I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 23 June 2020

2.00pm

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Office, 1 The Strand, Takapuna

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Aidan Bennett

 

Deputy Chairperson

George Wood, CNZM

 

Members

Trish Deans

 

 

Ruth Jackson

 

 

Jan O'Connor, QSM

 

 

Toni van Tonder

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness

Democracy Advisor

 

17 June 2020

 

Contact Telephone: 021 815 313

Email: rhiannon.guinness@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome/Karakia                                                                     5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 5

8          Deputations                                                           5

9          Public Forum                                                                            5

10        Extraordinary Business                                       5

11        Lake Road Improvement Project - Post-consultation update                                              7

12        Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two 2019/2020 grant allocations                      13

13        Adoption of the Devonport-Takapuna Open Space Network Plan                                           19

14        Local board feedback on Plan Change 22 and Plan Modification 12 – additions of places of significance to Mana Whenua                           27

15        Auckland Transport Monthly Update - June 2020                                                                      33

16        Arts Community and Events venue partners interim service approach                                   35

17        Draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020                                                                      41

18        Local board feedback on the Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency's Northern Pathway project – Akoranga to Constellation connection                                                           47

19        Provisional funding allocation towards Innovating Streets for People pilot fund application                                                           49

20        Addition to the 2019-2022 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Meeting schedule                         57

21        Chairpersons' Report                                         61

22        Elected Members' Reports                                63

23        Ward Councillors Update                                   65

24        Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Workshops April 2020                                        67

25        Governance Forward Work Calendar               69  

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome/Karakia

 

Member Toni van Tonder will open the meeting with a karakia.

 

Whakataka te hau ki te uru                 Cease o winds from the west

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga             Cease o winds from the south

Kia mākinakina ki uta                         Bring calm breezes over the land

Kia mātaratara ki tai                            Bring calm breezes over the sea

E hī ake ana te atakura                      And let the red-tipped dawn come

He tio                                                   With a touch of frost

He huka                                              A sharpened air

He hau hū                                           And promise of a glorious day

Tīhei mauri ora!

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making

when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external

interest they might have.

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected

members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of

Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy. The policy covers two classes of conflict of

interest:

 

i.                A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member

ii.              A non-financial conflict interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component. It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

 

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members

understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968. The

guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail and provide elected members with

practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of

interest.

 

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office

of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request.

Any questions relating to the Code

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 19 May 2020, including the confidential section, as a true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Lake Road Improvement Project - Post-consultation update

File No.: CP2020/08129

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to update the Devonport Takapuna Local Board on recent consultation on the Lake Road Improvements Detailed Business Case (DBC) project and Belmont Centre improvements, and advise on the proposed way forward.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Consultation on the Lake Road and Belmont Centre improvements was undertaken throughout March and April 2020 and resulted in 563 submissions being received. Despite the disruptions from the Covid-19 lockdown, mitigations put in place by Auckland Transport (AT), including extending the consultation duration, meant that a sufficient response rate was achieved and the majority of submissions received were from local respondents.

3.       A full consultation summary report will shortly be available for the local board and all submitters to review. Themes from the consultation included:

·    Strong support for making Lake Road cycling safer, including physically separate facilities

·    Concerns that the proposals would worsen or not address traffic congestion

·    Desire to better connect the project proposals north of Esmonde Road, towards Takapuna

·    Desire to ensure future facilities safely separated pedestrians and cyclists

·    Support for proposals at Belmont Centre and undergrounding of powerlines  

4.       The project team have taken on board the consultation feedback and are progressing with the design, with a number of amendments. These include:

·    Investigating whether the proposed two-way cycleway south of Seabreeze Rd can instead be standard uni-directional cycle lanes (may require localised kerbline changes)

·    Investigating the potential to underground powerlines wherever footpath works are required

·    Investigating more detailed designs of the Old Lake Road and Belmont Centre areas (the Belmont designs to be developed further with Auckland Council)

·    Investigating the preferred option for connecting the Esmonde Road transit lane to the citybound motorway on-ramp  

5.       The next steps for the project include resolving outstanding design issues, updating associated cost and benefit analysis, and drafting the Detailed Business Case (DBC) for approval by project funders (AT and the NZ Transport Agency).

6.       The Board will be aware that Auckland Council is currently consulting on an Emergency Budget, due to the unprecedented financial impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic. As such there is currently no certainty as to the availability of capital funding for the next project phases (detailed design and construction) and the project will be on hold after the completion of the business case phase. Once the budget is confirmed and a revised capital programme is developed, the local board will be updated on the funding situation for the Lake Road Improvements project.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the emerging way forward of the Lake Road Improvements project and Belmont Centre improvements, following consideration of recent public consultation.

b)      note that funding for implementation of the Lake Road Improvements project will not be able to be confirmed until after the adoption of Auckland Council’s Emergency Budget and the subsequent establishment of a revised capital programme.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       As the local board is aware, AT is part-way through a detailed business case for Lake Road improvements, which aims to improve to improve sustainable travel choices and help free up Lake Road for people who need to drive. An associated project to design improvements at Belmont Centre, being led by Auckland Council and sponsored by the local board, has also been progressing.

8.       Previous public consultation feedback was to avoid substantial roadworks, major disruption or property impacts. As safety is a major focus and Lake Road has high traffic volumes, the current proposal includes physically protected cycle lanes, safer pedestrian crossings and safer intersections (of 28 serious crashes in the last ten years, ten casualties were pedestrians or cyclists).

9.       The proposal also includes targeted transit lanes and integration with a potential upgrade of the Belmont centre (in conjunction with Auckland Council and the local board).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     Public submissions on the proposals were open between 16 March - 26 April 2020.  A brochure was sent to many households in the peninsula, which included a feedback form (there appear to have been some issues with delivery due to the Alert Level 4 lockdown, but AT undertook additional steps and broad coverage was achieved).

11.     To promote the consultation, AT undertook local newspaper advertising, press releases and social media. Some project info boards were erected, however due to the Covid-19 lockdown all planned public events were cancelled.

12.     To mitigate this, AT extended the consultation period by two weeks, created additional online videos, undertook increased promotion and included an email on the project webpage for one-on-one engagement if members of the public required it.

13.     563 submissions have been received and a full consultation summary report will shortly be available for the local board and all submitters to review.

14.     Themes from the consultation included:

·    Strong support for making Lake Road cycling safer, including physically separate facilities. There was a recognition that the current painted cycle lanes are not perceived as safe so are not used by new potential users, resulting in additional car trips.

·    Concerns that the proposals would worsen or not address traffic congestion. This has been consistent theme over preceding project phases, with a strong community desire to see improved traffic flows (albeit with a range of views as to how this should be achieved – widened road, new coastal bypass routes, etc.).

·    Desire to better connect the project proposals north of Esmonde Road, towards Takapuna. The original project extent sought to not encroach into the Takapuna area in order to avoid overlap with development plans there, however respondents saw benefit in taking the cycling facilities north of Esmonde Road in order to provide a more connected outcome.

·    Desire to ensure future facilities safely separated pedestrians and cyclists. The proposal had some locations, such as at Belmont centre, where pedestrians and cyclists may have shared or overlapping locations, and this was queried by some respondents.

·    Support for proposals at Belmont Centre and undergrounding of powerlines. There was general support for proposed public space and transport improvements at Belmont. There was a general desire to improve the appearance of Lake Road and reduce street clutter. 

15.     The project team have taken on board the consultation feedback and are progressing with the design, with a number of amendments. It was not always possible or viable to address all issues raised however some of the actions include:

·    Investigating whether the proposed two-way cycleway south of Seabreeze Road can instead be standard uni-directional cycle lanes. This had been the result of a constrained section near Mozeley Avenue, so the revised proposal may require localised kerbline changes. This will also simplify the design at Albert Road and Seabreeze Road.

·    Investigating the potential to underground powerlines wherever footpath works are required. There are substantial costs with undergrounding, however where utilities may be expected to be affected by kerbline changes then there is an opportunity to additionally underground powerlines at this time.

·    Investigating more detailed designs of the Old Lake Road and Belmont Centre areas. The feedback raised a number of issues, including the need to relocate the protected cyclelanes to the inside rather than outside of parking (for safety reasons). This is relevant in locations such as the shops opposite Old Lake Road. The Belmont Centre design proposals had a range of feedback and revisions will be developed further with Auckland Council.

·    Investigating the preferred option for connecting the Esmonde Road transit lane to the citybound motorway on-ramp. The integration of the proposed transit lane into the motorway interchange will be considered in collaboration with the NZ Transport Agency, but an updated option has been developed for review.    

·    Other amendments include seeking raised tables across the mouths of sidestreets, confirming the appropriate start/end transition for transit lanes and determining the appropriate hours of operation for the transit lanes (Feedback tended to support peak time operation).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     Moving forward with the proposals will assist in encouraging more sustainable travel options for the area and in doing to assist in reducing transport emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     AT continues to work with representatives from Auckland Council’s Plans and Places department, in relation to the Belmont Centre upgrade. It is proposed that the Lake Road project team, the Council and their specialists develop the next version for the centre’s upgrade, including a ‘base’ comparison option without the additional urban realm improvements, so that the additional costs and benefits of the improvements can be included in the business case

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The project team held a workshop with the local board in early June to provide an update on emerging consultation themes and expected next steps. It is important that local board views are included as part of the completion of the DBC, so this report seeks that feedback. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The project team have met with Ngati Whatua representatives and received a supportive submission from Ngati Whatua as part of the consultation process. Engagement will continue as the project progresses.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     Auckland Council is currently consulting on an Emergency Budget, due to the unprecedented financial impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic. As such there is currently no certainty as to the availability of capital funding for the next project phases (detailed design and construction) and the project will be effectively on hold after the completion of the business case phase in the next couple of months.

21.     Once that regional budget is confirmed and a revised capital programme is developed, the local board will be updated on the funding situation for the Lake Road Improvements project.

22.     Should 2020/21 funding not be available, the DBC would be completed and ready for use to inform the next phases of work, but the contracting of those next phases would be paused until budget became available.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     The greatest current risk relates to funding certainty, which will be addressed through the adoption of the Council’s Emergency Budget.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The next steps for the project include resolving outstanding design issues, updating associated cost and benefit analysis, and drafting the DBC for approval by project funders (AT and the NZ Transport Agency).

25.     The local board’s views are critical for inclusion in the DBC before it can be completed.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Lake Road Detailed Business Case post consultation update

 

b

Lake Road Detailed Business Case public consultation report June 2020

 

      

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Daniel Newcombe – Manager Strategic Projects: Central Access, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Chris Morgan - Group Manager Strategic Projects, Auckland Transport

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two 2019/2020 grant allocations

File No.: CP2020/07567

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two 2019/2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two 2019/2020 (Attachment B).

3.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board adopted the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Community Grants Programme 2019/2020 on 19 March 2019 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $263,130 for the 2019/2020 financial year. A total of $248,284.37 was allocated in previous grant rounds, this leaves a total of $14,845.63 to be allocated to the remaining quick response round.

5.       Twenty-three applications were received for Quick Response Round Two 2019/2020, requesting a total of $43,013.82.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two 2019/2020, listed in Table One.

Table One: Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two 2019/2020 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2002-206

The Operating Theatre Trust - Tim Bray Theatre Company

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of venue hire.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-208

Losalia Aleva

Arts and culture

Towards tutors’ fees and venue hire costs to deliver Tongan Dance classes in the North Shore area.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-210

Show Me Shorts Film Festival Trust Board

Arts and culture

Towards the programming, communication, and marketing costs for the Devonport -Takapuna season of the "Show me Shorts" film festival at "The Vic".

$1,966.66

Eligible

QR2002-215

Oliver Cain

Arts and culture

Towards the purchase of a new klin.

$1,000.00

 

QR2002-216

Victoria Theatre Trust Board

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of venue hire and advertising for a play reading series at "the Victoria Theatre" in September 2020.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-219

Gregory Smith

The Depot Artspace

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of the Depot Artspace gallery rental and membership fee for an art exhibition 'Artist in Uniform / Camouflage and Concealment' in October 2020.

$1,410.00

Eligible

QR2002-220

The Lake House Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the purchase and installation of a heat pump in the multi-purpose art room at the Lake House Arts Centre.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-222

Depot Arts and Music Space Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of filming and editing the film "Aroha Toku Kainga/Love my Community".

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-201

Coast Youth Community Trust Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase of five computers.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-223

Devonport Community House Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase of 21 chairs for the Kauri Hall at Devonport Community House.

$1,983.24

Eligible

QR2002-229

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the costs of triage support and supervision of the volunteer counsellors for the period of 1 July 2020 to 31 December 2020.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-209

The Auckland King Tides Initiative

The Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand Inc

Environment

Towards the installation of water level (tidal) gauges and the design and production of the signage.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-212

Sustainable Coastlines Charitable Trust

Environment

Towards the cost of catering and travel to take residents from “Arena Living” residential homes to the beach clean up event and costs associated with the “Love Your Coast” (LYC) presentation in schools.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-221

Green Business HQ Limited

Environment

Towards the delivery of four “Climate Talk” workshops.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-225

Northshore Rowing Club Incorporated

Events

Towards the cost of security, waste management, and portaloos for the "Bennett Shield Memorial Regatta".

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-228

Devonport Business Association Incorporated

Events

Towards the cost of stage hire for the Devonport Waterfront Festival in 2021.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-226

Marie Chang

Historic Heritage

Towards the measured survey and professional fees for a seismic upgrade of an historic building

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-203

Milford Tennis Club Incorporated.

Sport and recreation

Towards the annual affiliation fee of the club

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-205

Ngataringa Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of a new defibrillator (AED).

$1,715.00

Eligible

QR2002-207

Lake Pupuke Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of tennis balls.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-211

Takapuna District Cricket Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of replacing the aging synthetic grass surface at the Massey University Indoor Cricket Centre.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-218

North Harbour Softball Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the delivery of the "Games Development programme" in local schools within the Devonport-Takapuna area, specifically the development officer's fees.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2002-227

Calliope Sea Scouts

The Scout Association of New Zealand

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of camping and sailing equipment for the Calliope Sea Scouts Group, including stove, adaptor, Luminated Emitting Diode (LED) light bar, battery, rope coil, chair and table.

$1,938.92

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$43,013.82

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board adopted the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Community Grants Programme 2019/2020 on 19 March 2019 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

12.     Due to the current COVID-19 crisis, staff have also assessed each application according to which alert level the proposed activity is able to proceed. Events and activities have been assessed according to these criteria.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

18.     A summary of each application received through Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two 2019/2020 (Attachment B) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Maori. Auckland Council’s Maori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

20.     Six applicants applying to Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

22.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $263,130 for the 2019/2020 financial year. A total of $248,284.37 was allocated in previous grant rounds, this leaves a total of $14,845.63 to be allocated to one quick response round.

23.     Twenty-three applications were received for Quick Response Round Two 2019/2020, requesting a total of $43,013.82.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Following the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board allocation of funding for the quick response round two, the grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Grants Programme 2019-2020

 

b

Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two 2019/2020 applications

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Adoption of the Devonport-Takapuna Open Space Network Plan

File No.: CP2020/07183

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Devonport-Takapuna Open Space Network Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Adoption of the open space network plan will assist local board decision-making and provide a framework for the development of open space over the next 10 years.

3.       The purpose of the plan is to set out actions to deliver a sustainable, quality open space network that can respond to, and accommodate, anticipated population growth.

4.       It will help ensure that the community has access to a range of recreational, social, cultural and environmental experiences.

5.       The open space network plan includes:

·     the current state of the network and the challenges it faces

·     four key moves that provide the framework to deliver a sustainable quality open space network

·     prioritised actions that will deliver improved open space outcomes.

6.       There is no additional funding to implement projects in the plan beyond renewal of existing assets and planned capital expenditure.

7.       The lack of funding to implement all identified actions could create reputational risk. The local board can use the plan to advocate for increased funding as part of Annual and Long-term Plan processes, or to help inform prioritisation of its locally driven initiative capital (LDI Capex) budgets.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      adopt the Devonport-Takapuna Open Space Network Plan (Attachment A)

b)      delegate the approval of any minor document amendments to the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       An open space network plan has been prepared at the request of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board.

9.       This plan outlines the local board’s aspirations and priorities for the future development of local parks and open spaces.

10.     The plan responds to growth and increasing diversity anticipated in the Devonport-Takapuna area, including changes in demographics and patterns of usage.

11.     Auckland Council’s Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan 2013 (POSSAP) sets out how parks and open spaces contribute to the outcomes of the Auckland Plan. It identifies local board open space network plans as one of the key tools to achieve this.

12.     The plan is strategically aligned to three Auckland Plan focus areas:

Belonging and Participation - Focus area 1

Create safe opportunities for people to meet, connect, participate in and enjoy community and civic life.

Belonging and Participation - Focus area 7                             

Recognise the value of arts, culture, sport and recreation to quality of life.

Homes and Places - Focus area 5                                        

Create urban places for the future.

13.     The final document is presented in three parts:

14.     The plan was prepared in consultation with the local board, partners and key stakeholders and is informed by Devonport-Takapuna parks research.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The plan analyses the current state of the Devonport-Takapuna open space network and sets out four key moves. These provide the framework for the future development and management of the open space network over the next 10 years.

Devonport-Takapuna Open Space Network Plan

16.     The main strengths of the existing open space network include:

·     many coastal open spaces which serve as popular destination points

·     prominent cultural and heritage features located along the coastline of beaches, estuaries and inlets, headlands and cliffs

·     two significant maunga and fresh-water Lake Pupuke

·     a community which values the environment and is engaged in working to protect and enhance the Wildlink area

·     the presence of a rich cultural heritage

17.     The main challenges relating to existing open space include:

·     detrimental effects from coastal inundation, storm surge and poor water quality impacting open space

·     constrained east to west walking and cycling opportunities connecting the coastlines

·     limited connections both within the Devonport-Takapuna open space network and to neighbouring local board areas.

·     lower sport and recreation participation levels compared to the rest of Auckland

18.     Four key moves respond to the issues and opportunities identified through the current state analysis and help formulate actions to develop the open space network:

·     respond to the growth of our increasingly diverse communities

·     activate and enhance our parks and open spaces

·     improve biodiversity and ecological outcomes

·     enhance walking, cycling and green corridors to connect our communities.

19.     These are linked to the key focus areas of Treasure, Enjoy, Connect and Utilise identified in POSSAP and look at how best to prioritise funding through the Long-term and Annual planning processes.

20.     The goal is to provide a sustainable and high-quality parks and open space network.

Prioritisation, decision-making and actions

21.     The plan prioritises actions to improve the open space network.

22.     Prioritisation principles provide direction for planning and implementing park development. The following list of principles assist in prioritising the actions:

·     existing capital works programmes and contractual commitments

·     areas zoned for high growth (metropolitan centre, town centres, local centres, mixed use, terrace housing and apartments) and open space provision gaps

·     areas of deficiency and/or poor-quality open space prioritised over areas of good provision and/or good quality open space

·     high level cost-benefit of individual actions

·     planning and funding cycles and other influences such as land acquisitions, infrastructure projects, integrated planning with neighbouring local boards and other stakeholders such as environmental services and healthy waters

·     changes and trends in sport and recreation.

23.     Focus areas and actions have been prioritised according to the principles.

24.     The following actions are recommended based on the analysis of the current state, input from mana whenua and the framework of key moves:

Key Move 1 – activate and enhance our open spaces

Key Move 2 – connecting and sharing open spaces

Key Move 3 – optimising and increasing utilisation

Key Move 4 – sport and recreation for the enjoyment of all

 


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     Parks and open space serve as ecological and biodiversity corridors. They promote and protect native plants and animals. Vegetation and woodland process carbon to help slow the accumulation of greenhouse gases.

26.     Grassed areas help reduce maximum temperature ranges in urban and suburban areas. Parks and open space also act as collection points for surface and run-off water, reducing flood risks during storms.

27.     Parks and open space must be managed in environmentally sensitive ways to achieve these benefits. This includes energy and waste reduction and conserving water resources.

28.     The open space network plan will reflect the effects of predicted climate change. The plan will consider such impacts as increasing temperatures. Rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the open space network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     The plan has been developed in consultation with relevant council departments. Their views are reflected in this plan.

30.     Customer and Community Services, Auckland Transport and Infrastructure and Environmental Services will implement the network plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     Local communities will benefit from the actions in this plan. These include increased sport and recreation opportunities, leading to improved health and wellbeing.

32.     Staff engaged in a robust consultation process through a series of workshops and meetings outlined below.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     Māori identity and well-being is an important outcome in the Auckland Plan. The implementation of this network plan responds to and supports the following focus areas:

Māori identity and well-being - Focus Area 1

Meet the needs and support the aspirations of tamariki and their whanau.

Māori identity and well-being - Focus area 7

Reflect mana whenua mātauranga and Māori design principles throughout Auckland.

34.     Quality parks and open spaces help to facilitate Māori participation in sport and recreation.

35.     Staff engaged with mana whenua in December 2017 and April 2018 to seek their views in relation to the open space network in Devonport-Takapuna.

36.     The key issues raised by iwi are outlined below:

·    mana whenua support the local board’s interest to work closely together on open space and suggested two approaches:

scheduling an ongoing engagement process with mana whenua

sharing best practice management, conservation, promotion and preservation methodologies from a cultural perspective to support Māori heritage in the area

·    Te Aranga design principles in all park design and development

·    incorporate Māori naming, wayfinding and cultural narratives.

37.     These views have been incorporated into the key moves and prioritised actions of the network plan.

38.     The final open space network plan includes project opportunities for working closely with both mana whenua and the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     Development of the open space network plan is funded by Community and Social Policy.

40.     No funding has been allocated for public consultation, as the open space network plan informs local board decision-making. There is no statutory requirement to involve the public.

41.     No additional budget is provided for the implementation of the open space network plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     The lack of funding to implement the plan could create a reputational risk. However, the local board can use the network plan to advocate for increased funding as part of the Annual Plan and Long-term Plan processes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     The plan will be implemented over the next 10 years as budgets allow.

44.     The delivery of specific projects will involve public consultation and draw on a wide range of potential partners.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Open Space Network Plan

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ann-Marie Quinn - Policy Analyst

Authorisers

William  Brydon - Principal Policy Analyst

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Local board feedback on Plan Change 22 and Plan Modification 12 – additions of places of significance to Mana Whenua

File No.: CP2020/06778

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request the views of the local board on:

·   Plan Change 22 (PC22) to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part)(AUP)

·   Plan Modification 12 (PM12) to the Auckland Council District Plan – Hauraki Gulf Islands Section 2018 (Inner Islands) (HGI).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In 2014, in collaboration with 19 Mana Whenua entities, Auckland Council (the council) initiated the Māori Cultural Heritage Programme (MCHP) to improve the understanding and protection of Māori cultural heritage across the Auckland region.

3.       As part of the implementation of the findings of the MCHP, the council has proposed two plan changes in order to appropriately recognise and protect culturally significant sites within both the AUP and HGI. These two plan changes form tranche one of what is intended to be a series of future plan changes to progressively identify and protect culturally significant sites.

4.       Eleven Mana Whenua entities have completed assessments for sites in these plan changes. Thirty-three sites are proposed for scheduling: 30 sites in the AUP and four in the HGI. Note that one site, Te Rangihoua (Te Putiki o Kahumatamomoe), is included in both the AUP and HGI to represent its landward and coastal extents.

5.       On 21 March 2019, PC22 and PM12 were originally notified. Following submissions and after further analysis, on 26 September 2019 a minor correction was made to PC22 to remove an incorrect reference. Due to technical and procedural issues, on 24 October 2019 a second amendment to withdraw the Te Wairoa River site was notified. On 11 February 2020, the plan changes were then re-notified to a limited number of directly affected parties.

6.       The details of the sites related to the local board are listed in Attachment A.

7.       Key themes of the submissions received are to:

·   support PC22 as notified

·   support PC22 with a minor amendments to Schedule 14.1 and a site description in Schedule 12

·   oppose PC22 due to potential effects on houseboat activities

·   support PM12 as notified

·   support PM12 and apply the same approach to other reserves on Waiheke Island

·   oppose PM12 for various other reasons.

8.       On 8 August 2019, the Regulatory Committee appointed three independent hearing commissioners to hear and make decisions on PC22 and PM12 (REG/2019/49). This included at least two independent commissioners with expertise in planning and tikanga Māori. 

9.       This report is the mechanism for the local board to provide its formal views on PC22 and PM12 prior to the public hearing. Any comments received will be included in the planner’s hearing report and considered by the independent commissioners. Any local board views provided should be that of the local board, therefore no technical recommendations are made in this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      provide local board views on Plan Change 22 and Plan Modification 12.

b)      appoint a local board member to speak on behalf of the local board views at a hearing on the plan changes.

c)       delegate authority to the chairperson of the local board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in Resolution b) is unable to attend the plan change hearing.

 

Horopaki

Context

Decision-making authority

10.     Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of the council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.

11.     In 2014, the council initiated a Māori Cultural Heritage Programme (MCHP) in collaboration with 19 Mana Whenua entities in the Auckland region with the purpose of improving the understanding and protection of Māori cultural heritage and to identify the best management options that recognise and protect the cultural values of these sites. To date 400 such sites of have been nominated by Mana Whenua for consideration.

12.     The AUP currently contains 75 scheduled Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua. There are no Māori Heritage sites currently identified in the HGI Plan.

13.     The Auckland Council’s Planning Committee resolution (PLA/2017/39) approved engagement with Mana Whenua and landowners in order to develop draft plan changes to add qualifying sites to the AUP and the HGI plan. The criteria to identify and evaluate these sites are contained within the Auckland Regional Policy Statement section of the AUP.

14.     On 27 November 2018, the Planning Committee resolved to approve the proposed plan changes for notification (PLA/2018/128).

15.     The plan changes propose:

i.    The addition of 30 sites to the AUP’s Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua Overlay, as identified in Chapter L Schedule 12. There are also consequential changes to Schedule 6 (Outstanding Natural Features) and Schedule 14.1 (Historic Heritage Overlay) to reflect the cultural significance of the identified sites; and

ii.   The addition of four sites to the HGI Plan. There are also changes to the explanatory text of the plan to clarify the criteria by which sites are identified and evaluated.

16.     If the local board chooses to provide its views, the reporting planner will include those views in the hearing report for these plan changes. Local board views will be included in the analysis of the plan changes and submissions received.

17.     If the local board chooses to provide its views, local board members will be invited to present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who make the decision on the plan changes.

18.     This report provides an overview of PC22 and PM12 and gives a summary of the key themes which have arisen through submissions. This report does not include a recommendation. The planner cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Plan change overview

19.     The AUP and the HGI plans contain objectives, policies, and rules to manage and protect both Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua (AUP), and Māori Heritage sites (HGI). The proposed plan changes do not alter any of the existing objectives, policies, rules or resource consent assessment criteria set out in the two plans.

20.     PC22 proposes the following changes:

·   The addition of 30 Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua (SSMW) to Schedule 12 of AUP.

·   The addition of a ‘significance of the site to Mana Whenua’ evaluation criterion (criterion k) to eight sites already listed in Schedule 6 – Outstanding Natural Features Overlay of the AUP.

·   The addition of a ‘significance of the site to Mana Whenua’ evaluation criterion (criterion k) to eight sites already listed in Schedule 6 – Outstanding Natural Features Overlay of the AUP.

·   The addition of the ‘significance of the site to Mana Whenua’ evaluation criterion (criterion c) to five sites already listed in Schedule 14.1 - Schedule of Historic Heritage Overlay of the AUP(OiP).

·   The addition of the sites to the AUP viewer (the online tool to view the AUP maps).

21.     PM12 proposes the following changes:

·   The addition of four Māori Heritage Sites (MHS) to Appendix 1f of the HGI.

·   The addition of explanatory text to Appendix 1f, Appendix 4 and Part 7.13 of the HGI – Māori heritage to include references to the criteria for the identification and evaluation of MHS.

·   The addition of the sites to the HGI planning maps.

Further discussion:

22.     There are 33 sites proposed across both PC22 and PM12. These sites cover a wide range of zones including open space, coastal marine area, and transport corridor zones.

23.     The sites are owned by or designated by Auckland Transport, Department of Conservation, Auckland Council, CRL Ltd, Ports of Auckland, The NZ Transport Agency, Watercare, LINZ, Ministry of Education, Transpower NZ Ltd and First Gas Limited.

24.     By scheduling the sites, there will be greater awareness and weight placed on existing objectives, policies and methods within the plans for protecting cultural heritage when considering applications for resource consent, private plan changes, designations and policy development in both plans.

25.     In the AUP, scheduling introduces more restrictions on activities within the sites with respect to disturbance in the coastal marine area, temporary activities, new buildings and structures, new alterations and additions to existing buildings, and subdivision.

26.     In the HGI, scheduling will remove permitted levels of ground disturbance within scheduled sites, making all ground disturbance activities require resource consent. Resource consent will also be required for establishing toilets and changing facilities within scheduled sites.

Themes from submissions received

27.     On 21 March 2019, PC22 and PM12 were originally notified. Following submissions and after further analysis, on 26 September 2019 a minor correction was made to PC22 to remove an incorrect reference. Due to technical and procedural issues, on 24 October 2019 a second amendment to withdraw the Te Wairoa River site was notified. On 11 February 2020, the plan changes were then re-notified to a limited number of directly affected parties.

28.     Following the processes outlined above, a total of seven primary submissions and two further submissions have been received for PC22. Six primary submissions and three further submissions have been received for PM12. The following key themes have been identified in the submissions received:

·   support PC22 as notified

·   support PC22 with minor amendments to Schedule 14.1 and a site description in Schedule 12

·   oppose PC22 due to potential effects on houseboat activities

·   support PM12 as notified

·   support PM12 and apply the same approach to other reserves on Waiheke Island

·   oppose PM12 for various other reasons.

29.     Minor amendments identify a technical error in the plan change where an evaluation criterion has been omitted from one of the schedules. They also propose additional wording to one of the site descriptions to include reference to bird roosting/gathering sites.

30.     Effects on existing houseboat activities in Putiki Bay (Waiheke Island) are of concern to two houseboat owners. Heritage scheduling which is outside the proposed plan change area is of concern to one submitter opposing PM12.

31.     One submitter is opposing the scheduling of Rangihoua Park / Onetangi Sports Fields on Waiheke Island as part of PM12 on the basis that they feel the scheduling would place unrealistic conditions on the continued use and development of these activities. This was supported by one further submission with 92 co-signatories.

32.     On 26 March 2020, the latest summary of the decisions requested by submitters on PC22 was notified and is available on the council’s website at the following link: https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/unitary-plan/auckland-unitary-plan-modifications/proposed-plan-changes/pc22summarydecisions/summary-of-decisions-requested-and-submissions.pdf

33.     On 26 March 2020, the latest summary of the decisions requested by submitters on PM12 was notified and is available on the council’s website at the following link: https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/unitary-plan/auckland-unitary-plan-modifications/proposed-plan-changes/docspc22/pm-12-renotification.pdf

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     The decision whether to provide local board views:

·   will not lead to increased greenhouse gas emissions and negatively affect the approach to reduce emissions.

·   will not be impacted by a climate that changes over the lifetime of that decision.

35.     This is because the plan changes do not promote new activities within the sites and, by their nature of protecting Māori cultural heritage, are unlikely to encourage a greater intensity of development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     As mentioned previously, the 33 sites covered by these two plan changes cover a range of environments. These include roads, carparks, publicly owned parks and lakes, rivers and streams. They are also subject to a number of designations.

37.     During the development of the plan changes, relevant council departments and Council Controlled Organisations (CCO) were consulted. With respect to council internal departments, the sites have particular relevance to the council’s Customer and Community Services Department. This department includes the Community Facilities, Parks, Sports and Recreation, and Service Strategy and Integration teams.

38.     Many of the proposed sites contain leases which are managed by the above department. The strategic management of public open spaces is also managed by these teams through the use of reserve management plans as well as other open space and recreation planning tools.

39.     The Customer and Community Services Department has been actively involved in the plan changes during their development and notification. None of these teams have raised opposition to the proposed scheduling.

40.     From a CCO perspective, Auckland Transport has been involved in the development of the plan changes as they apply to public roads and parking infrastructure. Auckland Transport is not opposed to the plan changes.

41.     One of the sites, Te Puna Wai a Hape (Site 091), schedules land currently owned by Watercare Services Limited. Watercare has been involved during the development of the plan changes and is not opposed to the scheduling.    

42.     No CCO has made a submission or further submission on PC22 or PM12.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

43.     Further detail such as a map showing the location of the sites relevant to the local board and previous involvement by the board are in Attachment A.

44.     The main impact of PC22 and PM12 is to place greater recognition on the cultural significance of identified sites. This is likely to increase the need for consultation with affected Mana Whenua when considering activities within the sites. The scheduling places greater restrictions on some land use activities and coastal activities as outlined previously.

45.     A summary here of what local board engagement was undertaken during the development of this plan change is included in Attachment A.

46.     Factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view are as follows: interests and preferences of people in the local board area; well-being of communities within the local board area; local board documents, such as the local plan and local board agreement; responsibilities and operation of the local board.

47.     This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views so the decision-makers on PC22 and PM12 can consider those views.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.     This report addresses matters that relate to two plan changes to protect and manage new nominated sites and places of cultural significance to Mana Whenua. All Mana Whenua entities have been invited to participate in this process and 11 Mana Whenua entities have actively contributed to these plan changes.

49.     Recognising and protecting Mana Whenua cultural heritage is identified as an issue of regional significance in the Auckland Unitary Plan Regional Policy Statement (RPS). Policies in the RPS specifically provide for the identification, protection and enhancement of the tangible and intangible values of identified Mana Whenua cultural heritage.

50.     In November 2018, a governance hui was conducted where staff briefed all 19 Mana Whenua entities on the feedback received from the 14 affected local boards and of the landowner engagement. The IMSB has also been kept informed of these plan changes and has participated in their approval for notification.

51.     Some iwi authorities have made submissions in support of these plan changes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

52.     The local board is not exposed to any financial risk from providing its views.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

53.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s). This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     Any views provided by the local board will be included in the planner’s hearing report. The local board will be informed of the hearing date and invited to speak at the hearing in support of its views. The planner will advise the local board of the decision on the plan change by memorandum.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Sites related to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Matthew Gouge - Principal Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport Monthly Update - June 2020

File No.: CP2020/07973

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the June 2020 Auckland Transport monthly update.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport June 2020 monthly update report and thank Marilyn Nicholls for her presentation and attendance.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Auckland Transport June 2020 Report

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Arts Community and Events venue partners interim service approach

File No.: CP2020/08164

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for an interim service approach for Arts Community and Events venue partners for 1 July 2020 to 30 September 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       More than half of the Arts Community and Events (ACE) venues portfolio is managed by 122 partners.

3.       Fifty-five of these partners (including seven out of ten Devonport Takapuna partners) have contracts and funding agreements that expire on 30 June 2020.

4.       Key concerns for these partners are:

·        the council’s expectation of service delivery from 1 July 2020

·        levels of activity they should be delivering

·        funding availability

·        their responsibilities as employers.

5.       The recommended approach is, firstly, a clarification that services should continue from 1 July 2020 to 30 September 2020.

6.       Secondly, it is to ensure a sustained level of service from the ACE venues portfolio while Emergency Budget deliberation is underway.

7.       Finally, it is to provide a pro rata interim payment (12 weeks of the annual amount) covering the first quarter of FY 2020/2021, to ensure the above can be delivered.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve interim payments be made to:

i.    Devonport Museum for $5,00 from Locally Driven Initiatives budget

ii.   Lake House Arts Centre for $17,365 plus Consumer Price Index adjustment from the Asset Based Services Budget

iii.   Michael King Writers Centre for $9,241 plus Consumer Price Index adjustment from the Asset Based Services Budget

iv.  Pumphouse Theatre for $21,870 plus Consumer Price Index adjustment from the Asset Based Services Budget

v.   Depot Artspace (and Whare Toi) for $20,637 plus Consumer Price Index adjustment from the Asset Based Services Budget

vi.  The Rose Centre for $14,580 plus Consumer Price Index adjustment from the Asset Based Services Budget

vii.  Taharoto Community Facility for $4,250 from Locally Driven Initiatives budget

a)   note the proposed interim payments to:

i.        Devonport Community House for $11,259 plus Consumer Price Index adjustment from the Asset Based Services Budget

b)      Sunnynook Community Centre and Kennedy Observation Point for $15,881   plus Consumer Price Index adjustment from the Asset Based Services Budget

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Auckland Council provides spaces in the community where all Aucklanders can come together to do things that interest them, stretch themselves, have fun, participate, connect, interact, discover new things and learn about each other.

9.       There is an Arts Community and Events (ACE) venue in almost every neighbourhood across Auckland, and the ACE team ensures this diverse portfolio – including community centres, community art galleries, theatres and both rural and urban community halls – is delivering for local communities.

10.     This portfolio contains more than 240 ACE Venues with 122 partners managing over half of these on behalf of the council.

11.     These partnerships are managed with a variety of contracts and agreements in place and funding of over $8m per annum, in addition to in-kind support and resources, including asset provision.   

12.     To help protect Aucklanders during the COVID-19 response, Auckland Council made the decision to temporarily close the Arts, Community and Events venues including community centres, community art galleries, theatres and venues for hire and to support its partners to do the same.

Partner insights

13.     Staff have continued to be in close contact with ACE venue partners through all Alert Levels to answer queries where possible and offer support to their decision-making where appropriate, including:

·   varying contracts to explicitly relieve them of responsibilities under their contracts and funding agreements, as they could not deliver their service under Alert Level Four or Three

·   prioritising final contract payments due in Q3 and Q4 of the current financial year

·   supporting the reopening of venues at Alert Level Two, including implications of group and capacity restrictions.

14.     Staff surveyed ACE venue partners during this time to gather insights on the impacts of COVID-19. Key considerations for partners were:

·   financial security, including uncertainty of funding that might be available in FY 2020/2021

·   concern about their ability to continue to pay staff and deliver expected services and programmes to their local communities.

15.     Fifty-five of these 122 partners have contracts and funding agreements that expire on 30 June 2020.

16.     From survey results and subsequent conversations with partners, the key concerns being are as follows.

·   Are they expected to open and deliver services from 1 July 2020?

·   What level of service should they be delivering?

·   What funding is available for them to continue to deliver services?

·   Concerns regarding their responsibilities as employers.

17.     While our ACE venue partners are aware that the Emergency Budget consultation and deliberation is underway, a number have notified us that without an arrangement they may have to suspend services until the Emergency Budget is adopted and implemented in August 2020.

18.     Staff are also aware of concerns raised by local board members and these were discussed in workshops when ACE staff visited local boards to discuss facility reopening plans over the last month.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Interim service delivery support

19.     The recommended approach is to clarify that services should continue from 1 July 2020 to 30 September 2020, ensuring a sustained level of service from the ACE venues portfolio while Emergency Budget deliberation is happening.

20.     In consultation with Auckland Council’s Commercial & Finance and Legal departments, staff have determined that the best approach to both sustain service and to address the level of uncertainty that exists with ACE venue partners is to provide interim funding covering the first quarter of FY 2020/2021.

21.     To do this will require a pro rata interim payment (12 weeks of the annual amount).

22.     Interim funding will enable ACE venue partners to operate throughout July, August and September. In August 2020, after local boards approve their work programmes staff will  make contract/grant payments to for the balance of approved funding to partners for the remaining quarters of FY 2020/2021.

23.     For the Devonport Takapuna Local Board area the partnership under consideration is:

 

ACE venue partner

Interim payment

amount

+CPI where applicatable

Annual contract amount

Funding mechanism

Expiry

Budget source

Key relationship holder

Devonport Museum

$5,000

$20,000

FA*

FY20

LDI opex

Arts and Culture

Lake House Arts Centre

$17,365

$69,458

FA*

FY20

ABS opex

Arts and Culture

Michael King Writers Centre

$9,241

$36,963

FA*

FY20

ABS opex

Arts and Culture

Pumphouse Theatre

$21,870

$87,479

FA*

FY20

ABS opex

Arts and Culture

Depot Artspace (and Whare Toi)

$20,637

$82,549

FA*

FY20

ABS opex

Arts and Culture

The Rose Centre

$14,580

$58,319

FA*

FY20

ABS opex

Arts and Culture

Taharoto Community Facility

$4,250

$17,000

 

FA*

FY20

LDI opex

Arts and Culture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

24.     The following partnership agreement for the Devonport Takapuna Local Board area is supported by multi-year agreement that is in-train. Staff are working closely with these partners to arrange interim quarterly payments.

ACE venue partner

Interim payment

amount

+CPI

Annual contract amount

Funding mechanism

Expiry

Budget source

Key relationship holder

Devonport Community House

$11,259

 

$45,034

CCMA**

FY22

ABS opex

Community Places

Sunnynook Community Centre and Kennedy Observation Point

$15,881

 

$63,524

CCMA**

FY22

ABS opex

Community Places

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*FA - Funding agreement

**CCMA – Community Centre Management Contract

***SA – Service agreement

 

25.     Staff are aware of the concerns this uncertainty is causing ACE venue partners and have advised them in writing that this approach will be brought to local boards as governors of local facilities and locally funded services.

26.     This approach requires a commitment to advance funding for the first quarter of FY 2020/2021 ahead of the Emergency Budget approval and decisions to finalise local board work programmes for FY 2020/2021.

27.     Options for consideration by the board are:

Option

Option one

Option two

Recommended Approach

Option three

Description

Defer funding decision until the Emergency Budget is confirmed

 

Allocate interim partial payment

 

Allocate full pro rata 12 weeks payment

 

Action

No interim payment is made

 

A payment of less than pro rata amount is made at a later date

 

An interim payment can be made early July

 

Implications

·     Possible suspension of services

·     Risk of these partners not being able to reopen

 

·     Negotiations on level of service and new Key Performance Iindicators would need to be entered into for the first quarter

·     New contracts generated and agreed

·     Neither Auckland Council nor ACE venue partners have resources or time to manage this

 

·     Service is sustained at current level – doors remain open

·     The impact of different funding scenarios can then be workshopped with board and partners as the Emergency Budget is considered

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     ACE venues can have a positive climate impact as they enable people to connect, participate and recreate locally without having to travel long distances. They help foster a sense of community and contribute positively to people’s views of where they live.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     Auckland Council provides fair, easy and affordable access to safe and welcoming venues through the Arts, Community and Events department of the Customer and Community Directorate.

30.     The Community Places and Arts and Culture units manage the relationship and contracts with ACE venue partners.

31.     Subject to the outcome of this decision, staff will work with Community Facilities to manage implications for council-owned assets.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     A number of local board workshops were conducted through May and early June 2020 on the Auckland Council approach to COVID-19 Level 2 and the phased reopening of local community facilities.

33.     During these workshops local boards:

·   were informed the majority of ACE venue partners reopened promptly at Level Two

·   expressed an interest in the status of ACE venue partner delivery and FY2020/2021 funding

·   considered additional funds due to marked loss in revenue from classes and bookings.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     Art Community and Events venues support diverse, equitable, and affordable access to spaces to all Aucklanders, including Māori.

35.     Programming through Arts Community and Events venues supports Māori outcomes, and showcases work from Māori content creators and artists.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     This approach requires a total commitment of $192,251 from Asset Based Services and $9,250 from the Locally Driven Initiatives funding the Devonport Takapuna Local Board’s opex in advance of the Emergency Budget approval and decisions to finalise local board work programmes for FY 2020/2021.

37.     $92,943 is an interim payment to the partner with a funding agreement that expire on 30 June 2020.

38.     $108,558 is the total annual amount for the in-train agreements with two partners.

39.     This total amount will not be available for reallocation in future FY 2020/2021 decision making.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     Risks associated with this decision and mitigations are:

Risk

Mitigation

A decision could preempt significant budgetary decisions

This is an interim approach, consistent with the council’s managed provision in this portfolio

The recommended approach may not provide sufficient surety for partners

Staff will communicate with partners and inform them of the Emergency Budget consultation process

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     Subject to local board approval, staff will organise agreements and payments to partners no later than mid-July 2020.

42.     Staff will continue to work with these partners to assess the impact of different funding scenarios, if any, to funding levels, service delivery, outcome areas, or key performance indicators for the remainder of FY 2020/2021. This will inform discussions on local board work programmes once the Emergency Budget has been approved.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Teirny – Senior Project Lead

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott – Manager Community Places

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020

File No.: CP2020/08182

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 and statement of proposal for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board complete a local board plan for adoption by 31 October of the year following election and uses the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

3.       The consultation period for the SCP will take place from 13 July to 13 August 2020.

4.       The draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 has been developed using feedback obtained before COVID-19. There is a risk in approving the draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 for public consultation while the full social and economic effects of COVID-19 on the community are not yet determined.

5.       The consultation process will seek the views and aspirations of the public to inform the final plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 in Attachment A and the statement of proposal in Attachment B for public consultation using the special consultative procedure.

b)      delegate authority to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to approve final changes to the draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 and statement of proposal.

c)       delegate authority to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) to approve the type of engagement events to take place, the number of events and the dates of the engagement events.

d)      delegate to the following elected members and staff the power and responsibility to hear from the public through ‘spoken’ (or New Zealand sign language) interaction, at the council’s public engagement events, during the consultation period for the local board plan:

·    local board members and chairperson

·    General Manager Local Board Services, Local Board Relationship Manager, Local Board Senior Advisor, Local Board Advisor, Local Board Engagement Advisor

·    any additional staff approved by the General Manager Local Board Services or the Group Chief Financial Officer.

e)      approve to hold an extraordinary meeting of the local board to adopt the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 to be held Tuesday 3 November 2020 at 4pm.   

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 states that each local board must:

·    adopt their local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

·    use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

7.       Local board plans are strategic documents developed every three years. They set a direction for local boards and reflect community priorities and preferences. They provide a guide for local board activity, funding and investment decisions. They also influence local board input into regional strategies and plans, including annual budgets.

8.       The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. They also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for the following three financial years and subsequent work programmes.

Timeframes

9.       The consultation period for the local board plans was due to be held in June and July 2020. The implementation of COVID-19 alert levels 3 and 4 required a change in the direction of the draft plans to ensure they responded to the effects of COVID-19. Restrictions on public gatherings also required a shift in planning how engagement events could occur. Planning for these took time, which has forced the consultation period to be moved to July and August 2020.

10.     Section 83 of the Local Government Act 2002 requires the consultation period to be a minimum of one month. The COVID-19 Response (Further Management Measures) Legislation Act 2020, which came into force on 16 May 2020, permits a council to modify its SCP and conduct a shorter period of consultation than one month (but no less than 7 days).

11.     The threshold for a council being able to modify its consultation period under this Act is high. According to the Act, a council can only take a modified approach to “the extent that it is satisfied to do is necessary or desirable to support measures taken to contain or mitigate the outbreak of COVID-19 or its effects, including, without limitation, by addressing the impacts and consequences of the outbreak for any aspect of the well-being of the community”.

12.     While it may be possible to shorten the consultation period, it is important that the community is given a reasonable time of one month to provide feedback on the draft plan in which to indicate their priorities and aspirations.

13.     Whilst every effort will be made to adopt the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 in October 2020, the unavoidable change to the dates of the consultation period may require a small extension of time. This is to ensure the local board has sufficient time to consider the submissions received.

It is recommended that provision be made for an extraordinary meeting to adopt the final plan during the weeks of 26 October to 13 November 2020, should it be required. Adoption of the final plan will be no later than 30 November.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 (refer Attachment A) has been developed by considering:

·    previous community engagement, including engagement on the 2017 Local Board Plan, 2018-2028 Long-term Plan and prior annual plans

·    the uncertainty of the impact of COVID-19 on Auckland Council’s budget and service levels

·    subject matter expert advice from council and other council organisations

·    mana whenua and mataawaka views.

15.     Targeted consultation was also undertaken in January to April 2020 through various activities with local community groups.

16.     The draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 has been developed while the impacts of COVID-19 are not yet fully determined. It is possible that some of the aspirations and desires may need to change as a result.

Key features

17.     Key features of the draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 include the following aspirations:

·    a focus on environmental issues, particularly water quality

·    facilities and infrastructure that is of high quality and meets the needs of users

·    communities feel safe and have opportunities to connect

·    improvements to transport infrastructure and services that will give communities options to travel safely and use modes of transport of choice.

·    an environment that supports businesses, visitors and locals in our town centres

·    our Maori culture is supported to flourish

 

Statement of proposal

18.     The use of the SCP requires the local board to approve an accompanying statement of proposal (refer Attachment B). This document provides financial context and an outline of how the public can provide input through the SCP.

Engagement plan for the SCP

19.     The consultation period will run from 13 July to 13 August 2020.

20.     The engagement approach focuses on engagement through digital and online platforms.

21.     The COVID-19 alert system has certain restrictions on public gatherings, which has varying implications for consultation under the SCP. Due to the uncertainty of knowing which COVID-19 alert level Aucklanders will be under at the time of the consultation period, it is not possible to confirm all the details of engagement events as part of the engagement plan.

Consultation documentation and translations

22.     To support Aucklanders to be able to provide feedback in a way that suits them, information will be provided online and in hard copy.

23.     Hard copies and feedback forms will be available at libraries, service centres and local board offices subject to being open, or on request by calling 09 301 0101. The draft local board plan will be available to view online at www.akhaveyoursay.nz.

To enable a wide reach across the diverse communities, the feedback form and sections of the draft plan will be translated into Simplified Chinese, Korean and Te Reo

Methods for obtaining feedback

24.     Feedback will be gathered through the events described below. These may be subject to change depending on the rules and requirements around COVID-19 alert levels:

·    Have Your Say face-to-face engagement events (spoken interaction)

·    online submission via www.akhaveyoursay.nz

·    written submissions, for example pro formas and letters received by post or email

·    verbal submission through telephone by calling 09 301 0101

·    social media comments which are in scope of the engagement, although people will be encouraged to go to the online form to make a formal submission

·    partnerships with community partners to obtain feedback from our diverse communities.

 

Processing feedback

25.     Feedback will be analysed and collated for local board members to consider prior to making decisions on the final local board plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     The draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 reflects the impacts of predicted climate change. The plan contemplates initiatives that support our communities to achieve a low carbon lifestyle, increase recycling and reduce waste. It also considers such impacts as increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the local board area.

27.     Specific initiatives are outlined throughout the plan under the different outcome areas including:

·    initiatives that build community understanding of severe weather events, erosion of our coastlines and the effects on our natural habitats

·    supporting our residents, schools and businesses to develop sustainable and low carbon living practices

·    working with Auckland Council’s Emergency Management Service to support vents and programmes that educate our communities on emergency preparedness

·    taking opportunities, whenever resources are available, to install sunshades at playgrounds or consider planting trees to provide natural shade cover

·    advocating for improved public transport services and infrastructure to encourage more people to leave their cars at home

·    supporting active transport modes by improving walking and cycling connections

 

28.     The impact on the climate from the process of engagement has been considered. Digital feedback will be encouraged where possible, and printing of hard copies will be limited. The ability to provide feedback from any location reduces the need to travel to a specific location.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     The approval of the Devonport-Takapuna draft local board plan 2020 for public consultation will provide the local board with feedback on the communities’ aspirations on the direction the local board intends to take. Planning and operational areas of the council have taken part in the development and review of the draft plans.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The local board’s views have informed the development of the draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 through a series of workshops from November 2019 to May 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     In January 2020 a letter was sent to all iwi authorities inviting participation in local board discussions to ensure key messages were captured early in the planning process.

32.     Staff sought the services of public health organization Hapai te Hauora to engage with Maori communities during the pre-draft engagement. For several reasons, including complications due to COVID-19, this engagement was not conducted during the pre-draft period.

33.     The local board has also considered existing feedback on several matters from mana whenua and matawaka.

34.     Aspirations and priorities include:

·    Maori narratives and history are reflected in our built and natural environment

·    Celebrate maori culture and support te reo Māori to flourish

35.     These views have been incorporated into the draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     Budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process. The local board plans inform this process.

37.     The total engagement budget is $12,000 per local board, which is provided for in the Local Board Services group budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     There is a risk in approving the draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 for public consultation while the full social and economic effects of COVID-19 on the community are not yet determined. The consultation process will seek the views and aspirations of the public to inform the final plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Following approval, the draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 and statement of proposal will be available for public consultation from 13 July to 13 August 2020.

40.     Details of specific engagement events will be finalised as part of this process.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan

 

b

Statement of Proposal

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maureen Buchanan - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Local board feedback on the Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency's Northern Pathway project – Akoranga to Constellation connection

File No.: CP2020/07898

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To retrospectively endorse the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board’s (the local board) feedback on Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency’s (NZTA) Northern Pathway project – Akoranga to Constellation connection.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       NZTA is currently undertaking the Northern Pathway project – Akoranga to Constellation a shared pathway across the Waitematā Harbour that will connect the suburbs of the North Shore with the growing cycle network in the city. This is part of Auckland’s Better Travel Choice Mode Shift Plan, which aims to provide better access and greater choice for people to adopt new ways of moving around the city.

3.       The section of the Northern Pathway between Constellation Drive and Albany is already under construction as part of the Northern Corridor Improvements (NCI) Project.

4.       For the section of pathway between Westhaven and Akoranga, NZTA are finishing the detailed design, seeking consents and approvals and planning to start construction in 2021.

5.       NZTA are now developing a business case for the section between Akoranga and Constellation to realise the full vision of the Northern Pathway and have undertaken public consultation between 22 May and 17 June 2020.

6.       The benefits of the Northern Pathway include:

·    providing greater choice for people to travel between Central Auckland and the North Shore;

·    reducing the number of short trips taken by private vehicles;

·    providing people with a healthy, environmentally friendly way to commute to and from work and education, access services, or connect with friends and family;

·    supporting future growth of the walking and cycling network on both sides of the harbour; and

·    increasing access to transport hubs on the North Shore, including Akoranga, Smales Farm and Constellation Drive Bus Stations.

7.       The Akoranga to Constellation connection has shortlisted two preferred routes which run alongside the eastern and western sides of State Highway One.  The features of these routes are detailed in the consultation material, which is included as Attachment B.

8.       To fulfil consultation timeframes, the local board submitted their feedback on the Akoranga to Constellation connection on 12 June 2020.  This report requests the local board retrospectively approves their feedback, and is attached to this report as Attachment A.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      Endorse Attachment A, which details the local board’s feedback on the Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency’s Northern Pathway project – Akoranga to Constellation connection.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board submission on Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency Northern Pathway project

 

b

Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency’s Northern Pathway project – Akoranga to Constellation consultation brochure

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tristan Coulson - Senior Local Board Advisor Devonport-Takapuna

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Provisional funding allocation towards Innovating Streets for People pilot fund application

File No.: CP2020/07934

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report requests the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board (the local board) consider a provisional $30,000 operational funding allocation to support their application for New Zealand Transport Agency’s (NZTA) Innovating Streets for People pilot fund (the fund).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The purpose of the fund is to help councils create more people-friendly spaces in their towns and cities through the use of tactical urbanism and place-making.

3.       The programme helps the councils plan, design and develop towns and cities by providing a toolkit of support options specifically targeted at retrofitting streets to reduce vehicle speeds and create more space for people.

4.       At the 5 May 2020 business meeting, the local board agreed to delegate to Members Van Tonder, Jackson and Deputy Chairperson Wood, the responsibility of completing and submitting an expression of interest to potentially be supported from the fund (DT/2020/55).

5.       The delegates completed a process in accordance with the 5 May 2020 business meetings recommendations, and submitted the Al Fresco Fridays project for funding consideration.

6.       The delegates agreed that Al Fresco Fridays was a strong project for consideration because:

·    the $300,000 project budget, and $30,000 local board contribution is relatively small, yet it would bring significant benefit to the local board area.  The project has economic development benefits by bringing people into town centres, which will support local businesses following COVID-19, and it can promote place-making by temporarily closing local roads in town centres to trial potential shared spaces;

·    operational, rather than capital funding can be used to deliver the project;

·    the project is strongly supported by the three BIDs;

·    the three BIDs have a proven and successfully track-record in delivering these types of events;

·    it uses temporary pilots, pop-ups or treatments as a pathway to permanent change in the future; and

·    the project aligns to the current local board plan, and also other strategic local board documents such as the Area Plan, and town centre plans (i.e. Milford and Takapuna centre plans),

7.       Staff have identified an opportunity to fund the local board contribution from existing 2019/2020 budgets.  Due to COVID-19 cancelling ANZAC Day and local civic events, most of these project budgets remain unspent and can be reallocated to fund the $30,000 contribution.

8.       The proposed reallocation has been assessed and is supported by council’s finance staff.  They noted that the reallocation is appropriate because it has a direct link to providing post-COVID-19 support to local business and the wider community.

9.       The following attachments are included to support this report:

·    Attachment A: Assessment of nominated projects for Innovating Streets for People Pilot fund; and

·    Attachment B: Innovating Streets for People pilot fund brochure.

10.    

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      provisionally allocate $30,000 operational funding to support the application for the New Zealand Transport Agency’s Innovating Streets for People pilot fund.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

Innovative Streets for People Pilot fund

11.     The purpose of the fund is to help councils create more people-friendly spaces in their towns and cities through the use of tactical urbanism and place-making.

12.     The programme helps the councils plan, design and develop towns and cities by providing a toolkit of support options specifically targeted at retrofitting streets to reduce vehicle speeds and create more space for people.

13.     The technique of employing fast tactical changes in our streets is well evidenced and has the potential to deliver significant safety benefits in a short timeframe.

14.     The support package offered by NZTA will make it easier for councils to deliver:

·    temporary, or semi-permanent, physical changes to streets

·    improvements that test a permanent fix and prototype a street design

·    activations that help communities re-imagine their streets

15.     The fund has also been created to respond to the impacts COVID-19 has had on transport systems and services.  It can make a contribution by providing councils with an opportunity to adapt their streets to better support active and safe transport needs, while following official advice about people movement.

16.     NZTA has allocated more than $7,000,000 for projects across New Zealand, and it will provide councils with a 90 percent funding assistance rate, as well as capability building support for successful applicants, including participation in a community of practice.

17.     NZTA has advised that successful projects must:

·    be less than $1,000,000 in total;

·    not create more space for cars;

·    be temporary or semi-temporary in nature, though able to explain how they will move to permanent changes;

·    need to strategically align with both the Innovating Streets programme objectives, and local councils’ strategies and plans; and

·    demonstrate the value of using tactical urbanism to advance in this situation.

 

 

Auckland Council process to consider applications

18.     To support NZTA, Auckland Council created a process to ensure a coordinated approach to considering and determining applications from local board, councillors, council departments and council controlled organisations (CCOs).  This process included:

Date

Process

14 May 2020

Due date for expressions of interest from local boards.

25 May 2020

List of local potential projects circulated to local boards for review.

29 May 2020

Due date for local board feedback on all expressions of interest from.

2 June 2020

Staff assessment of all expressions of interest projects.

4 June 2020

Report to Planning Committee seeking endorsement on which projects will proceed to funding application.

8 June - 19 June 2020

Notification of which projects will proceed to a formal funding application, funding applications prepared.

22 June – 26 June 2020

Internal review of applications, and approval made by Planning Committee chair, deputy chair and an Independent Māori Statutory Board member under delegated authority.

29 June – 3 July 2020

Applications submitted to NZTA.

End of July 2020

NZTA notifies successful applicants.

 

19.     Council staff also advised nominated projects must meet the fund’s criteria, and:

·    local boards will need to show how this links to an existing council or CCO permanent project, or that the local board is able to completely fund a permanent project from their own funds; and

·    each local board limits themselves to proposing one potential project. 

 

Local board process

20.     At the 5 May 2020 business meeting, the local board agreed to the following processes to consider and determine a project to potentially be supported from the fund:

20.1 NZTA Innovating Streets Pilot Fund

Resolution number DT/2020/55

MOVED by Chairperson A Bennett, seconded by Deputy Chairperson G Wood: 

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

A.   delegate to members Toni Van Tonder, Ruth Jackson and George Wood, the responsibility of completing and submitting an expression of interest (EOI) for one project to be considered for funding from the Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) ‘Innovating Streets’ Pilot Fund on behalf of the board, noting that:

i.    the deadline for submission is 4pm on Thursday 14 May 2020; and

ii.    all members will have the opportunity to put forward projects or initiatives for consideration by the delegation.

B.   delegate to members Toni Van Tonder, Ruth Jackson and George Wood, the responsibility of reviewing and ranking potential projects that have been proposed by staff across Auckland Transport, Auckland Council, and Panuku on behalf of the board, noting that:

i.    the lists of projects / initiatives generated by staff will be provided on or before Monday 25 May 2020;

ii.    local board feedback will need to be submitted by Friday 29 May 2020; and

iii.   all members have the opportunity to provide views and preferences to the delegates on potential projects that have been proposed by staff across Auckland Transport, Auckland Council, and Panuku.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Development and agreement of preferred project

21.     The three delegated local board members (the delegates) met with Local Board Services staff on 12 May 2020 to identify and consider projects which could be supported from the fund.  Five projects were initially considered, these include:

·    Al Fresco Fridays – Pop up outdoor dining and entertainment in the three town centres;

·    support active transport modes project for Campbells Bay Primary School;

·    road treatment to encourage traffic calming in Devonport town centre;

·    temporary spaces in Milford (closing access to carpark on Kitchener Road);

·    safety improvements at Sunnynook Bus Station; and

·    temporary footpath widening on Kitchener and Hustmere roads.

22.     At this stage, temporary spaces in Milford, the safety improvements at Sunnynook Bus Station and temporary footpath widening on Kitchener and Hustmere roads were not considered further.  This was due to:

·    significant traffic management and access constraints by closing all or part of the carpark near New World and the Milford Mall.  The current road layout and infrastructure is also unsuitable to support any temporary changes

·    despite being considered a key project where significant safety improvements and a long-term solution are required, it is unlikely the Innovative Streets fund will enable the required changes at Sunnynook Bus Station; and

·    there is no long-term project to widen the footpaths along Kitchener and Hurstmere roads.

23.     The delegates then sought informal advice and the views from Auckland Transport (AT), other local board members and the three business improvement districts (BIDs) on the three remaining projects.  The following table summarises their input:

Entity

Input

Al Fresco Fridays

Active transport Campbell’s Bay Primary School

Road treatment at Devonport town centre

AT

Staff

Support

Did not support

Support

Local board members

Chairperson Bennett

Preferred project

-

-

Member Deans

-

Preferred project

-

Member O’Connor

-

Preferred project

-

Business Improvement Districts

Takapuna Beach

Support

No comment

No comment

Milford

Support

No comment

No comment

Devonport

Support

No comment

Did not support

 

24.     AT advised that Al Fresco Fridays and road treatment in Devonport town centre had the strongest alignment to the fund’s criteria and were worthy projects to be submitted to NZTA.  AT also advised that while the active transport project near Campbells Bay Primary School had merit, investigative work has not been undertaken yet and is required is informed the necessary changes near the school.

25.     Devonport Business Association (DBA) did not support the proposal because the impact would be too significant on local businesses following COVID-19. 

26.     During this period the delegates assessed the projects against the council’s criteria, where road treatment to encourage traffic calming in Devonport town centre was the preferred project.  However, following the DBA’s comments, the delegated agreed to nominate Al Fresco Fridays for funding consideration. 

27.     The delegates agreed that Al Fresco Fridays was a strong project for consideration because:

·    the $300,000 project budget, and $30,000 local board contribution is relatively small, yet it would bring significant benefit to the local board area.  The project has economic development benefits by bringing people into town centres, which will support local businesses following COVID-19, and it can promote place-making by temporarily closing local roads in town centres to trial potential shared spaces;

·    operational, rather than capital funding can be used to deliver the project;

·    the project is strongly supported by the three BIDs;

·    the three BIDs have a proven and successfully track-record in delivering these types of events;

·    it uses temporary pilots, pop-ups or treatments as a pathway to permanent change in the future; and

·    the project aligns to the current local board plan, and also other strategic local board documents such as the Area Plan, and town centre plans (i.e. Milford and Takapuna centre plans),

28.     An expression of interest document was then completed and submitted to council staff on 14 May 2020.

29.     Detailed information on the projects, and assessment against both the council and fund criteria is included in Attachment A.

 

Progress since agreeing to preferred project

30.     As outlined in recommendation B (i)(ii)(iii), the delegates were also requested to provide feedback on other projects to be considered for funding.  This process however was not completed because feedback was only received from two delegates, and therefore an agreed view / position was not formed.  Based on this wider local board feedback was also not sought.

31.     As result, the local board delegates did not provide comment on other projects being considered.

32.     It should be noted that during this period, Members Deans, Jackson and O’Connor provided feedback that they do not support the Al Fresco Friday’s project.  While this has been acknowledged, it has not been addressed further because this feedback has been undertaken outside of the agreed process.

33.     The project was presented and subsequently endorsed by the Planning Committee at their 4 June 2020 business meeting to proceed to a detailed application (PLA/2020/30)

34.     Part of the detailed application includes identifying and agreeing to the ten percent funding contribution. 

 

Proposal approach to fund ten percent contribution

35.     Staff estimate it will cost $300,000 for the three BIDs to deliver Al Fresco Fridays.  These costings include running the project as a series of events, hiring project management support and funding other aspects such as traffic management plans. 

36.     As noted in the report, the local board is required to fund ten percent of the Al Fresco Friday project costs.  This means the local board contribution is $30,000 operational funding.

37.     Staff have identified an opportunity to fund the local board contribution from existing 2019/2020 budgets.  Due to COVID-19 cancelling ANZAC Day and local civic events, most of these project budgets remain unspent and can be reallocated to fund the $30,000 contribution.

38.     It is important to note that following the impacts of COVID-19 on council budgets, there are additional financial controls in place which guide the local board’s ability to reallocate unspent operational funding.  These controls include council’s finance department assessing and endorsing any proposed reallocation, before a local board decision is made.

39.     The proposed reallocation has been assessed and is supported by council’s finance staff.  They noted that the reallocation is appropriate because it has a direct link to providing post-COVID-19 support to local business and the wider community.

40.     It is recommended that the local board fund the ten contribution from existing 2019/2020, rather than 2020/2021 operational budgets.  Staff advise funding this project in 2020/2021 may be more challenging as the local board will have a reduced operating budget. 

41.     Staff advise that should the local board support the funding contribution, only a provisional allocation is made.  This is because the Al Fresco Fridays project is still subject to approval by the Planning Committee delegates, and ultimately NZTA.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

42.     Both council’s Service Strategy and Integration (who are managing the council process) and AT have advised the Al Fresco Fridays project is a strong candidate for funding from NZTA.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

43.     The proposed local impacts of the Al Fresco project are considered positive and beneficial to the local board area.  This position is based on:

·    it will attract both locals, people from the Auckland region and wider domestic tourists / visitors to the three town centres.  This creates tourism and economic development opportunities which will benefit local businesses as they recover from COVID-19;

·    it will create a sense of vibrancy and entertainment to the three town centres, and support the local board area ‘getting back to normal’;

·    any trials of road closures and changes will can help inform future potential roading changes.

44.     Local board, and delegated member views have been detailed throughout this report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     The financial implications have been detailed and addressed throughout this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     If the local board rejects the ten percent funding contribution, it is likely that the project will not be supported by the Planning Committee delegates and / or NZTA. 

47.     Staff advise that if the ten percent funding contribution is rejected, the local board withdraw their application for further consideration.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     Following the local board’s decision, the Planning Committee delegates will consider all detailed applications on 26 June 2020, then NZTA will consider the application between 29 June and 3 July 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Assessment of nominated projects for Innovating Streets for People Pilot fund

 

b

Innovating Streets for People pilot fund brochure

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tristan Coulson - Senior Local Board Advisor Devonport-Takapuna

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Addition to the 2019-2022 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Meeting schedule

File No.: CP2020/07959

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for a meeting date to be added to the 2019-2022 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board meeting schedule in order to accommodate changes to the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 timeframes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Due to the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, Auckland Council is consulting Aucklanders on further matters for the Emergency Budget 2020/2021. This significantly changes the process set out for the annual plan this year.

3.       The local board is being asked to approve one as an addition to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board meeting schedule to receive feedback from the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 consultation and provide input to the Governing Body. This will enable the modified Emergency Budget 2020/2021 timeframes to be met.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      Approve the addition of a meeting date to the 2019-2022 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 timeframes as follows:

·    Tuesday, 7 July 2020, 2pm

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

5.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·    clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·    sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board adopted its 2019-2022 business meeting schedule at its 19 November 2019 business meeting.

6.       Due to the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, Auckland Council is consulting Aucklanders on further matters for the Emergency Budget 2020/2021. This significantly changes the process set out for the annual plan this year.

7.       To allow local boards to receive feedback from Aucklanders in their local board area on the proposed Emergency Budget, and to provide input to the Governing Body, it is recommended that an additional or extraordinary business meeting be held between 6 to 10 July.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The local board has two choices:

i)       Add the meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule.

or

ii)       Add the meeting as an extraordinary meeting.

9.       For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the Annual Budget 2020/2021 timeframes change again, or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled anyway.

10.     For option two, only the specific topic Emergency Budget 2020/2021 may be considered for which the meeting is being held. No other policies or plans could be considered at this meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule an additional meeting and consider whether to approve it as an extraordinary meeting or an addition to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     There is no specific impact for Māori arising from this report. Local boards work with Māori on projects and initiatives of shared interest

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.     If the local board decides not to add this business meeting to their schedule this will cause a delay to the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 process, which would result in the input of this local board not being able to be presented to the Governing Body for their consideration and inclusion in the Emergency Budget.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.     Implement the processes associated with preparing for business meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Chairpersons' Report

File No.: CP2020/07528

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues relevant to the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thank Chairperson A Bennett for his verbal report

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Elected Members' Reports

File No.: CP2020/07532

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the members of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues they have been involved in since the May 19 2020 Meeting

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thank members for their verbal reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Ward Councillors Update

File No.: CP2020/08158

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board allocated a period of time for Ward Councillors, Chris Darby and Richard Hills, to update the board on activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      Thank Cr Chris Darby and Cr Richard Hills for their update to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Workshops April 2020

File No.: CP2020/07526

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a record of Devonport-Takapuna Local Board workshops held during May 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on 12 May 2020, the board was briefed on:

·    Grants

-     Local Grants Round 2

·    Local Board Services

-     Draft Local Board Plan Update

-     Signage and Wayfinding proposal

·    Americas Cup 36

-     AC36 Update

3.       At the workshop held on 26 May 2020, the board was briefed on:

·    Local Board Services

-     Draft Local Board Plan Update

4.       Records of these workshops are attached to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the records of the workshops held in May 2020

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board workshop record - 12 May 2020

 

b

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board workshop record - 26 May 2020

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2020/07522

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the board for 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by the local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance to staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The June 2020 governance forward work calendar for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board is provided as Attachment A. The information contained within this attachment is as accurate as possible under covid-19 circumstances.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      note the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board governance forward work calendar for June 2020 as set out in Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

June 2020 Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager