallis residents noted as making the highest proportion of requests for help.

Plans and places

·        The six-monthly report on activity in the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area shared programme is due to be reported separately so is not part of this report. 

Activities with significant issues

14.     Shadbolt House – refurbish house to safe levels – green – see 2776, Attachment A.

15.     Kay Road Bale Fill Project Support – green – see 606, Attachment A.

16.     Titirangi village toilet block replacement – see 1973

17.     Waitākere Ranges – small parks improvements – amber – see 2831, Attachment A. 

18.     Withers Reserve, Kaurilands, replace pedestrian bridge and widen footpaths – amber - 2338 – there’s insufficient funding available. Staff are seeking to change the design or secure more funding.

19.     Booking hours across council and community managed venues were down, though this is attributed to non-reporting by some community partners.

Activities on hold

20.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·    587 - Shadbolt House operational grant – $10,170 This activity is on hold until further decisions are made by the local board on how to fund building restoration work.

·    589 - Glen Eden Playhouse operational grant – $18,157 – while the grant is noted as being on hold in Q2, the report highlights activities at the theatre which include Touch Compass - who put on a performance for those with hearing and visual impairment. The resident theatre company, Playhouse Theatre Inc, also produced and performed a season of Spamalot.

·    2313 - Waitākere Domain Hall - renew roof on hall – this been moved to FY22 as was noted in Q1

·    3833 - Harold Moody Park to Savoy Road Cycleway Bridge - develop connection. This option is no longer being explored, however, investigations for Glen Eden connections are underway for Verdale Circle / Olive Grove.

·    2389 – Concordia Reserve track renewal – since this was proposed it has been superseded by the decision on kauri dieback in local parks.

·    3549 - Mahoe Walk - renew walkways and path – since this was proposed it has been superseded by the decision on kauri dieback in local parks.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

21.     No activities were reported as deferred in Q2 from the 2019/2020 work programme.

Cancelled activities

22.     No activities were reported as cancelled in Q2, although EcoMatters has noted some workshop cancellations within its overall work programme.

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

23.     No activities were reported as merged with other activities for efficient delivery in Q2.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

25.     Work programmes were approved in June 2019 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

26.     The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

·        The finalising of the Waitākere Ranges Greenways Plan which identifies nine priorities for future investment in the walking and cycling network in this area.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     This report informs the Waitākere Ranges Local Board of the performance for quarter two ending 31 December 2019.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     The following projects contain a specific approach to progressing Māori responsiveness.

·    179 – ori responsiveness, partners with mana whenua and matāwaka organisations to support collaborative projects that respond to Māori aspirations. Novi Marikena has been appointed by Hoani Waititi Marae to the Kaiwhakaawe (Māori Broker) role, which has been established to progress the relationship and programme aspirations of the marae, west Auckland local boards and Māori communities.

·    179 – a report on the cultural park design process with rangatahi of Te Kura Kaupapa O Hoani Waititi marae was completed. This will lead on to a design for Sunvue Park, Glen Eden.

·    368 – Te Kete Rukuruku programme - ori naming (and associate storytelling) of parks and reserves). A ‘tranche 1’ list of parks, which were identified in the previous quarter, have been presented to mana whenua for discussion for naming/renaming. Staff have continued to work on identifying the overlapping iwi interests in quarter 2, which has taken longer than anticipated. The programme aims to identify opportunities for park naming/renaming and engaging with mana whenua to develop Māori names and enhance Aucklands Māori identity and heritage and promote the use of te reo Māori.

·    174 – Build capacity –Young People, funds youth providers including Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Hoani Waititi Marae, to facilitate placemaking, place activation or environmental projects that are led and delivered by young people.  Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Hoani Waititi Marae progressed their stream restoration project and development of a nursery on the kura grounds. This will be reported in more detail in Q3 as the project progresses.

·    1024 – Libraries celebrate Te Ao Māori and strengthing responsiveness to Māori. Whakatipu i te reo Māori with events and programmes including regionally coordinated and promoted programmes: Te Tiriti o Waitangi, Matariki and Māori Language Week. Engaging with Iwi and Māori organisations. Whakatipu i te reo Māori - champion and embed te reo Māori in our libraries and communities.

·    1110 – Hoani Waititi Marae funding is a three-year term agreement with Hoani Waititi Marae Trust towards operation and maintenance associated costs, enabling the marae to be open and available for public use for 2019/2020. There is no update noted in the work programme report (Attachment A) for this quarter.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

31.     An overview of financial performance is provided in Attachment B.


 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

33.     Community Facilities are currently going through a departmental restructure to provide better support and guidance for decision makers.  There is a risk that the work programmes could be disrupted or delayed. To mitigate this risk a transition plan is in place to ensure that your work programmes are delivered, and disruptions are kept to a minimum. The local board will be kept informed throughout the transition

34.     The approved Community Facilities 2019/2020 work programme and 2020-2022 indicative work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the 2019/2020 financial year, by ensuring that if projects intended for delivery in the 2019/2020 financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances, that other projects can be progressed while the causes for delays are addressed.

35.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter three (31 March 2020).

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work Programme 2019/2020 Quarter Two Report

 

b

Financial Performance 2019/2020 Quarter Two Report

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Brett Lane - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitākere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2020

 

 

Panuku Development Auckland Local Board Six Monthly Update 1 August 2019 to 29 February 2020

File No.: CP2020/03767

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Waitākere Ranges Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) activities within the local board area and the region for the six months from 1 August 2019 to 29 February 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Panuku is charged with balancing financial and non-financial outcomes in order to create and manage sustainable and resilient places where people want to live, work, invest, learn and visit. The activities of Panuku cover four broad areas: 

·        redevelopment of urban locations, leveraging off council owned land assets, mostly within existing suburbs

·        review of, and where appropriate, redevelopment of council non-service property

·        management of council property assets including commercial, residential, and marina infrastructure

·        other property related services such as redevelopment incorporating a service delivery function, strategic property advice, acquisitions and disposals.

3.       Panuku currently manages 21 commercial and residential interests in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area. 

4.       No properties were purchased or sold in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area during the six-month reporting period.

5.       One property is currently under review as part of our rationalisation process.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)   receive the Panuku Development Auckland Local Board update for 1 August 2019 to 29 February 2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland, from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

7.       The Auckland Plan is the roadmap to deliver on Auckland’s vision to be a world class city, Panuku plays a significant role in achieving the ‘Homes and Places’ and ‘Belonging and Participation’ outcomes.

8.       Panuku leads urban redevelopment in Manukau, Onehunga, Wynyard Quarter, Waterfront, Northcote, Avondale, Takapuna, Henderson, Papatoetoe, Ormiston and Flat Bush, Panmure, Pukekohe, City Centre and redevelopment of the Haumaru Portfolio.

9.       Panuku manages around $3 billion of council’s non-service property portfolio, which is continuously reviewed to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio, or release land or property that can be better used by others. “Non-service properties” are Council owned properties that are not used to deliver Council, or CCO, services.

10.     As at 31 December 2019, the Panuku managed regional property portfolio comprises 1674 properties, containing 1035 leases. This includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres, and a large portfolio of residential rental homes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Development

11.     Panuku is contributing commercial input into approximately 50 region-wide council-driven renewal and housing supply initiatives.

12.     Panuku works with partners and stakeholders over the course of a project. It also champions best practice project delivery, to achieve best value outcomes within defined cost, time and quality parameters.

13.     Below is a high-level update on activities in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area:

Properties managed in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board Area

14.     Panuku currently manages 20 commercial and one residential interest within the local board area.

Business interests

15.     Panuku also manages the commercial return from business interests on the council’s behalf. This includes two forestry enterprises, two landfills and four quarries. 

16.     There are currently no managed business interests in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area.

Portfolio strategy

Optimisation

17.     Optimisation is a self-funding development approach targeting sub-optimal service assets approved in 2015. The process involves an agreement between Community Facilities, Panuku and local boards and is led by Panuku. It is designed to equal or enhance levels of service to the local community in a reconfigured form while delivering on strategic outcomes such as housing or urban regeneration with no impact on existing rate assumptions.

18.     Using optimisation, underperforming assets will have increased utility and efficiency, lower maintenance and operating costs, as well as improved service delivery benefiting from co-location of other complimentary services or commercial activities. Optimisation will free up a range of undercapitalised development opportunities such as air space, full sites, or part sites.

19.     Using optimisation as a redevelopment and funding tool, the Local Board can maximise efficiencies from service assets while maintaining levels of service through the release of some or all of that property for sale or development.

20.     Local boards are allocated decision making for the disposal of local service property and reinvestment of sale proceeds in accordance with the service property optimisation approach.

Portfolio review and rationalisation

Overview

21.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within the council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. Panuku has a focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes.

22.     Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

23.     Panuku works closely with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to identify potential surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

Target for July 2018 to June 2019:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$30 million disposal ‘recommendations’

$30.4 million disposal recommendations.

 

Target for July 2019 to June 2021:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio Review

$45m disposal recommendations.

$20 million disposal recommendations as at 28 February 2020.


Process

24.     Once identified as no longer delivering the council service use for which it was acquired, a property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council departments and CCOs, the local board and mana whenua. This is followed by Panuku board approval, engagement with the local ward councillors, the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally, a Governing Body decision.

Under review

25.     Properties currently under review in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the governing body.

 

Property

Details

300 West Coast Road, Glen Eden

Approximately 5,500m2 of the former Glen Eden Borough Council works depot is being retained for open space network purposes. The remainder of the site is subject to a Panuku led rationalisation process.

300 West Coast Road is a closed land fill and a medium risk contaminated site.

The internal consultation commenced in December 2015 and was deferred while alternate public work uses were investigated.

A revised open space assessment of the entire site was undertaken in July 2018 and provides an updated recommendation to enable the Waitākere Ranges Greenways/Pathways route to the Glen Eden town centre.

The approximately 4,900m2 balance of the site is not required for a public work and will be subject to offer back obligations to the former owner in accordance with section 40 of the Public Works Act 1981. 

The Waitākere Ranges Local Board resolved at its 28 March 2019 business meeting to support the retention of the entire property for open space and future growth purposes, and due to its strategic location and proximity to the Glen Eden town centre.

Panuku is engaging with council departments regarding service use requirements for the area of 300 West Coast Road being retained before reporting to the Finance and Performance Committee for a final decision on the balance.

 

Acquisitions and disposals

26.     Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. Panuku purchases property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other services. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

Acquisitions

27.     Panuku does not decide which properties to buy in a local board area. Instead, it is asked to negotiate the terms and conditions of a purchase on behalf of the council.

28.     Panuku has purchased 8 properties for open space across Auckland in the time period between August 2019 and February 2020 at a cost of $28.2 million.

29.     No properties have been purchased in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area during the reporting period for open space.

30.     All land acquisition committee resolutions contain a confidentiality clause due to the commercially sensitive nature of ongoing transactions, and thus cannot be reported on while in process. 

Disposals

31.     In the reporting period between August 2019 and February 2020, the Panuku disposals team has entered into five sale and purchase agreements, with an estimated value of $3.6 million of unconditional net sales proceeds. 

32.     Panuku 2019/20 disposals target is $24 million for the year. The disposals target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis. 

33.     No properties have been sold in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area during the reporting period.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     The Panuku Priority Location programmes support regeneration of existing town centres, developing underutilised sites within the urban area, close to transport links. Increasing the density of housing results in reduced carbon emissions through improved utilisation of existing infrastructure and transit-oriented development. The provision of easy, safe and attractive walking and cycling routes reduces reliance on private motor vehicles and enables low carbon lifestyles. Panuku has adopted a minimum standard of a Homestar 6 rating for all homes, resulting in warmer, drier and more energy efficient buildings.

35.     Climate change increases the probability of hotter temperatures and more frequent flooding and drought in the Waitākere Board area. Panuku seeks to future-proof our communities by:

a)   specifying adaptation and resilience in the design of buildings and spaces.

b)   specifying that infrastructure and developments are designed to cope with warmer temperatures and extreme weather events.

c)   use of green infrastructure and water sensitive design for increased flood resilience, ecological and biodiversity benefits

d)   provision of increased shade and shelter for storm events and hotter days.

 Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     The views of the council group are incorporated on a project by project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     Any local or sub-regional impacts related to local activities are considered on a project by project basis.

38.     Panuku requests that all feedback and/or queries relating to a property in the local board area be directed in the first instance to localboard@developmentauckland.co.nz.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     Panuku work collaboratively with mana whenua on a range of projects including potential property disposals, development sites in the area and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum who have a broader mandate.

40.     Panuku will continue to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     The next six-monthly update is scheduled for October 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Perin Gerrand - Engagement Coordinator

Authorisers

Lisa Gooding - Senior Engagement Advisor

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitākere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2020

 

 

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework - Proposed changes

File No.: CP2020/02844

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to outline key amendments to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework and to obtain the local board’s views.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region (ENV/2018/11).

3.       To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (‘ACAF‘) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors.

4.       In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved a consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

5.       In February 2020, a memorandum was circulated to share key findings from the public consultation (Attachments A and B).

6.       To address the feedback from the consultation, this report outlines key structural changes proposed for the framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers to which all actions will align (i.e., a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change).

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities to streamline actions and address feedback.

7.       It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

8.       The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      formally endorse the tabled feedback on Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework including:

·   introducing three pillars representing the core drivers for climate action (i.e., a place-based approach; emissions reduction; preparing for climate change)

·   moving from eleven key moves to eight priorities

·   changing the title from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

b)      delegate authority to the Chair to approve the wording of any further changes directed by the local board.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In February 2018, the Environment and Community Committee resolved to develop an integrated climate action plan for the Auckland region, addressing both emissions reduction (i.e. mitigation) and preparing for the impacts of a changing climate (i.e. adaptation) (ENV/2018/11).

10.     To meet this requirement, Auckland Council led the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, (‘ACAF‘) with extensive collaboration and engagement with mana whenua, public, private and voluntary sectors, reaching hundreds of Aucklanders.

11.     Local board engagement and insights were sought throughout development of the framework, including meetings and cluster workshops.   A summary of feedback from local boards is available in Attachments C and D.

12.     In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee approved the consultation draft of ACAF and associated materials.

13.     In February 2020, a memo was circulated to all local boards to share key findings from the public consultation on the draft ACAF (Attachment A and B).

14.     This report provides an overview of key proposed changes to the draft ACAF to address the feedback received through the consultation.  Local Board views will be reflected in the final version, which will be reported to the Environment and Climate Change Committee in May 2020.

15.     More detailed changes reported in the consultation summary are not repeated here but will be reflected in text changes in the final version.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The proposed changes to ACAF have been informed by consultation feedback received on the draft document.  Some key themes that arose include:

·   Urgency and scale of action needs to be better articulated

·   Lack of clarity on how key moves work together and how they address our climate goals. In addition, it was felt that there are too many.

·   Need to be clearer about roles and responsibilities with a request for more information on who is responsible for actions at each level.

·   Need for partnership working across sectors and with central government and mana whenua in particular.

·   Greater focus on equity across feedback points.

·   Need for a strong Māori voice with widespread support for working with Māori, using mātauranga Māori and Māori practices in designing and implementing climate action.

·   Need for a system shift and scale of change required, and to better articulate this with Aucklanders.

·   Need for communication and behaviour change and a request for campaigns to raise awareness across the region and enable action at an individual level.

·   Need for a significant shift in transport (of all key moves) with the identified actions supported but a need for these to be delivered at pace and scale.

17.     To address this feedback a number of key structural changes are proposed.

18.     The first of these is establish three core drivers for action – our ‘pillars’ (Attachment E).  These provide greater clarity on the goals of the framework and all actions will align to how they deliver against these goals:

·     A Tāmaki response: This pillar reflects the uniqueness of Auckland and our place-based response to climate change.  It is informed by learning from Māori principles and practice, provides a greater focus on equity and a better definition of roles and responsibilities and collective action across governance and sectors.

·   Reducing our emissions: This pillar reflects the need to provide greater clarity on our emissions target and the need to halve emissions by 2030 and reach net zero emissions by 2050.  It improves alignment with the actions and how we will deliver and prioritise emissions reductions.

·   Preparing for climate change: This pillar enables a greater focus on how we will approach climate change adaptation and take a precautionary approach for the region and also provides greater alignment with the actions.

19.     The second structural change is that the eleven key moves are streamlined into eight priorities (Attachment F). This proposed change is to address feedback on where areas are more foundational and therefore should be embedded throughout all priority areas, or where there is confusion and overlap.

·   It is proposed that Key Move 3: Make development and infrastructure climate compatible and Key Move 4: Transform existing buildings and places are combined into a single built environment priority area. 

·   It is proposed that Key Move 1: Lay the foundation is embedded into our three pillars in recognition of the cross-cutting nature of the actions.

·   Similarly, Key Move 9- Rangatahi (Youth & Inter-generational equity) is embedded into pillar 1 to reflect the need to consider actions across the framework.

20.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1 and 9 will still be maintained and reflected in the updated document.

21.     Actions contained within Key Moves 1-11 will be carried through into Priorities 1-8 (Figure 2) and updated to:

·   clarify any ambiguities that were raised in consultation 

·   remove repetition or overlapping actions

·   make additions in response to consultation feedback

·   strengthen alignment to delivery of the three pillars.

22.     Overall, the intent of the actions between the Key Moves 1-11 and Priority areas 1-8, remain the same. Attachment G briefly summarises how the actions have changed from the consultation document to the updated priority areas.

23.     It is also proposed that the title of the document is changed from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to reflect feedback and the greater focus on the impact of actions against our climate goals and roles in delivery. In addition, this provides certainty for roles and responsibilities with regards to implementation.

24.     The proposed changes meet the requirements of a climate action plan as defined by C40 Cities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     The changes identified in this report have been made to reflect feedback received and updated emissions modelling.  As such, they will further deliver and strengthen climate action already identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Regular meetings and workshops took place across the council group for development of the framework.

27.     In addition, a working group was established from the outset to provide expertise from across the council group, central government and district health boards.

28.     This group has continued to provide input post-consultation and has reviewed and provided input into the proposed changes.

29.     In addition, the team has been working closely across the Council group in the development of costed actions for consideration in the Long-term Plan. This process is running concurrently with the finalisation of the plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The framework will have implications for all local boards.

31.     In June 2018, the Chief Sustainability Office attended workshops of 19 of the 21 local boards and obtained informal email feedback from the other two local boards to identify their main priorities related to climate change.  This was followed up in September 2018 at cluster workshops to assess and test a series of ‘must haves’, which were the precursors to the actions included in the draft framework.

32.     Priorities included:

·   coastal erosion and inundation concerns

·   affordable and accessible transport

·   long-term infrastructure development to consider climate impacts

·   better stormwater management

·   climate-related education and awareness

·   building community resilience

·   for Auckland Council to lead by example.

33.     This report seeks Local Board formal views on proposed changes to the draft Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework outlined in this report. These views will be reflected in the final version.

34.     Local boards will be key in taking climate action at a local level. Support will be provided for local board planning and alignment with outcomes.

35.     The Chief Sustainability Office and Quality Advice Unit will implement a programme of work for the whole council family to provide guidance and training on how to embed climate action in Local Board plans and what to expect in climate impact statements.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Climate change impacts and associated policy and action will have significant impacts for Māori communities.

37.     A Tāmaki and climate change subject matter expert rōpū (group) was established in March 2019 which has been supporting and advising mana whenua and council on climate change issues for Māori and providing direct advice and narrative for the draft framework.

38.     A rangatahi Māori and Pasifika rōpū has also been working in partnership with council on this kaupapa to develop rangatahi-focused actions for the framework.

39.     A joint mana whenua and Māori expert task group is finalising a Tāmaki and climate change position paper, Te ora ō Tāmaki, which will be used as the bridging document to weave key anchor points into the climate action framework. 

40.     Anchor points include:

·   weaving the narrative into the framework, specifically the following sections: Climate change and Māori, impacts on Māori and Developing the Plan with Māori

·   a section developed by rangatahi (the Youth and intergenerational equity key move)

·   a separate key move of Te puawaitanga o te tangata (Resilient Māori communities).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Actions within the framework will result in budgetary implications for organisations across the region; identifying and unlocking appropriate funding and financing streams in the future will be critical. 

42.     Taking climate action will require a range of finance and/or funding mechanisms. For instance, green bonds have been a useful tool for financing council-owned assets such as electric trains but investment in clean tech may require crowd-sourcing, grants or venture capital.

43.     To support this, a climate finance work package is underway to identify partnerships and broader funding mechanisms across actions such as bonds, grants, equity instruments and public/private partnerships.

44.     The final framework and specific Auckland Council actions being developed will need to inform on-going Long-term Plan discussions to support delivery and avoid costs associated with inaction, such as increased maintenance costs and infrastructure failures through to missed opportunities to Auckland’s economy in delivering the transition. 

45.     Not all actions within council’s remit will require additional budget. Some actions can result in long-term cost avoidance – for example electrifying fleets can reduce fuel and maintenance costs. Some actions could require existing funds to be redirected if priorities change.

46.     Also, not all actions will require funding, for example those related to advocacy to central government or expert input into actions led by other organisations.

47.     The costs associated with different council-specific actions will consider funding sources as described above.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     No high or extreme risks have been identified with the proposed approach.

49.     Moderate risks exist, including:

·   preparing for the implications of climate change may not comply with current rules and regulations

·   potential strategic risk with non-alignment with New Zealand Government direction and policy

·   potential governance risk in shared leadership and ownership of the framework across sectors.

50.     A risk mitigation plan has been developed to address the above, including targeted engagement approaches, a legal review of the final framework, on-going partnership with central government and establishment of clear governance structures for the implementation of the framework. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Workshops will be held in April 2020 with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Independent Māori Statutory Board to discuss updated framework text, and the final text will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for approval in May 2020.

52.     The draft digital plan layout will be workshopped with the Environment and Climate Change Committee in June 2020 and finalised in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

ACAF Consultation Summary Memo

 

b

ACAF Consultation Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Engagement Summary - LB workshops June 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Engagement Summary - Clusters workshops Oct 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

ACAF Proposed Three Pillars

 

f

ACAF Proposed Eight Priorities

 

g

ACAF Proposed Priority Areas and Actions

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Anderson - Principal Specialist Sustainability and Climate Resilience

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2020

 

 

Local Board feedback to the Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review

File No.: CP2020/02928

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to provide formal feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Review to the Independent Panel.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governing Body approved the Terms of Reference for an Independent Panel to undertake a review of substantive CCOs at its meeting on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127].

3.       The review covers Auckland Transport, Auckland Tourism Events and Economic Development, Panuku Development Auckland, Regional Facilities Auckland and Watercare. The overall objectives are to examine:

•        whether CCOs are an effective and efficient model for delivering services to the council and Aucklanders, and

•        whether the CCO decision-making model provides sufficient political oversight, public transparency, and accountability.

4.       The review asks the Independent Panel to examine three areas: the CCO model and its accompanying roles and responsibilities; the accountability of CCOs; and CCO culture.

5.       The Independent Panel is seeking the views of local boards on these areas.

6.       Local boards are advised that their views are requested by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)   formally endorse the tabled feedback on the Council-Controlled Organisations Review to the Independent Panel.

b)   delegate authority to the Chair to approve the wording of any changes directed by the local board.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Governing Body approved the CCO review Terms of Reference on 26 November 2019 [GB/2019/127]. The Independent Panel was appointed by the Governing Body on 12 December 2019 and is comprised of Miriam Dean, Doug Martin, and Leigh Auton. Miriam Dean has been appointed panel chair [GB/2019/149].

8.       Briefings on the CCO Review were provided to local board chairs in December 2019 by staff and in February 2020 by panel member Leigh Auton. The panel wrote to local board chairs in February asking for advice on what constitutes good engagement between CCOs and local boards.

9.       Monthly updates on the review are reported to the CCO Oversight Committee and circulated to all local boards.

10.     The Independent Panel is seeking comprehensive engagement to obtain a range of views about the issues forming the subject of the review (Attachment A). Community engagement on the review is occurring alongside the Annual Budget 2020/2021 in February/March 2020. An engagement document has been developed and a summary document has been translated into five languages and a New Zealand Sign Language video. A webpage[3] provides information on the review, including stakeholder updates, relevant documents (including the Terms of Reference) and a contact for further information.

11.     All feedback on the CCO Review will be provided to the Independent Panel. The Panel will report on the key issues and community and stakeholder feedback in May and will provide a final report and recommendations in July 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     To identify the scope of their work, the Independent Panel has distilled the essence of the review terms into a list of issues, that forms the basis of the engagement and eventual report. The list and prompts, at Attachment A, provide a structure for local boards to give feedback.

13.     The three key areas of focus set out in the list of issues are:

Issue

Area of focus

CCO model, roles and responsibilities

The essential question here is whether the CCO model delivers council services with the maximum of operational efficiency, transparency, and accountability, or whether there are better ways to deliver such services

CCO accountability

Here the key question is whether the council’s current approach to holding CCOs to account on behalf of Aucklanders could be improved

CCO culture

The central issue here is whether CCOs need to improve how they consult, engage with, and respond to the wider community and council

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Local boards have an opportunity to consider suggestions that might improve climate change outcomes/mitigation in their feedback on the CCO Review.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The Independent Panel is engaging across the council group on the review, including:

·    the chair of the independent panel wrote introducing the panel and the review objectives to all CCO chairs and chief executives, councillors, local board chairs, chief executive of IMSB and the co-chairs of the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 20 December 2019

·    the panel met briefly with the CCO chief executives and chairs on 28 January 2020 to discuss the proposed review process and CCO engagement. Each CCO was asked to provide the panel with key stakeholders/customers

·    individual meetings have taken place with CCO chief executives and board chairs over February and March 2020, and the panel is meeting with CCO stakeholders.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local board formal feedback on the CCO Review, including issues experienced with CCOs, good practice and options for improvement, is sought by the Independent Panel by 3 April 2020.

17.     Material on the CCO Review was available at Have your Say local board events for the Annual Budget.

18.     Following the conclusion of the Independent Panel’s review, as part of the development of the next 10-year budget, local boards will have the opportunity to provide formal views on any proposals for change to the CCO model.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Staff presented to the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 19 December 2019. The panel met with one of the Forum co-chairs and mana whenua are invited to provide feedback to the panel. Mana whenua have also been invited to a hui with panel members on 18 March 2020.

20.     The panel has met with the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

21.     Panel members spoke on Radio Waatea to promote Māori interest and feedback on the CCO review. Material on the CCO review is being provided at mataawaka events for the Annual Budget and mataawaka organisations have been briefed on the review during the public engagement period.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There are no financial implications from this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are no risks associated with the recommendations in this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The Independent Panel is due to report on key issues, community, and stakeholder feedback in May and to provide a final report, with recommendations, in July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Independent Council-Controlled Organisations Review list of issues

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Gomas - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitākere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2020

 

 

Chair's Report - March 2020

 

File No.: CP2020/03730

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Secretarial Note: This report has been carried forward from the 26 March 2020 Business Meeting, which was cancelled due to New Zealand’s Covid-19 Alert Level 4.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Board members are responsible for leading policy development in their areas of interest, proposing and developing project concepts, overseeing agreed projects within budgets, being active advocates, accessing and providing information and advice.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive Chair Presland’s report for March 2020.

 

Coronavirus

3.       The virus is spreading with terrifying speed throughout the world.  So far New Zealand has had limited notified infections.  They have all been traced to persons who had recently travelled to hot spots.  No case of community infection has yet occurred as far as we know. At the time of writing we have had a record 40 days without rain.  It has been glorious, but some locals are starting to feel the pinch.

4.       Overseas China appears to be getting on top of the problem but only through taking extraordinary steps that it is difficult to think would work in New Zealand.  Whole cities have been subject to curfews. Titirangi itself is fine thanks to the reticulated water supply system.  But parts of Cornwallis, Huia, Karekare, Piha, Te Henga, Waitākere and Waiatarua are struggling.

5.       Italy is in the midst of a crisis with its older population feeling the effects more keenly.  In the north of the country, where medical facilities are world class the system is groaning under the increase of hospitalisations.  Although for most people, particularly young, the disease causes no more than temporary discomfort, for some the effect can be devastating.  Hospitalisation rates are high enough to throw the health system in disarray.  China responded to the crisis by constructing new hospitals within weeks.  Italy does not have that luxury or that ability.  But it has put into a place a country wide curfew and taken the extraordinary step of suspend mortgage payments.

6.       What can we do?  Panic buying of masks, or for that purpose toilet paper, does not help.  But we can take basic hygiene steps.  If we sneeze, make sure it is into a tissue or at least our elbow.  Avoid handshakes and wash our hands regularly and well.  If we feel ill, then take time out and keep away from others.  And we need to keep washing our hands regularly.

7.       This made me think about citizenship ceremonies.  At a typical ceremony I would shake hands with a hundred people.  I would hate to be the spreader of the disease.

8.       Because of this Auckland Council is going to propose that we discontinue hand shaking at ceremonies.  I think this is the right step to take, until things to settle down.

9.       As an alternative there are various options, including from different cultures.  One we could think about is adopting the Vulcan greeting, involving the making of a V sign with our right hand and saying "live long and prosper".  In the face of a disease that is developing into a pandemic I cannot think of anything better to say.

10.     The outbreak has had an effect on local events.  Recently the Pasifika Festival was cancelled, as was the memorial event for the Christchurch Mosque massacre and the Waitākere Holi Festival.  The Piha World Surfing event was also cancelled and Titirangi’s own Festival of Music has been postponed.

11.     Clearly the current situation is playing havoc with the organising of local events, both Council organised and community organised and the Local Board will help local organisations who plan and organise public events to adjust and adapt.  We will get through this but for a while we are going to be less social.

12.     Please look after each other.  Check your neighbours are ok.  Remember to wash your hands and if you do feel ill then don’t go to work.  And if you seek help then do so in such a way that is safe for doctors’ practices and medical professionals.

Water shortage

13.     Second up in terms of major problems our area is facing…

14.     Last month I referred to the Auckland drought and the need to preserve water.  And after writing my report and before our last meeting it rained!  I should obviously write about these issues more often.

15.     But we are not out of the woods yet.  Although there has been rain it has been intermittent and not sufficient to resolve matters.  Dam levels are at a healthy 62% at the time of writing although this is down from about 70% a month ago.

16.     And the reason why they are so healthy is that Watercare has been using Waikato water as much as possible.  It is estimated that if it was not for this the dams would be 25% full and then we would all be facing a crisis.

17.     And the weather patterns are, thanks to global warming, changing.  We are going to have to find long term solutions to this problem.

Waitākere Hospital

18.     The Henderson Massey Local Board Chairperson Chris Carter arranged a briefing for local board members out west from senior managers at the Waitematā District Health Board (DHB).  As well as a presentation on Coronavirus we were told of the DHB’s future plans for Waitākere Hospital.

19.     The hospital provides some current provision of services, but many more services are provided at North Shore Hospital.  The Waitematā DHB has the largest population of any DHB in the country.

20.     The west has special requirements.  We are a poorer area and because of this health needs are more intense.  We also have areas of intense growth.

21.     The Henderson-Massey and Waitākere Ranges combined population makes us bigger than Dunedin, Tauranga and Hamilton.  And the large geographical area makes travelling to the North Shore a long and stressful process.

22.     The hospital needs to become a full acute hospital site capable of handling all sorts of medical issues.  This will take pressure off Auckland Hospital and North Shore Hospital.  It will also allow people to be treated locally and reduce the stress of travel for families

23.     I understand that a decision is to be made in the near future by the Government.

24.     The local board chairs for the west intend to advocate strongly in support of full development of the Waitākere Hospital and to make representations directly to the Minister of Health.

Watercare Hearing

 

25.     With Saffron Toms and Ken Turner I recently presented the local board's submissions on the Waima Watercare application.

26.     The evidence has now all been filed, and some interesting issues have become prominent. 

27.     The most significant is kauri dieback.  The fear has been expressed by a number of experts including Council's expert that the earth works in an area that has Kauri dieback spores will mean that the spores are spread throughout the area.  Every time it rains spores will be washed through the valley in an area that has significant groves of magnificent Kauri.

28.     And on this the expert evidence, from both Council and from experts briefed by the opponents, which interestingly enough includes the Department of Conservation, is terrifying.

29.     The basic premise as I understand it is that the huge amount of earthworks will accelerate the spread of Kauri dieback.  Water trickling down broken up soil is the best way to achieve its spread.  To stop the spread would require a rather large structure resembling a moat.  And the area downstream is home to some of the most significant groves of Kauri in the region.

30.     I wondered what a safe worksite would look like.  I suggested that Watercare would have to construct a moat around the site to gather the water and then pipe it to the Manukau which is quite a few kilometers away.

31.     My concluding comment to the hearing was as follows:

"In assessing the merits of this application, the Board’s concern is that the risk of spreading kauri dieback through the valley is far too high and the potential consequences catastrophic.  The local board remains opposed to the application.  In fact, based on the expert evidence our opposition is now more determined."

32.     The panel has recommended that the various experts caucus and present a brief to the panel indicating what is agreed to and what is disputed.

33.     The valley immediately below the site is the home of some of the most significant and magnificent Kauri out west.  I trust the panel will take all necessary care in determining this application.

34.     To add to this the planned mitigation is not enough.  To mitigate the clear felling of a forest would require funding for a hundred-year plan.

35.     This discovery has reinforced my view that the Waitākere Ranges Local Board was correct in its opposition to the plant.  We will see in the future what the commissioners conducting the hearing think.

Waitākere Heritage Area Gateway Sign Project

36.     This has been on the Local Board's work programme for a while and until recently progress has been slow.  But the Board recently had a very welcome presentation by a new staff member Keren Alleyne and by Claire Walker, a contractor also recently involved in the project.

37.     The Board's thinking is that some form of artwork is preferable to signs, that a generic design with local variations would be better, and that the artwork should act as markers on the edge of the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area.  In terms of the artwork a suggestion is that for cost and durability reasons laser cut steel could be an option.

38.     We want consultation with Te Kawerau a Maki and with local ratepayers’ groups including the group of residents who had worked on the proposal to occur.  We will hopefully then be in a position to work out selection of an artist to provide us with a concept for the project.

39.     Funding will be sought from different sources as to do it properly would be beyond the means of the local board.


 

Annual Plan and Local Board Agreement consultation

 

40.     This is now under way.  The one particular proposal that affects the  Waitākere Ranges local board area is the future of the septic tank pump out service.  This is a service paid for by residents with older style septic tanks and ensures that every three years they will have their tanks pumped out.  The way I see it there are two benefits, we get the advantage of scale and fees can be kept reasonable for everyone, and secondly all relevant tanks are pumped out.  To my way of thinking there is a significant risk to the environment if the scheme is discontinued and this is why the current scheme, with a regional subsidy, should be continued.  After all we are dealing with the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area and special care should be exercised.

41.     We have also been talking to local communities about our three-year plan and what people think should be in it.  So far there have been two drop-in sessions, a meeting with the Trustees of the Glen Eden Mosque, and a meeting with the Glen Eden Methodist congregation.  Feedback was received during Waitangi day at Hoani Waititi Marae and online and further meetings are planned although adjusting to Coronavirus is making this problematic.

42.     By all means let us know your views.  What do you think is important for our area in the next three years and what should the local board be doing?


 

Kauri Karnival

 

43.     After receiving advice Council decided to proceed with the Kauri Karnival.  The risk was assessed to be low and the nature of the event, with crowds spread out and no identified people facing threats was not the sort that demanded cancellation.

44.     Numbers were down on last year, which given the circumstances was understandable.  But the event delivered top quality music and some very interesting stalls as well as a number of activities which were child friendly and child pleasing.

Shadbolt House

45.     This has been on the local board's work plan for a few years.  The Going West Trust has expressed an interest in converting the house into a writer's residence.  The house was originally purchased by Waitākere City Council with this intent.  The Colin McCahon House shows what can be done with this sort of model.

46.     Staff are being cautious and have raised health and safety concerns.  I am confident that this can be taken care of however and that working with the trust they can be overcome.

47.     There is a feeling that Titirangi's art sector is more than adequate.  I am a fan of it being exceptional.

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Stewart - Democracy Advisor, Waitākere Ranges Local Board

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitākere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2020

 

 

Chair's Report - April 2020

 

File No.: CP2020/04703

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on projects, meetings, and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Board members are responsible for leading policy development in their areas of interest, proposing and developing project concepts, overseeing agreed projects within budgets, being active advocates, accessing and providing information and advice.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive Chair Presland’s report for April 2020.

 

3.       I trust everyone is well and is adapting to this new way of life. The actions taken by everyone so far have led me to be cautiously optimistic that we can beat the threat posed by Covid-19. New Zealand may do better than most nations and we may get back to a relatively normal way of life in the near future.

4.       But please keep up the social distancing, the washing of your hands and most importantly be kind to each other.

5.       The local board is still getting to grips with the implications of Covid-19. It will have a profound effect on council activity for some time to come.

Community support

6.       I am always pleased to see the power of community and how people immediately adjust to help others in difficult times. Locally I am aware that Vision West is providing significant support to local families in need.

7.       Council itself has stepped up and is providing support.

8.       There is an Emergency food parcel delivery service - 0800 22 22 96 - which has received 8,000 calls at the time of writing, 5,000 of which required assistance. So far 3,250 deliveries have been made.

9.       Amongst those seeking help are people who have never needed help in the past. They are people who have lost their jobs and are suddenly struggling.

10.     Council is also running a call system. Staff are ringing people aged 70 years or older to check them. Over 50 library staff are being used.


 

Finances

11.     The implications are significant for Auckland Council’s finances.

12.     Wellington City Council has indicated a likely $70 million hit to its income this year. I can say confidently that the hit to Auckland Council’s finances will be worse.

13.     Fees and charges account for about half of Auckland Council’s income. Nationally the figure is more like 40%. It means for Auckland that any change in conditions will have a dramatic and very quick effect.

14.     In working out how to respond there is always the fiscally disciplined approach, cut the expenditure back until fiscal equilibrium is reached. Unfortunately, as shown by the great depression this is the wrong approach for a public entity to take, and all that it will do is make the recession worse.

15.     Every Kensyan economist in the world will tell you that public institutions have to be counter cyclical, when economies crash public entities have to start spending. The neoclassical ideas proposed by the Chicago School of Economics in the 1980s that has dominated economic approaches through most of the world are in decline. We are all Keynesians now.

16.     The problem though is that Auckland Council is nearing its debt ceiling of 270% of debt to income ratio.

17.     This is a ratio set by rating agencies to measure the fiscal health of Auckland Council. The fear is that the rating agencies will downgrade Auckland Council’s credit rating if this cap is breached and borrowing will be more expensive. But at a time when even the strongest of corporations are having their balance sheets battered and public institutions are the only safe entities standing, I think it is time to review this.

18.     Sure, the debt will have to be repaid. But interest rates are at a historically low point and to get us through increasing debt is an option I think Council should be considering.

19.     The Government has effectively trashed its fiscal responsibility rules and is spending up large. It is time I think for Auckland Council to do the same.

20.     What about rates increases? There has been calls to freeze rates and some families are going to face considerable hardship for the next year or two at least.

21.     Auckland Council is in a difficult position. Its job is to spend up large, keep people in jobs, get major projects under way, not breach the Council’s debt ceiling, and not hurt already struggling ratepayers.

22.     Something has to give!

23.     Staff are preparing scenarios for Councillors to consider. There is the urgent procedure for changes to the ten-year plan that can be used.

24.     These discussions could be the most critical that Councillors will undertake. In the spirit of co-governance, I trust that local boards will be included in these discussions from an early stage.

Infrastructure

25.     As one of the measures the Government is undertaking to stimulate and preserve employment it has asked Councils to nominate "shovel ready" projects that Councils wanted accelerated. After a remarkably quick round of consultation Council has drawn up a list of projects that it wanted advanced.

26.     The local board was asked for our view. Our requested additions included Greenways Plan projects the Te Whau pathway, the North Western Busway, Project Gigawatt (solar power rollout), Kauri protection initiatives, and Sportsfields development. These have mostly made the process so far, but details are not clear.

27.     The three westie local board chairs, Chris Carter, Kay Thomas, and myself also took the opportunity to separately lobby for extensions to Waitākere Hospital.  By a happy coincidence, an application was submitted last month to the Government for a significant increase to the Waitākere Hospital base.  It has plenty of land and there is a growing need in the west for its own hospital. Again, I am quietly confident that the request will be considered in a positive manner but time will tell.

28.     The main concern that I have is that Council and the Government takes this opportunity to concentrate of infrastructure that will be needed to address climate change.  Climate change is this second crisis that is developing more slowly but in a more dramatic fashion. We should be taking every chance that we have to get ready now.

29.     The effects of climate change are already being felt. Now at this time where there is an imperative to keep the economy going and provide jobs Auckland Council should also take the opportunity to prepare the city to become more sustainable and more resilient. Covid-19 presents to us both a crisis and an opportunity to improve our city.

Meetings

 

30.     Normal meetings could be a while away and the meeting where this report will be considered is planned to be held via skype. Future meetings may be held in the same way.

31.     The agendas will be put up on Council's Infocouncil page when it is available, and I will make sure it also goes up on our Facebook page.  All board members are contactable by email.

32.     So, if you have any comments or questions let any of the board members know.

33.     And if you have any proposals for what you think we should be doing feel free to communicate these to us.

34.     Already we have had a zoom meeting with residents involved in local emergency management. The meeting, organised by Mark Allen, went well and I hope that we repeat this type of meeting with other groups.

Local Board Plan

35.     Amongst everything that is happening is our drafting of the local board's three-year plan.

36.     This is a legal requirement. We are working on a draft and hope to have it released for discussion in the near future.

37.     The circumstances are fundamentally different to what they were three years ago when we prepared our last plan.

38.     A major downturn in the economy is inevitable. Foreign trade will be rare and trips overseas the exception. Local production of goods and food will become essential. Oratia may again become a major fruit basket.

39.     Ideally our lives will become simpler and less materialistic. And we may be better placed to deal with climate change.

40.     In preparing our draft I have wanted us to emphasise the importance of Manakitanga, of hospitality, kindness, generosity, and support and care for others.

41.     Kaitiakitanga, the care and stewardship of our environment, will also be very important as will the care and support for local businesses. Without good local jobs and the regular supply of goods we cannot achieve our goals.

42.     The continued fostering of our art sector will also be critical. Our arts sector is very vibrant and something for us to be proud of. 

43.     I am sure that we will want to make sure that our parks and facilities are maintained to a good standard, that our social programmes reach across the local board area, and that we are effective with the resources that we have available.

44.     I am also sure that Glen Eden will continue to receive our attention. We will want to advance renewal of Glen Eden as quickly as possible.

45.     In our discussions so far, members have wanted to emphasise that we are the local custodians of the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area.

46.     The draft plan should be available for comment in June. We will want as much feedback as possible so that we can make sure the plan faithfully represents local aims and aspirations.

47.     Finally, I often use a lot of pictures in my reports.  I found it difficult to find appropriate pictures for this report. But I thought I would add this picture taken at the Glen Eden Christmas festival in November last year at a much more innocent time. May we get back to that situation soon!

A group of people standing in front of a crowd

Description automatically generated

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Stewart - Democracy Advisor, Waitākere Ranges Local Board

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitākere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2020

 

 

Local Board Member Report - Member Coney

File No.: CP2020/03543

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for Member Coney to provide a written update on projects, and events attended since the previous month’s meeting and to discuss other matters of interest to the board.

          Secretarial Note: This report has been carried forward from the 26 March 2020 Business Meeting, which was cancelled due to New Zealand’s Covid-19 Alert Level 4.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Board members are responsible for leading policy development in their areas of interest, proposing and developing project concepts, overseeing agreed projects within budgets, being active advocates, accessing and providing information and advice.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive Member Coney’s board member report for March 2020.

 

General update

Heritage

Heritage Conference: Destination West

3.       The organising group met late in 2019 to debrief on that year’s Heritage Conference held on 20 October during the Heritage Festival. Feedback was positive from participants and changes we had made to the format – such as shortening the event – were greeted positively and will be followed through in 2020.

4.       Particularly popular were two keynote addresses; Graeme Murdoch’s “He Haerenga Tawhito – early Maori ancestral journeys in West Auckland” and Isaac McIvor and Larry Paul on “The Rescue of the Daring” a schooner which was wrecked on Te Oneone Rangatira in 1863 and uncovered and excavated in 2018.

5.       For 2020 we have adopted the theme of the Heritage Festival – “Hidden Stories”. The conference will be held on 11 October.

Waikumete Cemetery

6.       In February I met with Sheree Stout, former Head Sexton at Waikumete and now Operations Manager Cemetery Services, and Nikki Marchant-Ludlow, Manager Cemetery Services, to be updated on Waikumete. Several areas of the cemetery are under development but not those parts of the cemetery which have SEAs. There are about 10 years of burial space left in the cemetery and the Council is exploring sites for new cemeteries in the north-west.

7.       We discussed the Waikumete Cemetery Open Day which is due to take place this year. This has been a joint project between Waikumete Cemetery and the Waitākere Ranges Local Board. This is yet to be discussed by the board.

Shadbolt House

8.       Following discussion of this project with the board I attended a meeting with the Going West Trust and heritage architect, Graeme Burgess. It is intended to follow this up with a site visit, however as the Council officer who was managing this has left, we now await who the new appointment will be.

Glen Eden War Memorial

9.       I met with Keren Alleyne who is the project manager for an interpretive sign at the Glen Eden War Memorial and Recreation Centre to discuss sources of information for the sign.

Court of Honour, Auckland Museum

10.     I have continued to attend meetings of the Council, Museum etc. as part of the group advising the mayor on WW1 commemorations. The group is working on a substantial upgrade of the Court of Honour at Auckland Museum, which is used for the Anzac Day commemorations and other events.

Mural by Theo Schoon with gourds by him in from, Te Uru

 

Split Level View Finder: Theo Schoon and New Zealand Art at Te Uru

11.     I attended part of the first day of this exhibition over several galleries of the work of modernist artist Theo Schoon. I attended two presentations of art historians making commentary on the importance of Schoon. Schoon was Dutch, grew up in Java and attended art school in Rotterdam where he was influenced by the Bauhaus. His family came to New Zealand in 1939 where Schoon was very taken with Maori art forms and design: “He worked across and between cultures and contexts.” He worked in many art forms including dance and influenced other artists such as Paratene Matchitt and Robert Ellis. He has been much neglected and this exhibition, put together by City Gallery Wellington is a real coup for Te Uru. It is showing until 31 May.

Rodney Bell and Suzanne Cowan led the walk on Byers Track

 

The Hauntology of Inheritance walk on Byers Track

12.     On 29 February I attended a walk on Byers Track, Piha, organised by Te Uru and led by Rodney Bell and Suzanne Cowan, both choreographers and dancers. The walk focused on the "legacy of Pakeha and paid respects to Te Kawerau a Maki". It focused on the forest and at five points rituals were held. A very interesting and enjoyable walk with accessibility a focus given our two leaders were in wheelchairs. We were able to get all the way up to the junction with Knutzen Track on the wheelchairs, an unexpected bonus of the recent upgrading for kauri dieback.

Parks

Piha Wetland Developments

13.     I have attended two meetings with regard to the Outcome Plan for the former Ministry of Education land at Piha. Four groups in the local community – West Coast Gallery, Protect Piha Heritage, Piha Kidz Charitable Trust and Piha R&R have formed the Piha Wetland Trust with a view to helping restore the wetland and develop community activities and assets on the site. The Board will consult on the outcome plan to gather feedback from the community.

14.     Invasive Mercer grass in the wetland has been treated by Te Ngāhere and this control will be repeated. Healthy Waters intends to carry out some restoration to improve the hydrology and also some work to address erosion.

Piha Pump Track at Les Waygood Park

15.     This has been well used leading to children waiting for a turn, taking over the carpark.

16.     In discussion with Piha Kidz Charitable Trust and with the agreement of the Board it was decided to cut a track through the kikuyu etc. in the park to create a cycle track which can be used by children with bikes.

Piha Pro

17.     The board gave landowner approval for this major event, organised by World Surfing League and supported by ATEED, to go ahead on Piha beach.

18.     I gave comment on behalf of the board on the resource consent application which was necessary because the event takes place over 9 days. The issues I raised were: a lack of attention to environmental aspects, the need to ensure Piha did not get grid-locked, ensuring emergency vehicles could operate and the need to work with the local community especially groups.

19.     I subsequently attended a public meeting organised by WSL where there was general community support and in February attended another meeting with the organisers and some community groups.

20.     There are particular challenges with transport and the chair wrote to the mayor and ATEED asking that the shuttle bus from Parrs Park was extended beyond the planned two days. I am pleased that that resulted in the shuttles being expanded to five days which will enable those without transport or without a booked parking space at Piha to attend.

21.     The event has attracted some big names in the surfing world. It is planned as a three-year event.

22.     I took the opportunity to ask Auckland Transport and Community Facilities to “tidy up” Piha for the event and am pleased to say there was a real effort to make the place look good, including replacing broken bollards and timber barriers and replacing the old WCC sign at the campground with an Auckland Council one.

23.     The event has led to some entities applying for special alcohol licenses for the event and I have had a crash course in how these are approved and the powers they confer. I was surprised to learn a special license overrode the Board’s alcohol ban on the beachfront which runs from 7 pm to 7 am. Licenses have been given to later hours than this.

24.     I was also surprised when properties neighbouring part of the Piha Domain received a letter to say because of the Piha Pro it was intended to fence the effluence disposal field in the Domain that has been in situ for many years. A site visit was held attended by Piha R&R and Healthy Waters and Ken Turner and myself for the Board. I am pleased to say common sense prevailed, and no fence will be built. These is now ongoing discussion between Piha R&R and Healthy Waters on how to best manage the weed control and planting in the field.

Other activities

25.     On 2 March I presented to other local boards at a Takapuna workshop on WRLB’s Strategic Weed Management Plan and Our Backyard climbing asparagus control programme. The Rodney Local Board in particular was interested in the approach of working with a community NGO to deliver a board outcome and how this has attracted support from the regional level of Council.

26.     I attended a meeting on 5 March at Barnett Hall Piha related to the Annual Plan. It was not entirely clear what the focus of this meeting was. It was apparently intended to be a drop-in but attendees had come to discuss the septic tank pump-out programme so it was re-organised as a meeting.

27.     There was a disappointing turn-out. About 20 including 4 elected members. The meeting had not been very visible and the middle of the week is not a good time for bach owners who make up half of the ratepayers at Piha. This topic will be of great interest to many and this was a missed opportunity to inform people.


 

Meetings attended

2020

·    11 March   Pest Free Waitākere Ranges Alliance meeting at Woodlands Park School

·    10 March   Waitemata District Health Board with local boards at Henderson on Waitākere                        Hospital and Covid-19

·    6 March     Beach Valley Road, Piha, with AT re road safety

·    4 March     Hearings on Watercare proposal for a new treatment plant at Waima

·    2 March     Combined Ratepayers at Waiatarua

·    16 February          AGM of Friends of Arataki at Arataki

·    Committee meeting of Piha Residents & Ratepayers

·    Four lupin weeding bees on local park and regional park at Piha

2019

·    17 November Pest Free Waitākere Ranges Alliance seminar at Arataki

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Stewart - Democracy Advisor, Waitākere Ranges Local Board

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitākere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2020

 

 

Confirmation of Workshop Records

 

File No.: CP2020/03727

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present records of workshops held by the Waitākere Ranges Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       Briefings provided during workshops held are as follows:

13 February 2020

·    Staff members from the Community Facilities (CF) department of Auckland Council gave the Board an overview of the Takaranga Park Playground Renewal Consultation Feedback and Penihana Park (Mettam Drive, Swanson) Development Concept Design.

·    Staff members from CF and Legal and Risk attended to brief members on an application for an easement through the Glen Eden Library carparking area.

·    Robin Taua-Gordon, Environment and Heritage Officer from Te Kawerau a Maki attended to give the Board an overview of the history of Te Kawerau a Maki and her whānau and outlined the Tribal Authority’s values and aspirations.

·    Staff members from the CF Leasing team attended to update the board on a number of leases in the local board area.

20 February 2020

·    Staff members from the Parks Sports and Recreation (PSR) department of Auckland Council gave an overview of the Piha Wetlands Outcomes Plan and the Huia Domain Services Outcomes Plan and discussed additional requirements or considerations for the plans and/or consultations.

·    Staff members from PSR gave an overview of Olive Grove Connection options and priority routes.

·    Staff members from CF gave an overview of the Shadbolt House programme of work and the costs involved in upgrading the existing building to meet minimum Health & Safety requirements for council buildings.

·    Staff members from CF briefed the board on the current lease at Piha Campground.

·    Staff sought direction on the next steps with the Titirangi Toilet Renewal after carrying out a further investigation of site options.

          27 February 2020

·    Staff updated the local board on progress in developing the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Gateways Project.

5 March 2020

·    Staff members from the Arts Community and Events (ACE) department of Auckland Council updated the local board on the Rural Halls Future Direction Review and requested feedback on the draft recommendations and continuation of the Community Halls Partnership Funding.

·    Staff from the Infrastructure & Environmental Services (I&ES) department gave an overview of the community weed bin project for the 2020/2021 financial year including options for bin placement and timing.

·    Staff from CF gave the local board an overview of growth in the Waitākere Ranges Local Board area and in a regional context.

·    Community Waitākere reported on progress against their 2019/2020 work programme and sought local board feedback on direction for the 2020/2021 work programme.

12 March 2020

·    Staff from I&ES updated the board about the Our Backyard project and gave an overview of the proposed direction for the 2020/2021 financial year.

·    Staff gave an overview of the grants awarded in 2019-2020 and reviewed the grants programme for 2020-2021, including eligibility criteria, lower priorities and exclusions, grant round opening and closing dates.

·    Local Board Members gave feedback about the development of a draft grants programme for adoption at an upcoming business meeting.

·    Staff from Auckland Transport attended to discuss how the local board would like to spend the Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

·    Staff from Auckland Council’s Development Programme Office attended to brief the local board on the upcoming Glen Eden Town Centre Project.

 

19 March 2020

·    The local board reviewed the 2020/2021 Local Board work programme and discussed line items that were new or had been changed, or that were queried by board members.

·    It was noted that there may be future work programme funding changes in the wake of the global Covid-19 pandemic.

26 March 2020 – CANCELLED

·    This workshop was cancelled due to New Zealand’s Level 4 Covid-19 Lockdown.

 

2 April 2020

·    Chair Presland gave an update from the Chairs’ Briefing held earlier in the day.

·    Staff gave an overview of the process for taking the Local Board Plan forward.

·    Staff gave an overview of the Auckland Council response to Covid-19 thus far, and West networks and providers of community support.

 

9 April 2020

·    Community Facilities Staff gave an update on the Covid-19 situation with the Level 4 Lockdown in terms of community facilities maintenance, cleaning, professional services, and requests for service.

·    Staff gave an overview of and reviewed the background for the Titirangi Village Public Toilet Renewal.

·    The Relationship Manager gave an overview of the Local Board Plan process thus far and next steps.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the workshop records for 13, 20 & 27 February, 5, 12 & 19 March and 2 & 9 April 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop records 13, 20 & 27 February 2020

 

b

Workshop record 5, 12 & 19 March 2020

 

c

Workshop records 2 & 9 April 2020

 

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Stewart - Democracy Advisor, Waitākere Ranges Local Board

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitākere Ranges, Whau

 


Waitākere Ranges Local Board

23 April 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Programme

File No.: CP2020/03729

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waitākere Ranges Local Board with its updated governance forward work programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Waitākere Ranges Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar is part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitākere Ranges Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work programme calendar for April 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Programme April 2020

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Stewart - Democracy Advisor, Waitākere Ranges Local Board

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Relationship Manager Henderson-Massey, Waitākere Ranges, Whau

     

    



[1] This figure includes grants from the three programmes: Local Events Fund, Community Grants, and Love Your Neighbourhood (EcoMatters) Waitākere Ranges..

[2] This figure includes grants from the three programmes: Local Events Fund, Community Grants, and Love Your Neighbourhood (EcoMatters) Waitākere Ranges..

[3] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/council-controlled-organisations/Pages/review-of-council-controlled-organisations.aspx