I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 23 June 2020

10.00am

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board office, 7-13 Pilkington Road, Panmure

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Chris Makoare

 

Deputy Chairperson

Debbie Burrows

 

Members

Don Allan

 

 

Nerissa Henry

 

 

Peter McGlashan

 

 

Maria Meredith

 

 

Tony Woodcock

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Tracey Freeman

Democracy Advisor

 

18 June 2020

 

Contact Telephone: 021 537 862

Email: Tracey.Freeman@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     The Dust Palace                                                                                                    5

8.2     Jan Brown                                                                                                             6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Body Member's Update                                                                              9

12        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                  11

13        Board Member's Reports                                                                                            19

14        Draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020                                                21

15        Onehunga Community Needs Assessment                                                              65

16        Te Oro Charter and Governance Report 2019/2020                                               165

17        Auckland Transport Update June 2020                                                                   181

18        Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund                                   189

19        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Quick Response Round One 2019/2020 grant allocations 205

20        Appointment of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board member to Tāmaki College Recreation Centre Trust                                                                                            285

21        Addition to the 2019-2022 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board meeting schedule 307

22        Urgent Decision -  Basel Convention Plastic Waste Amendment                       311

23        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      359

24        Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops                                  363  

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 26 May 2020 as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       The Dust Palace

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Providing Eve Gordon of The Dust Palace the opportunity to address the board in relation to the work they are doing in the local board area.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chairperson has approved the deputation request from Eve Gordon.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thank Eve Gordon for her attendance.

8.2       Jan Brown

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Providing Jan Brown the opportunity to address the board in relation to the work they are doing on behalf of a group of migrant, refugee and asylum seeker resettlement organisations and how they can improve the level of service they provide in the local board area.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chairperson has approved the deputation request from Jan Brown.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thank Jan Brown for their attendance.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2020/07514

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on local activities that the Governing Body representative is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To provide the Governing Body Member an opportunity to update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Member’s update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tamaki Puketapapa

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2020/07520

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the Chairperson is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s report for June 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairperson C Makoare Monthly Report June 2020

13

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tamaki Puketapapa

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Board Member's Reports

File No.: CP2020/07529

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the local board members are involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the board members report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketapapa

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020

File No.: CP2020/07966

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020, statement of proposal for public consultation, and to approve the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Engagement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board complete a local board plan for adoption by 31 October of the year following election and uses the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

3.       The consultation period for the SCP will take place from 13 July to 13 August 2020.

4.       The draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 has been developed using feedback obtained before COVID-19. There is a risk in approving the draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 for public consultation while the full social and economic effects of COVID-19 on the community are not yet determined.

5.       The consultation process will seek the views and aspirations of the public to inform the final plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 in Attachment A and the statement of proposal in Attachment B for public consultation using the special consultative procedure.

b)      delegate authority to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to approve final changes to the draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 and statement of proposal.

c)      delegate authority to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) to approve the type of engagement events to take place, the number of events and the dates of the engagement events.

d)      delegate to the following elected members and staff the power and responsibility to hear from the public through ‘spoken’ (or New Zealand sign language) interaction, at the council’s public engagement events, during the consultation period for the local board plan:

·    local board members and chairperson

·    General Manager Local Board Services, Local Board Relationship Manager, Local Board Senior Advisor, Local Board Advisor, Local Board Engagement Advisor

·    any additional staff approved by the General Manager Local Board Services or the Group Chief Financial Officer.

e)      approve to hold an extraordinary meeting of the local board, if required, at a suitable date and time during the weeks of 2 November to 13 November 2020 to adopt the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 states that each local board must:

·    adopt their local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

·    use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

7.       Local board plans are strategic documents developed every three years. They set a direction for local boards and reflect community priorities and preferences. They provide a guide for local board activity, funding and investment decisions. They also influence local board input into regional strategies and plans, including annual budgets.

8.       The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. They also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for the following three financial years and subsequent work programmes.

Timeframes

9.       The consultation period for the local board plans was due to be held in June and July 2020. The implementation of COVID-19 alert levels 3 and 4 required a change in the direction of the draft plans to ensure they responded to the effects of COVID-19. Restrictions on public gatherings also required a shift in planning how engagement events could occur. Planning for these took time, which has forced the consultation period to be moved to July and August 2020.

10.     Section 83 of the Local Government Act 2002 requires the consultation period to be a minimum of one month. The COVID-19 Response (Further Management Measures) Legislation Act 2020, which came into force on 16 May 2020, permits a council to modify its SCP and conduct a shorter period of consultation than one month (but no less than 7 days).

11.     The threshold for a council being able to modify its consultation period under this Act is high. According to the Act, a council can only take a modified approach to “the extent that it is satisfied to do is necessary or desirable to support measures taken to contain or mitigate the outbreak of COVID-19 or its effects, including, without limitation, by addressing the impacts and consequences of the outbreak for any aspect of the well-being of the community”.

12.     While it may be possible to shorten the consultation period, it is important that the community is given a reasonable time of one month to provide feedback on the draft plan in which to indicate their priorities and aspirations.

13.     Whilst every effort will be made to adopt the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 in October 2020, the unavoidable change to the dates of the consultation period may require a small extension of time. This is to ensure the local board has sufficient time to consider the submissions received.

14.     It is recommended that provision be made for an extraordinary meeting to adopt the final plan during the weeks of 2 November to 13 November 2020, should it be required. Adoption of the final plan will be no later than 30 November.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 (refer Attachment A) has been developed by considering:

·    previous community engagement, including engagement on the 2017 Local Board Plan, 2018-2028 Long-term Plan and prior annual plans

·    the uncertainty of the impact of COVID-19 on Auckland Council’s budget and service levels

·    subject matter expert advice from council and other council controlled organisations

·    mana whenua and mataawaka views through the Southern Mana Whenua hui held on 30 January 2020 at Ngāti Ōtara Marae and the Tāmaki Open Space Network Plan hui held on 2 November 2018 at Ruapōtaka Marae.

16.     Targeted consultation was also undertaken in January to April 2020 through various activities with local community groups.

17.     The draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 has been developed while the impacts of COVID-19 are not yet fully determined. It is possible that some of the aspirations and desires may need to change as a result.

Key features

18.     Key features of the draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 include:

·    six outcomes that directly align to the outcomes in the Auckland Plan 2050, with the intent that local board decisions will be more sustainable for the future as their aspirations support the long-term vision for the region.

·    Māori responsiveness is threaded throughout the draft plan and there is a direct outcome related to Māori, Outcome 2: Te ao Māori is thriving and visible. These highlight the local boards commitment to Treaty-based obligations and to Māori participation and development

·    a wellbeing lens is woven throughout the draft plan, as the social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing of their communities is a priority for the local board

·    climate action and resilience is also threaded throughout the draft plan. Protecting, enhancing and restoring the environment, remains a priority for the board as well, with a dedicated outcome, Outcome 5: Our built natural and cultural taonga (treasures) are protected and celebrated.

Statement of proposal

19.    The use of the SCP requires the local board to approve an accompanying statement of proposal (refer Attachment B). This document provides financial context and an outline of how the public can provide input through the SCP.

Engagement plan for the SCP

20.     The consultation period will run from 13 July to 13 August 2020.

21.     The engagement approach focuses on engagement through digital and online platforms.

22.     The COVID-19 alert system has certain restrictions on public gatherings, which has varying implications for consultation under the SCP. Due to the uncertainty of knowing which COVID-19 alert level Aucklanders will be under at the time of the consultation period, it is not possible to confirm all the details of engagement events as part of the engagement plan.

23.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan Engagement Plan (refer Attachment C) outlines the high-level methods the local board will be using to consult with its community.

Consultation documentation and translations

24.     To support Aucklanders to be able to provide feedback in a way that suits them, information will be provided online and in hard copy.

25.     Hard copies and feedback forms will be available at libraries, service centres and local board offices subject to being open, or on request by calling 09 301 0101 or by contacting the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board.

26.     The draft local board plan will be available to view online at www.akhaveyoursay.nz.

27.     To enable a wide reach across the diverse communities, the feedback form and sections of the draft plan will be translated into te reo Māori, Simplified Chinese, Tongan and Samoan. The sections to be translated are the outcomes with a brief description, the objectives and initiatives.

Methods for obtaining feedback

28.     Feedback will be gathered through the events described below. These may be subject to change depending on the rules and requirements around COVID-19 alert levels:

·    Have Your Say face-to-face engagement events (spoken interaction)

·    online submission via www.akhaveyoursay.nz

·    written submissions, for example pro formas and letters received by post or email

·    verbal submission through telephone by calling 09 301 0101 or contacting the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

·    social media comments which are in scope of the engagement, although people will be encouraged to go to the online form to make a formal submission

·    partnerships with community partners to obtain feedback from our diverse communities.

 

Processing feedback

29.     Feedback will be analysed and collated for local board members to consider prior to making decisions on the final local board plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.     The draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 reflects the impacts of predicted climate change. It considers such impacts as increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the local board area.

31.     All outcome areas in the draft plan acknowledge climate action and how the outcome may impact or influence it.

32.     The plan includes Outcome 5: Our built, natural and cultural taonga (treasures) are protected and celebrated, which includes the specific objective:

·    our community is resilient and feels prepared for the effects of climate change.

33.     Specific initiatives are outlined under this outcome, including:

·    develop a local climate action plan that integrates with wellbeing initiatives

·    enhance, maintain and protect the urban ngāhere (forest) in our parks, streets and public open spaces

·    partner with key agencies to establish an Ope Programme to grow the number of local Enviroschools and support the development of sustainable, resilient communities

·    support the establishment of the new Onehunga Community Recycling Centre and promote its use as a local hub for waste minimisation education, employment and enterprise

34.     The impact on the climate from the process of engagement has been considered. Digital feedback will be encouraged where possible, and printing of hard copies will be limited. The ability to provide feedback from any location reduces the need to travel to a specific location.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     The approval of the draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 for public consultation will provide the local board with feedback on the communities’ aspirations on the direction the local board intends to take. Planning and operational areas of the council have taken part in the development and review of the draft plans.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     The local board’s views have informed the development of the draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 through a series of workshops from November 2019 to May 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     In January 2020 a letter was sent to all iwi authorities inviting participation in local board discussions to ensure key messages were captured early in the planning process.

38.     Staff engaged with mana whenua and mataawaka on 30 January 2020 at Ngāti Ōtara Marae for the Southern Mana Whenua hui to seek their views and values in relation to the area.

39.     The local boards community partner Hāpai Te Hauora was unable to deliver their engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka due to lockdown measures.

40.     The local board has also considered existing feedback on several matters from mana whenua and mataawaka, particularly feedback gathered at the Tāmaki Open Space Network hui held on 2 November 2018 at Ruapōtaka Marae.

41.     Aspirations and priorities include:

·    supporting mana whenua to uphold their role as kaitiaki for the environment

·    te ao Māori is seen, spoken and heard throughout the local board area and community

·    the upgrade of Ruapōtaka Marae in Glen Innes.

42.     These views have been incorporated into the draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

43.     Budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process. The local board plans inform this process.

44.     The total engagement budget is $12,000 per local board, which is provided for in the Local Board Services group budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

45.     There is a risk in approving the draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 for public consultation while the full social and economic effects of COVID-19 on the community are not yet determined. The consultation process will seek the views and aspirations of the public to inform the final plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     Following approval, the draft Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 and statement of proposal will be available for public consultation from 13 July to 13 August 2020.

47.     Details of specific engagement events will be finalised as part of this process.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Local Board Plan 2020

27

b

Statement of Proposal Draft Local Board Plan 2020

61

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mal Ahmu - Local Board Advisor - Mngke-Tmk

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketapapa

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Onehunga Community Needs Assessment

File No.: CP2020/07617

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Onehunga Community Needs Assessment report (Attachment A) and approve staff progressing recommendations relating to Sir William Jordan Recreation Centre and Pearce Street Hall.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Community Facilities Network Action Plan (2019) contains the following action which is a driver for this needs assessment.

“Investigate the need for leisure space in the wider Onehunga area and consider the development of Sir William Jordan Leisure Centre or alternative location or partnership options.”

3.       The Transform Onehunga programme led by Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku), is an urban regeneration programme focused on the Onehunga Town Centre and its surrounds. The potential optimisation of the council-owned property at 3-5 Pearce Street, Onehunga, which contains the Sir William Jordan Recreation Centre and Pearce Street Hall is identified as an opportunity in the programme.

4.       The needs assessment sought to understand local community service requirements, how these are being met by existing providers (council and non-council) and the implications for Sir William Jordan Recreation Centre and Pearce Street Hall.

5.       The needs assessment found Onehunga has the right type of community facilities, but the quality, capacity, location and configuration impacts the ability to fully meet community needs.

6.       Indoor recreation/sport provision is predominantly accommodated at Sir William Jordan Recreation Centre and the centre is well utilised. The population in Onehunga will continue to grow and change, increasing the existing need for additional indoor recreation/sport capacity within Onehunga.

7.       Utilisation levels for Pearce Street Hall are high when compared to other council community venues in Onehunga. There is clear demand for ongoing provision of a large community space currently provided by Pearce Street Hall.

8.       There is some capacity within other existing council venues (i.e. Onehunga and Oranga Community Centres), but these are predominantly small to medium spaces. There are multiple reasons for the low utilisation rates of these facilities, some contributing factors are:

·    a lack of community awareness and co-ordination between facilities,

·    perception council services are too expensive and unaffordable.

9.       The next step is to identify and assess options for the optimal delivery of community and indoor recreation services for the Onehunga community. Panuku and council will work together to investigate the options, including the potential optimisation of 3-5 Pearce Street. 

10.     The options investigation may be constrained by reduced operational budgets and restrictions on the engagement of external consultancy services due to the council’s Emergency Budget for 2020/2021.  Staff will undertake as much work inhouse as possible, and specialist advice will be procured subject to budget availability.

11.     Staff will work with council departments to consider the incorporation of other recommendations from the needs assessment report into future work programme advice, subject to priority and budget capacity.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the findings of the Onehunga Community Needs Assessment (Attachment A)

b)      approve staff working with Panuku Development Auckland to identify and assess options for the future delivery of community services currently provided from Sir William Jordan Recreation Centre and Pearce Street Hall that:

i)        reflect the need for increased indoor recreation services and continued provision for a large community space in Onehunga

ii)       consider the asset condition and limitations of the Sir William Jordan Recreation Centre and Pearce Street Hall and the implications of addressing any issues

iii)      use optimisation as a primary funding source for capital investment

c)      endorse staff working with council departments to consider the incorporation of other recommendations from the needs assessment report into future work programme advice.

 

Horopaki

Context

Scope and drivers for this work

12.     The Onehunga Community Needs Assessment is an item on the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board 2019/2020 work programme:

Resolution number MT/2018/85

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

d) Request a community needs assessment to confirm the current and future service requirements as they relate to the Onehunga town centre and Community Facilities.

13.     The needs assessment seeks to understand the current and future community service needs of the Onehunga community, how these needs are being responded to by council and non-council providers and the implications for the Sir William Jordan Recreation Centre (Recreation Centre) and Pearce Street Hall (Hall).

14.     Two key drivers for this work are:

·    the Community Facilities Network Action Plan (2019) –which contains an action to “Investigate the need for leisure space in the wider Onehunga area and consider the development of Sir William Jordan Leisure Centre or alternative location or partnership options.”

·    Transform Onehunga – a regeneration programme led by Panuku with the overarching vision of “A flourishing Onehunga that is well connected to its past, its communities and the environment, including the Manukau Harbour”. The Transform Onehunga programme includes the opportunity for optimisation of the council owned 3-5 Pearce Street site where the Recreation Centre and Hall are located. Optimisation offers an alternate funding source for reinvestment in improved community outcomes by unlocking the development potential of a site and enabling the development of a fit for purpose facility on a cost neutral basis.

About the Recreation Centre and Hall

15.     The Recreation Centre is located at 5 Pearce Street, Onehunga, and is owned by Auckland Council. The YMCA hold the management contract to operate and deliver indoor recreation services from this facility along with the Onehunga War Memorial Pool located at 1 Park Gardens Lane, Onehunga (see Figure 3.2 for map of Onehunga’s predominant community facilities, page 11 Onehunga Needs Assessment).

16.     The facility contains one full-sized indoor court with seating, a lounge room and kitchen overlooking the indoor court, a fitness centre on split levels and toilets and changing amenities. A variety of activities and programmes are offered including basketball and netball sport leagues, after school care, holiday programmes, youth programmes and fitness and group exercise.

17.     The Hall is located at 3 Pearce Street, Onehunga, adjacent to the Recreation Centre. The Hall is owned and operated by Auckland Council as a venue for hire (see Figure 3.2 for map of Onehunga’s predominant community facilities, page 11 Onehunga Needs Assessment).

18.     The Hall is comprised of a main hall which caters for up to 150 people and has a small stage. There are two adjoining smaller rooms, kitchen and toilet amenities. The facility has a high level of use and is hired by various groups for activities such as dance, religious activities, meetings and gatherings.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Needs assessment methodology

19.     Visitor Solutions were engaged to undertake the needs assessment. The methodology for the needs assessment involved:

·    a review of relevant strategic plans and policies

·    assessment of demographics and population projections

·    current state review of council and non-council facilities

·    input from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board and relevant council departments

·    community engagement involving surveys (online and hard copy), face-to-face interviews with stakeholders and user groups, and intercept interviews at local events.

Demographic and growth information

20.     The study area for the needs assessment focused on the area shown in Figure 1 which encompasses;

·    Onehunga town centre and residential area

·    Eastern side of Royal Oak

·    Te Papapa

·    Oranga

Figure 1 Study area for Onehunga Needs Assessment

21.     The current population of Onehunga is approximately 21,000 with an expected increase to 30,000 in the next ten years, and 38,000 in the next 30 years representing 45% population growth, compared to Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area at 60%, and the Auckland Region growth rate of 38%.

22.       In light of Covid-19 a review of council’s growth forecast (i11v5) is currently underway by Auckland Plan, Strategy and Research. If required a revised version of the forecast is expected to be available in July 2020 and may lead to changes in timing of anticipated growth and/or demographic information relating to the growth. Implications of the revised version will be considered as part of next steps and reflected in future advice.

23.     There are six Special Housing Areas (SHAs) in the Onehunga area, with approximately 800 dwellings planned. These 800 dwellings include plans by Kāinga Ora to develop multiple apartment complexes within a five-minute drive of the Recreation Centre and Hall. These apartments are to be a mix of social and private housing.

24.     Two-thirds of the Onehunga population is made up of the age groups 15-39 and 40-64. Although all age-groups are projected to grow the highest growth is for over 65 years.

25.     Onehunga has higher proportions of Pacific people in comparison to the wider Auckland Region. Within the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area there is significant Asian population growth projected, along with continued growth in Pacific people.

Table 1 Ethnic composition (2018 Census data)

 

Pacific people

Māori

Asian

European

Onehunga

22%

11%

27%

52%

Auckland Region

16%

12%

28%

54%

 

Summary of findings and recommendations

26.     The research carried out by Visitor Solutions identified a strong desire amongst locals to create a community heart/hub in Onehunga.

27.     There is a good range of community services and facilities, but opportunities for improvement were identified.

28.     The recommendations (outlined in paragraph 29 and 30 below) address the following issues, which limit the ability to meet community needs for indoor recreation and community services:

· the quality, capacity, location and configuration of facilities

· lack of awareness of, and co-ordination between, services

· a perception that many of the services are expensive or unaffordable.

29.     The library is well known in the Onehunga area and its services are highly valued by the local community (Section 8.4 Onehunga Library, Onehunga Needs Assessment, Community and Indoor Recreation).

30.     The key findings/rationale and recommendations identified through the needs assessment are as follows:

Findings/Rationale

Recommendations

There is a strong existing and growing need for increased greater indoor recreation/sport capacity. Indoor recreation/sport provision is predominantly accommodated at the Recreation Centre where issues have been identified such as poor quality and layout, insufficient court space, and no indoor-outdoor connection, have been identified.

1.   Investigate expanded and enhanced indoor court/recreation facility, considering site options, spatial parameters and other requirements.

Demand for large community space is met by the Hall which has high utilisation, but there are limited alternate large spaces in the area. There is some capacity within other existing venues, but these are predominantly small to medium spaces.

2.   Investigate continued provision of a fit-for-purpose, large community space - taking account of space/service configuration, site and integration considerations.

 

31.     Further findings/rationale and recommendations were identified to enhance service provision (both asset and non-asset responses) for the Onehunga community:

 

Findings/Rationale

Recommendations

Indoor Recreation

There is limited community understanding of what the term ‘recreation centre’ means and there was no identified connection associated with Sir William Jordan. The purpose of the Recreation Centre could be articulated more clearly.

3.   Review the name of the Sir William Jordan Recreation Centre.

A lack of facility awareness was found for both the location of the Recreation Centre and Hall and the nature of activities and services available.

4.   Review promotion strategies to market indoor recreation programmes and services.

The Oranga community expressed concern regarding the lack of sport and active recreation opportunities available in their immediate suburb. Covered courts may address indoor recreation provision in this community.

5.   Support the direction of the Fergusson Domain Concept Plan and investigate potential for covered courts.

Community Activities

The Onehunga community has limited awareness of the Onehunga and Oranga Community Centres and the nature of activities available.

This awareness is evident with the Onehunga Community Centre even though it sits adjacent within the same building of the Onehunga Library. A combined shared reception may improve awareness and support collaboration between respective services within this facility.

Consider ways to integrate service delivery and the service offer to improve customer and community experience;

6.   Investigate opportunities to improve the Community Centre facades at Onehunga and Oranga.

7.   Investigate viability of a shared reception to serve the Onehunga Library and Community Centre.

8.   Review promotion strategies to market community centre programmes and services.

A community need for a creative space to make arts and crafts, learn sewing, woodwork or metalwork was identified.

9.   Investigate how spaces can support more integrated creative programming including the option of a maker space.

The cost of accessing venues for hire and community centres is seen by many as prohibitive and not equitable across council and non-council providers. Council’s discount scheme for venues for hire has limited awareness in the community.

10. Review the pricing structure and promote council’s community discount.

Awareness and Coordination

The library and has a strong presence in the community, is well recognised, and highly utilized. This could be leveraged to support other services and facilities that have a low level of community awareness.

11. Consider using Onehunga Library as a community information hub to support other providers.

There is limited awareness of community services and facilities both physically and digitally.

While there are attempts for service providers to work together, it was evident the public are seeking more of a collaborative approach for delivery of community services and facilities (both council and non-council).

Onehunga hosts a range of events which are frequented by Aucklanders. There is further opportunity to utilise this platform for promotion of community services and facilities.

12. Investigate an integrated and coordinated approach to promote services, programmes and facilities.

13. Initiate regular service delivery meetings between community providers (council and non-council).

14. Better use of events to promote community services and facilities.

The community expressed an interest in additional programmes for youth, children, elderly and creative space. The needs assessment identified several existing programmes currently delivered for children, youth and elderly in Onehunga, but low awareness of these programmes may be the issue.

15. Target promotion of existing programmes and services for children, youth and elderly before introducing delivery of any new programmes.

Additional project recommendations:

16. Work with the community and local board to review council run programmes on offer to ensure they are relevant to the local communities needs and are not competing with other community and private providers.

17. Consider how to leverage and support community-led programmes through the council network.

 

 

Priority of recommendations from Needs Assessment

32.     As the Transform Onehunga programme is one of the key drivers for this needs assessment, priority should be given to recommendations one and two to assess the optimisation potential of 3-5 Pearce Street, Onehunga.

33.     All other recommendations have been shared with relevant council departments for their consideration and potential incorporation into future work programme advice, subject to priority and budget capacity.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     The recommendations in this report have no climate impact. Climate impacts will be assessed in any future work that may arise as a result of further investigations and in alignment with council’s Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Framework.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     The findings included in this report have been developed with input from the project team comprised of representatives from council departments including Parks Sports and Recreation, Arts Community and Events, Local Board Services, Libraries and Information, Community Facilities, Service Strategy and Integration and Panuku Development Auckland.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     The YMCA were included in the project team to input into the needs assessment and will continue to be involved in any future work that may arise as a result of this needs assessment.

37.     Visitor Solutions undertook extensive community engagement which included targeted surveys for facility users, a survey for the general public, and face to face interviews with user groups and stakeholders including the Onehunga Business Association, and non-council service providers such as the Onehunga Community House and Zen Gardens.

38.     Staff attended workshops with the local board to discuss scope and approach of the project. Interviews with local board members were conducted for input into the engagement phase.

39.     Findings and recommendations from the needs assessment were presented to the local board at two workshops in December 2019 and April 2020. The local board supported the findings.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki local board area has a Māori population of approximately 11,000, with 2,370 living in the Onehunga area.

41.     The Māori Participation in Community Sport Review carried out in 2017 for Sport New Zealand found Māori are a key customer grouping in the sport and recreation sector evidenced by Māori’s significant contribution to the sector as participants, volunteers and high-performance athletes.

42.     The ethnic breakdown of respondents to the general community survey showed the response rate by Māori was relative to the Onehunga ethnic make-up.

43.     Mana whenua were invited to participate in the engagement process for this needs assessment. Te Ahiwaru expressed interest in the findings from this needs assessment. Mana whenua and mataawaka will be invited to participate in future phases of this work.

44.     The following actions from the Independent Māori Statutory Board Māori Plan 2017 will inform future work and investigations:

·    Review education programmes in libraries, and sports and recreation facilities to assess the quality of the engagement, use by and responsiveness to Māori.

·    Assess Council health programmes measures and report on how it can increase the quality of the engagement and responsiveness to Māori community needs (sports and recreation facilities, bylaw implementation and monitoring).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     Auckland Council and Panuku staff time to identify and assess options is possible within existing staff resource for FY21. 

46.     The Emergency Budget 2020/2021 will determine the budget available to procure specialist advice to support option development and assessment. This may also delay delivery of this advice. The financial implications of the recommendations outlined in paragraph 30 will be assessed for consideration as part of future work programmes, subject to priority and budget capacity.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     Identified risks and mitigations associated with the recommendations in this report are outlined in the table below.

Risks

Mitigations

Community concern and/or opposition to considering alternate provision including replacement of the Sir William Jordan Recreation Centre and Pearce Street Hall as part of an optimisation programme

Development of a communications and engagement plan with the local board to support stakeholder, mana whenua and community engagement.

Clear communications that the need for indoor recreation and community services in Onehunga have been confirmed and that removal of provision without replacement is not being considered as an option.

Assessing the option of retaining and making fit for purpose the current buildings as they stand, alongside other options.

Budget is not available to procure specialist advice to enable a full assessment of the options identified.

Emergency Budget will confirm capacity to deliver in 2020/2021. Future work will be guided by local board prioritisation.

Optimisation relies on a market attractive proposal to identify a development partner and may not be a viable funding mechanism.

Plan sequencing to market to take account of market conditions.

Work with Panuku to understand sensitivity of commercial viability throughout options development.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     Subject to local board endorsement, staff will make the Onehunga Community Needs Assessment available to mana whenua and community stakeholders that participated in the process.

49.     A communications and engagement plan will be developed and workshopped with the local board to support an integrated approach to future work programme delivery.

50.     Panuku and a cross-council team will work together to identify and analyse options for the future provision of indoor recreation and community services in Onehunga using optimisation as a primary funding source. These will be workshopped with the local board.

51.     The needs assessment findings will be shared with the appropriate council departments to for consideration in the development of work programmes.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Onehunga Needs Assessment: Community and Indoor Recreation

75

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bex Ah Fook - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Lisa Tocker - Head of Service Strategy and Integration

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tamaki Puketapapa

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Te Oro Charter and Governance Report 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/07760

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the refreshed charter as a guiding document for Te Oro until 2025 and to approve direct governance of Te Oro by the local board with community engagement and involvement prioritized as business as usual.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Te Oro is a council-run arts facility in Glen Innes, with a focus on youth, community, and creativity. To provide strategic direction for the facility, a charter was developed by a Community Working Group in 2012/2013 before the facility opened. The charter sets the vision, focus, values and whāinga (goals).

3.       In 2017, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board requested staff review Te Oro’s governance model and charter document as part of a business plan refresh (MT/2017/14).

4.       Due to resourcing, the scope of the charter review was constrained to the whainga and focus areas. The facilities purpose was out of scope.

5.       The review found that the charter could, however, be updated to reflect the lived experience in the facility over the past five years and to respond to the current interests of the community as identified by the Te Oro Governance Committee.

6.       Staff recommend the local board now adopt the refreshed charter and plan to resource a full review of its relevance in advance of Te Oro’s tenth year in operation (2025).

7.       The review found that the governance model of a local board committee, made up of local board members, community members and mana whenua, had not achieved its intended outcomes, namely of creating a sense of community ownership and empowerment.

8.       Four governance options were considered and staff now recommend the local board retain direct governance over Te Oro (following the natural dissolution of the governance committee in September 2019).  Staff also recommend an integrated approach to community engagement and input is prioritised as business as usual to address a critical gap in this governance model.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approve updates to the Te Oro Charter as outlined in Attachment A and adopt the Charter as guiding document until 2025;

b)      endorse full and direct governance model for Te Oro by the local board, supported by an integrated approach to community engagement, input and capability building (option three in Attachment B); 

c)      agree to investigate community aspirations for the facility in the lead up to Te Oro’s tenth year of operation.

 

Horopaki

Context

Background to Te Oro

9.         Te Oro is a council-run arts facility in Glen Innes, with a focus on youth, community, and creativity.  The need for such services was first documented in 1995 in a Glen Innes resident survey and was reinforced in feedback and research during the following two decades. 

10.       A charter was developed by a community working group in 2012/2013 to provide strategic direction for the facility.  The charter sets the vision, focus, values and whāinga (goals).

11.       In 2013 the local board approved a local board committee governance model for the facility to be composed of local board members, members of the Tāmaki community and mana whenua.

12.       The desired outcomes of this model were:

·     The governance body is accountable to the wider community

·     The community feels a strong sense of ownership and empowerment

·     There is access to the necessary expertise to run a music and arts centre for youth

·     There is access to the necessary funds and expertise to maintain a community facility

·     Is cost efficient

·     Funding opportunities exist

·     Opportunities and incentives exist to be innovative and entrepreneurial

13.       In 2015, Te Oro opened and has since been operated by Auckland Council under the governance of the local board committee.  

Review of Charter and Governance

14.       In 2017, the local board requested staff review Te Oro’s governance model and charter as part of a business plan refresh planned for 2018/2019 (MT/2017/14).

15.       Due to resourcing, the scope of the charter review was constrained to the whainga and focus areas. The facilities purpose was out of scope.

16.       In 2019, staff interviewed members of the governance committee to learn more about their experiences and ask for their recommendations for Te Oro’s future governance. 

17.       Feedback from the governance committee indicated this model had not achieved its intended objectives, nor been a satisfactory experience for participants. 

18.       The natural term for the governance committee came to an end in September 2019, at the end of the last political term, and members were not re-appointed for the current political term.

19.       A review of governance options and the charter has since been completed, resulting in the recommendations contained in this report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Te Oro Charter

20.       In workshops with the local board, the Te Oro Governance Committee, and staff, the following key issues were raised:

·     The number of whāinga is overwhelming. Attempting to deliver to all twenty-one whāinga means resources are spread thin and impact can be diluted.

·     The charter’s focus on young people can feel exclusive of the wider community.  This may also affect venue utilisation

·     The diagram used to illustrate the three focus areas creates confusion instead of clarity

Ngā whāinga

21.       The Te Oro Charter includes twenty-one goals, grouped under three whāinga (goals) headings. Attempting to respond to all twenty-one goals has stretched the centre’s capacity and resources and may have limited staff’s ability to make meaningful progress toward any specific goal.

22.       Strategically, it is better practice to set fewer goals to enable greater focus, clarity, resourcing and impact.

23.       Before the committee’s dissolution in September 2019, the Te Oro Governance Committee identified six whāinga they recommend be prioritised at the facility in 2020/2021.  This approach will enable staff to focus their efforts, but also enables direction setting at a governance level and is also an example of how the community can influence operations at Te Oro in future.

24.       The six whāinga that were recommended by the governance committee are:

·     Young people are supported by tuakana / teina relationships that inspire aroha, reciprocity and respect

·     Young people are empowered through having leadership opportunities and participating at all levels of the centre’s activities

·     The local community is involved and informed about activities and developments at Te Oro, and ideas are shared between the centre and community

·     The capabilities of the local community are strengthened, enabling the growth of creative and social enterprises

·     A diverse range of creative cultural expression is celebrated, including contemporary and traditional arts and celebrations.  Specifically:

Ngā toi Māori

Pacific arts and culture

·     Creative excellence is experienced, encouraged and practiced by engaging with artists, practitioners and mentors who inspire young people and nurture their talents

Focus on youth

25.       Staff undertook desktop research to understand the historical aspirations for the facility.  This research confirmed that opportunities for youth had been a long-standing aspiration and identified need of the community, but not to the exclusion of the wider community. 

26.       The paper Ka Mau Te Wero – Rise to the Challenge by the Glen Innes Stronger Communities Action Group (2010) specifically proposed ‘a multipurpose building with facilities catering specifically to meet the music and arts related aspirations of our youth sector as well as the need for wider community groups and members for appropriate spaces to get together to learn, network and engage in activities that would promote connected and empowered communities. 

27.       A report to the local board in 2013 (CP2013/26019) stated “The charter seeks to illustrate that the primary purpose for the centre’s development is the provision of creative opportunities for local young people… While the primary focus is fostering the creativity of young people in Tāmaki, the charter aims to be inclusive. This means the centre will provide a place for the wider whanau, community and peers of young people, including those who may live beyond Tamaki boundaries.  It may also draw on the input of creative practitioners who do not live locally”

28.       A report by Tim Walker Associates titled Options for the GIMAC Operating and Programme Model (2014) also noted that “in Māori & Pacific world views the idea of youth classified in isolation to the community made no sense and was prescriptive... There is widespread excitement about the GIMAC programme offer being developed in a manner that sees youth in the context of a high level of wider community engagement and use.”

29.       The original aspirations for the facility were to reflect the community it serves through being multi-dimensional, dynamic and serving the whole community rather than solely focused on local youth.

Interpretation of the diagram

30.       The charter tried to illustrate this sense of dimension and dynamism with a diagram that showed the intended overlap and interplay between the three focus areas (see below).

Figure A: Diagram from Te Oro Charte

r

 

31.       However, staff, governance committee members and the local board have since struggled to interpret the intended interplay between focus areas.  As a result, the facility’s direction has defaulted to a focus on the central overlap of youth, community, and creativity, which may have contributed to the sense of exclusivity and under-utilisation by non-youth for non-arts purposes. 

32.       One of the top themes identified in the 2014 Tāmaki Needs Assessment was ‘things for youth and young people to do’ alongside ‘welcoming community hubs’ and ‘low (or no) cost activities that bring people together’.  These priorities were mirrored in aspirations shared by whānau throughout a series of wānanga held across Tāmaki Makaurau in early 2018. 

33.       Staff worked with the governance committee to identify a selection of minor updates to the charter that would reflect the lived experience in the facility over the past five years and respond to current needs and interests of the community.  These recommendations are outlined in Attachment A.

34.       The governance committee agreed that these updates would address many of their frustrations and concerns, whilst remaining true to the intention of the original charter.

35.       Reframing the Te Oro Charter as a guiding document places it as a navigational tool instead of a set of precise and/or exhaustive requirements.  This will enable greater flexibility, responsiveness, dynamism and innovation at both governance and operational levels.  

36.       The outbreak of COVID-19 precluded staff from socialising charter updates with community stakeholders, but feedback has been received from staff who were part of the Community Working Group, have a historical connection to the facility, or are currently working with Maungakiekie-Tāmaki communities.

37.       Staff now recommend the local board approve updates to Te Oro Charter as outlined in Attachment A and adopt it as guiding document until 2025.

Te Oro Governance

38.       In 2019, staff interviewed members of the Te Oro Governance Committee to learn more about their experiences and ask for their recommendations for Te Oro’s future governance.  Feedback from the governance committee indicated this model had not achieved its intended objectives, nor been a satisfactory experience for participants. 

39.       Issues cited include:

·          The function of the governance committee has never been clear, beyond ‘providing a community voice’ at the facility

·          The committee’s mandate is to govern the programming direction for the facility, but direction is already set in Te Oro’s charter (vision, values and goals)

·          Operational oversight of Te Oro is out of scope for the committee, yet it impacts programming decisions

·          This has resulted in a sense of ‘rubber stamping’ within the committee.

·          Members did not feel empowered to make decisions or that there were decisions left to be made by the committee, especially at a governance level. 

40.       Other concerns identified were the lack of youth representation on the committee, and whether the community felt any more empowered or connected to the facility because of the committee model. 

41.       Staff revisited advice previously provided to the local board and researched current governance practice across council facilities. The following four options were identified:

Options

Outcomes

Option one (not recommended)

Governance Committee (Status Quo)

Re-instate the Te Oro Governance Committee as committee of Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board

Complex governance structure

Meets community expectations (no change)

Enables local board and community input

Enables mana whenua governance input

Existing issues likely to continue

Existence of a formal community input model can remove the impetus to involve the community in decision-making in other areas, affecting the sense of community ownership and empowerment

Option two (not recommended)

Advisory Panel

Direct governance by Local Board, supported by an advisory panel to provide feedback and insights.

Enables wider and/or more specific community input

Clarifies decision making authority (local board)

Reduces formal community input into decision making.

Existence of a formal community input model can remove the impetus to involve the community in decision-making in other areas, affecting the sense of community ownership and empowerment

Can create negative outcomes if panel not utilised effectively (e.g. clarity of advice sought)

Risk of disengagement / disillusionment if advice not implemented

Requires additional funding for increased community representation

Mana whenua input in advisory role instead of governance.  Offense may be caused by perceived demotion.

Option three – Recommended

Integrated community engagement and capacity/capability building

Direct governance by Local Board.  Community engagement and involvement is prioritised as BAU.

Simplest governance structure

Aligns with other council-delivered arts and community facilities

Absence of formal community input drives impetus to engage with community through other means, and stimulates innovation

Provides many entry points for community input and involvement

Engagement can be broad, or specific as needed

Potential for greater visibility of community input

Community capacity and capability can be developed through supported involvement in planning, decision making and service delivery (including ability to fundraise)

Can create strong sense of community ownership and empowerment

Basic engagement can be integrated within budget, but more extensive or innovative approaches may require funding

Perceived reversal of commitment to community input

Loss of mana whenua governance seat

Option four (not recommended)

External governance / management

Seek expressions of interest from community organisations to govern or manage Te Oro.

Most uncertainty as current community interest / capability / capacity is unknown

Model provides highest level of community ownership & empowerment, and opportunities to fundraise

Model provides lowest level of control, cost efficiency and accountability through elected members

Financial sustainability a risk

Potential for ‘interest group takeover’

Potential for youth and mana whenua representation - but currently unknown

 

Feedback from Community Places

42.       Feedback was sought from council’s Community Places team, who did not recommend the advisory panel model, noting their experience of advisory panels that have struggled with similar feelings of disempowerment and frustration.

43.       The Community Places team also referred to Community Voices in Community Places, a project that employed an Empowered Communities approach to address the desire of the Community Places team to align their work more closely with the new Auckland Plan and the Thriving Communities Action Plan. 

44.       A key finding from this resource is that Council-delivered and community-led places need community voice. Local residents and the wider local community need to be engaged in community led places. Being managed by a community group does not automatically lead to this local community engagement.”

45.       One of the principles of The Thriving Communities Action Plan is self-determination and resourcefulness. This involves being committed to a community-led, ground-up approach to community development and focusing on the strengths and assets of a community.


Assessment against governance outcomes

46.       The four governance options were assessed against the original outcomes, plus the following two outcomes drawn from Te Oro’s charter and identified as priorities by staff, governance committee and local board:

·     Young people are empowered through having leadership opportunities and participating substantially at all levels of the centre’s activities

·     The importance of Mana Whenua to the local area is acknowledged through their involvement in the centre Te Oro

Scorecard for governance objectives

Status Quo

Advisory Panel

Integrated

External

Accountability to community through elected representatives

þþþ

þþþ

þþþ

þ

Community feels a sense of ownership & empowerment

þ

þþ

þþþ

þþþ

There is necessary expertise to run the facility

þþþ

þþþ

þþþ

?

There is access to necessary funds and expertise to maintain the facility

þþþ

þþþ

þþþ

?

Is cost efficient

þþþ

þþ

þþ

?

Fundraising opportunities exist

þ

þ

þþ

þþþ

Opportunities and incentives exist for entrepreneurship and innovation

þ

þ

þþþ

þþþ

Youth representation / participation

þ

þþ

þþþ

?

Mana whenua governance seat

þþþ

þ

þþ

?

SCORE OUT OF 27

19

18

24

10

 

47.       The assessment revealed that:

·        Direct governance by the local board achieves many of the desired outcomes, specifically related to public accountability, risk management, and access to the required skills and resources

·        There are few benefits to be gained from replacing the governance committee model with an advisory panel model.

·        There is little evidence that formal community input models achieve the desired outcome of ‘the community feels a strong sense of ownership and empowerment’

·        The biggest difference across the model options relates to mana whenua representation at a governance level, which is enabled in the governance committee model but would have to be rethought if other options were implemented.

·        Governance by an external group (e.g. a community trust) meets many of the desired outcomes, especially in community empowerment, capacity to raise additional funds, and opportunities for entrepreneurship and participation.  However, it is difficult to assess the community’s capability and capacity without signposting an intention to transfer governance and/or management of Te Oro to the community.

48.       There is potential for ownership of Te Oro to be transferred to the community, but this would need to be explored further with all stakeholders. Staff recommend investigating this option as a lead up to Te Oro’s tenth year of operation.

49.       Unless governance is entirely delegated to an external organisation, ultimate decision making will always remain with the local board and a governance committee or advisory panel will always be limited. For these reasons, staff recommend embracing this reality and re-establishing a direct line of governance between Te Oro and the local board.

50.       Under a simpler governance structure, staff will have more capacity to integrate community input and involvement into the facility’s practice as business as usual.  Taking an integrated approach can create room for multi-faceted engagements with many entry points for community input and involvement. This approach is included in option 3 in Attachment B.

51.       Community capacity and capability can be built through supported involvement in planning, decision-making and service delivery at many levels.  This approach also provides opportunities for more members of the community to interact with the facility and allows room for nuanced engagement with priority communities such as youth. 

52.       Community development support can be targeted toward the potential end goal of reducing the level of council influence over facility management.

53.       Staff now recommend the local board:

·        Endorse the full and direct governance model for Te Oro.

·        Support an integrated approach to community engagement, input, and capability building at Te Oro.

·        Plan to investigate community aspirations for the facility in the lead up to Te Oro’s tenth year of operation

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

54.       Te Oro features 256 photovoltaic panels on the roof structure, which, in 2016, was sufficient to supply total building energy needs.

55.       A key element of Te Oro’s role as a community place is the provision of access to arts and culture experiences in a local context, which reduces the climate impact of intra-city travel.

56.       By assuming full and direct governance over Te Oro, the local board will have more opportunities to influence and prioritise a response to climate change at Te Oro.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

57.       Establishing a direct governance relationship with the local board will align Te Oro’s governance with other council-led arts venues and community places.

58.       Advice was sought from council’s Community Places, Community Engagement Unit, Community and Social Policy, Service Strategy and Integration, CCO Governance & External Partnerships and Democracy Services (Panels) teams.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

59.       The local board has provided feedback and guidance throughout this project.  Their feedback has been considered and helped inform advice and recommendations regarding Te Oro’s charter and governance model.

60.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2017 includes the following outcomes and objectives:

Outcome 1: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki is an active and engaged community

·   People are cared for and enabled to participate, celebrate and contribute to the community.

·   Our young people are engaged in the community and have access to a wide range of opportunities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.       Māori are important partners and contributors to the development of Te Oro.

62.       Council undertook consultation with iwi prior to embarking on the business case for the project in 2012.

63.       Architects established a working relationship with a senior Māori artist/designer, and received input from mana whenua groups Ngāti Paoa, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

64.       The name Te Oro references natural phenomena well known to Mana Whenua, the sound of wind through and across Maungarei.  Views to Maungarei are emphasised for those leaving the building’s main entrance, with Maungarei further referenced as the basic trianglular form within the font system designed for Te Oro’s branding.  Key rooms within Te Oro were gifted the names of the local landscape features Maungarei, Taurere, Te Omaru, Te Pupu O Kawau and Te Wai O Taiki by Mana Whenua, further connecting Te Oro to landscape, tūpuna (ancestors) and pepeha (statements of place).

65.       Advice was sought from Art, Community and Event’s Senior Advisor Maori Responsiveness and one of council’s Matanga - Tikanga me Te Reo Māori on an appropriate kupu (word) to replace the charter value of Reciprocity, as recommended by the Te Oro Governance Committee. The recommended replacement is ‘tauutuutu’.

66.       Local iwi were asked to provide recommendations for mana whenua representation on the governance committee.  A rotating mana whenua seat was established as part of the committee’s Terms of Reference.

67.       There is a reputational risk caused by the dissolution of the governance committee model after one term, as this means only Ngāti Paoa has been represented at a governance level.

68.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board could mitigate this by inviting input into facility governance at a rangatira ki rangatira level, which would meet the council’s treaty obligations by promoting a direct partnership.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

69.       Te Oro is funded through local board ABS budget. In 2019-2020, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board allocated $395,868 to fund the operational running of Te Oro, including the complete suite of programming delivered.

70.       There are no financial implications related to the recommendation to adopt the updated charter as a guiding document.

71.       The dissolution of the governance committee will result in small operational savings for Te Oro in the form of koha (gift) offered to community representatives on the committee.

72.       Staff will endeavour to integrate community engagement and input at the facility within current budget allocations.  This will be workshopped with the local board as part of the annual work programme process. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Risks

Mitigations

There is a reputational risk caused by the dissolution of the governance committee model after one term, as this means only Ngāti Paoa has been represented at a governance level.

 

The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board could mitigate this by inviting input into facility governance at a rangatira ki rangatira level, which would meet the council’s treaty obligations by promoting a direct partnership.

 

There is a reputational risk of disappointing community members by the dissolution of the governance committee and that members of the Community Working Group object to the updates made to Te Oro’s charter.

 

These risks can be mitigated with positive and joined up messaging from staff and local board, and by immediate efforts to include the community in planning and delivering activity at Te Oro.

 

There is a risk in operating the facility under a currently undecided governance model. Te Oro’s governance committee dissolved in September 2019, and a new model has yet to be implemented.

 

This risk will be removed if the local board accepts this report’s recommendations

The impact of COVID-19 poses a risk to the level of service that can be delivered at Te Oro from 1 July onwards. The budget for 2020-2021 is dependent on the outcome of the Emergency Budget that is out for public consultation.  

 

This risk will be mitigated by implementing a direct line of governance to the facility, to ensure services are as aligned to local board outcomes as possible within budget constraints. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

73.       Community engagement, input and capability building will be included as a separate work programme line for 2020/2021 so that the local board can receive quarterly updates on activity.

74.       The local board will be asked to feed into identification of whāinga priorities and key initiatives on an annual basis.

75.       Staff will also return to the local board in 2021/2022 to discuss funding to investigate the relevance of the Te Oro Charter and community aspirations for the facility going into its tenth year (2025).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te Oro Charter Updates

177

b

Analysis of Governance Options

179

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Debs Mc Smith – Arts & Cultural Operational Strategy Advisor - ACE

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tamaki Puketapapa

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport Update June 2020

File No.: CP2020/08118

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on Auckland Transport (AT) matters in its area and an update on its Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF). 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an opportunity to highlight Auckland Transport activities in the Maungakiekie- Tāmaki Local Board area and contains information about the following:

·    Auckland Transport’s responses to Covid-19 Level 2

·    A brief update on the status of other significant AT projects in the local board area

·    Progress on the local board’s LBTCF funded projects (2016-2019), along with information on the local board’s Community Safety Fund projects.

·    Public consultations that the local board has been informed about are also noted.

·    A decision is required this month, described in a separate report also on this agenda

3.   The local board currently has $3,613,626 in its transport capital fund in this political term. The available budget as noted will only remain, provided that the level of overall funding for the Local Board Transport Capital Fund remains at $20.8 million per annum. Current indications are that this will not be the case for FY 2020/2021, if Auckland Council adopts it’s proposed Emergency Budget 2020/2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport June 2020 update report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       AT is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. It reports on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in its Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role of local boards within and on behalf of their local communities. 

5.       This report updates the Maungakiekie- Tāmaki Local Board on Auckland Transport (AT) projects and operations in the local board area, it updates the local board on their consultations and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and Community Safety Fund (CSF).

6.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport (AT). Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also:

·   be safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

7.       The CSF is a “one-off” capital budget established by Auckland Transport for use by local boards to fund local road safety initiatives. The purpose of this fund is to allow elected members to address long-standing local road safety issues that are not regional priorities and are therefore not being addressed by the Auckland Transport programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

COVID 19 Response - General Points

8.       On 13 May 2020, New Zealand’s COVID 19 Alert Level dropped to Level 2.  During this time, Auckland Transport worked hard to support Aucklanders.  Auckland Transport construction projects were activated again, and public transport began operating at normal schedules.

9.       At Level 2, Auckland Transport’s normal business operations re-started including charging for parking, enforcement of parking and bus lanes and responding to non-emergency requests for service from the community.  This has been important as approximately one third of Auckland Transport’s budget comes from business operations, in order to deliver services and projects this income is needed.

10.     New Zealand dropped to Alert Level 1 on 9 June 2020.   AT’s aim will continue to be to get everyone back to work as quickly as possible to help kick-start economic activity and contribute to job growth recovery. Auckland Transport projects are worth hundreds of millions of dollars and they all contribute to the economy and to helping Auckland recover.

 

COVID 19 – Public Transport

11.     After the shift to Alert Level 2 public transport returned to pre-lockdown schedules. It also stopped being free. When schedules returned to normal Auckland Transport asked that people travelling on public transport avoid peak times unless necessary, as this helped to ensure that two metres of physical distancing between staff and customers was able to be maintained.

12.   Auckland Transport also took numerous measures at Level 2 to help keep customers safe on the network and maintain effective and safe public transport services for our customers, these included:

a)   The AT Mobile app which indicates the available capacity that is on a bus or train service at any given time, so customers will know if two metre distancing will be achievable before they board.

b)   Public transport operators introduced enhanced cleaning regimes to include antimicrobial protection fogging of facilities and the fleet.

c)   People were asked to use the rear door to get on and off the bus. This ensured everyone is kept as safe as possible by minimising physical contact between customers and the bus drivers.  Customers who use a wheel chair or other mobility device or require driver assistance could still use the front door of buses.

13.   Level 1 changes as of 9 June 2020 mean that people will no longer need to be physically distanced.  Passengers can now use the front door of the bus but cash fares will not be accepted. Passengers are also encouraged to register their HOP cards so that contact tracing will be easier.

Covid -19 – Discounted Off-Peak Fares

14.     Auckland Transport has discounted fares on buses and trains to encourage more people to travel during the day, outside of peak times.

15.     Throughout June 2020, there will be a 30 per cent discount on AT HOP rates for adults who travel on weekdays after 9am and before 3pm. The discount also applies after 6.30pm, until the end of service, Monday to Friday only.

16.     This is an opportunity for Aucklanders who are able to work more flexibly, to trial it for the month and relieve some pressure on public transport services while Covid-19 Level 1 distancing measures are in place.

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund Projects 2016-2019 - Update

Project

Description

Status

Funds Allocated

Jubilee Shared Bridge

Construction of shared path and bridge.

This project is being progressed by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities Group.

$700,000

Tāmaki Shared Path

Connection from Omaru Creek to Kiano Place

This project is being progressed by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities Group.

$380,000

Line Rd/Taniwha Raised Crossings

Located on Line Road, between Eastview and Taniwha Reserves, and Taniwha Road, between Taniwha and Maybury Reserves

This work is included as part of the Glen Innes Cycleway project.

$190,000

Tripoli Road Raised Crossing

Upgrading of existing pedestrian crossings at 33 and 89 Tripoli Rd.

A Board workshop is scheduled for 30 June 2020 to discuss progress on this project.

$600,000

Onehunga Mall Raised Crossing Paths

Two pedestrian crossings to provide a better connection to Laneway 2, 4 & 5.

This project is being progressed by Panuku.

$300,000

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund 2019-2022

17.     A separate report on Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Boards 23 June 2020 business meeting discusses the local board’s proposals for consideration of its projects for this political term.

18.     It is expected that the local board will decide on the priority of its Year 1 LBTCF projects for the 2019-2022 triennium in July or August 2020.

 

Community Safety Projects

19.       The local board’s Community Safety projects are noted below.

Selwyn St pedestrian safety improvements

Public consultation closed on 19 May 2020.  The results of the consultation are now being reviewed.

$300,000

Farringdon pedestrian safety improvements

 

Public consultation closed on 19 May 2020.  The results of the consultation are now being reviewed.

$260,000

Elstree Ave pedestrian safety improvements

Public consultation closed on 19 May 2020.  The results of the consultation are now being reviewed.

$260,000

 

Bailey Rd pedestrian safety improvements

Public consultation closed on 19 May 2020.  The results of the consultation are now being reviewed.

$50,000

Panama Rd School pedestrian safety improvements

High friction surfacing on both approaches to the existing zebra crossing on Panama Rd has been installed.

$20,000

Harris Rd pedestrian safety improvements

High friction surfacing on both approaches to the existing zebra crossing and road parking to delineate parking at Harris Road has been installed.

$20,000

Electronic speed feedback signs at Apirana Ave and Dunkirk Rd

Project team is currently processing procurement to install electronic speed signs at Apirana Ave and Dunkirk Rd. Planned for installation in 2019-2020 financial year.

$80,000

Hamlin Rd pedestrian safety improvements

Redline project

Now being considered in LBTCF programme

 

AMETI Update

20.     The AMETI-Eastern Busway is Auckland Transport’s biggest project.  It is worth $1.4 billion and is New Zealand’s first urban busway. The busway provides congestion free ‘bus only’ lanes for commuters from Botany to Panmure.

21.     Now that work has started again, after the site was shut down during Alert Level 4, the project is progressing as planned.

22.     Stage One construction is advancing with work now operating again in all sites within the project areas. Major work is planned in late June moving eastbound traffic off Pakuranga Road onto the new busway so utility work to take place. This will cause a significant change to the road layout and we expect some delays and impacts while the public become used to this new traffic plan. The new road layout will be in place until late 2020. More information will be provided once the final traffic plan is confirmed.

23.     A road closure is planned for Jellicoe Road and Queens Road in late June/early July to coincide with the school holidays. AT are working with the Panmure Business Association and other impacted parties to ensure this is widely communicated and mitigation plans are in place.

24.     A Registration of Interest (ROI) to join Auckland Transport in an ‘alliance’ to design and construct the remainder of the AMETI -Eastern Busway was released to the construction industry in early May. An alliance involves a group of public sector and private sector organisations joining in consortium to deliver a very large project.  AMETI – Eastern Busway worth $ 1.4 billion is an example of a very large project.

25.     An alliance structure encourages members to work together throughout planning and construction. The members also share risk incentivising members to deliver the best possible solutions at the best prices.  This creates efficiencies and allows for innovation which maximizes value for money. The system has been used successfully both in Auckland and across New Zealand.  The Waterview Tunnel in an example of a large project built in Auckland using an alliance model.

26.     The ROI was successful; three consortiums of design, construction and planning specialists registered their interest and will progress through the formal procurement process with Auckland Transport. As per previous timelines, Auckland Transport expects to announce the final structure of the alliance by late 2020.

27.     AT is working with Panuku on a final plan for public consultation to decide the possible relocation of the Panmure sign. A full update will be provided once next steps have been agreed.

 

Auckland Transport Projects in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki area

AMETI Stage 2

The AMETI-Eastern Busway is Auckland New Zealand’s first urban busway. The busway provides congestion free ‘bus only’ lanes for commuters from Botany to Panmure.

 

Update as above

Links to Glen Innes Cycleways

The cycleways will provide safe and attractive cycle routes that connect people to the Glen Innes train station, the town centre, schools, shops, parks, and community facilities.

Project split into two packages:

Package-1 “Taniwha St. link 2B” detailed design completed, resource consent in progress.

Package-2 “other links”, detailed design in progress.

Construction budget to be confirmed.

190 Tripoli Road

This is a proposal to upgrade the pedestrian crossing to a raised zebra at 190 Tripoli Road in Point England. This location has been identified through road safety investigations and it is expected that the raised zebra crossing will improve road safety for people walking in the area by slowing approaching traffic and prioritising pedestrians.

 

Project is now out for public consultation

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

29.     One of AT’s core roles is providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     The impact of information in this report is mainly confined to Auckland Transport.  Where LBTCF projects are being progressed by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities group, engagement on progress has taken place. Any further engagement required with other parts of the Council group, such as Panuku, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

 

Transport Workshops

31.     Three workshops were held with the local board during May 2020.  The first workshop discussed the Links to Glen Innes project and work on the provision of car parking spaces that the local board had requested.

32.     The second workshop introduced the local board’s new relationship manager and confirmed the list of LBTCF projects that the local board was considering.

33.     The third workshop discussed potential projects for the LBTCF in more detail and gave direction to staff about which projects should move on to rough order of costing. This direction is reflected in the decision report also being considered on this agenda. Other topics discussed at this workshop included:

·          A briefing on the Connected Communities project

·          An update on the AMETI project.

 

Auckland Transport Consultations

34.     AT provides the Maungakiekie- Tāmaki Local Board with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in their area.  The consultations below were sent to the local board during May 2020 for either comment or information.


Location

Proposal

190 Tripoli Road

This is a proposal to upgrade the pedestrian crossing to a raised zebra at 190 Tripoli Road in Point England. This location has been identified through road safety investigations and it is expected that the raised zebra crossing will improve road safety for people walking in the area by slowing approaching traffic and prioritising pedestrians.

 

Mays Road/ Grey Street/Curzon Street, Te Papapa

The local board was informed that AT intends to improve road safety outcomes by painting broken yellow lines (no stopping at all times) at the intersection of Mays Road, Grey Street and Curzon Street, Te Papapa. This intersection has been the site of numerous crashes over the years and the new road markings should improve safety by increasing visibility at the intersection.

 

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

35. The decisions of the Traffic Control Committee affecting the Maungakiekie- Tāmaki Local Board area during the May 2020 reporting period are noted below.

Street Name

 

Nature of Restriction

 

Type of Report

Decision

Great South Road, Greenlane

 

Removal of Bus Stop / Removal of Bus Shelter

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

Carried

Mount Wellington Highway / Roslyn Road / Hamlin Road / Longford Street,

 

No Stopping At All Times / Surface Friction Treatment / Bus Stop / Bus Shelter / Bus And Heavy Vehicle Lane / Ambulance Service Lane / Edge Line / Flush Median / No Passing / Traffic Island / Traffic Signal / Stop Control / Lanes / Lane Arrow Marking / Removal Of Bus Stop / Removal Of Bus Shelter

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

Carried

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     There are no specific impacts on Māori for this reporting period. AT is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi-the Treaty of Waitangi-and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive or effective to Māori. Our Maori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to with 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     There are no financial implications in the local board receiving this report.  A separate report on this agenda discusses the financial implications of a decision on the Board’s LBTCF.

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary 2019 - 2022

Total Funds Available in current Political Term

5,426,589

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$1,812,963

Remaining budget left

$3,613,626

 

38.     The available budget above will only remain, provided that the level of overall funding for the Local Board Transport Capital Fund remains at $20.8 million per annum. Current indications are that this will not be the case for 2020/21, if Council adopts it’s proposed 2020/21 budget. It may also not be the case in 2021/22 and 2022/23 but work remains to be done on what budgets will be available in these years. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     Auckland Council is consulting on its Emergency Budget 2020/2021 from Friday 29 May. We will have more certainty on the impacts to the AT programme when the budget is adopted in July 2020.

40.     AT’s capital and operating budgets will be reduced through this process. Some projects we had planned for 2020/2021 may not be able to be delivered, which will be disappointing to communities that we have already engaged with.

41.     Both the Community Safety Fund and the Local Board Transport Capital Fund may be impacted by these budget reductions. Therefore, local boards should consider the prioritisation of their projects carefully.

42.     The only way to mitigate this risk is to clearly communicate the Board’s intentions so staff supporting it may plan ahead and to make the best use of any available funds.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.       AT will prepare a further report for the local board next month.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lorna Stewart – Elected Member Relationship Manager, AT

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Manager – AT

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketapapa

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2020/08133

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To progress the allocation of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board’s (the Board) Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) by considering allocating $644,000 for enhancements to the Links to Glen Innes cycle project and putting forward other projects to Auckland Transport (AT) for the LBTCF rough order of costing process.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has $3,613,626 currently in its LBTCF. Local boards can use the LBTCF to deliver transport infrastructure projects that are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. The Board is asked to consider allocating a portion of this fund by July 2020.

3.       This report requests the Board to consider allocating $644,000 from its LBTCF to provide enhancements by way of additional car parking opportunities for the proposed Links to Glen Innes cycle project on Line Road and Taniwha Road, Glen Innes

4.       Allocating $644,000 to the Links to Glen Innes project would leave a balance of $2,969,626 remaining in the fund, providing that the level of overall funding for the LBTCF remains at $20.8 million per annum. If Council adopts it’s proposed Emergency Budget 2020/2021 then the LBTCF would reduce significantly.

5.       For this reason, staff recommend the Board defer allocating funding to the Links to Glen Innes project until the effects on the LBTCF is known and the Board’s list of potential projects, are duly prioritised.

6.       Information and advice on the Links to Glen Innes project are included in sections of this report.

7.       The report also outlines potential projects that the Board has identified it would like to put forward to Auckland Transport for the preparation of rough order of costing.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      defer the decision on the allocation of local board transport capital fund to the Links to Glen Innes project until the local board’s July 2020 business meeting, after Auckland Council’s budget for FY2020/2021 is confirmed.

b)      request Auckland Transport to provide rough order of costs for the following projects:

·   Hamlin Road – pedestrian safety measures to support Sylvia Park School

·   Taniwha Road – pedestrian improvement to support access to the Tāmaki path near Kiano Place

·   Dunkirk Road – pedestrian improvements to support Panmure Bridge School

·   Barrack Road – pedestrian improvements to support Panmure District School

·   Grey Street – pedestrian improvements to support Golden Grove School

·   A boardwalk in Onehunga Bay Reserve

·   A programme of bus shelters in both Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board subdivisions

 

Horopaki

Context

8.         The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme. Projects must also:

·        be safe

·        not impede network efficiency

·        be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

9.         There is currently $3,613,626 remaining in the 2019-2022 LBTCF.

10.       The Board has held four workshops where the list of potential LBTCF projects and the Links to Glen Innes project have been discussed.  This included a workshop which confirmed the list of projects that the Board had put forward, a workshop where the priority of these projects was discussed and two detailed workshops on potential Board-funded enhancements proposed for the Links to Glen Innes project.

11.       Criteria to assist the Board to prioritise projects is attached as Attachment D, for guidance. The Board should consider whether the criteria used meets the needs of the Board and the Board should decide the most appropriate order of the projects it wishes to move forward. 

12.       The projects recommended for rough order of costing are presented in the recommendations in a priority order suggested by staff.

13.       The Board has requested AT to bring the enhancements to the Links to Glen Innes Project to this meeting for a decision and this proposal is described below.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Investigating enhancements on Line Road and Taniwha Street to AT’s proposed cycle project – Links to Glen Innes

14.     AT is proposing a number of dedicated cycle facilities in the suburbs of Glen Innes, Stonefields, Saint Johns and Point England.

15.     There are six new cycleways in Glen Innes and Point England proposed as part of the wider project with the two links along Taniwha Street (from Line Road to West Tāmaki Road) and Line Rd (between Taniwha Street and Eastview Road) being the subject of this report.

16.     Proposed enhancements to AT’s proposed cycle projects to provide additional car parking spaces on Line Road and Taniwha Street were requested by the Board at workshops in February, April and May 2020.

17.     AT’s parking assessment showed that parking demand was low on Taniwha Street and after making some changes after the consultation process and during detailed design, considered that the current parking demand could be accommodated by parking opportunities on side streets.

18.     The Board was concerned that although current parking demand is low, the amount of intensification being built and planned in these areas could lead to the cycle project being compromised by illegally parked cars and therefore the Board requested that AT provide more options for car parking. AT came back to the Board with further options but said it would be unable to fund the delivery of any extra spaces.  At those workshops, the Board’s direction to staff was to present the options described below for decision.

Line Road (Route 1)

19.     As part of the design development for Line Road, the Board requested AT to consider providing some additional provision for car parking for a section along Line Road between Taniwha Street and Eastview Road.

20.     In response to the Board request to provide more space for on-street parking, the design team presented a 1.5m wide cycle path with 0.7 buffer (separation from traffic) as shown in drawings as Attachment A.

21.     This provided twelve recessed parking bays between Eastview Road and West Tāmaki Road. The civil works necessary for the construction of the parking bays involves the removal of three trees, the reconstruction of stormwater outlets and driveways plus the risk of service relocations and additional lighting.

22.     The cost of the twelve recessed parking bays on Line Road is therefore estimated to be $240,000.

Property No.

Tree Removal

Intended Parking

Cost

Line Rd #5

0

2

$40,000

Line Rd #18

1

6

$120,000

Line Rd #33-35

2

4

$ 80,00

 Total

3

12

$ 240,000

Taniwha Street (Route 2B)

22.     The Taniwha Street cycle project was designed as a cycleway – an on-road facility protected with a raised separator from the live traffic.

23.     As part of the design development for Taniwha Street, the Board requested AT to retain car parking for the section of cycleway between Kotea Road and West Tāmaki Road intersections.  The options presented to the Board in February 2020 included:

·     Option 1 – intermittently located indented car parks to fit with a cycleway; or

·     Option 2 – cycle path along the west side of Taniwha Street (A cyclepath is defined as a raised path for cycling only (at footpath level) separated by a buffer from the live traffic).

 

24.     Option 1 was discarded as unsafe as it could create conflicts between cars entering and exiting parking bays and cyclists.

25.     Option 2 looked at the risks, cost estimates and the number of parking spaces retained by providing a cycle path instead of a cycle way along the west side of Taniwha Street between Mansfield Road and West Tamaki intersections. These were workshopped with the Board in early May 2020.

26.     Risks included removal of street trees, reconstruction of driveways (in the road reserve), potential service relocation and the existing substandard footpath width.

27.     The additional cost of changing the cycle lane into a cycle path along the west side of Taniwha Street between Mansfield and West Tāmaki Roads to provide 34 extra car parking spaces was calculated at $791,443.00.

28.     The Board considered treating the complete west side of Taniwha Street as a cycle path as beyond its budget and directed AT to present options for decision for two portions of Taniwha Street. They are Taniwha Street - north of Mansfield Street and south of Silverton Avenue; and Taniwha Street – Hilton Place to West Tamaki Road. Treating these sections of Taniwha Street would provide 24 additional car parking spaces at a cost of $404,000. (see Attachment B)

Sections

Specific Risks

Tree Removal

Parking  Retained

Cost

1 - North of Mansfield Street and south of Silverton Avenue

·    Five trees removed
·    Vehicle crossing reinstatement (no work within private property)

5

17

$158,289.00

2 – South of Silverton Avenue and Hilton Place

·    Power pole and overhead power line relocation
·    A tree removal
·    Substandard footpath width
·    Services relocation/ resetting
·    Reinstatement of seven vehicle crossings including work within private property

1

10

$387,807.00

3 - Hilton Place to West Tamaki Road

Five trees removed
·    Substandard footpath width
·    Services relocation/ resetting
·    Reinstatement of three vehicle crossing including work within private property

 

4

7

$ 245,347.00

 

 

10

34

$791,443.00

 

Potential LBTCF projects considered at 2020 at local board workshops

29.     The following potential projects were considered for the LBTCF at a local board workshops held in April, May and June 2020. The following projects were recommended by staff for rough order of costing in LBTCF Year One.

·   Hamlin Road – pedestrian safety measures to support Sylvia Park School

·   Dunkirk Road – pedestrian improvements to support Panmure Bridge School

·   Barrack Road – pedestrian improvements to support Panmure District School

·   Grey Street – pedestrian improvements to support Golden Grove School

·   A programme of bus shelters in both Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board subdivisions

·   Taniwha Road – pedestrian improvement to support access to the Tāmaki path.

30.       The projects below were recommended by staff for consideration in LBTCF Year 2.

·   Tāmaki Path – a connection through to Mokoia Pā

·   Safety Improvements at Onehunga Bay Reserve for pedestrians (this included footpath widening on Beachcroft Avenue and a boardwalk in the reserve).

31.     Most of the safety projects around schools were put forward by AT’s Community Transport team who meet regularly with schools in the Auckland region to discuss safety issues and to encourage active travel.

32.     The pedestrian improvements at Onehunga Bay Reserve are part of an Auckland Council Reserve Plan and put up as an option for the Board to consider.  AT has a safety project in detailed design for Beachcroft Road and aspects of the reserve plan would enhance safety for pedestrians in this area. The Board direction at the workshop requested AT to provide a costing for the boardwalk as shown in the reserve plan (Attachment C).

Criteria and assessment of LBTCF projects

33.     AT has developed criteria to help local boards assess the priority of LBTCF projects against other each other. 

34.     The list of projects for rough order of costing, and the Links to Glen Innes proposal are assessed by staff against the criteria, and outlined in Attachment D. It will be important that the Board consider the priorities of projects, particularly once projects come before the Board for final allocation of budget in July/August 2020.

35.     Due to the safety benefits of the projects put up for rough order of costing, this report recommends that all the projects noted for LBTCF Year One move forward to rough order of costing with the addition of the Onehunga Bay boardwalk (previously shown in Year 2 of the LBTCF Programme). Putting forward the Onehunga Bay Reserve boardwalk into Year 1 will enhance safety of pedestrians in the area and mean a more even division of budget between the Board’s two subdivisions.

36.     The proposal for enhancements to the Links Glen Innes project consumes significant amount of the Board’s 2019-2022 LBTCF.  The analysis of the criteria for this project (Attachment D) show lesser benefits for it than for the other projects listed.

37.     The Board understands the needs of its communities and that any decision to provide additional car parking opportunities on Line Road and Taniwha Street must be weighed up against the potential LBTCF projects the Board may consider in July and in Year 2 of the LBTCF.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

39.     One of AT’s core roles is providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The impact of information in this report is mainly confined to Auckland Transport.  Where LBTCF projects are being progressed by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities group, engagement on progress has taken place. Any further engagement required with other parts of the Council group, such as Panuku, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     Local board views, informed by local board workshops, were incorporated in the short list of projects and development of the criteria discussed in this report.

42.     Local board plan outcomes are one of the criteria against which potential projects are assessed and all gained some points in this section.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     Any engagement with, or impact on, Māori will be assessed on a project by project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     The table below shows the current amount available in the LBTCF for the Maungakiekie- Tāmaki Local Board.

Maungakiekie- Tāmaki Local Board Transport Capital Fund Financial Summary 2019 - 2022

Total Funds Available in current Political Term

5,426,589

Amount committed to date on projects approved for design and/or construction

$1,812,963

Remaining budget left

$3,613,626

 

45.     If the Board approves the allocation of $644,000 of the LBTCF to the enhancement of the Links to Glen Innes project then $2,969,626 will remain in the fund, provided that the level of overall funding for the Local Board Transport Capital Fund remains at $20.8 million per annum. If Council adopts it’s proposed Emergency Budget 2020/2021 then this budget will be significantly reduced. Work remains to be done on what budgets will be available in later financial years. 

46.     All other recommendations in this report are subject to further analysis therefore present no financial risk to the Board. Providing rough orders of costs for projects impacts on AT’s budgets rather than the Board’s budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     Auckland Council is consulting on its Emergency Budget 2020/2021 from Friday 29 May. We will have more certainty on the impacts to the AT programme when the budget is adopted in July 2020.

48.     AT’s capital and operating budgets will be reduced through this process. Some projects we had planned for 2020/2021 may not be able to be delivered, which will be disappointing to communities that we have already engaged with.

49.     Both the Community Safety Fund and the Local Board Transport Capital Fund may be impacted by these budget reductions. Therefore, local boards should consider the prioritisation of their projects carefully.

50.     The only way to mitigate this risk is for the Board to resolve their prioritised LBTCF projects for rough order of cost, so staff may plan ahead and make the best use of any available funds.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     Auckland Transport will progress the decisions made by the local board as a result of this report and provide updates via the monthly reporting process. A rough order of costs report will be presented to the Board in July 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Line Road Diagram

197

b

Taniwha Street Diagram

199

c

Onehunga Bay Reserve Plan

201

d

Local Board Transport Capital Fund Scoresheet

203

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Lorna Stewart – Elected Member Relationship Manager - AT

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Manger - AT

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tamaki Puketapapa

 



Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Quick Response Round One 2019/2020 grant allocations

File No.: CP2020/07566

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Quick Response Round One 2019/2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Quick Response Round One 2019/2020 (Attachment B).

3.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2019/2020 on 23 April 2019 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $120,000 for the 2019/2020 financial year. A total of $99,497.52 was allocated in previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $20,502.48 to be allocated to the remaining quick response round.

5.       Fifteen applications were received for Quick Response Round One 2019/2020, requesting a total of $44,393.50.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Quick Response Round One 2019/2020, listed in Table One.

Table One: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Quick Response Round One 2019/2020

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2011-127

City of Sails Pipe Band Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of the band's hall hire from 2 July 2020 to 1 July 2021.

$2,400.00

Eligible

QR2011-101

Mainly Music New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards the session facilitator and excluded communities manager wages and travel, office and storage rental costs and programme costs for the  “Mainly Music” playgroup from 13 July 2020 to 13 July 2021.

$3,567.50

Eligible

QR2011-102

The Period Place

Community

Towards the cost of period products and education procurement.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR2011-104

Pro-Pare Athlete Management Trust

Community

Towards tutoring costs for at-risk youth within the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board area and the cost of three rubbish bins.

$3,960.00

Eligible

QR2011-108

YMCA North Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of playground activity kits and starter sets to deliver the after school care and children's holiday programme.

$1,934.00

Eligible

QR2011-116

The Crescendo Trust of Aotearoa (CTOA)

Community

Towards the cost of designing seven posters for the promotion of the CTOA programmes to youth in the East Auckland area.

$1,400.00

Eligible

QR2011-117

Panama Road School

Community

Towards the cost of day trips for year six students from Panama Road School including the cost of the venue entry fees and transport.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR2011-121

New Zealand Ethnic Social Services Trust

Community

Towards the cost of delivering online workshops to children from the Persian community including the facilitators' cost, project manager's wages, resources, and administration for the period of 1 July 2020 to 30 September 2020.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR2011-123

Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust

Community

Towards the community support coordinator's wages.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2011-126

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the costs of triage support and supervision of the volunteer counsellors for the period of 1 July 2020 to 31 December 2020.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2011-105

Tread Lightly Charitable Trust

Environment

Towards the costs to engage the specialist environmental education teacher to deliver the Tread Lightly programme

$1,132.00

Eligible

QR2011-118

The Auckland King Tides Initiative

The Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand Inc

Environment

Towards the installation of water level (tidal) gauges and the design and production of its signage.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2011-120

Green Business HQ Ltd

Environment

Towards the delivery of eight “Climate Talk” workshops.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR2011-106

Eastern Suburbs Gymnastics Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of a new gymnastics beam.

$4,000.00

Eligible

QR2011-111

Royal Oak Bowls Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase and installation of two air-conditioning units in the club's main hall and sports lounge.

$4,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$44,393.50

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2019/2020 on 23 April 2019 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

12.     Due to the current COVID-19 crisis, staff have also assessed each application according to which alert level the proposed activity is able to proceed. Events and activities have been assessed according to these criteria.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

18.     A summary of each application received through Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Quick Response Round One 2019/2020 (Attachment B) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Maori. Auckland Council’s Maori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

20.     Nine applicants applying to Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Quick Response Round One indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

22.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $120,000 for the 2019/2020 financial year. A total of $99,497.52 was allocated in previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $20,502.48 to be allocated to the remaining quick response round.

23.     Fifteen applications were received for Quick Response Round One 2019/2020, requesting a total of $44,393.50.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Following the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board allocation of funding for the quick response round one, the grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Grants Programme 2019-2020

211

b

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Quick Response Round One 2019/2020 grant applications

215

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tamaki Puketapapa

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

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23 June 2020

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Appointment of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board member to Tāmaki College Recreation Centre Trust

File No.: CP2020/08148

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To appoint a local board member to the Tāmaki College Community Recreation Centre Trust as a council representative.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Elected members participate as representatives of the local board on a number of external community and national organisations.

3.       A small number of these appointments, due to legislation or the terms in a deed are the responsibility of the Governing Body, but because the relationship between the council and the organisation is local, the Governing Body delegates its responsibility to nominate an elected member to the relevant local board.

4.       At the local board’s business meeting on 3 December 2019 it appointed members to represent the board on various external organisations for the 2019-2022 triennium, including appointing member Peter McGlashan as the local board lead to the Tāmaki College Community Recreation Centre Trust (MT/2019/72).

5.       Due to the provisions of the Tāmaki College Community Recreation Centre Trust Deed, the local board’s appointment of member Peter McGlashan as a lead was not able to be implemented.

6.       In order for a new council representative to be appointed to the trust, Chair Chris Makoare is required to step down as trustee and the local board would need to formally resolve to appoint a new board member as council’s representative on the trust.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      Note Chair Chris Makoare’s letter of resignation as the Auckland Council representative on the Tāmaki College Community Recreation Centre Trust (Attachment A);

b)      Appoint a local board member to the Tāmaki College Community Recreation Centre Trust as the council representative.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       A number of external organisations provide for the formal participation of Auckland Council elected members. Elected member appointees will have a variety of duties and liabilities depending on the individual organisation.

8.       At the commencement of each triennium, the Governing Body and local boards make appointments to external organisations.

9.       A small number of these appointments, due to legislation or the terms in a deed are the responsibility of the Governing Body, but because the relationship between the council and the organisation is local, the Governing Body delegates its responsibility to nominate an elected member to the relevant local board.

10.     As local board representatives, the nominated members represent the board, and do not attend in a personal capacity.  Nominated local board members will provide updates at local board meetings to regularly inform all local board members of discussions and decisions made of their activities, unless good reasons exist for confidentiality. These updates are in the form of business meeting reports which maintain public transparency.

11.     The reasons for elected member participation in external organisations can be described in a number of ways:

·   a trust deed, that requires Auckland Council to make an appointment to an organisation

·   an organisation of interest to the local board is inviting elected member representation at its meetings

·   associations entered into by the council which provide for elected member representation

·   organisation governance, or project or programme oversight, such as regional or local parks management groups

·   a statutory or regulatory provision (for example a regulation providing for a community liaison committee) or

·   a resource consent requiring the formation of a committee or hearing panel.

12.     In making decisions about these appointments, it is suggested that local boards are mindful of:

·   the elected member’s availability

·   any conflict of interests, including whether the local board provides funding to the entity

·   relevance

·   historical relationship with the organisation and Auckland Council.

13.     Members are delegated in their capacity as elected local board members. Should they no longer be a local board member, their nominations would be automatically repealed.

14.     Local board members may be part of any organisation in their private capacity and personal interests. They are encouraged to disclose memberships of external organisations in the conflict of interest register.

Tāmaki College Community Recreation Centre Trust

15.     The Tāmaki College Community Recreation Centre is owned by Tāmaki College Board of Trustees and managed by the Tāmaki College Community Recreation Trust Board.

16.     Council entered into agreement with the Trust to provide up to $100,000 per annum which allows community access to the facility and the activities run at the centre for a reasonable fee. As part of the agreement, the Trust provides accountability reports to council for the funding received and a representative from council is appointed as a trustee in accordance with the trust deeds.

17.     The agreement is set to expire in 2022.

18.     The Governing Body have delegated to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board the appointment of a member to the trust to represent council.

19.     At the local boards 3 December 2019 business meeting it appointed member McGlashan as the lead for the Tāmaki College Recreation Centre Trust (MT/2019/72).

20.     A lead is not the same as an appointed trustee as the responsibilities and delegated powers differ. Attached to this report is the responsibilities of a lead (Attachment B) and the powers of a Tāmaki College Community Recreation Centre trustee (Attachment C) that details this further.

21.     In accordance with the trust deed, Chair Makoare has resigned as council’s appointed trustee by notice in writing to the Chairperson. Chair Makoare’s resignation letter is Attachment A of this report.

22.     As a result of Chair Makoare’s resignation and in accordance with the trust deeds, the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is required to appoint a new council representative to the Tāmaki College Recreation Centre Trust.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     These decisions are procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decisions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     This report enables Auckland Council to meet its requirements or duties to have representation on external community organisations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     This report seeks the local board’s decision on representatives to external community organisations relevant to the local board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     This report has no specific impact on Māori. It covers appointments of local board members to external organisations and community networks to represent the view of local communities, including Māori communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     There are no financial implications as a result of this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     Local board members may be part of any organisation in their private capacity and personal interests. They are encouraged to disclose memberships of external organisations in the conflict of interest register.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Local Board Services staff will inform the Tāmaki College Recreation Centre Trust of the name of the local board appointment. They will also inform the local board representative of the meeting time, date and location.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Council representative on the Tāmaki College Community Recreation Centre Trust Letter of Resignation

289

b

Roles and Responsibilities of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board leads for the 2019-2022 triennium

291

c

Tāmaki College Community Recreation Centre Trust Deeds

293

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mal Ahmu - Local Board Advisor - Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketapapa

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Addition to the 2019-2022 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2020/07659

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for two meeting dates to be added to the 2019-2022 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board meeting schedule in order to accommodate changes to the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 timeframes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Due to the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, Auckland Council is consulting Aucklanders on further matters for the Emergency Budget 2020/2021. This significantly changes the process set out for the annual plan this year.

3.       The local board is being asked to approve two meeting dates as an addition to the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board meeting schedule to receive feedback from the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 consultation and provide input to the Governing Body. This will enable the modified Emergency Budget 2020/2021 timeframes to be met.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approve the addition of two meeting dates to the 2019-2022 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 timeframes as follows:

·    Tuesday, 7 July 2020, 2.30pm

·    Tuesday, 21 July 2020, 2.30pm

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

5.         In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·    clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·    sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

6.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted its 2019-2022 business meeting schedule at its 3 December 2019 business meeting.

7.       Due to the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, Auckland Council is consulting Aucklanders on further matters for the Emergency Budget 2020/2021. This significantly changes the process set out for the annual plan this year.

8.       To allow local boards to receive feedback from Aucklanders in their local board area on the proposed Emergency Budget, and to provide input to the Governing Body, it is recommended that an additional or extraordinary business meeting be held between 6 to 10 July.

9.       To ensure the Emergency Budget can be adopted by the Governing Body on 30 July it is recommended that an additional or extraordinary business meeting be held between 20 to 24 July to adopt the Local Board Agreement.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.       The local board has two choices:

i)        Add the meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule.

or

ii)       Add the meeting as an extraordinary meeting.

11.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the Annual Budget 2020/2021 timeframes change again, or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled anyway.

12.     For option two, only the specific topic Emergency Budget 2020/2021 may be considered for which the meeting is being held. No other policies or plans could be considered at this meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.       There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule an additional meeting and consider whether to approve it as an extraordinary meeting or an addition to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

16.     There is no specific impact for Māori arising from this report. Local boards work with Māori on projects and initiatives of shared interest.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

17.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

18.     If the local board decides not to add these business meetings to their schedule this will cause a delay to the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 process, which would result in the input of this local board not being able to be presented to the Governing Body for their consideration and inclusion in the Emergency Budget, and stop the Governing Body from being able to adopt the Emergency Budget by 31 July 2020.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

19.       Implement the processes associated with preparing for business meetings.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketapapa

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision -  Basel Convention Plastic Waste Amendment

File No.: CP2020/07294

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board that an urgent decision was made and approved under delegation by the Chair and Deputy Chair to provide feedback on Auckland Council’s submission on the Ministry for the Environment’s Basel Convention Plastic Waste Amendment.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the 3 December 2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board meeting the board considered the urgent decisions process and passed resolution MTLB/2019/75:

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meet the requirement of a quorum;

b)      delegate authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board;

c)      agree that the relationship manager, chair and deputy chair (or any person/s acting in these roles) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off the authorisation memo;

d)      note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary meeting of the local board.   CARRIED

3.       Local boards have a role in representing the views of their communities on issues of local importance, such as inputting local impacts of Central Government proposals into Auckland Council submissions. 

4.       Local board input into Auckland Council’s submission on the Ministry for the Environment’s Basel Convention Amendment is due on 19 May 2020. This is in order for Auckland Council to meet the final submission date on 22 May 2020.

 

5.       An urgent decision is required as Maungakiekie Tāmaki Local Boards next business meeting is on 26 May 2020, after the deadline for local board input.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the decision made under the urgent decision-making process on 19 May 2020, that the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board provide input into Auckland Council’s submission on the Ministry for the Environment’s Basel Convention Plastic Waste Amendment.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent Decision: Basel Convention Plastic Waste Amendment

313

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tamaki Puketapapa

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2020/07538

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the board with the governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar is updated every month. Each update is reported to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the attached Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar June 2020

361

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketapapa

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020

 

 

Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops

File No.: CP2020/07547

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops for 2, 9 and 16 June 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board workshops are held to give board members an opportunity to receive information and updates or provide direction and have discussion on issues and projects relevant to the local board area. No binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board record of workshops held on 2, 9 and 16 June 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Record of Workshops June 2020

365

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tracey Freeman - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Relationship Manager for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Puketapapa

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

23 June 2020