I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Papakura Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 24 June 2020

4.30pm

Local Board Chambers
Papakura Service Centre
35 Coles Crescent
Papakura

 

Papakura Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Brent Catchpole

Deputy Chairperson

Jan Robinson

Members

Felicity Auva'a

 

George Hawkins

 

Keven Mealamu

 

Sue Smurthwaite

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Paula Brooke

Democracy Advisor

 

18 June 2020

 

Contact Telephone: 021 715 279

Email: Paula.Brooke@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Shiloh Creative Life Centre Charitable Trust.                             5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Body Member's Update                                                                              7

12        Chairperson's Update                                                                                                   9

13        Auckland Transport June 2020 report to the Papakura Local Board                    11

14        Papakura Local Board Small Grants Round Two 2019/2020 grant allocations    21

15        Approval for the extension of existing names for 3 new roads at 135 Grove Road, Papakura                                                                                                                       31

16        Panuku and Auckland Transport integrated asset redevelopment programme  39

17        Opāheke Sports Park Clubrooms Project – progression to Stage 2 of planning 47

18        Arts Community and Events venue partners interim service approach               63

19        Panuku Development Auckland - Papakura Local Board Six Monthly report update 01 August 2019 to  31 January 2020                                                                          69

20        Draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020                                                                     75

21        Addition to the 2019-2020 Papakura Local Board meeting schedule                   81

22        Urgent decision - Papakura Local Board feedback on the Supporting Growth south Auckland projects                                                                                                        85

23        For Information: Reports referred to the Papakura Local Board                           93

24        Papakura Local Board Achievements Register 2019-2022 Political Term            95

25        Papakura Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - June 2020         101

26        Papakura Local Board Workshop Records                                                            107  

27        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

A board member will lead the meeting in prayer.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting held on Wednesday 27 May 2020, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Papakura Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Shiloh Creative Life Centre Charitable Trust.

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Dee Petit from Shiloh Creative Life Centre Charitable Trust, will speak to the trust’s activities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      thank Dee Petit from the Shiloh Creative Life Centre Charitable Trust, for her presentation on the trust’s activities.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2020/07385

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Manurewa Papakura ward councillors to update the board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      receive Councillor Angela Dalton and Councillor Daniel Newman’s updates.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Paula Brooke  - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Chairperson's Update

File No.: CP2020/07386

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Papakura Local Board Chairperson to update the local board on issues he has been involved in over the past month.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal report from the Papakura Local Board Chairperson.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Paula Brooke  - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport June 2020 report to the Papakura Local Board

File No.: CP2020/07387

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Each month, Auckland Transport provides an update to the Papakura Local Board on transport-related matters, relevant consultations in its area, Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects and decisions of Auckland Transport’s Traffic Control Committee.

2.       The Auckland Transport June 2020 update report is attached to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport June 2020 monthly update report as provided in Attachment A to this report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport June 2020 report to the Papakura Local Board

13

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Paula Brooke  - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Papakura Local Board Small Grants Round Two 2019/2020 grant allocations

File No.: CP2020/07585

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Papakura Local Board Small Grants Round Two 2019/2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received for the Papakura Local Board Small Grants Round Two 2019/2020.

3.       The Papakura Local Board adopted the Papakura Local Grants Programme 2019/2020 on 27 March 2019 (PPK/2019/32) as provided in Attachment A to this report. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants submitted to the local board.

4.       The Papakura Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $137,777 for the 2019/2020 financial year.

5.       In Papakura Local Grants Round One and Multi-Board Grants Round One 2019/2020, a total of $67,856 was allocated. At the September 2019 business meeting, the Papakura Local Board resolved to allocate a further $2,500 to the Papakura Santa Parade (PPK/2019/171), from the community grants budget line.

6.       In Papakura Small Grants Round One 2019/2020 the local board allocated a total of $20,326.51 and at the December 2019 business meeting, the Papakura Local Board resolved (PPK/2019/223) to allocate a further $5,000 to the Local Civic Events Papakura work programme for local civic events. The local board also granted $1,811.25 for the Hawkins Theatre hirage costs for the Papakura Theatre Company fundraising weekend, in support of the Australian fires (PPK/2020/17).

7.       In Papakura Local and Multi-Board Grants Round Two 2019/2020, a total of $27,400 was allocated. This leaves $12,833.24 to be allocated to the remaining grants round.

8.       Seventeen applications were received for consideration in Papakura Small Grants Round Two 2019/2020, with a total amount requested of $25,044.91.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Papakura Local Board Small Grants Round Two 2019/2020 listed in Table One.

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

QR2014-201

Papakura Business Association

Community

Towards band costs for the Santa Parade event in the park.

$1,300.00

QR2014-203

YMCA North Incorporated

Community

Towards intermediate school camp costs, including catering, accommodation, donations, event first response team fees, medals, trophies, sports equipment and laundry.

$2,000.00

QR2014-204

Tai Brown

Sport and recreation

Towards children’s fun day costs at the pools, including barbeque hire, sausages, pool entry, advertising flag, drinks, sauce and napkins.

$1,000.00

QR2014-205

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Community

Towards costs of tickets to Rainbows End for school leaders and patrol volunteers for the Blue Light Funday.

$1,967.16

QR2014-206

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Community

Towards costs of the workbooks for the health and wellbeing programme run out of ACG Strathallan School

$903.75

QR2014-207

The Youth Spaces Charitable Trust

Community

Towards replacement costs of the club’s gazebo.

$1,500.00

QR2014-208

Counties Manukau Gymnastics Incorporated

Counties Manukau Gymnastics

Sport and recreation

Towards costs of the Xero and Friendly Manager software for the organisation.

$1,449.00

QR2014-209

Well Women Franklin

Community

Towards venue hire costs of the peer support group in Papakura.

$1,960.00

QR2014-210

Auckland Southern District Chinese Association Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards band, choreography, host, stage supervision fees, photography and production costs, cast fees, on-site equipment costs, bottled drinking water and petrol subsidies.

$1,550.00

QR2014-212

Gateway Community Trust

Events

Towards costs of the storytellers New Zealand high school speaking contest, Mentorship Programme, including manuals, trophies and online finalist costs.

$2,000.00

QR2014-213

Tread Lightly Charitable Trust

Environment

Towards costs to engage the environmental specialist education teacher to deliver the Tread Lightly programme in Papakura schools.

$1,025.00

QR2014-214

Royal New Zealand Plunket Trust

Community

Towards wages for the community support co-ordinator.

$2,000.00

QR2014-215

Sustainable Papakura

Community

Towards volunteer costs, purchase of t-shirts and high-visability vests for volunteers and printing of volunteer induction kits.

$550.00

QR2014-216

Kiwanis Club of Drury

Community

Towards costs of book vouchers for the Terrific Kids Award presentations in Papakura schools.

$600.00

QR2014-217

Auckland Paraplegic and Physically Disabled Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards digital collaboration online costs.

$1,240.00

QR2014-218

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards costs for triage support and supervision for the volunteers who staff the Youthline Helpline.

$2,000.00

QR2014-219

Papakura City Football Club

Community

Towards operational costs, including fire protection, power, phone and internet costs.

$2,000.00

Total

 

 

 

$25,044.91

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

10.     Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

11.     The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements.

 

12.     The Papakura Local Board adopted the grants programme for 2019/2020 on 27 March 2019 (PPK/2019/108) and will operate two small grants and two local grants rounds for this financial year.

13.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

14.     For the 2019/2020 financial year, the Papakura Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $137,777.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Due to the current COVID-19 crisis, staff have also assessed each application according to which alert level the proposed activity is able to proceed. Events and activities have been assessed according to this criteria.

16.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.


 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·    local food production and food waste reduction

·    decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·    home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·    local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·    education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

19.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Papakura Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

21.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so  they can  increase their chances of success in the future.

22.     A summary of each application received through Papakura Local Board Small Grant Round Two 2019/2020 is provided in Attachment B to this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Maori. Auckland Council’s Maori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

25.     The Papakura Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $137,777 for the 2019/2020 financial year.

26.     In Papakura Local Grants Round One and Multi-Board Grant Round One 2019/2020, a total of $67,856 was allocated. At the September 2019 business meeting, the Papakura Local Board resolved to allocate a further $2,500 to the Papakura Santa Parade (PPK/2019/171), from the community grants budget.

27.     In Papakura Small Grants Round One 2019/2020 the local board allocated a total of $20,326.51 and at the December 2019 business meeting, the Papakura Local Board resolved (PPK/2019/223) to allocate a further $5,000 to the Local Civic Events Papakura work programme for local civic events. The local board also granted $1,811.25 for the Hawkins Theatre hirage costs for the Papakura Theatre Company fundraising weekend, in support of the Australian fires (PPK/2020/17).

28.     In Papakura Local and Multi-Board Grants Round Two 2019/2020 a total of $27,400 was allocated. This leaves $12,833.24 to be allocated to the remaining grants round.

29.     Seventeen applications were received for consideration in Papakura Small Grants Round Two 2019/2020, with a total amount requested of $25,044.91.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Following the Papakura Local Board allocating funding for the local grants round two, council staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Papakura Local Board Grant Programme 2019/2020

27

b

Papakura Local Board Small Grants Round Two 2019/2020 grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Helen Taimarangai - Senior Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 


 


 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Approval for the extension of existing names for 3 new roads at 135 Grove Road, Papakura 

File No.: CP2020/07753

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Papakura Local Board to extend existing names along three new public roads created by way of a subdivision development at 135 Grove Road, Papakura.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council’s road naming guidelines set out the requirements and criteria for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across Auckland.

3.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, Interface Homes Ltd, agent Maven Associates Limited have proposed the names presented in the tables below for consideration by the local board.

4.       The existing road names ‘Kairākau Street’, ‘John Burn Road’, and ‘Tētēkura Street’ were approved by the Papakura Local Board under Resolution number PPK/2019/213 at the neighbouring development at 169 Walters Road, Papakura. The extension of the existing names at 135 Grove Road therefore requires formal road name approval.

5.       As the proposed names are extensions of existing road names, no alternative names have been provided.

6.       The proposed road name extensions meet the Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming, as they have already been approved by the Papakura Local Board in this location.

7.       The proposed names to be extended along the 3 new public roads at 135 Grove Road are:

 

Table 1: 135 Grove Road Proposed Road Names

Road Reference

Proposed Name to extend

Public Road 1 (Extension)

Kairākau Street

Public Road 2 (Extension)

John Burn Road

Public Road 3 (Extension)

Tētēkura Street

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      approve the name ‘Kairākau Street’ for the new public road (Road 1) to be extended at 135 Grove Road, Papakura, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60336570 and SUB60336571.

b)      approve the name ‘John Burn Road’ for the new public road (Road 2) to be extended at 135 Grove Road, Papakura, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60336570 and SUB60336571.

c)      approve the name ‘Tētēkura Street’ for the new public road (Road 3) to be extended at 135 Grove Road, Papakura, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60336570 and SUB60336571.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B to this report respectively.

9.       Resource consent BUN60336570 (subdivision reference number SUB60336571) was issued in October 2019 for the construction of seventy-six residential units, three public roads, and four commonly owned access lots (COALs).

10.     Three existing public roads at 169 Walters Road are now being extended as part of the development at 135 Grove Road and now require formal approval from the local board to retain the names ‘Kairākau Street’, ‘John Burn Road’, and ‘Tētēkura Street’.

11.     The four COALs will serve as rear accessways for houses that front existing and extended public streets. As each of the COALs will serve less than 5 lots, they are not required to be named.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

13.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area;

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

14.     All consultation for the 3 proposed road names was undertaken under the original road naming application and summarised in the report approved under file number CP2019/20010.

15.     It is recommended that the 3 existing names (‘Kairākau Street’, ‘John Burn Road’, and ‘Tētēkura Street’) be extended along the new section of roads to ensure smooth passage and ease of navigation and wayfinding.

16.     The Applicant’s proposed names and meanings are set out in the table below:

Table 2: 135 Grove Road Preferred Road Names & Meanings

Road reference

Proposed name to extend

Meaning (as described by applicant)

ROAD 1 (extension)

Kairākau Street

Suggested by Ngai Tai Tamaki. ‘Kairākau’ means army of experienced warriors. Paying homage to the NZDF, and many Māori graduate fighters.

ROAD 2 (extension)

John Burn Road

John Burns was a decorated soldier who fought for the commando squadron based out of Papakura. This name was suggested by the New Zealand Defense Force (NZDF).

ROAD 3 (extension)

Tētēkura Street

Suggested by Ngai Tai Tamaki. ‘Tētēkura’ is a brave warrior and/or chief/leader. Paying homage to the NZDF, and many Māori graduate fighters.

 

17.     All the name options listed in the tables above are acceptable for use, having been assessed by the Council Subdivision team to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards have been met. Therefore it is up to the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context.

18.     ‘Street’ and ‘Road’ are acceptable road types for the new public roads, suiting the form and layout of the road, as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     This reports seeks the decision of the local board and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     The naming of roads is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome “A Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Māori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to support Auckland’s  Māori identity. To aid Local Board decision making, the ‘Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines’ includes:

·   The Objective of recognising ancestral linkages to areas of land by engagement with mana whenua and the allocation of road names as appropriate, as well as the Principle that Māori road names are actively encouraged, and;

·   An agreed process to enable mana whenua to provide timely feedback on all proposed road names in a manner they consider appropriate (through council’s central facilitator).

23.     All relevant local iwi were written to (via email) and invited to comment as part of the 169 Walters Road road naming application (File number CP2019/20010). Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki responded in support of the applicants proposed names and also suggested additional names of their own, which the applicant included in their proposal for the local boards consideration. No objections were received from any of the other iwi groups.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand and recorded on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by local councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

135 Grove Road site plan

35

b

135 Grove Road Location Plan

37

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Elizabeth Salter, Subdivision Advisor, Resource Consents

Authorisers

David Snowden Team Leader Subdivision, Resource Consents

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 


 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Panuku and Auckland Transport integrated asset redevelopment programme

File No.: CP2020/03485

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek the Papakura Local Board’s support for the proposed Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) and Auckland Transport (AT) Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy, and its endorsement to utilise the Papakura Train Station Park and Ride located at 18-22 Railway Street West, Papakura for integrated transport orientated redevelopment.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An Auckland Plan transformational shift is to ‘radically improve the quality of urban living’.  A key aspect of this is improving the quality of urban living by delivering high-quality integrated development.  AT and Panuku have the ability to partner and collaborate to deliver transport infrastructure that is integrated with high-quality development on properties in the AT fixed asset register. 

3.       A number of credible development companies have enquired with AT and Panuku about the prospect of partnering to progress opportunities. Potentially significant opportunities have remained untapped to date. AT and Panuku have worked together to scope the opportunities which exist in the AT managed portfolio and develop a framework to progress the opportunities. Our proposed strategy seeks to integrate transport service requirements at designated council owned park and ride sites with mixed use development. The focus is on current park and ride sites which have the potential for the airspace above the site to be sold for development or another disposal component, while the underlying transport asset is retained in council ownership. 

4.       The Panuku and AT Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy seeks to achieve increased public transport patronage and strong urban regeneration and urban design outcomes at selected park and ride sites. It also seeks to increase density and intensification around transport nodes and provide the Auckland region with additional housing supply and a range of housing typologies.

5.       The net proceeds generated from the redevelopment of selected park and rides sites are intended to be optimised and reinvested back into regional transport priorities, in line with the existing service property optimisation policy for Auckland Council’s service property assets. Service property optimisation previously applied to Auckland Council’s community assets; not properties on the AT fixed asset register. The Finance and Performance Committee resolved the extension of the Optimisation of Service Property approach to Auckland Transport managed assets in March 2018 to enable reinvestment of net proceeds from AT managed assets into transport priorities arising from the commercial development of service property undertaken in partnership with Panuku as part of an urban development project where airspace is being sold above a transport service site

6.       Ten sites have been selected as the first batch of opportunities to progress.  Subject to the Finance and Performance Committee approving the Panuku and AT Park and Ride Integrated Development Strategy, the functional and commercial requirements for the transport component and the potential development envelope for each site will be confirmed and necessary due diligence and planning assessments will be completed.  This will inform the site-specific design and development briefs which will be taken to the market.  AT and Panuku will form a joint panel to review tender proposals received and select the preferred development partner. Final terms and conditions of the disposal of any component of the site to enable development will be approved under the appropriate delegations.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      supports the Panuku Development Auckland and Auckland Transport Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy

b)      endorses the Papakura Train Station Park and Ride located at 18-22 Railway Street West, Papakura being utilised as part of an integrated transport orientated development

c)      notes that specified current and future transport operations at the Papakura Train Station Park and Ride will remain in council ownership and continue to be maintained and controlled by Auckland Transport.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       An Auckland Plan transformational shift is to ‘radically improve the quality of urban living’.  A key aspect of this is improving the quality of urban living by delivering high-quality integrated development.  The Auckland Plan states:

“Integrating land use and transport is particularly important for rapid transit. Unlocking growth around rapid transport corridors and stations is essential to address Auckland’s housing and transport challenges. It will also maximise the benefits from the large investment required to build and operate rapid transport.”

8.       AT and Panuku have complimentary roles to play in this area, with many properties in the AT fixed asset register presenting opportunities to deliver transport infrastructure that is integrated with high-quality development.

9.       Potentially significant opportunities have remained untapped to date. A number of credible development companies have enquired with AT and Panuku about the prospect of partnering to progress opportunities.

10.     The Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy is a joint initiative between Panuku and AT and provides a framework for facilitating such opportunities.  It seeks to utilise Panuku’s mandate and delegation to progress development opportunities, while AT will ensure the necessary transport requirements are achieved on a site by site basis.

11.     As part of the Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy, net proceeds generated from the redevelopment of selected park and rides facilities will be reinvested back into regional transport priorities.  This is in accordance with the service property optimisation framework, which is a policy tool that aims to deliver improved community outcomes with no impact on rates.  It previously only applied to Auckland Council’s community assets; not properties on the AT fixed asset register. On 20 March 2018, the Finance and Performance Committee resolved (resolution number FIN/2018/40):

“the extension of the Optimisation of Service Property approach to Auckland Transport noting that this will enable reinvestment of net proceeds by Auckland Transport in transport priorities arising from the commercial development of service property undertaken in partnership with Panuku as part of an urban development project where airspace is being sold above a transport service site”.


 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Background

12.     The proposed Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy seeks to integrate transport service requirements at designated council owned park and ride sites with mixed use development.  As a starting point, the land development potential in existing single use transport service assets across the regional transport network was identified.  Sites were assessed to ascertain if any development potential can be realised (i.e. some part of the asset such as the airspace above the transport component of the site is sold to enable redevelopment).  Sites with latent development potential can be optimised; unlocking the value to provide funding for reinvestment back into the transport network, providing improved access, service delivery and a mixture of additional uses.

13.     AT and Panuku have been working together to scope the opportunities.  The focus is on current Park and Ride sites, with the potential to sell the airspace above each site or another disposal component based on the development strategy, while retaining the underlying transport asset in council ownership.  Prospective opportunities have been identified and assessed by utilising current and past investigations undertaken by both AT and Panuku.

14.     Eight Auckland Council owned and AT managed Park and Ride sites, one asset held by the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) and one asset jointly owned by both NZTA and Auckland Council have been selected as the first batch of opportunities to progress.  The sites which has been identified and reviewed in the Papakura Local Board area is the Papakura Train Station Park and Ride located at 18-22 Railway Street West, Papakura. A full schedule of the sites across the region proposed for the Panuku and AT Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy is contained in Attachment A to this report.

Objectives

15.     The objectives of the Panuku and AT Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy are:

·        increased public transport patronage, active modes and safe access;

·        strong urban regeneration and urban design outcomes;

·        increasing density and intensification around transport nodes;

·        increasing housing supply and delivery of a range of housing typologies as a priority;

·        the ability to partner with developers capable of delivery;

·        the release of capital / latent value from park and ride sites;

·        future proofing for imminent strategic transport requirements.

Anticipated programme of works

16.     It is anticipated that completion of the full programme of works will take a number of years.

17.     Subject to the Finance and Performance Committee approving the Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy, AT will confirm the functional and commercial requirements for the transport component and the potential development envelope for each site. Panuku will undertake all necessary due diligence to understand all relevant legal, technical and historical information and council’s statutory obligations in respect of each site.  Panuku will also complete a planning assessment of each site. The collated information will inform the site specific design and development briefs which will be taken to the market. 

18.     Final terms and conditions of the disposal of any component of the site to enable development will be approved under the appropriate delegations.  Elected members and key stakeholders will be made aware of the appointment of the development partner for each site, the agreed transport requirements and development outcomes and the timeline for delivery.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The Panuku and AT Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy seeks to integrate transport service requirements at designated council owned park and ride sites with mixed use development. This strategy is intended to help address the some of the issues the Auckland region faces due to climate change by:

·     creating density in and around transport nodes;

·     helping to create walkable communities;

·     increasing public transport accessibility;

·     providing communities with more options to be less reliant on traditional forms of transport such as cars;

·     reducing transport related emissions.

20.     Subject to Finance and Performance Committee approval, analysis will be undertaken on a site by site basis of the climate change impact, with potential risks such as if the site is in flood plains and the potential for coastal inundation considered and mitigation strategies formed if necessary. 

21.       We recognise that any form of construction and development can increase emissions.  Emissions associated with any potential redevelopment could be reduced through development standards agreed through a future development agreement. Panuku has a policy that all residential developments are rated a minimum of Homestar 6 and also includes requirements to reduce carbon emissions in commercial developments.

22.       The long term benefits of there being a reduced reliance on private motor vehicles is also anticipated to offset construction related emissions by the creation of density in and around transport nodes.  This will contribute to helping to create walkable communities, improving access to public transport and reducing transport related emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     An Auckland Plan transformational shift is to ‘radically improve the quality of urban living’.  A key aspect of this is improving the quality of urban living by delivering high-quality integrated development.  AT and Panuku have worked together in the development of the Panuku and AT Integrated Development strategy.

24.     Should this strategy be approved by the Finance and Performance Committee, engagement will take place with the council group on a site by site basis to identify any potential issues and any opportunities for collaboration and input from other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Informal engagement was undertaken with the previous Papakura Local Board on 14 August 2019 regarding this proposal. The feedback received was supportive, with the board raising the following points:

·    that it supported residential development in the air space above the Papakura Train Station Park and Ride;

·    that there is demand for increased Park and Ride capacity;

·    support for working together on the wider transport interchange;

·    questions regarding the One Local Initiative and that there may be a need to look at alternative funding to achieve vision. 

26.     This feedback has been noted.

27.     Panuku and AT also provided an update to the board by way of an information memorandum in March 2020.

28.     Subject to Finance and Performance Committee approval, Panuku will engage further with the Papakura Local Board on the Papakura Train Station Park and Ride located at 18-22 Railway Street West, Papakura regarding any development and design outcomes to be achieved for viable transport orientated development opportunities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     The importance of effective communication and engagement with Māori on the subject of land is understood. As a first step, AT and Panuku are jointly attending four hui with mana whenua to discuss the proposed Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy.  The purpose of attending the hui is to engage early with mana whenua so that they are informed about the proposed strategy.

30.     At the hui we will also seek feedback on our proposed framework for working with mana whenua on site specific opportunities, should the Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy be approved. Our proposed approach is to firstly undertake full due diligence of the property titles and acquisition history, so that we are aware of any historical issues of significance for mana whenua for any of the sites.  Following this, we propose contacting each mana whenua group independently and requesting feedback on the specific proposal.

31.     This engagement will seek to understand any potential issues of cultural significance the group would like to formally express and any preferred outcomes that the group would like considered. We will also invite mana whenua to express potential commercial interest in the subject properties. We will also seek input into, and collaboration on, any related public realm design.

32.     Our proposed approach is subject to change based on the feedback we receive from mana whenua on our proposed framework for working with them on the Park and Ride Integrated Development sites.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     Service property optimisation is a tool that aims to deliver improved community outcomes with no impact on rates.  It involves the sale or redevelopment of under-performing service property, with proceeds reinvested into eligible projects. It previously only applied to Auckland Council’s community assets; not properties on the AT fixed asset register. On 20 March 2018, the Finance and Performance Committee resolved the extension of the Optimisation of Service Property approach to Auckland Transport assets.  This enables the net proceeds from the redevelopment of the selected park and ride sites to be reinvested into regional transport priorities. 

34.     The delivery of the Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy will provide an additional funding stream for reinvesting into regional transport priorities which is not derived from rates.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     There may be insufficient appetite from the development community for new development opportunities, particularly given the potential post Covid-19 impacts on the property market. There may also be an oversupply of development sites on the market.  The Panuku and AT Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy enables the marketing of sites to be sequenced to mitigate any potential downturn in the property market or lack of demand.

36.     Given the interest AT and Panuku have received from a number of credible development companies which have enquired about the prospect of partnering to progress opportunities, a delay in taking these sites to the market may erode private sector interest. Should the Panuku and AT Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy be approved by the Finance and Performance Committee, the development community will be kept appraised about progress.  Feedback received and property market expertise will be utilised in forming the sequencing of these sites to the market.

37.     There are risks associated with undertaking any form of development in and around transport functions.  These will need to be carefully managed, with current and future transport requirements and operations continuing to be maintained and controlled by Auckland Transport.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     The Panuku and AT Park and Ride Integrated Development strategy will be recommended to the Finance and Performance Committee in July 2020. 

39.     Subject to Finance and Performance Committee approval of the strategy, site specific due diligence will be undertaken on each site. AT will confirm the functional requirements for the transport component. Further due diligence and planning assessments will be undertaken which will inform the site-specific design and development briefs that will be taken to the market.

40.     Final terms and conditions of the disposal of any component of the site to enable development will be approved under the appropriate delegations.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Schedule of sites

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Letitia Edwards – Head of Strategic Asset Optimisation (acting), Panuku Development Auckland

Kevin Jones- Manager Strategic Projects (North & West), Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Marian Webb – General Manager, Assets and Delivery (acting) – Panuku Development Auckland

Chris Morgan – Group Manager, Strategic Projects – Auckland Transport

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Opāheke Sports Park Clubrooms Project – progression to Stage 2 of planning

File No.: CP2020/05983

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve:

i)          The findings from Stage 1 of the Opāheke Sports Park Clubrooms Project.

ii)         Progressing to Stage 2 of the above project.

iii)         The scope for Stage 2 which includes confirming spatial requirements, the concept design, estimated cost of construction and clubrooms ownership.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Papakura Local Board adopted the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment in June 2018.  The board has budgeted $88,000 in its 2019/2020 Locally Driven Initiatives operations budget to implement recommendations.  This is line item 1136 in the work programme. 

3.       The purpose of the budget is to support a strategic approach to achieving sport and recreation outcomes through the development of sport facilities.  This can be achieved by allocating the budget to recommendations in the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment, that require operational funding. 

4.       Within the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment, one of the project priorities that requires operational funding is to plan for clubrooms at Opāheke Sports Park.  In September 2019, the local board approved $88,000 be allocated to plan the clubrooms. 

5.       Sports groups that were identified in the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment were contacted in December 2019 and January 2020 about being based at, or using Opāheke Sports Park. Other potential park user groups were also contacted.

6.       Three organisations are committed to being based at the park.  They are United Cricket Club, Counties Manukau Zone of New Zealand Rugby League and Papakura Kings Gridiron Club.  Two groups, Marist Rugby Club and Auckland Football Federation, will confirm shortly.  Several other sports groups will be park users and will use the proposed clubrooms from time to time.

7.       This report recommends proceeding to Stage 2 of the clubrooms planning project and that the Stage 2 scope in Attachment C be approved.  The scope includes confirming spatial requirements, the concept plan, estimated cost of construction and clubroom ownership.

8.       Subject to local board approval to progress, Stage 2 will start in July 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      approve the findings from Stage 1 of the Opāheke Sports Park Clubrooms Project

b)      approve proceeding to Stage 2 of the Opāheke Sports Park Clubrooms Project

c)      approve the scope for Stage 2 which includes confirming spatial requirements, the concept design, estimated cost of construction and clubroom ownership.

 

Horopaki

Context

2019/2020 Papakura Local Board work programme:  Work Programme item No. 1136 - Sport and Recreation Fund

9.       Papakura Local Board has $88,000 remaining of the $100,000 allocated in its 2019/2020 Locally Driven Initiatives budget to implement the priority actions from the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment.  This is line 1136 of the 2019/2020 work programme.  The remaining $12,000 was allocated to completing the Prince Edward Park master plan.

10.     The purpose of the budget is to support a strategic approach to achieving sport and recreation outcomes through the development of sport facilities. 

11.     The activity description for line number 1136 in the Papakura Local Board Work Programme for 2019/2020 is:

“Implement the priority actions from the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment which will improve the utilisation of existing sport and recreation facilities to increase sport and active recreation”.

Papakura Local Board Plan (2017)

12.     Outcome 2 in the Papakura Local Board Plan 2017 is “People in Papakura lead active, healthy and connected lives”.  For sport and recreation, the objective and associated key initiatives are:

 

Objective: Papakura’s parks and recreation facilities are well used.

Key Initiatives:

i)          continue to invest in the development of Bruce Pulman Park, and the Opāheke  and Hingaia sportsgrounds

ii)         progressively upgrade and improve the overall standard of existing parks, sports and recreation facilities to meet the needs of all age groups

iii)         ensure that new and existing facilities can be utilised as multi-purpose community hubs.

Papakura Sports Needs Assessment (2018)

13.     Papakura Local Board adopted the Papakura Local Board Sports Needs Assessment in June 2018.  It provides a strategic approach to achieving sport and recreation outcomes through the development of sports facilities in the local board area. 

14.     The plan recommends investment in facilities at various parks.  Some recommendations require capital development funding and others, operational funding.

15.     In 2018/2019, the local board allocated funds to the following projects.  They are both currently included in the Community Facilities work programme.

i)          Drury Sports Complex: $50,000 to complete a master plan for the park. 

ii)       Prince Edward Park: $38,000 towards the preparation of a master plan for the park.  This does not include $12,000 allocated to this project from work programme item 1136 in 2019/2020.  .

16.     In September 2019, the local board allocated $88,000 towards planning costs associated with new clubrooms at Opāheke Sports Park.


 

Opāheke Sports Park Clubrooms Project – Stage 1

17.     From December 2019 until February 2020, Visitor Solutions was engaged to complete Stage 1 of the project which included engagement with:

i)        Sports groups identified in the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment.  Groups were contacted to enquire whether they want to be based at Opāheke Sports Park and/or whether they will be park user groups.  They included: cricket, rugby, rugby league, Australian football, touch, kabaddi, kilikiti and football. 

ii)       Regional sports organisations and other sports groups that were identified after the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment was adopted.  Regional sports organisations provided input about clubs relocating or using the park.  Codes not identified in the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment were contacted as they are emerging or growing sports.   

Current capital development at Opāheke Sports Park

18.    A toilet and changing rooms facility is currently under construction at the park and has been designed to allow for a second level to be added at a later date.  Funding for this capital development project is growth funding.  An additional public toilet has been funded through the Encumbrance Fund.  The project is expected to be completed in June 2020.

19.     The new building has been strengthened so it can accommodate clubrooms on the second level.  A concept design for the second level clubrooms was prepared in 2017.

Encumbrance Fund

20.     There is $1,670,000 of capital funding available in the Opāheke Sports Park Encumbrance Fund.  The previous local board’s direction was that the Encumbrance Fund be allocated to projects in the southern section of Opāheke Sports Park. 

Results from engagement with sports groups – Stage 1

21.     Table 1 below confirms the current situation.  Further information for each group is in Attachment A to this report.

Table 1: Opāheke Sports Park – summary from engagement with sports groups

Group 1: Groups that would or could be based at the clubrooms and their expected park use

Group 2: Park user groups who may wish to use clubrooms from time to time

Group 3: Will not be based at Opāheke Sports Park

United Cricket Club: training and competition.

Counties Manukau Zone of NZ Rugby League: club-based training and competition, representative level also.

Ardmore Marist Rugby Club: training and games.

Papakura Kings Gridiron Club - American Football League: training and games.

Auckland Football Federation – southern hub.

Counties Manukau Softball: training.

Drury Rugby Club if

i)   the satellite field used for training at Drury Sports Complex is relocated to Opāheke Sports Park.

ii)  games, if they are scheduled at the park.

Kilikiti: training and games.

Kabaddi: tournaments.

 

Papakura Rugby Club.

Drury Rugby Club (including Touch) as its clubrooms are at Drury Domain.

Auckland Australian Football League (AFL).

 

 

22.     It is acknowledged that the regional sports organisations such as the Counties Manukau Zone of New Zealand Rugby League will draw participants from outside Papakura Local Board area.

Clubroom facility requirements

23.     Groups 1 and 2 in Table 1 were asked about their clubroom facility requirements.  A list of facilities was compiled for each group.  These include space for office/sports administration, a social space and meeting space.  Should the project progress to Stage 2, the spatial requirements will be confirmed as part of Stage 2.

24.     Group 1 identified the following requirements for clubroom space, in addition to the required toilet facilities in clubrooms.  The requirements of Group 2 can be accommodated by providing the facilities for Group 1.

Table 2: Summary of clubroom facilities required

Group 1: Groups that would or could be based at the clubrooms

When clubrooms will be used

Description of ancillary facilities

United Cricket Club.

October to March

Social space for 80 people, a workstation space, meeting room for 20 people, kitchen/facilities for catering, storage for club information.

Counties Manukau Zone of NZ Rugby League.

Winter and shoulder season

Social space for 150 people (also highlighted in the rugby league facilities plan (November 2019), workstation space for two staff, meeting room for 20 people, kitchen/facilities for catering, storage for club information. 

Ardmore Marist Rugby Club.

Winter and shoulder season

Social space for 100+ people, workstation space for up to three staff, meeting room for 20 people, kitchen/facilities for catering.  Requested bar facilities. Storage for club information.

Papakura Kings Gridiron Club (American Football League).

July to December

A small club is expected with two or three teams.  The group will use the social space, meeting room and kitchen facilities described above.  A workstation space won’t be required.

Auckland Football Federation – southern hub.

All year

Social space for 50 people, a workstation space, meeting room for 20 people, storage for club information.

 

25.     A key component of the Stage 2 investigation is to ascertain how the community needs identified above translate to a building footprint and functional space.  Once the footprint required is known, it will be compared to the 2017 concept design.

Other requirements

26.     Four groups in Table 2 confirmed they require storage for equipment.  Storage is part of the changing rooms and toilet facility currently under construction.  Additional storage may be required.

Assessment criteria for project options

27.     Following the engagement with sports groups, the options available for the next steps have been assessed against the criteria from the following strategic documents: Auckland Plan, Papakura Local Board Plan and the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan.  The criteria do not include operational management of clubrooms which will be considered in a future stage of planning.


The assessment criteria are listed in Attachment B and focus on the following outcomes:

-     creating safe opportunities for people to meet, connect, participate in, and enjoy community and civic life

-     providing accessible services and social and cultural infrastructure that are responsive in meeting people’s evolving needs

-     recognising the value of arts, culture, sports and recreation to quality of life

-     investing in one of the following three parks: Bruce Pulman Park, and the Opāheke and Hingaia sportsgrounds

-     upgrading and improving the overall standard of existing parks, sports and recreation facilities to meet the needs of all age groups

-     ensuring that new and existing facilities can be utilised as multi-purpose community hubs

-     growing the capacity of the supporting amenities in response to demand

-     using insights to identify the need for new, growing and emerging recreation and sport activities

-     prioritising investment in partnerships which provide multi-use, multi-sport or maximised use of recreation and sport facilities.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options considered

Option 1 – Progress to Stage 2 of the project to confirm spatial requirements, concept design, estimated cost and ownership

28.     Option 1 is to progress the project to Stage 2 to confirm the spatial requirements, concept design, estimated cost and building ownership model.  It will involve working with clubs to confirm the dimensions for spaces required and the preferred building design option.  A quantity surveyor will estimate the construction cost and the ownership model will be investigated. 

29.     In 2017, the cost of delivering a canter-levered design that was prepared for the second level of the building was higher than the budget available.  It is not known if a change / simplification of design will enable the project to be delivered within budget.

30.     With a clearer understanding of community needs and the associated second level footprint required to meet those needs, building design can be reviewed.

31.     If a more cost-effective building solution cannot be found, staff will provide the board with information about the funding gap.  Should there be a funding gap the board can explore alternative funding sources.

32.     Council’s preference is that this building be owned by one entity, either council or the community, in alignment with the Facility Partnership Policy.  Given that council already owns the ground floor, it makes sense that the second floor is also owned by council.

33.     However, it may be possible to seek an exemption to the Facility Partnership Policy.  The policy was adopted after the local board had committed to build the ground floor. At the time, the board’s view was that the second level could be community owned.

34.     In Stage 2 staff will provide guidance on the pros and cons of a community owned model.  A key benefit of this model is the ability of community groups to raise partnership funding to leverage against funds from a cornerstone funder.

35.     Two immediate concerns in relation to the community-owned model are staff awareness of:

-         the number of other community-led sport and recreation facility projects that are also seeking funding at this time and

-         the likely significant impact of Covid-19 on available gaming and charitable trust funding.

36.     For these reasons, at this time, staff would likely recommend a council-owned option is explored as the current preferred option.  However, a community-owned option is not yet fully ruled out.

Table 3: Advantages and disadvantages of Option 1

Advantages

Disadvantages

Enables the opportunity to design clubrooms that create safe opportunities for people to meet, connect, participate in, and enjoy community and civic life.

 

Provides cultural and social infrastructure that will be responsive in meeting people’s evolving needs.

 

Recognises the contribution of sport and recreation to quality of life.

 

Invests in a project at one of the three key parks listed in the local board plan; Opāheke Sports Park.

 

Enables part of the process to upgrade and improve the overall standard of parks, sport and recreation facilities to meet the needs of all age groups.

 

Ensures that new clubrooms will be utilised as a multi-purpose community clubrooms/ hub.

 

Supports the increase in capacity of “supporting amenities in response to demand”.

 

Enables further insight into the needs for new, growing and emerging recreation and sport activities (e.g., kabaddi, kilikiti, rugby league).

 

Enables investment to be prioritised into a partnership which provides multi-use, multi-sport or maximised use of recreation and sport facilities.

No disadvantages identified.

 

 

 

 

Recommendation:

37.     Option 1 is recommended, which is to progress to Stage 2 to confirm spatial requirements, preferred concept design, the estimated cost and clubroom ownership.  The indicative cost for Option 1 is $30,000. This will provide the evidence needed to decide whether to progress with a business case (Stage 3).  The evidence from Stage 2 will be required to support the allocation of the Encumbrance Fund, should the local board decide to allocate it to clubrooms in the future.

38.     The scope for Stage 2 is in Attachment C and it is recommended that this be adopted.

Option 2 – Stop the project (status quo)

39.     Option 2 is to stop the project and discontinue investigation into the provision of clubrooms.   This means that there will be no progress in implementing the recommendation in the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment for this work programme item. 

40.     The Encumbrance Fund will continue to de-value each year in real terms while it remains unallocated.  It can be used for other projects in the southern part of the park.

41.     Sports groups will not be involved in any further council-led engagement to plan new clubrooms at the park.

Table 4: Advantages and disadvantages of Option 2

Advantages

Disadvantages

Invests in a project at one of the three key parks listed in the local board plan; Opāheke Sports Park. 

 

Funds allocated to another sport facility in the southern part of the park, in accordance with the master plan, will recognise the contribution of sport and recreation to quality of life.

 

 

 

No opportunity to design clubrooms that create safe opportunities for people to meet, connect, participate in, and enjoy community and civic life.

 

No cultural and social infrastructure that is responsive in meeting people’s evolving needs.

 

Less contribution to upgrade and improve the overall standard of parks, sport and recreation facilities to meet the needs of all age groups.

 

Delay in new clubrooms that will be utilised as a multi-purpose community clubrooms/ hub.

 

Won’t support increasing the capacity of “supporting amenities in response to demand”.

 

Won’t enable further insight into the needs for new, growing and emerging recreation and sport activities (e.g., kabaddi, kilikiti, rugby league).

 

Lost opportunity for investment to be prioritised in partnerships which “provide multi-use, multi-sport or maximised use of recreation and sport facilities”.

 

Recommendation

42.     Option 2 is not recommended because it does not achieve many of the outcomes council and the local board are seeking.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

How the proposed decision could impact on direct greenhouse gas emissions and the approach to reduce emissions

43.     There will be no impact on direct greenhouse gas emissions for options 1 and 2.

44.     The decision to progress with Option 1 means that the intention is to further investigate new clubrooms being located at Opāheke Sports Park.

45.     Option 1 includes the concept planning for the layout of the clubrooms.  Decisions about promoting energy and water efficiency, the use of renewable energy and waste reduction will not be made in this stage. 

Effect climate change could have over the lifetime of the proposed decision and how these effects are being addressed

46.     Should the decision lead to new clubrooms being feasible, sustainable and achievable, climate change could affect the operation of clubrooms as follows: 


 

Table 5: Effects of climate change and how these are being addressed.

Description

Effect climate change could have over the lifetime of the proposed decision

How effects are being addressed

Option 1:  Progress to Stage 2 of the project to confirm the ownership, spatial requirements, concept design and estimated cost. 

 

If rainfall is lower, less water will be collected on the roof of the clubrooms. 

 

 

 

Warmer temperatures will require consideration of shade provision outside the clubrooms.

Water collection from the roof will be considered in detailed building design.

Adequate potable water storage will be required.

Shade provision outdoors (e.g., if there is a deck) for clubroom visitors may be required.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

47.     In December 2019, the Environment and Community Committee adopted the Facility Partnerships Policy.  The policy states that council will not invest in a split ownership model for buildings, as follows: 

“We won’t invest in facility partnerships that have split ownership of the facility (e.g. where the council would own one level, part or area of a building or structure, and partner(s) would own another), or joint ownership (e.g. where the council and partners would each own a share of a building or structure). This is to ensure clear legal responsibility for assets throughout their life” (Auckland Council, 2018.  Facilities Partnerships Policy.  Retrieved from http://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/facilitypartnershipspolicy, p 31).

48.     When the decision was made to future proof the new toilet and changing rooms to accommodate clubrooms on top, the Facility Partnership Policy had not been adopted. 

49.     Staff will explore whether an exemption to the Facility Partnership Policy is viable or necessary.

50.     The Sport and Recreation Team will lead Part 1 in Attachment C which focuses on spatial requirements and obtaining a high-level estimate based on construction cost per square metre.  Community Facilities will lead on the preparation of concept options and cost analysis. 

Council Controlled Organisations

51.     The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     The input and views of the local board were received at a workshop held on 19 February 2020.  

53.     The local board raised concern about the Facility Partnerships Policy whereby building ownership cannot be split.  The board has invested in excess of $500,000 in strengthening the toilets and changing rooms to accommodate clubrooms on top.

54.     The board was supportive of Option 1.

55.     The local board proposed that the needs of hockey should be considered in the planning for Opāheke Sports Park.  Within the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment, the need for a new hockey turf in the Papakura Local Board area was not identified. 

56.     The Auckland Region Hockey Facilities Report 2014 – 2031 does not identify the need for a new hockey turf in south Auckland.  The priority for new turfs is at Metro Park in Silverdale and Colin Maiden Park in St Johns.  The current focus for Counties Manukau Hockey Association in south Auckland is on gaining access to the new hockey turf at Gurudwara Sri Kalgidhar Sahib temple for junior hockey.  This will maximise the use of existing facilities.

57.     The local board acknowledged that the Encumbrance Fund will not be sufficient to construct the clubrooms.  If council is to own clubrooms on top of the changing rooms and toilets, the board acknowledged that additional capital development funding will be required.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

58.     Within the Papakura Local Board area, 27% of the population is Maori. 

59.     The impact on Māori in Papakura Local Board area is likely to be greater than that of general participants for:

-     rugby league:  Maori are 118% more likely to play rugby league

-     rugby:  Maori are 43% more likely to play rugby.

60.     The impact on Māori is likely to be less than that of general participants for football.   Maori are 3% less likely to play football than general participants in Papakura Local Board area.

61.     The impact on Māori who play cricket will be less than for general participants.  Maori are 58% less likely to play cricket in Papakura Local Board area.

62.     Few Maori from Papakura Local Board area play American Football.  Participation is likely to increase if the proposed new club is based at Opāheke Sports Park.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

63.     Papakura Local Board has budgeted $88,000 in line item 1136 within its 2019/2020 work programme.  The needs assessment cost is $22,500, leaving $65,000 in this line item. The indicative cost of Option 1 (Stage 2 of the project) is $30,000. This will leave a balance of $35,000 to complete Stage 3, the business case.

64.     In 2017 when the original concept design for the second level clubrooms was completed, funds within the Encumbrance Fund were less than the cost of construction.  There is a significant chance that further funding will be required for construction of the proposed clubrooms.

65.     The $1,670,000 in the Encumbrance Fund devalues every year.

66.     Should a community partnership be the preferred ownership option, Covid-19 will have an impact on non-council funding.  It is likely community groups in a partnership will have a challenge to raise funds for construction of clubrooms.

67.     The return on investment from identifying clubroom options is that the design will meet the future needs of groups and the clubrooms will be fit-for-purpose. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

68.     If council can’t own the clubrooms on top of the changing rooms and toilet block, there is a risk that none of the groups wish to own the clubrooms.  This will be explored during Stage 2, if required.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

69.     Subject to local board approval of Option 1 and the associated Scope in Attachment C to this report, the project can start in July 2020. Visitor Solutions Ltd is the consultant that has been contracted for Stage 2.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary from engagement with sports clubs

57

b

Assessment criteria used to assess options

59

c

Scope for Stage 2 of the Opāheke Sports Park Clubrooms Project

61

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rose Ward - Sport and Recreation Advisor - Parks, Sports and Recreation

Authorisers

Neil Coventry - Sports & Recreation Lead Team Leader - Parks, Sports and Recreation

Dave Stewart - Manager Sport & Recreation - Parks, Sports and Recreation

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Attachment A – Summary from engagement with sports groups

Groups that will or could be based at new clubrooms

i)     United Cricket Club: The club started using Opāheke Sports Park for games in late 2019.  It is very supportive of being based at Opāheke Sports Park.  The move from Drury Sports Complex is supported by Counties Manukau Cricket Association.

ii)    Counties Manukau Zone of New Zealand Rugby League:  Auckland Rugby League Regional Facilities Network Plan (November 2019) identifies Opāheke Sports Park as the venue most suited to be the future location for Counties Manukau Home of Rugby League.  This is supported by the Counties Manukau Zone of New Zealand Rugby League.  Participation in rugby league is likely to increase in the Papakura Local Board area due to the forecast increase in the Pacifica population, from 9,180 to 18,850 by 2038 (159% increase).

iii)    Ardmore Marist Rugby Club: The club is based at Pulman Park and pays rent.  With playing numbers decreasing it is becoming financially challenging.  The club sees it can have a role in a growing community and as such would like to explore the possibility of a move.

iv)   Papakura Kings Gridiron Club (affiliated with American Football Auckland League): The club was established in 2016 has not participated in competition in the last 12 months.  The club has a new president who advised members will be training in winter 2020.

v)    Auckland Football Federation: The association wishes to have a performance hub for its eight southern clubs.  The intention is to establish a southern representative programme.  There is interest, pending the outcome of the association’s investigation, in the southern region performance hub being based at Opāheke Sports Park.

Groups identified as park user groups who may wish to use clubrooms from time to time

vi)   Counties Manukau Softball Association: The association is based at Prince Edward Park.  It advised there is a shortage of training facilities for its 120 teams.  Capacity at Prince Edward Park will increase when lights are installed around the diamonds.  Following that, more space will be required for softball training and space could be provided at Opāheke Sports Park.

vii)  Kilikiti: A Samoan church is looking to relocate to Drury.  Should this eventuate, it is likely members will want to use Opāheke Sports Park for their kilikiti training.  In addition, participation in kilikiti is likely to increase in the Papakura Local Board area due to the forecast increase in the Pacifica population, from 9,180 to 18,850 by 2038 (159% increase).

viii)  Kabaddi:    Gurdwara Dukh Niwaran Sahib sikh temple in Takanini has provided a kabaddi oval at the temple.  Staff at the temple advised they could use Opāheke Sports Park for one-off tournaments.  In time, it is possible circle kabaddi could be based at the park.

Groups that will not be based at Opāheke Sports Park

ix)   Papakura Rugby Club: the Papakura Needs Assessment highlighted a desire by the club to move to Opāheke Sports Park.  However, subsequently the club confirmed its preference is to be based at Massey Park and signed a new lease in 2019 for its clubrooms at Massey Park.  The lease is for 10 years with one right of renewal.  It expires in 2039.

x)    Papakura Cricket Club: The club will remain based at Pulman Park.  Recently two portacoms were moved onto Pulman Park as a temporary solution for clubrooms.  In 2020, the club will work with Community Leisure Management to confirm the preferred option for clubrooms.  This includes the option of sharing clubrooms with Papakura Netball Club. 

xi)   Drury Rugby Club: Although the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment recommended the club move from Drury Domain and be based at Opāheke Sports Park, the club does not support this.  The main reasons are that: i) members are from Drury rather than the Opāheke area; Opāheke Sports Park is three kilometres from Drury Domain ii) the club has been based at Drury Domain for approximately 100 years.  The move to Opāheke Sports Park is supported by the New Zealand Rugby Union.  Counties Manukau Rugby Football Union support the club’s position.

xii)  Touch/ Drury Rugby Club: Touch modules are mostly delivered by local clubs.  If Drury Rugby Club re-located to Opāheke Sports Park, it would most likely deliver modules.

xiii)    Auckland Australian Football League is working towards establishing a new south Auckland club and would like the club to be based at Opāheke Sports Park.  However, due to the amount of park space that is required for the game, it is not feasible to have this code based at Opāheke Sports Park.

Other groups contacted that are not referenced in the Papakura Sports Needs Assessment

The following groups were contacted as participation in these sports is increasing.

xiv)    Counties Baseball Association: Participation in baseball is increasing.  The nearest baseball club is located at Karaka Sports Park and is part of the Karaka Sports Park project.  The association has no desire to move.

xv)    Papakura Sea Eagles Rugby League Club: The club is based at Prince Edward Park and sees local level rugby league in the Papakura area being based there. 

xvi)    Lacrosse Auckland: Lacrosse is an emerging sport, especially among teenage girls.  To date, no response has been received.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepared by Rose Ward, Sport and Recreation Lead, March 2020


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Attachment B – Assessment criteria used to assess options

Criteria

Outcome in strategic document

Outcome description

Reference

1

Belonging and participation

Create safe opportunities for people to meet, connect, participate in, and enjoy community and civic life

Auckland Plan:  Focus area 1

2

Belonging and participation

Provide accessible services and social and cultural infrastructure that are responsive in meeting people’s evolving needs

Auckland Plan:  Focus area 2

3

Belonging and participation

Recognise the value of arts, culture, sports and recreation to quality of life

Auckland Plan: Focus area 7

4

People in Papakura lead active, healthy and connected lives.

Invest in one of the following three parks: Bruce Pulman Park, and the Opāheke  and Hingaia sportsgrounds.

Papakura Local Board Plan 2017 - Outcome 2.

5

People in Papakura lead active, healthy and connected lives.

Upgrade and improve the overall standard of existing parks, sports and recreation facilities to meet the needs of all age groups

Papakura Local Board Plan 2017 - Outcome 2.

6

People in Papakura lead active, healthy and connected lives.

Ensure that new and existing facilities can be utilised as multi-purpose community hubs

Papakura Local Board Plan 2017 - Outcome 2.

7

Fit for purpose network of facilities

Grow the capacity of the “supporting amenities in response to demand”

Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan, initiative 7.1

8

Fit for purpose network of facilities

Use insights to identify the need for new, growing and emerging recreation and sport activities

Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan, initiative 7.1.

9

Facility partnerships

Prioritise investment in partnerships which provide multi-use, multi-sport or maximised use of recreation and sport facilities

Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan, initiative 8.1

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Attachment C – Scope for Stage 2 of the Opāheke Sports Park Clubrooms Project

 

 

Methodology

The methodology for Stage 2 requires a collaborative approach to be taken by appointed consultants, Community Services, Community Facilities and finance teams. 

Typically with a project of this nature, Community Services would determine the need for an asset and Community Facilities would determine the asset solution.

However, given the ownership and funding required for this building has yet to be determined, the Sport and Recreation Lead will take on a project co-ordination role.

Scope

a)   Confirm the spatial requirements for the community sports groups.

b)   Review the 2017 second floor design to confirm if it meets the 2020 spatial requirements and if it is the most cost-effective way to achieve the outcomes required.  This may be using the existing design or al alternative design.  It is assumed that as the building has had investment to future-proof the addition of a second level, there will be no exploration of a separate community owned asset elsewhere on the park.

c)   Confirm any funding gap between the estimated build cost and the funds available in the Encumbrance Fund.

d)   If there is a funding gap, confirm:

·    if/ how that gap may be mitigated through alternative council funding sources

·    if an exemption to the Facility Partnership Policy is possible.  If exemption is possible, confirm the pros and cons of a council-owned vs a shared ownership model

·    the pros and cons of a community owned model.

e)   In line with quality advice, confirm any alternative options for the allocation of the Encumbrance Fund at Opaheke Sports Park.

f)    Present the results and options to the local board at a workshop.  At this point, the local board will confirm its preferred direction which will inform the next steps. 

 

 

 

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Arts Community and Events venue partners interim service approach

File No.: CP2020/08266

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for an interim service approach for Arts Community and Events venue partners for 1 July 2020 to 30 September 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       More than half of the Arts Community and Events (ACE) venues portfolio is managed by 122 partners.

3.       Fifty-five of these partners (including one Papakura partner) have contracts and funding agreements that expire on 30 June 2020.

4.       Key concerns for these partners are:

·        the council’s expectation of service delivery from 1 July 2020

·        levels of activity they should be delivering

·        funding availability

·        their responsibilities as employers.

5.       The recommended approach is, firstly, a clarification that services should continue from 1 July 2020 to 30 September 2020.

6.       Secondly, it is to ensure a sustained level of service from the ACE venues portfolio while Emergency Budget deliberation is underway.

7.       Finally, it is to provide a pro rata interim payment (12 weeks of the annual amount) covering the first quarter of FY 2020/2021, to ensure the above can be delivered.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      approve interim payments be made to:

i.        Papakura Museum for $30,286 made up of $29,505 plus Consumer Price Index from the local board’s Asset Based Services budget and $781 from the local board’s Locally Driven Initiatives opex budget.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Auckland Council provides spaces in the community where all Aucklanders can come together to do things that interest them, stretch themselves, have fun, participate, connect, interact, discover new things and learn about each other.

9.       There is an Arts Community and Events (ACE) venue in almost every neighbourhood across Auckland, and the ACE team ensures this diverse portfolio – including community centres, community art galleries, theatres and both rural and urban community halls – is delivering for local communities.

10.     This portfolio contains more than 240 ACE Venues with 122 partners managing over half of these on behalf of the council.

11.     These partnerships are managed with a variety of contracts and agreements in place and funding of over $8m per annum, in addition to in-kind support and resources, including asset provision.   

12.     To help protect Aucklanders during the COVID-19 response, Auckland Council made the decision to temporarily close the ACE venues including community centres, community art galleries, theatres and venues for hire and to support its partners to do the same.

Partner insights

13.     Staff have continued to be in close contact with ACE venue partners through all Alert Levels to answer queries where possible and offer support to their decision-making where appropriate, including:

·   varying contracts to explicitly relieve them of responsibilities under their contracts and funding agreements, as they could not deliver their service under Alert Level Four or Three

·   prioritising final contract payments due in Q3 and Q4 of the current financial year

·   supporting the reopening of venues at Alert Level Two, including implications of group and capacity restrictions.

14.     Staff surveyed ACE venue partners during this time to gather insights on the impacts of COVID-19. Key considerations for partners were:

·   financial security, including uncertainty of funding that might be available in FY 2020/2021

·   concern about their ability to continue to pay staff and deliver expected services and programmes to their local communities.

15.     Fifty-five of these 122 partners have contracts and funding agreements that expire on 30 June 2020.

16.     From survey results and subsequent conversations with partners, the key concerns are:

·   Are they expected to open and deliver services from 1 July 2020?

·   What level of service should they be delivering?

·   What funding is available for them to continue to deliver services?

·   Concerns regarding their responsibilities as employers.

17.     While our ACE venue partners are aware that the Emergency Budget consultation and deliberation is underway, a number have notified us that without an arrangement they may have to suspend services until the Emergency Budget is adopted and implemented in August 2020.

18.     Staff are also aware of concerns raised by local board members and these were discussed in workshops when ACE staff visited local boards to discuss facility reopening plans over the last month.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Interim service delivery support

19.     The recommended approach is to clarify that services should continue from 1 July 2020 to 30 September 2020, ensuring a sustained level of service from the ACE venues portfolio while Emergency Budget deliberation is happening.

20.     In consultation with Auckland Council’s Commercial & Finance and Legal departments, staff have determined that the best approach to both sustain service and to address the level of uncertainty that exists with ACE venue partners is to provide interim funding covering the first quarter of FY 2020/2021.

21.     To do this will require a pro rata interim payment (12 weeks of the annual amount).

22.     Papakura Museum has received funding from the local board from both Asset Based Services and Locally Driven Initiatives opex sources. Staff are recommending a pro rata payment made up from the combined annual total of both budgets.

23.     Interim funding will enable ACE venue partners to operate throughout July, August and September. In August 2020, after local boards approve their work programmes staff will  make contract/grant payments to for the balance of approved funding to partners for the remaining quarters of FY 2020/2021.

24.     For the Papakura Local Board area the partnership under consideration is:

 

ACE venue partner

Interim payment

amount

 

Annual contract amount

Funding mechanism

Expiry

Budget source

Key relationship holder

Papakura Museum

$30,286

 

$121,145

FA*

FY20

ABS + LDI opex

Arts and Culture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*FA - Funding agreement

 

25.     Staff are aware of the concerns this uncertainty is causing ACE venue partners and have advised them in writing that this approach will be brought to local boards as governors of local facilities and locally funded services.

26.     This approach requires a commitment to advance funding for the first quarter of FY 2020/2021 ahead of the Emergency Budget approval and decisions to finalise local board work programmes for FY 2020/2021.

27.     Options for consideration by the board are:

Option

Option one

Option two

Recommended Approach

Option three

Description

Defer funding decision until the Emergency Budget is confirmed

 

Allocate interim partial payment

 

Allocate full pro rata 12 weeks payment

 

Action

No interim payment is made

 

A payment of less than pro rata amount is made at a later date

 

An interim payment can be made early July

 

Implications

·      Possible suspension of services

·      Risk of these partners not being able to reopen

 

·      Negotiations on level of service and new Key Performance Indicators would need to be entered into for the first quarter

·      New contracts generated and agreed

·      Neither Auckland Council nor ACE venue partners have resources or time to manage this

 

·      Service is sustained at current level – doors remain open

·      The impact of different funding scenarios can then be workshopped with board and partners as the Emergency Budget is considered

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     ACE venues can have a positive climate impact as they enable people to connect, participate and recreate locally without having to travel long distances. They help foster a sense of community and contribute positively to people’s views of where they live.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     Auckland Council provides fair, easy and affordable access to safe and welcoming venues through the Arts, Community and Events department of the Customer and Community Directorate.

30.     The Community Places and Arts and Culture units manage the relationship and contracts with ACE venue partners.

31.     Subject to the outcome of this decision, staff will work with Community Facilities to manage implications for council-owned assets.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     A number of local board workshops were conducted through May and early June 2020 on the Auckland Council approach to COVID-19 Level 2 and the phased reopening of local community facilities.

33.     During these workshops local boards:

·   were informed the majority of ACE venue partners reopened promptly at Level Two

·   expressed an interest in the status of ACE venue partner delivery and FY2020/2021 funding

·   considered additional funds due to marked loss in revenue from classes and bookings.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     Art Community and Events venues support diverse, equitable, and affordable access to spaces to all Aucklanders, including Māori.

35.     Programming through Arts Community and Events venues supports Māori outcomes, and showcases work from Māori content creators and artists.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     This approach requires a total commitment of $29,505 from Asset Based Services and $781 from the Locally Driven Initiatives funding the Papakura Local Board’s opex in advance of the Emergency Budget approval and decisions to finalise local board work programmes for FY 2020/2021. This means this amount will not be available for reallocation when possible changes to funding levels, service delivery, and outcome areas are discussed.


 

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     Risks associated with this decision and mitigations are:

Risk

Mitigation

A decision could preempt significant budgetary decisions

This is an interim approach, consistent with the council’s managed provision in this portfolio

The recommended approach may not provide sufficient surety for partners

Staff will communicate with partners and inform them of the Emergency Budget consultation process

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     Subject to local board approval, staff will organise agreements and payments to partners no later than mid-July 2020.

39.     Staff will continue to work with these partners to assess the impact of different funding scenarios, if any, to funding levels, service delivery, outcome areas, or key performance indicators for the remainder of FY 2020/2021. This will inform discussions on local board work programmes once the Emergency Budget has been approved.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Teirney – Senior Project Lead, Arts, Community and Events

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Panuku Development Auckland - Papakura Local Board Six Monthly report update 01 August 2019 to  31 January 2020

File No.: CP2020/07722

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Papakura Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland activities within the local board area for the six months from 01 August 2019 to 31 January 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Panuku is charged with balancing financial and non-financial outcomes in order to create and manage sustainable and resilient places where people want to live, work, invest, learn and visit. The activities of Panuku cover four broad areas: 

·        redevelopment of urban locations, leveraging off council owned land assets, mostly within existing suburbs

·        review of, and where appropriate, redevelopment of council non-service property

·        management of council property assets including commercial, residential, and marina infrastructure

·        other property related services such as redevelopment incorporating a service delivery function, strategic property advice, acquisitions and disposals.

3.       Panuku Development Auckland currently manages fourteen commercial and residential interests in the Papakura Local Board area.

4.       Two properties were purchased, in the Papakura Local Board area during the six month reporting period.

5.       No properties were sold in the Papakura Local Board area during the six month reporting period.

6.       Two properties are currently under review as part of the rationalisation process.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      receive the Panuku Development Auckland Local Board update for 1 August 2019 to 31 January 2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland, from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

8.       The Auckland Plan is the roadmap to deliver on Auckland’s vision to be a world class city, Panuku plays a significant role in achieving the ‘Homes and Places’ and ‘Belonging and Participation’ outcomes.

9.       Panuku leads urban redevelopment in Manukau, Onehunga, Wynyard Quarter, Waterfront, Northcote, Avondale, Takapuna, Henderson, Papatoetoe, Ormiston and Flat Bush, Panmure, Pukekohe, City Centre and redevelopment of the Haumaru Portfolio.

10.     Panuku manages around $3 billion of council’s non-service property portfolio, which is continuously reviewed to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio, or release land or property that can be better used by others. “Non-service properties” are council owned properties that are not used to deliver council, or CCO, services.

11.     As at 31 December 2019, the Panuku managed regional property portfolio comprising 1674 properties and containing 1035 leases. This includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres, and a large portfolio of residential rental homes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Panuku is contributing commercial input into approximately fifty region-wide council-driven renewal and housing supply initiatives.

13.     Panuku works with partners and stakeholders over the course of a project. It also champions best practice project delivery, to achieve best value outcomes within defined cost, time and quality parameters.

14.     Below is a high-level update on activities in the Papakura Local Board area:

Properties managed in the Papakura Local Board Area

15.     Panuku currently manages eight commercial and six residential interests within the local board area.

Portfolio strategy

Optimisation

16.     Optimisation is a self-funding development approach targeting sub-optimal service assets approved in 2015. The process involves an agreement between Community Facilities, Panuku and local boards and is led by Panuku. It is designed to equal or enhance levels of service to the local community in a reconfigured form while delivering on strategic outcomes such as housing or urban regeneration with no impact on existing rate assumptions.

17.     Using optimisation, underperforming assets will have increased utility and efficiency, lower maintenance and operating costs, as well as improved service delivery benefiting from co-location of other complimentary services or commercial activities. Optimisation will free up a range of under capitalised development opportunities such as air space, full sites, or part sites.

18.     Using optimisation as a redevelopment and funding tool, the local board can maximise efficiencies from service assets while maintaining levels of service through the release of some or all of that property for sale or development.

19.     Local boards are allocated decision making for the disposal of local service property and reinvestment of sale proceeds in accordance with the service property optimisation approach.

Portfolio review and rationalisation

Overview

20.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within the council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. Panuku has a focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes.

21.     Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

22.     Panuku works closely with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to identify potential surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

Target for July 2018 to June 2019

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$30 million disposal ‘recommendations’

$30.4 million disposal recommendations.

 

July 2019 to June 2021 Target

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio Review

$45m disposal recommendations.

$20 million disposal recommendations as at 28 February 2020.

 

Process

23.     Once identified as no longer delivering the council service use for which it was acquired, a property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council departments and CCOs, the local board and mana whenua. This is followed by Panuku board approval, engagement with the local ward councillors, the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally, a Governing Body decision.

Acquisitions and disposals

24.     Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. Panuku purchases property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other services. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

Acquisitions

25.     Panuku does not decide which properties to buy in a local board area. Instead, it is asked to negotiate the terms and conditions of a purchase on behalf of the council.

26.     Panuku has purchased 8 properties for open space across Auckland in the time period between August 2019 and February 2020 at a cost of $28.2 million.

27.     Two properties have been purchased in the Papakura Local Board area during the reporting period for open space.

28.     All land acquisition committee resolutions contain a confidentiality clause due to the commercially sensitive nature of ongoing transactions, and thus cannot be reported on while in process. 


Disposals

29.     In the reporting period between August 2019 and February 2020, the Panuku disposals team has entered into five sale and purchase agreements, with an estimated value of $3.6 million of unconditional net sales proceeds. 

30.     Panuku 2019/20 disposals target is $24 million for the year. The disposals target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis. 

31.     No properties have been sold in the Papakura Local Board area during the reporting period.

Under review

32.     Properties currently under review in the Papakura Local Board area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the governing body.

Property

Details

72 Wood Street, Papakura

The residential property was acquired by the former Papakura District Council for an improved road alignment connection between Railway Street West and Chapel Street, Papakura.

At the time of acquisition, the former PDC resolved that any land that was surplus to the requirements of the project was to be sold.

Following the project completion in 2011, council’s Arts Community and Events department determined the property is not required within its portfolio.

Panuku is currently discussing with Auckland Transport its transport infrastructure requirements for the proposed Papakura bus station reconfiguration before progressing.

143 and 145 Keri Vista Rise, Papakura

143 and 145 Keri Vista Rise, Papakura are both vacant sites that were acquired for roading purposes. Auckland Transport has advised that these sites are no longer required for this purpose.  These sites are due to commence internal consultation with the council group and engagement will be undertaken with the Papakura Local Board as part of the rationalisation process.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     The Panuku Priority Location programmes support regeneration of existing town centres, developing underutilised sites within the urban area, close to transport links. Increasing the density of housing results in reduced carbon emissions through improved utilisation of existing infrastructure and transit-oriented development. The provision of easy, safe and attractive walking and cycling routes reduces reliance on private motor vehicles and enables low carbon lifestyles. Panuku has adopted a minimum standard of a Homestar 6 rating for all homes, resulting in warmer, drier and more energy efficient buildings.

34.     Climate change increases the probability of hotter temperatures and more frequent flooding and drought in Papakura. Panuku seeks to future-proof our communities by:

a)      specifying adaptation and resilience in the design of buildings and spaces.

b)      specifying that infrastructure and developments are designed to cope with warmer temperatures and extreme weather events.

c)      use of green infrastructure and water sensitive design for increased flood resilience, ecological and biodiversity benefits

d)      provision of increased shade and shelter for storm events and hotter days.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     The views of the council group are incorporated on a project by project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     Any local or sub-regional impacts related to local activities are considered on a project by project basis.

37.     Panuku requests that all feedback and/or queries relating to a property in the local board area be directed in the first instance to localboard@developmentauckland.co.nz.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     Panuku works collaboratively with mana whenua on a range of projects including potential property disposals, development sites in the rohe and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum who have a broader mandate.

39.     Panuku will continue to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing.         

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     The next six-monthly update is scheduled for October 2020.


 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Perin Garand Engagement Coordinator, Panuku

Authorisers

Jody Jackson Becerra, Senior Engagement Advisor, Panuku

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020

File No.: CP2020/06764

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 and statement of proposal for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board complete a local board plan for adoption by 31 October of the year following election and uses the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

3.       The consultation period for the SCP will take place from 13 July to 13 August 2020.

4.       The draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 has been developed using feedback obtained before COVID-19. There is a risk in approving the draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 for public consultation while the full social and economic effects of COVID-19 on the community are not yet determined.

5.       The consultation process will seek the views and aspirations of the public to inform the final plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      approve the draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 in Attachment A to this report, and the statement of proposal in Attachment B to this report, for public consultation using the special consultative procedure

b)      delegate authority to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) of the Papakura Local Board to approve final changes to the draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 and statement of proposal

c)      delegate authority to the Chairperson and/or other nominated member(s) to approve the type of engagement events to take place, the number of events and the dates of the engagement events

d)      delegate to the following elected members and staff the power and responsibility to hear from the public through ‘spoken’ (or New Zealand sign language) interaction, at the council’s public engagement events, during the consultation period for the local board plan:

i)        local board members and Chairperson

ii)       General Manager Local Board Services, Local Board Relationship Manager, Local Board Senior Advisor, Local Board Advisor, Local Board Engagement Advisor

iii)      any additional staff approved by the General Manager Local Board Services or the Group Chief Financial Officer.

e)      approve holding an extraordinary meeting of the local board, if required, at a suitable date and time during the weeks of 2 November to 13 November 2020 to adopt the Papakura Local Board Plan 2020.  

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 states that each local board must:

·       adopt their local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

·       use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

7.       Local board plans are strategic documents developed every three years. They set a direction for local boards and reflect community priorities and preferences. They provide a guide for local board activity, funding and investment decisions. They also influence local board input into regional strategies and plans, including annual budgets.

8.       The plans inform the development of the council’s 10-year budget. They also form the basis for development of the annual local board agreement for the following three financial years and subsequent work programmes.

Timeframes

9.       The consultation period for the local board plans was due to be held in June and July 2020. The implementation of COVID-19 alert levels 3 and 4 required a change in the direction of the draft plans to ensure they responded to the effects of COVID-19. Restrictions on public gatherings also required a shift in planning how engagement events could occur. Planning for these took time, which has forced the consultation period to be moved to July and August 2020.

10.     Section 83 of the Local Government Act 2002 requires the consultation period to be a minimum of one month. The COVID-19 Response (Further Management Measures) Legislation Act 2020, which came into force on 16 May 2020, permits a council to modify its SCP and conduct a shorter period of consultation than one month (but no less than seven days).

11.     The threshold for a council being able to modify its consultation period under this Act is high. According to the Act, a council can only take a modified approach to “the extent that it is satisfied to do is necessary or desirable to support measures taken to contain or mitigate the outbreak of COVID-19 or its effects, including, without limitation, by addressing the impacts and consequences of the outbreak for any aspect of the wellbeing of the community”.

12.     While it may be possible to shorten the consultation period, it is important that the community is given a reasonable time of one month to provide feedback on the draft plan in which to indicate their priorities and aspirations.

13.     Whilst every effort will be made to adopt the Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 in October 2020, the unavoidable change to the dates of the consultation period may require a small extension of time. This is to ensure the local board has sufficient time to consider the submissions received.

14.     It is recommended that provision be made for an extraordinary meeting to adopt the final plan during the weeks of 2 November to 13 November 2020, should it be required. Adoption of the final plan will be no later than 30 November 2020.  

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 (refer Attachment A) has been developed by considering:

·       previous community engagement, including engagement on the 2017 Local Board Plan, 2018-2028 Long-term Plan and prior annual plans

·       the uncertainty of the impact of COVID-19 on Auckland Council’s budget and service levels

·       subject matter expert advice from council and other council organisations

·       mana whenua and mataawaka views.

16.     Targeted consultation was also undertaken in January to April 2020 through various activities with local community groups.

17.     The draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 has been developed while the impacts of COVID-19 are not yet fully determined. It is possible that some of the aspirations and desires may need to change as a result.

Key features

18.     Key features of the draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 include:

·    a vibrant and prosperous local economy

·    a community enriched by its diversity, where people feel connected and lead active, healthy lives

·    a well-connected area where it’s easy to move around

·    a treasured environment and heritage

·    a partnership with Māori that creates a Papakura where Māori identity, culture and aspirations are embraced.

Statement of proposal

19.     The use of the SCP requires the local board to approve an accompanying statement of proposal (refer Attachment B). This document provides financial context and an outline of how the public can provide input through the SCP.

Engagement plan for the SCP

20.     The consultation period will run from 13 July to 13 August 2020.

21.     The engagement approach focuses on engagement through digital and online platforms.

22.     The COVID-19 alert system has certain restrictions on public gatherings, which has varying implications for consultation under the SCP. Due to the uncertainty of knowing which COVID-19 alert level Aucklanders will be under at the time of the consultation period, it is not possible to confirm all details of engagement events as part of the engagement plan.

Consultation documentation and translations

23.     To support Aucklanders to be able to provide feedback in a way that suits them, information will be provided online and in hard copy.

24.     Hard copies and feedback forms will be available at libraries, service centres and local board offices subject to being open, or on request by calling 09 301 0101 or the Papakura local board office on (09) 295 1376.

25.     The draft local board plan will be available to view online at www.akhaveyoursay.nz.

26.     To enable a wide reach across the diverse communities, the feedback form and sections of the draft plan will be translated into Te Reo, Samoan, Tongan and Punjabi. The sections to be translated will be the outcomes with a brief description, the objectives and initiatives.

Methods for obtaining feedback

27.     Feedback will be gathered through the events described below. These may be subject to change depending on the rules and requirements around COVID-19 alert levels:

·       Have Your Say face-to-face engagement events (spoken interaction)

·       online submission via www.akhaveyoursay.nz

·       written submissions, for example proformas and letters received by post or email

·       verbal submission through telephone by calling 09 301 0101 or the Papakura Local Board office on (09) 295 1376.

·       social media comments which are in scope of the engagement, although people will be encouraged to go to the online form to make a formal submission

·       partnerships with community partners to obtain feedback from our diverse communities.

Processing feedback

28.     Feedback will be analysed and collated for local board members to consider prior to making decisions on the final local board plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     The draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 reflects the impacts of predicted climate change. It considers such impacts as increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the local board area.

30.     Specific climate change initiatives are outlined under outcome four. These include:

·    working with our communities to support them in developing skills, knowledge and capacity to reduce emissions and respond to climate change impacts

·    advocating for appropriate management responses through reserve management, infrastructure and local plans

·    advocating to ensure that development decisions involving our coastlines take into account the impacts of climate change

·    advocating to identify local coastal hazards due to climate change and the communities most affected. Where possible, advocate to reduce the impacts from these hazards

·    continuing advocacy to ensure town planning regulations consider sustainable practices and reduce risks related to coastal inundation

·    advocating to the Governing Body for funding to address climate change impacts and coastal erosion hazards, including sea level rise, when planning upgrades of parks, walkways and other assets in coastal areas. The location of these assets should be appropriately set back to mitigate effects and ensure future-proofing.

31.     The impact on the climate from the process of engagement has been considered. Digital feedback will be encouraged where possible, and printing of hard copies will be limited. The ability to provide feedback from any location reduces the need to travel to a specific location.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     The approval of the Papakura draft local board plan 2020 for public consultation will provide the local board with feedback on the communities’ aspirations on the direction the local board intends to take. Planning and operational areas of the council have taken part in the development and review of the draft plans.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     The local board’s views have informed the development of the draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 through a series of workshops from November 2019 to May 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     In January 2020 a letter was sent to all iwi authorities inviting participation in local board discussions to ensure key messages were captured early in the planning process.

35.     Staff engaged with mataawaka on 28 January 2020 to seek their views and values in relation to the area.

36.     Staff engaged with mana whenua on 30 January 2020 to seek their views and values in relation to the area at a Southern Local Boards Hui held in Otara.

37.     The local board has also considered existing feedback on several matters from mana whenua and mataawaka.

38.     Aspirations and priorities include:

·    continuing to work together through the Māori Input into Local Board Decision-making project

·    providing kaitiakitanga over our natural environment for the benefit of current and future generations

·    supporting the continued co-governance of Pukekiwiriki Paa and the Manukau Harbour to restore, preserve and protect these taonga for current and future generations

·    working towards delivering enhanced visitor and tourism experiences at Papakura Marae that will provide economic benefits to the marae and the wider community

·    partnering to enable the local board to engage more effectively with the Māori community, including through business meetings, consultation, events and community hui.

39.     These views have been incorporated into the draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     Budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process. The local board plans inform this process.

41.     The total engagement budget is $12,000 per local board, which is provided for in the Local Board Services group budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     There is a risk in approving the draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 for public consultation while the full social and economic effects of COVID-19 on the community are not yet determined. The consultation process will seek the views and aspirations of the public to inform the final plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     Following approval, the draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 will be available for public consultation from 13 July to 13 August 2020.

44.     Details of specific engagement events will be finalised as part of this process.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Papakura Local Board Plan 2020 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Statement of Proposal (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Victoria Hutt - Senior Local Board Advisor - Papakura

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Addition to the 2019-2020 Papakura Local Board meeting schedule

File No.: CP2020/07729

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for a meeting date to be added to the 2019-2022 Papakura Local Board meeting schedule in order to accommodate changes to the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 timeframes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Due to the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, Auckland Council is consulting Aucklanders on further matters for the Emergency Budget 2020/2021. This significantly changes the process set out for the annual plan this year.

3.       The local board is being asked to approve one meeting date as an addition to the Papakura Local Board meeting schedule to receive feedback from the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 consultation and provide input to the Governing Body. This will enable the modified Emergency Budget 2020/2021 timeframes to be met.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      approve an additional meeting to the 2019-2022 Papakura Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 timeframes as follows:

·    Wednesday 8 July 2020, at 4.30pm

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

5.       In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·    clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·    sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

6.       The Papakura Local Board adopted its 2019-2022 business meeting schedule at its 4 December 2019 meeting [resolution PPK/2019/219].business meeting.

7.       Due to the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, Auckland Council is consulting Aucklanders on further matters for the Emergency Budget 2020/2021. This significantly changes the process set out for the annual plan this year.

8.       To allow local boards to receive feedback from Aucklanders in their local board area on the proposed Emergency Budget, and to provide input to the Governing Body, it is recommended that an additional or extraordinary business meeting be held between 6 to 10 July.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The local board has two choices:

i)        Add the meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule.

or

ii)       Add the meeting as an extraordinary meeting.

10.     For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the Annual Budget 2020/2021 timeframes change again, or the information is not ready for the meeting, there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled anyway.

11.     For option two, only the specific topic Emergency Budget 2020/2021 may be considered for which the meeting is being held. No other policies or plans could be considered at this meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule an additional meeting and consider whether to approve it as an extraordinary meeting or an addition to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     There is no specific impact for Māori arising from this report. Local boards work with Māori on projects and initiatives of shared interest.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     If the local board decides not to add this business meeting to their schedule this will cause a delay to the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 process, which would result in the input of this local board not being able to be presented to the Governing Body for their consideration and inclusion in the Emergency Budget.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     Implement the processes associated with preparing for business meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Paula Brooke  - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Urgent decision - Papakura Local Board feedback on the Supporting Growth south Auckland projects

File No.: CP2020/07883

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Noting the urgent decision detailing the Papakura Local Board feedback on the Supporting Growth south Auckland projects.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland’s population is expected to grow by up to a million people, and more than 400,000 new homes and 277,000 new jobs will be needed to accommodate this growth.

3.       In response to the projected growth of Auckland’s demand, the Auckland Unitary Plan has identified 15,000 hectares of predominantly rural land for future urbanisation over the next 30 years. This future urban growth land is further detailed in a sub-plan called the Future Urban Land Supply Strategy, and is equivalent to an area about 1.5 times the size of urban Hamilton, to be located in the following areas of greater Auckland:

·      North: Warkworth

·      North: Wainui, Silverdale, Dairy Flat

·      Northwest: Whenuapai, Redhills, Kumeū-Huapai and Riverhead

·      South: Takānini, Opāheke, Drury, Paerata and Pukekohe.

4.       Auckland Transport, Waka Kotahi (NZ Transport Agency) and Auckland Council identified a need to determine the most appropriate transport responses to support this projected growth. As a result, in 2015 they formed the Supporting Growth Programme (formerly known as the Transport for Future Urban Growth Programme) to investigate, plan and deliver the transport networks needed to connect these urban growth areas over the next 30 years.

 

5.       Consultation was undertaken for the projects identified for the south:

·    Mill Road – a new connection from Manukau to Drury South 

·    Pukekohe Expressway and connections to State Highway 22  

·    Pukekohe Urban Arterial 

·    Rail – supporting urban and economic growth 

·    Road upgrades along Opāheke Road, Ponga Road and Waihoehoe Road.

6.       The feedback period closed on 12 June 2020 which was before 24 June 2020, being the next scheduled meeting of the Papakura Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      note the urgent decision detailing the Papakura Local Board feedback on the Supporting Growth south Auckland projects, as provided in Attachment A to this report,

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent decision - Papakura Local Board feedback on the Supporting Growth south Auckland projects

89

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lee Manaia - Local Board Advisor - Papakura

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

For Information: Reports referred to the Papakura Local Board

File No.: CP2020/07382

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Papakura Local Board to receive reports and resolutions that have been referred from the Governing Body committee meetings, Council Controlled Organisations, forums or other local boards for information.

2.       The following information was circulated to the local board:

No.

Report Title

Item no.

Meeting Date

Governing Body Committee or Council Controlled Organisation or Forum or Local Board

1

Whau Local Board Notice of Motion resolutions on Incentivise a Climate Resilient Water Strategy- emailed to members 4 June 2020.

13

20 May 2020

Whau Local Board

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      receive the following information from the following Governing Body committee meetings, Council Controlled Organisations, forums or other local board meetings:

No.

Report Title

Item no.

Meeting Date

Governing Body Committee or Council Controlled Organisation or Forum or Local Board

1

Whau Local Board Notice of Motion resolutions on Incentivise a Climate Resilient Water Strategy- emailed to members 4 June 2020.

13

20 May 2020

Whau Local Board

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Paula Brooke  - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Papakura Local Board Achievements Register 2019-2022 Political Term

File No.: CP2020/07388

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for members to record the achievements of the Papakura Local Board for the 2019 – 2022 political term.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity to note the achievements of the Papakura Local Board for the 2019 – 2022 political term.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      request any new achievements be added to the Papakura Local Board Achievements Register for the 2019-2022 political term.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Papakura Local Board Achievements Register 2019-2022 Political Term

99

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Paula Brooke  - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 


 


 


 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Papakura Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - June 2020

File No.: CP2020/07389

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Papakura Local Board the three months Governance Forward Work Calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Governance Forward Work Calendar is a schedule of items that will come before the local board at business meetings and workshops over the next three months. The Governance Forward Work Calendar for the Papakura Local Board is included in Attachment A of this report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

i)    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

ii)   clarifying what advice is required and when

iii)   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month, be included on the agenda for business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar as at 17 June 2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The council’s Quality Advice Programme aims to improve the focus, analysis, presentation and timeliness of staff advice to elected representatives. An initiative under this is to develop forward work calendars for Governing Body committees and local boards. These provide elected members with better visibility of the types of governance tasks they are being asked to undertake and when they are scheduled.

6.       There are no new projects in the Governance Forward Work Calendar. The calendar brings together in one schedule reporting on all of the board’s projects and activities that have been previously approved in the local board plan, long-term plan, departmental work programmes and through other board decisions. It includes Governing Body policies and initiatives that call for a local board response.

7.       This initiative is intended to support the board’s governance role. It will also help staff to support local boards, as an additional tool to manage workloads and track activities across council departments, and it will allow greater transparency for the public.

8.       The calendar is arranged in three columns, “Topic”, “Purpose” and “Governance Role”:

i)    Topic describes the items and may indicate how they fit in with broader processes such as the annual plan.

ii)   Purpose indicates the aim of the item, such as formally approving plans or projects, hearing submissions or receiving progress updates

iii)   Governance role is a higher-level categorisation of the work local boards do. Examples of the seven governance categories are tabled below:

Governance role

Examples

Setting direction / priorities / budget

Capex projects, work programmes, annual plan

Local initiatives / specific decisions

Grants, road names, alcohol bans

Input into regional decision-making

Comments on regional bylaws, policies, plans

Oversight and monitoring

Local board agreement, quarterly performance reports, review projects

Accountability to the public

Annual report

Engagement

Community hui, submissions processes

Keeping informed

Briefings, cluster workshops

 

9.       Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar. The calendar will be updated and reported back every month to business meetings. Updates will also be distributed to relevant council staff.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     This report is an information report providing the governance forward work programme for the next three months.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     The council is required to provide Governance Forward Work Calendar to the Manurewa Local Board for their consideration.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

12.     All local boards are being presented with a Governance Forward Work Calendar for their consideration.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

13.     The projects and processes referred to in the Governance Forward Work Calendar will have a range of implications for Māori which will be considered when the work is reported.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

14.     There are no financial implications relating to this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

15.     This report is a point in time of the Governance Forward Work Calendar. It is a living document and updated month to month. It minimises the risk of the board being unaware of planned topics for their consideration.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

16.     Staff will review the calendar each month in consultation with board members and will report an updated calendar to the board.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar - June 2020

107

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Paula Brooke  - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 


 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 

Papakura Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2020/07390

 

  

 

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Papakura Local Board record for the workshops held virtually on 20 May 2020, 3 and 10 June 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.       Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion. This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Papakura Local Board:

a)      note the Papakura Local Board virtual workshop records held on:

i)        20 May 2020

ii)       3 June 2020

iii)      10 June 2020

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Papakura Local Board Workshop Record 20 May 2020

111

b

Papakura Local Board Workshop Record 3 June 2020

113

c

Papakura Local Board Workshop Record 10 June 2020

117

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Paula Brooke  - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Relationship Manager Manurewa & Papakura

 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 


 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020

 

 


 


 


Papakura Local Board

24 June 2020