I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

Monday, 31 August 2020

3.00pm

This meeting will be held remotely

Ngā Hui a te Poari Kaitohutohu mō te Pokapū o Te Tāone Nui o Tāmaki Makaurau /

Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

OPEN AGENDA

MEMBERSHIP

Chairperson

Ms Viv Beck

Business Improvement District

Deputy Chairperson

Mr Andrew Gaukrodger

Corporate sector

Members

Ms Noelene Buckland

City Centre Residents Group

 

Mr Greg Cohen

Tourism/Travel

 

Cr Pippa Coom

Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Auckland Council

 

Mr George Crawford

Property Council of NZ

 

Cr Chris Darby

Auckland Council (Mayor’s alternate)

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Auckland Council

 

Mr Matt Harray

Retail sector

 

Mr Mark Kingsford

Corporate sector

 

Ms Amy Malcolm

Tertiary sector (University of Auckland)

 

Mr James Mooney

Urban design/institute of architects

 

Mr Nigel Murphy

Tertiary sector (Auckland University of Technology)

 

Mr Richard Northey

Waitematā Local Board, Auckland Council

 

Mr Adam Parkinson

City Centre Residents Group

 

Ms Anahera Rawiri

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

 

Mr Patrick Reynolds

Transport representative

 

Mr Michael Richardson

Business Improvement District

(Quorum 10 members)

 

Mike Giddey

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Governance Advisor

26 August 2020

Contact Telephone: +64 9 890 8143

Email: mike.giddey@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

 


Terms of Reference

 

(Excerpt –full terms of reference available as a separate document)

 

1.       These terms of reference set out the roles, responsibilities and working arrangements for the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board.

2.       The board is a key advisory body, with no decision-making or autonomous budgetary authority.

3.       The board will assist the Auckland Council, specifically the Governing Body and the Waitematā Local Board and Auckland Council Controlled Organisations to oversee and be a key advisor to the Auckland Council on achieving the vision and strategic outcomes of the Auckland Plan, the City Centre Masterplan, the expenditure of the city centre targeted rate and city centre issues.

 

Membership:

Includes one councillor and one local board member.

 

The board should include members who can provide expert advice on many areas including transport, landscape, environment and youth sectors. The membership includes a position for Mana Whenua. Representatives from CCOs may be board members without voting rights. The number of the board members should be between 16 and 21 at any time.

 

The new panel’s term should end one month prior to the next local government elections in 2019. The membership of the panel may be rolled over for more than one electoral term of three years.

 

Purpose of City Centre Targeted Rate

(Excerpt –full information available in a separate document)

 

Background

 

The City Centre targeted rate is to help fund the development and revitalisation of the city centre. The rate applies to business and residential land in the City Centre area.

Activities to be funded

 

The City Centre redevelopment programme aims to enhance the city centre as a place to work, live, visit and do business. It achieves this by providing a high-quality urban environment, promoting the competitive advantages of the city centre as a business location, and promoting the city centre as a place for high-quality education, research and development. The programme intends to reinforce and promote the city centre as a centre for arts and culture, with a unique identity as the heart and soul of Auckland. The rate will fund expenditure within the following activities: Regional planning; Roads and footpaths; Local parks, sports and recreation.

 

The targeted rate will continue until 2024/2025 to cover capital and operating expenditure generated by the projects in the City Centre redevelopment programme. From 2016/2017, unspent funds from the targeted rate have been used to transition the depreciation and consequential operating costs of capital works to the general rate so that from 2019/2020 these costs will be entirely funded from general rates.

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

4          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

5          City Rail Link update                                                                                                     7

6          City centre Targeted Rate investment portfolio                                                       13

7          Draft standing orders                                                                                                  35

8          Responses to homelessness in the city centre                                                       51

9          Update on City Centre Activation Programme                                                         81

10        Information report: Update on the Waihorotiu Queen Street Valley Access for Everyone pilot, Forward work programme/progress on items and memoranda  91

11        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

Apologies from Mr A Parkinson, Mr M Harray and Mayor P Goff have been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 29 July 2020, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 

City Rail Link update

File No.: CP2020/11811

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board on City Rail Link works, naming of the lower Queen Street plaza and Britomart East works.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Construction work for the City Rail Link early work contracts are in their final stages and construction for the main works to build tunnels and stations are in full swing.

3.       City Rail Link Ltd and Link Alliance continue to interface with Auckland Council and council-controlled organisations on the project’s progress, monitor impacts of construction, ensure that opportunities are maximised and there is coordination between City Rail Link and other city centre projects.

4.       City Rail Link Ltd proposes to lead stakeholder consultation on Te Komititanga, the name that has been gifted by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and accepted by the City Rail Link mana whenua forum for the lower Queen Street plaza.

5.       City Rail Link Ltd and Link Alliance will also provide a presentation to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board meeting on 31 August 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the City Rail Link update.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The City Rail Link is New Zealand’s largest ever infrastructure project. It will enhance the capacity and performance of Auckland’s rail service and add to the quality of life in Auckland.

7.       City Rail Link, jointly sponsored by Auckland Council and the Crown, contributes to a number of sponsors’ priorities including the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2018/18-2027/28 and the Auckland Transport Alignment Project 2018. The City Rail Link also contributes to all six of Auckland Council’s priority outcomes in its Auckland Plan 2050, the City Centre Masterplan and contributes to social and economic objectives in additional community and council plans.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

City Rail Link update

8.       The City Rail Link project has been declared “essential” by the New Zealand Government because of its importance to the country’s economic recovery. The City Rail Link project currently employs over 1,200 people in design, engineering and construction, and has established a progressive employment programme that supports youth into meaningful work. City Rail Link also continues to be a largescale procurer of goods and services and has set social procurement targets for the project.

9.       There will be impacts on the project’s construction programme due to COVID-19, however the extent of delays are not fully known yet. To help offset delays caused by COVID-19, as well as maintain momentum and productivity to deliver the City Rail Link in 2024, extended construction hours were agreed by Auckland Council through the consenting process. This applies to Link Alliance construction sites at Mount Eden, Karangahape and Aotea.

10.     To support City Rail Link’s neighbouring businesses and communities, development response initiatives continue to be implemented across all construction sites. Initiatives include providing safe access around construction, local business signage and wayfinding, procuring goods and services from neighbouring businesses, use of hoarding and lighting, as well as activation and engagement.

11.     The Dame Whina Cooper tunnel boring machine (TBM), which will excavate 3.2 kilometres of City Rail Link tunnels, has undergone vigorous factory acceptance testing in Guangzhou, China. The project has now formally accepted ownership of the tunnel boring machine, which is currently being dismantled and is scheduled to arrive in Auckland in October 2020. The tunnel boring machine is expected to begin her first underground journey from Mount Eden in April 2021.

Contract 9: Britomart East

12.     The C9 Britomart East contract works will upgrade the eastern end of the station’s connections, including widening platforms, strengthening beams, moving a tunnel wall and modifying track. Construction partners will also build the equipment rooms in Britomart Station’s new basement that will eventually be required to run the City Rail Link.

13.     Construction is scheduled to start in late 2020 and is estimated to be completed in early 2024.

14.     Works as part of the C9 Contract are generally of lesser scale when compared with other contract packages that make up the City Rail Link project and are mostly confined to existing underground rail infrastructure.

15.     City Rail Link Ltd and KiwiRail are working together to ensure that stakeholders and project neighbours are aware of the planned works, with more detailed information on scope and construction programme to be provided in the upcoming months once finalised.

Contract 1: Britomart & Lower Queen Street

16.     Construction of the Lower Queen Street plaza is scheduled for completion in December 2020, and remaining construction on Tyler and Galway streets is scheduled for completion by mid-2021. The additional City Centre Targeted Rate funding advocated for by ACCAB has supported the delivery of a high-quality urban realm for Auckland’s communities.

17.     The tunnels and heavy concrete work for the C1 contract are complete. The streetscape on lower Queen Street, including paving, new native trees and street furniture is currently under construction.

18.     Auckland Transport’s proposal to extend the lower Queen Street ‘pedestrian mall’ onto part of Tyler Street and Galway Street and remove the exemption for buses and thoroughfare vehicles is now closed for public consultation. AT received 685 submissions that they are currently analysing.

19.     The fit out of the Chief Post Office building and Britomart Station continues, with four of the eight metro-grade escalators installed.

20.     A heritage strategy to showcase the Chief Post Office’s heritage features as well as the artefacts discovered during C1 construction is being developed. Last month, a seawall dating back to the 1860s was discovered during excavation for lower Queen Street. It will be protected in the location it was discovered and a heritage plaque installed in the pavers above it.

Lower Queen Street plaza – naming

21.     On 7 July 2020, the City Rail Link Mana Whenua Forum accepted a proposal from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei to gift the name Te Komiti for the lower Queen Street plaza. The name has since been amended to ‘Te Komititanga’ and won’t require ‘Square’ or ‘Plaza’ included as part of it.

22.     The name, Te Komititanga, reflects that this will be a place where people can come together in formality, celebration and parade. People will also travel through, mix and meet within the space as they move between transport modes, the harbour, Commercial Bay and mid-city. 

23.     As well as the mixing of people, the name also reflects that the plaza’s location had been where the waters of Waitematā and Wai o Horotiu, the stream that once ran into the harbour and still exists beneath Queen Street, had once merged.

24.     The Waitematā Local Board has delegated authority to choose the name for the plaza. City Rail Link Ltd sought feedback from the board on the proposed name and on the planned stakeholder engagement. Once consultation is complete and feedback has been reviewed, Auckland Council will formally request the board’s adoption of the proposed plaza name.

Contract 2: Albert Street

25.     The C2 contract for City Rail Link works along Albert Street from Wyndham Street to Customs Street towards the Waitematā Harbour is now ahead of its December 2020 completion date. Works are now scheduled to be substantially finished in October 2020.

26.     The streetscape work for this contract is being completed block-by-block, and the contract’s construction footprint continues to steadily decrease.

27.     Funding through the city centre targeted rate has supported the delivery of trees and a high quality urban realm along Albert Street. A total of 23 mature native trees are now installed, together with wider paved footpaths and new street furniture on top of upgraded utilities and already constructed City Rail Link tunnels.

28.     Through the Business Hardship Programme, City Rail Link Ltd is continuing to provide financial support in the form of rent relief to businesses affected by increased construction duration.

Contract 3: Aotea Station

29.     The main compound in the Bledisloe carpark has been built and now serves the workers on site which at peak will number around 300.

30.     Construction of Aotea Station’s diaphragm walls has begun and will make up the first permanent element of the station. For Aotea Station, 150 wall panels will be built, with three now complete. In the northern section of the site near Kingston and Wyndham Streets, around 60 out of 450 piles are now complete.

31.     Utility investigation and relocation continues along Albert Street between Mayoral Drive and Wyndham Street.

32.     Bluestone wall deconstruction will begin in approximately November 2020.

33.     A City Rail Link information hub will open in September outside Mojo Café on Wellesley Street. In the meantime, public drop ins will be held in the Auckland House lobby.

34.     Long-term hoardings are beginning to go up on site, which will be beautified with art and lighting installations.

Contract 3: Karangahape Station

35.     Construction of Karangahape Station’s diaphragm walls is now underway, with 10 of the 26 wall panels that will form the station box at Mercury Lane now installed. Beresford Square works will require 32 diaphragm wall panels.

 

 

 

36.     The concrete floor of the 22 metre temporary shaft at the Mercury Lane has been poured. The shaft will provide underground access for plant and personnel.

37.     Utility investigation and relocation is nearing completion for both the Mercury Plaza and Beresford Square sites.

38.     Construction of the noise enclosure at Mercury Lane is now underway and is scheduled to be operational by mid-September.

39.     The public toilets at Beresford Square will be decommissioned and removed on 21 August 2020. The Link Alliance is working with Auckland Council, Auckland Transport and the community to temporarily provide toilet facilities on the corner of Greys Avenue and Pitt Street – a location which is still being confirmed with Auckland Transport. In the interim, wheelchair accessible portable toilet facilities are available to the public near the Pitt Street / Karangahape Road intersection.

Contract 3 and Contract 5: Mt Eden Station and North Auckland Line connections

40.     Mount Eden train station closed on 11 July 2020 and will be closed until 2024. This enables the Link Alliance to construct the new Mount Eden station and City Rail Link connections to the Western Line. The Porters Avenue level crossing also closed permanently to vehicles on 29 May 2020.

41.     City Rail Link Ltd and the Link Alliance continue to work closely with Auckland Transport to ensure the public are aware of the station closure and have alternative public transport options available. An ongoing community preparedness campaign began in mid-February which resulted in a high level of public knowledge.

42.     A new frequent ‘64’ bus service started operating on 5 July 2020 and will be free during City Rail Link construction. It provides an alternative to train travel between Mount Eden, Kingsland and Newmarket.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

43.     City Rail Link continues to set the benchmark for sustainability on New Zealand infrastructure projects. Because there is no sustainability standard for infrastructure in New Zealand, the project is using the Infrastructure Sustainability Council of Australia (ISCA) framework.

44.     City Rail Link Ltd has enhanced the ISCA framework together with mana whenua to make it more appropriate for Tāmaki Makaurau. The project is on track for an ‘excellent’ sustainability rating for early works C1 and C2 contracts. Sustainability outcomes are also embedded within the Link Alliance.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

45.     City Rail Link Ltd and its construction partners continue to have numerous controls and interfaces in place with Auckland Council and council-controlled organisations to monitor the project’s progress, monitor impacts of construction, ensure that opportunities are maximised and there is coordination between City Rail Link and other city centre projects.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

46.     The Waitematā Local Board regularly receives updates on the City Rail Link construction programme.

47.     The Waitematā Local Board has delegated authority to choose the name for the lower Queen Street plaza. City Rail Link Ltd sought feedback from the board on the proposed name (Te Komititanga) and on the planned stakeholder engagement. Once consultation is complete and feedback has reviewed, Auckland Council will formally request the board’s adoption of the proposed plaza name.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.     The City Rail Link mana whenua forum accepted a proposal from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei to gift the name Te Komititanga for the lower Queen Street plaza.

49.     City Rail Link Ltd has worked with mana whenua to enhance the ISCA framework to make it more appropriate for Tāmaki Makaurau.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

50.     There are no financial implications in this update.  The CRL project is jointly funded by the Crown and Auckland Council.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

51.     The Covid-19 pandemic will impact the City Rail Link project, however the project remains on track to be completed on time and within the $4.4 billion cost envelope. City Rail Link Ltd and its construction partners are continuously working together to mitigate risks and the challenges ahead.

52.     A key challenge for the project is the current border restrictions due to COVID-19. There are a number of skills required on the project that are not currently available in New Zealand. City Rail Link Ltd and the Link Alliance will continue to try to bring these essential workers into the country, while also upskilling our workforce, to maintain momentum on the project.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.     The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board will receive regular updates at its meetings and through newsletter updates.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maria Hernandez-Curry – Stakeholder Communications Manager, City Rail Link Ltd

Authoriser

John Dunshea – Lead Officer Support

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 

City centre Targeted Rate investment portfolio

File No.: CP2020/11903

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on the status of city centre projects underway and funded through the city centre targeted rate investment portfolio, following the adoption of the Emergency Budget 2020/2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The city centre targeted rate portfolio budget 2019/2020 was endorsed by the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board at its 24 July 2019 meeting (resolution CEN/2019/35) to deliver outcomes that support the City Centre Masterplan, creating a vibrant, accessible and inclusive city centre that supports public transport, walking, cycling and responds to growth.

3.       On 30 July 2020, Auckland Council’s Governing Body adopted the Emergency Budget for the 2020/2021 financial year (resolution GB/2020/77).

4.       The Emergency Budget 2020/2021 resulted in a reduction of capital expenditure across Auckland Council, including a reduction to expenditure through the city centre targeted rate investment portfolio.

5.       The Emergency Budget prioritised the continuation and completion of significant projects already in the construction phase. Delaying or deferring of these projects would have presented risks to health and safety, contractual commitments as well as impacting stakeholders if they were deferred. Some projects also have critical interdependencies that could require costly rework in the future if timeframes are not met.

6.       This report provides a summary of the revised delivery programme in the context of the Emergency Budget and the impacts of COVID-19.

7.       Staff will present the revised city centre targeted rate investment portfolio to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board in September 2020 as part of the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 process.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the update on the status of city centre targeted rate projects following the adoption of the Emergency Budget 2020/2021.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The City Centre targeted rate is used to help fund the development and revitalisation of the city centre and aims to enhance the city centre as a place to work, live, visit and do business. It achieves this by providing a high-quality urban environment, promoting the competitive advantages of the city centre as a business location, and promoting the city centre as a place for high-quality education, research and development.

9.       The city centre targeted rate portfolio budget 2019/2020 was endorsed by the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board at its 24 July 2019 meeting (resolution CEN/2019/35).

10.     The portfolio will deliver outcomes that support the City Centre Masterplan, creating a vibrant, accessible and inclusive city centre that supports public transport, walking, cycling and responds to growth.

11.     The COVID-19 pandemic, including the Alert Level-4 lockdown, significantly impacted on the delivery of city centre projects, including those within the city centre targeted rate portfolio.

12.     On 16 July 2020, the Auckland Council Governing Body made its final decisions on the Emergency Budget for the 2020/2021 financial year. This budget was formally adopted on 30 July 2020 (resolution GB/2020/77).

13.     The Emergency Budget included a reduction of capital expenditure across Auckland Council, including a reduction in expenditure through the city centre targeted rate investment portfolio.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The infrastructure projects within the city centre targeted rate portfolio are at varying stages of the project lifecycle, from pre-business case to construction.

15.     The Emergency Budget prioritised the continuation and completion of projects already in the construction phase. Delaying or deferring these projects would have presented risks to health and safety and contractual commitments as well as impacts on stakeholders if they were deferred. Some projects also have critical interdependencies that could require costly rework in the future if timeframes are not met.

16.     A summary of the revised delivery programme in the context of the Emergency Budget and the impacts of COVID-19 is provided below.

·    Karangahape Road Enhancements - construction is currently progressing in several locations along the street and will continue through quarter two of 2021. Sections of the cycleway from Ponsonby Road to Day Street and Symonds Street to Upper Queen Street have been opened to the public following the substantial completion of these stages.

·    Quay Street Enhancement – construction is currently progressing in several locations along the street and will continue through quarter two of 2021, sections of the project area have been opened to the public. These works are being delivered as part of the Downtown Infrastructure Development Programme.

·    Britomart Streetscapes – this funding is being used to support the delivery of a programme of streetscape upgrade works in the Britomart Precinct. Construction is currently progressing on Galway Street, between Commerce Street and Gore Street, and will continue through quarter four of 2020. Construction is also progressing on both Tyler and Galway Streets, between Lower Queen Street and Commerce Street, and will continue into 2021. These works are being delivered as part of the Downtown Infrastructure Development Programme and the City Rail Link respectively.

·    Lower Queen Street Upgrade – construction on the urban realm improvements to Lower Queen Street is underway and will continue through to the end of 2020. These works are being delivered as part of the City Rail Link.

·    Albert Street Upgrade – construction of the urban realm improvements to Albert Street is currently progressing in several locations between Quay Street and Wyndham Street, and will continue through to the end of 2020. Several sections of the project area are substantively complete and are open to the public.

 

·    Federal Street Upgrade Stage 2 – Mayoral Drive to Wellesley Street – the project’s Detailed Design is complete, and a physical works tender package has been compiled. An Expressions of Interest process was completed in April 2020 which identified four potential physical works tenderers. Construction is now planned to commence in early 2021, to align with the construction of the Auckland City Mission HomeGround development and the closure of the Albert Street and Wellesley Street intersection. The project’s construction is expected to conclude in late 2021.

·    Myers Park Underpass – The Preliminary Design was completed in July 2020. On 19 August 2020 the Waitematā Local Board approved a renewals budget contribution of $100,000 towards the project in Financial Year 2021 (resolution WTM/2020/185). This contribution, in addition to city centre targeted rate budget, will enable the completion of the Detailed Design within the current financial year. The physical works have been deferred until Financial Year 2022.

·    Nelson Street Slip Lane – Placemaking Improvements – the current phase of Concept Design and Business Case was completed in June 2020, concluding existing contractual commitments. The next phase of design development is planned to commence in Financial Year 2022 and construction the following financial year.

·    Federal Street Stages 3 and 4 – Victoria Street to Fanshawe Street – the project’s Concept Design was completed in July 2020.  The next phase of design development is planned to commence in Financial Year 2022.

·    Service Lane Programme – this funding will be used to develop and deliver a programme of works along Mills Lane and Exchange Lane. The programme has interfaces with adjacent private developments. One such development has reconsidered their timing in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. The programme will continue to investigate the opportunity to integrate works with the planned private developments in the area.

·    High Street Streetscapes – delivery of the Access for Everyone Concept Pilot was completed in May 2020.The installed works will continue to be monitored through 2021, and the insights gathered will be used to support the Business Case for the permanent works, now scheduled to commence in Financial Year 2022.

·    Hobson Street Upgrade (Victoria Street to Wellesley Street) – the project has been delayed following the New Zealand International Convention Centre fire in October 2019. Coordination will continue with New Zealand International Convention Centre development.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The city centre targeted rate portfolio supports the delivery of the environmental outcomes detailed in the City Centre Masterplan, promoting a green and sustainable city centre. This occurs at a project level, through elements such as water sensitive design and planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     Projects in the city centre targeted rate portfolio are being delivered by several council group or council-funded organisations, including Auckland Council, Auckland Transport and City Rail Link Limited.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The city centre targeted rate area falls within the Waitematā Local Board area.

20.     The Waitematā Local Board received an update on the impact of the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 on the Development Programme Office city centre portfolio at its workshop on 11 August 2020.

21.     On 19 August 2020 the Waitematā Local Board allocated $100,000 in funding from its 2020/2021 Community Facilities work programme to support the progression of the Myers Park Underpass Detailed Design (resolution WTM/2020/185). This contribution, in combination with an allocation from the city centre targeted rate investment portfolio, has allowed the design to be completed in the current financial year.

22.     The chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board is a member of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement .

23.     Māori outcomes delivered by the city centre targeted rate portfolio are managed at the project level, with each project responsible for delivering on their individual outcomes.

24.     The city centre targeted rate is being used to contribute to Māori outcomes by enabling kaitiakitanga (environmental guardianship) and highlighting our unique cultural heritage by incorporating Māori design elements.

25.     Mana whenua consultation occurs as part of the development and delivery of all city centre projects, on a project by project basis, via the monthly Infrastructure and Environmental Services mana whenua Hui and other project specific hui.

26.     A Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei representative is a member of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     Funding has been allocated through the Emergency Budget 2020/2021 process to support the delivery of the city centre targeted rate portfolio in accordance with the above summary. Staff will present the revised city centre targeted rate investment portfolio to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board in September 2020.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     The uncertainty surrounding the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic presents a risk to the delivery of the projects in the city centre targeted rate portfolio. Projects will continue to follow their individual health and safety plans for working under the various alert level conditions.

29.     The COVID-19 lockdown has resulted in unbudgeted cost increases across all projects currently under construction, with additional work required to shut-down the sites and remobilise. These unbudgeted costs have put additional pressure on both project and organisational budgets.

30.     The suspension of construction due to the Alert Level-4 lockdown, and lower productivity working at Alert Levels 2 and 3, mean that the completion dates for many projects have been impacted. The ability to mitigate the impact to the construction programme varies depending on the individual circumstances of each project.

31.     The delay in construction completion will prolong the impact to city centre businesses, residents, workers and visitors. Auckland Council will continue to support businesses through the periods of disruption with the implementation of specifically catered development response programmes which are being led by the relevant project teams. These programmes provide business support and mentoring, activate spaces, encourage clear wayfinding and promote local businesses.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board will continue to receive updates of the city centre targeted rate projects.

33.     Staff will present the revised city centre targeted rate investment portfolio to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board in September 2020 as part of the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 process.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

City Centre Targeted Rate delivery portfolio update

19

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Brown – Programme Analyst, Development Programme Office

Authorisers

Oliver Smith – Manager Programme Delivery, Development Programme Office

John Dunshea – Lead Officer Support

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 

Draft standing orders

File No.: CP2020/11931

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider and adopt standing orders that will govern future meetings of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland City Centre Advisory Board (formerly “CBD Advisory Board”) was established in the 2005/2006 financial year by the former Auckland City Council to advise on the spend of the city centre targeted rate.

3.       The board also provides advice on council’s strategies, policies, plans, bylaws and programmes in relation to city centre development, as well as key issues and opportunities to support city centre outcomes. The board considers its advice at formal meetings and at workshops.

4.       Standing orders are the procedural rules for conducting a meeting.  When a body adopts standing orders the members of the body are agreeing the rules they want to apply to the conduct of their meetings.  This adds clarity for all members about the procedure at meetings. Once a body adopts standing orders it is incumbent on all members to comply with them (or agree to change them).

5.       Standing orders have been drafted to outline how the board operates and govern the conduct of meetings and subcommittees, including requirements for a quorum at meetings and voting.

6.       The draft standing orders have been based on:

(i)         typical meeting standing orders, in particular Auckland Council standing orders

(ii)        understandings staff have of how ACCAB members wish to conduct their meetings

(iii)       the terms of reference set by Auckland Council (standing orders cannot be inconsistent with these)

(iv)       any applicable legislative requirements.

7.       Standing orders are recommended to aid transparency and to support good governance particularly in relation to the board’s advice on how the targeted rate is spent.

8.       In addition, standing orders will help to ensure good meeting protocols are in place to support contribution from all members of the board and especially as virtual meetings may continue to be required from time to time over the coming year.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      adopt standing orders to govern the conduct of future board meetings.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft standing orders

37

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Carol Hayward - Principal Advisor Panels

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor - Democracy Services

Authorisers

Rose Leonard – Acting General Manager Democracy Services

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 


 


 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 

Responses to homelessness in the city centre

File No.: CP2020/11906

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide updates on:

·    the implementation of the assertive outreach pilot

·    issues relating to the street community on Karangahape Road

·    the Inner-City Auckland Homelessness Initiative and city centre needs assessment.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an update to the matters discussed at the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board’s meeting on 29 July 2020.

3.       Auckland City Mission and Lifewise have expanded rough sleeper street outreach services in the city centre, enabled by support from the city centre targeted rate.

4.       These assertive outreach services proved invaluable during the COVID-19 response which began in March 2020. Between 23 March and 30 April 2020, these two organisations supported more than 200 people into emergency accommodation, predominantly people from the city centre who were sleeping rough or without suitable shelter.

5.       Since May 2020, there has been an increase in antisocial behaviour associated with the street community who have gathered on Karangahape Road. Staff are participating in cross-sectoral initiatives to support the local business community to respond to these challenges.

6.       A report on the regional cross-sectoral homelessness plan and Auckland Council’s role in advancing the objectives of the cross-sectoral plan was presented to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) committee on 20 August 2020.

7.       Auckland Council’s Community and Social Policy team will attend the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board’s meeting to summarise the presentation to PACE committee and answer any questions from the advisory board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the updates on the implementation of the assertive outreach pilot, issues relating to the street community on Karangahape Road and the Inner-City Auckland Homelessness Initiative and city centre needs assessment.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Auckland City Mission and Lifewise have expanded rough sleeper street outreach services in the city centre, enabled by support from the city centre targeted rate.

9.       These assertive outreach services proved invaluable during the COVID-19 response which began in March 2020. Between 23 March and 30 April 2020, these two organisations supported more than 200 people into emergency accommodation, predominantly people from the city centre who were sleeping rough or without suitable shelter.

10.     Since May 2020, there has been an increasing amount of antisocial behaviour associated with the street community who have gathered on Karangahape Road. Staff are participating in cross-sectoral initiatives to support the local business community to respond to these challenges.

11.     A report on the regional cross-sectoral homelessness plan and Auckland Council’s role in advancing the objectives of the cross-sectoral plan will be presented to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) committee on 20 August 2020 (link to report).

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Assertive Outreach

12.     In August 2019, the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board resolved to support the assertive outreach pilot project by Auckland City Mission and Lifewise, totalling $600,000 over two years. Following the advisory board’s endorsement, the funding was approved by the Finance and Performance Committee, and the grants were issued to Auckland City Mission and Lifewise in November 2019. The pilot project will run for 2020 and 2021.

13.     Since November 2019, the two organisations have established a strong partnership and prepared a Memorandum of Understanding to guide their work together and support safe and appropriate information sharing processes. A summary of the first six months of the pilot is provided in Attachment A.

14.     Auckland City Mission’s outreach team now includes a team leader, three full-time outreach workers and a full-time mental health nurse. Plans to recruit for an alcohol and drug outreach worker remain but have been delayed by COVID-19.

15.     Lifewise have established the new Street Reach team operating out of Merge Café on Karangahape Road. The peer support workers appointed to this team are people with lived experience of homelessness who have previously been involved in the Merge Community peer support volunteer programme.

16.     Auckland Council relied heavily on the outreach teams and their respective housing and support services during the COVID-19 response from March to May 2020, and these strengthened outreach teams made a big difference to the capacity to support rough sleepers in the city centre as Auckland headed into Alert Level 4 lockdown.

17.     One of the many challenges with outreach work is the availability of appropriate emergency or transitional housing into which to refer those who are seeking shelter. One of the ‘silver linings’ of the COVID-19 response was a large increase in the supply of emergency accommodation in motels funded by the Ministry of Social Development and the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development. Lifewise and Auckland City Mission supported more than 200 individuals into emergency motel accommodation in the first five weeks of lockdown.

18.     Representatives from Auckland City Mission and Lifewise will attend the advisory board meeting and be available to answer questions.

Issues on Karangahape Road

19.     As discussed at the July 2020 advisory board meeting, there has been an increase in antisocial behaviour associated with a new street community on Karangahape Road. Although most of the individuals concerned currently have emergency or other housing, the group is comprised of people with lived experience of homelessness and have the appearance of sleeping rough.

20.     The challenge we are currently seeing on Karangahape Road is unusual. In the past, Karangahape Road has typically been very welcoming and tolerant of street whānau, and with the exception of a small number of individuals, have co-existed well. Unfortunately, with changes to the composition and behaviour of the street whānau since COVID-19, there has been a marked increase in antisocial behaviour and conflict with local residents and businesses. There is also a perception that this group of individuals is ‘clustered’ in one section of Karangahape Road rather than distributed along the length of the road, due to displacement by the various construction projects.

21.     Karangahape Road has been the focus of significant effort over the last three of months, by a variety of parties. Co-ordinated by the Karangahape Road Business Association with support from the council’s city centre safety project manager, there are regular operational safety meetings to ensure a continued and intensive focus and that all parties are working collaboratively. These include the New Zealand Police, the housing and outreach providers (Lifewise, Auckland City Mission), the recently re-introduced Māori Wardens, and other local community partners. Representatives from the health services are also connected into this work.

22.     At the July 202 Auckland City Centre Advisory Board meeting, staff proposed that a portion of the city centre targeted rate fund made available to support the city centre to respond to the impacts of COVID-19 be allocated to support initiatives to address antisocial behaviour on Karangahape Road. The board resolved to request staff to report back to the next meeting on the proposed Safe and welcoming spaces allocation of $50,000 (Resolution number CEN/2020/24).

23.     Following discussion with the Karangahape Road Business Association and other key stakeholders, staff are exploring alternative funding sources to support responses to the antisocial behaviour issues on Karangahape Road, so the proposed city centre targeted rate contribution is no longer needed for this purpose. 

City centre needs assessment

24.     A memo providing an update regarding the planned city centre needs assessment as part of the Inner-City Auckland Homelessness Initiative was provided to the board’s July 2020 meeting (Attachment B).

25.     Auckland Council’s Community and Social Policy team presented to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) committee on 20 August 2020 about the regional cross-sectoral plan to make homelessness rare, brief and non-recurring and Auckland Council’s role in advancing this plan. The report to PACE committee is available online[1].

26.     Community and Social Policy will be present at the advisory board meeting to answer questions about the plan and the implications for the city centre.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     A key driver of homelessness in Auckland is housing supply and affordability, which may be worsened by the impacts of climate change on the Auckland housing stock.

28.     People living without shelter are likely to be more exposed to the impacts of climate change such as increases in the number of hot days and the frequency of extreme rainfall. Addressing homelessness will increase the resilience of those currently living without shelter.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     Arts, Community and Events worked in collaboration with the Development Programme Office and Community and Social Policy in the preparation of this advice and to respond to issues and opportunities relating to homelessness or rough sleeping.

30.     Issues and initiatives relating to homelessness in the city centre inform the Auckland Council Implementation Plan and align to Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa, the regional cross-sectoral homelessness plan for Auckland.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     The Waitematā Local Board area contains the largest proportion of rough sleepers in the Auckland region, with a particular focus in the city centre. The local board continues to be active in its responsiveness to emerging needs and issues of Waitemata’s homeless community and provides financial support for locally driven initiatives in its annual Arts, Community and Events work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     Māori are disproportionately affected by homelessness and have the second highest rate of homelessness, after Pacific peoples. In the 2013 census, 32 percent of the homeless population identified as Māori and more than 40 percent of the social housing register identify as Māori.

33.     The council continues to engage with Māori through our relationships with central government, iwi, non-governmental organisations and other bodies (such as Te Matapihi) to ensure responsiveness to Māori needs and aspirations.

34.     In the city centre, the council works in partnership with a range of non-government partners to respond to the impacts of homelessness, including the Māori Wardens and Āwhina Mai Tātou Katoa, a kaupapa Māori arts collective based in Pitt Street.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     There are no new financial implications associated with this advice.

36.     The city centre targeted rate contribution to assertive outreach service proposals from the Auckland City Mission and Lifewise, totalling $600,000 over the 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years, was endorsed by the board at its 28 August 2019 meeting (Resolution number CEN/2019/40).

37.     Funding agreements with Auckland City Mission and Lifewise are in place, and the second annual instalment is committed to be paid to the recipients in November 2020. A budget of $300,000 is available in the current financial year 2020/2021 to meet this commitment.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     There are no specific risks associated with this update.

39.     The sector’s response to homelessness is being stretched by the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The council is supporting a collaborative cross-sectoral approach and playing a facilitative role in progressing the regional cross-sectoral plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The next update to the advisory board on the impact of the assertive outreach pilot is due in February 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Assertive Outreach Report: Auckland City Mission & Lifewise, 1 November 2019 to 30 April 2020

57

b

Update on the Inner-City Auckland Homelessness Initiative (ICAHI) Needs Assessment

77

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Natalie Hansby – Manager Development Response, Development Programme Office

Christine Olsen – Community Empowerrment Manager, Arts, Community and Events

Authoriser

John Dunshea – Lead Officer Support

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 


 


 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 

Update on City Centre Activation Programme

File No.: CP2020/12091

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report on the outcomes of the city centre activation programme in 2019/2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The city centre activation programme represents a collection of complementary techniques and tools to deliver activation programming and physical interventions across the city centre.

3.       The programme is guided by the Auckland Plan, the City Centre Masterplan, and area and precinct plans. The objectives the activation programme contribute to:

·    participation – to promote and enable place activation that engages, empowers and mobilises people in the city centre

·    responding to change – to support the people of the city centre and its economy during a period of significant development and growth

·    collaboration – to support new and existing strategic delivery initiatives by maximising partnerships and collaborations.

4.       The activation programme is achieved using a range of place activation tools including physical interventions, digital technology, event programming, partnerships and facilitation.

5.       This report provides the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board with a summary of expenditure and outcomes for the 2019/2020 financial year, and the strategic framework for 2020/2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the city centre activation programme report for 2019/2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The city centre place activation strategy was created in 2015 to foster meaningful and attractive places that reflect the needs of the people of the city centre, reflect local character, and support the city centre through change. The strategy gave rise to an activation programme that:

·        supports citizens in being stewards and champion of their places

·        helps create people-centric places through a mix of collaborative activations and design influenced interventions

·        facilitates and incentivises partnerships to enhance the city centre experience, providing opportunities to share ideas, resources and expertise, and in doing so leverage greater value

·        establishes and embeds tactical urbanism approaches to transformation, to inform and complement infrastructure projects

·        supports a creative, proactive approach to disruption management during construction so the city centre remains a vital and enjoyable place to live, work, play, visit and do business.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

City centre activation programme 2019-2020

7.       Highlights of the 2019/2020 activation programme include contributions to:

·        Matariki celebrations – June and July 2019: including the Piki Toi exhibition, Māori Film Festival and Busting Moves events at Ellen Melville Centre, and four guided hikoi celebrating Toi-Taonga ki Tāmaki.

·        Walking in Trees – August to September 2019: a free outdoor art project which saw a scaffolding staircase and platform constructed in Albert Park to allow people to connect with the majestic Himalayan cedar tree in Albert Park, illuminating the park’s rich history.

·        Artweek Auckland – October 2019: in collaboration with Heart of the City, the Late Night Art events, performances and activations formed part of the weeklong Artweek celebrations. Highlights included projections on the Saint James Theatre wall, lightbox exhibitions in Bledisloe Lane, DJ and opera performances in Freyberg Place and the Changing Lanes installations.

·        Haten Kohro – February 2020: an authentic Japanese classical performance featuring a heavy metal circus orchestra, enjoyed by hundreds of people at Freyberg Place.

·        Waitui Ātea – March to July 2020: an exhibition at the Central City Library to highlight the rich cultures of the Pacific.

·        Auckland Pride Festival – February 2020: an inclusive and diverse festival reflecting the breadth of Tamaki Makaurau’s queer communities and featuring the Queer Pavilion public programme in Albert Park.

8.       Staff also worked to establish a development response approach in significant infrastructure projects. While the development response programmes for Karangahape Road streetscapes upgrade and the Downtown Programme were funded through the infrastructure project budgets, the activation programme supported the establishment of common approaches and steps towards a best practice guide for future projects.

9.       The first half of 2020 was significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in the postponement or cancellation of numerous events and activities. During the lockdown period March to May 2020, staff led a cross-sectoral online programme for ‘Developing Resilience’, sharing placemaking and activation practices and fostering collaboration and innovation across the sector.

10.     Total expenditure for the city centre activation programme in the twelve months of the 2019-2020 financial year was $666,731, from a budget of $995,000. City centre targeted rate funding allocated to planned activities remained unspent and has been carried forward to be used in future years.


 

11.     Expenditure within the activation programme for the full financial year is summarised in Figure 1, and more detail is included in Attachment A.

Figure 1: City centre activation programme expenditure for 2019/2020

 

City centre activation programme 2020/2021

12.     As the city centre evolves in response to the impacts of COVID-19 and significant development in recent years, there is an opportunity to review the contribution of the activation programme to the experience of the city centre.

13.     Staff are working to update the strategic framework for the activation programme and a revised annual plan for 2020/2021 which reflects the current needs and opportunities in the city centre.

14.     The draft strategic framework for the city centre activation programme from 2020/2021 is attached as Attachment B. The strategic intents of the programme align to the Auckland Plan 2050, the objectives of the city centre targeted rate, and the draft Waitematā Local Board Plan 2020.

15.     An additional strategic intention for the 2020/2021 financial year seeks to support the city centre to respond to the impacts of COVID-19. This relates in particular to fostering a vibrant city centre and driving visitation by working with the two local business associations on initiatives across the city centre such as activating local businesses and addressing vacant storefronts.

16.     Staff are currently seeking informal feedback on the draft framework from a range of stakeholders. Auckland City Centre Advisory Board members are welcome to share any feedback or questions about the draft framework via email to Natalie.hansby@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz   

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     There are no significant climate impacts associated with this programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     Development and delivery of the city centre activation programme is in collaboration with related council departments and council-controlled organisations including Arts, Community and Events, Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development, Regional Facilities Auckland, and Panuku Development Auckland to avoid duplication and leverage collaborative approaches.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     Auckland’s city centre falls within the boundaries of the Waitematā Local Board, and the activation programme contributes to the local board’s key outcomes of[2]:

·    inclusive communities that are vibrant, healthy and connected

·    attractive and versatile public places that meet our communities’ needs

·    a high-quality built environment that embraces our heritage.

20.     The local board also supports arts, culture and placemaking activities within the board area. The activation team works closely with Arts, Community and Events to ensure there is no duplication and that work programmes are complementary

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     Māori outcomes are a key focus area of the activation programme, which is developed in partnership with the Māori design leads in the Auckland Design Office. Work to date has particularly focused on celebrating Māori arts and culture.

22.     Key contributions in the first half of 2020 are featured on pages six to nine of Attachment A, including the Waitui Ātea: Saltwater Realm Exhibition at the Central City Library, learning from disaster resilient Māori communities in the Developing Resilience programme, Māori Women Changing History as part of the Auckland Pride Festival, and the Reclamation performance at Basement Theatre. Two additional initiatives were planned for the Matariki Festival in June but were cancelled due to COVID-19.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The total proposed allocation in the city centre targeted rate portfolio budget for city centre activation in 2020/2021 is $850,000. This is in addition to the $300,000 allocated for tactical urbanism Initiatives.

24.     The underspend from 2019/2020 has been allocated across future years starting in 2021/2022.

25.     Development response initiatives are, for the most part, funded through the project budget for the relevant development project for example Karangahape Road streetscapes upgrade, or the City Rail Link construction sites.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     Continued support for events and activations have been identified as a key enabler for the city centre to respond to the impacts of COVID-19 by fostering a vibrant and welcoming city centre and giving people reasons to visit. Any reduction in financial support for the programme would result in a reduction in delivery and thereby lessen support for city centre recovery.

27.     Maintenance of city centre targeted rate support for activation is particularly important in the context of reduced funding available for other aligned council groups who have previously programmed or supported arts and culture-related activity in the city centre, such as Regional Facilities Auckland.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Staff will progress the refinement and implementation of the 2020/2021 activation programme and provide a progress update to the advisory board in November 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Activation programme expenditure 2019-2020

87

b

City centre activation programme draft framework FY21

89

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Barbara Holloway – Team Leader, City Centre Place Activation

Natalie Hansby – Development Response Manager, Development Programme Office

Authoriser

John Dunshea – Lead Officer Support

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 


 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 

Information report: Update on the Waihorotiu Queen Street Valley Access for Everyone pilot, Forward work programme/progress on items and memoranda 

File No.: CP2020/12046

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board on the following matters:

·    Waihorotiu Queen Street Valley Access for Everyone pilot

·    Forward work programme/progress on items

·    Information circulated to members via memoranda.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The information report is to inform the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board of matters that are in progress and planned across the council group.

Waihorotiu Queen Street Valley Access for Everyone pilot

3.       To update the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board on progress of the Waihorotiu Queen Street Valley Access for Everyone pilot (Attachment A).

Forward work programme/progress on items

4.       To update on progress on issues considered by the board and its forward work programme (Attachment B).

Information circulated to members via memoranda

5.       The following information has been circulated to members (Attachments C and D).

Date

Subject

24/08/2020

Downtown Programme Eastern lane closure update

24/08/2020

City centre Innovating Streets for People Funding Applications update

 

6.       Staff will be available to answer questions at the meeting.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the information report: Waihorotiu Queen Street Valley Access for Everyone pilot, Forward work programme/progress on items and Information circulated to members via memoranda.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waihorotiu Queen Street Valley Access for Everyone pilot

93

b

Forward work programme

95

c

Downtown Programme Eastern lane closure

105

d

Innovating Streets applications update

107

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tam White - Senior Governance and Relationship Advisor

Authoriser

John Dunshea – Lead Officer Support

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 


 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 


 


 



Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 



Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 


 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

31 August 2020

 

 


 


 

    

    



[1]https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2020/08/PAC_20200820_AGN_10031_AT.htm#PDF2_ReportName_73782

[2] Waitemata Local Board Plan 2017