I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 20 August 2020

10.00am

This meeting will be held via Skype and can be viewed on the Auckland Council website

https://councillive.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

 

 

Kōmiti Whakarite Pārae, Mahi Toi, Hapori, Kaupapa

Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Alf Filipaina

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

IMSB Member Tony Kake

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Pippa Coom

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr John Watson

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Cr Paul Young

 

Cr Shane Henderson

 

 

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

IMSB Member Mr Terrence Hohneck

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

Maea Petherick

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

17 August 2020

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 8136

Email: maea.petherick@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with community, social and cultural activities. The committee will establish an annual work programme outlining key focus areas in line with its key responsibilities, which include:

 

·         The Southern Initiative and The Western Initiative

·         sports and recreation, including parks and reserves

·         community facilities and community services

·         acquisition of property relating to the committee’s responsibilities and in accordance with the LTP

·         grants for regional events, arts and cultural and heritage organisations, indoor sports and leisure and for the regional community development programme

·         economic development

·         arts and culture

·         community safety

·         community engagement

·         community development

·         homelessness

·         working with the six demographic advisory panels to give visibility to the issues important to their communities and help effect change

·         working with the Auckland Domain Committee to give visibility to the issues important to the Domain and to help effect change.

 

Powers

 

(i)         All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities, including:

(a)        approval of a submission to an external body

(b)        establishment of working parties or steering groups.

(ii)        The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iii)       If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Planning Committee and/or the Environment and Climate Change Committee, then the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committee(s). For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of these committees for decisions.

(iv)       The committee does not have:

(a)        the power to establish subcommittees

(b)        powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2).

 

 

 


 

 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·           Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·           Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·           Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·           In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·           The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·           However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·           All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·           Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·           Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·           All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·           Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·           Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·           Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          7

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

8          Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation 2020/2021                                                   9

9          Regional Arts and Culture grant allocation: Round two 2019/2020
                                                                                                                                    
109

10        ACE regional contestable grants priorities FY 20/21                                            119

11        Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme                                              127

12        Community Access Scheme Review - extension to current funding agreements 139

13        Cultural Intiatives Fund - grant recommendations for 2020/2021                        149

14        Implementing a cross-sectoral approach to homelessness                                191

15        I Am Auckland Implementation and Evaluation Annual Update and COVID-19 Impacts                                                                                                                        217

16        Open space acquisition 2019/20                                                                              319

17        Regional Parks Management Plan - approval to notify intent to prepare new plan 325

18        Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework                                    391

19        Hibiscus Coast Youth Centre funding                                                                     413

20        Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee Forward Work Programme    421

21        Summary of Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee Information - updates, memos and briefings - 20 August 2020                                                                  431  

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 11 June 2020, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

Regional Event Fund Grants Allocation 2020/2021

File No.: CP2020/11229

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve grant allocations for the 2020/2021 Regional Event Grant Programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Regional Event Grants Programme 2020/2021 has a proposed budget allocation of $400,000. This is reduced from $600,000 in 2019/2020 due to the impacts of COVID-19 and the Emergency Budget allocations.

3.       The two annual funding rounds held in recent years have been combined into one round for the 2020/2021 year.

4.       Staff received 36 applications totalling $871,976 and have assessed them using priorities in the events policy and recommend allocating grants to 32 of the applications totalling $400,000.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve the following funding allocations for the 2020/2021 Regional Events Grant Programme:

Applicant

Event

Recommended funding allocation

Auckland Pride Festival Inc

Auckland Pride Festival

25,000

Athletics New Zealand (Incorporated)

Sir Graeme Douglas International Track & Field Championships 2021

5,000

Quantum Events

Swim the Shore (formally applied for and named King of the Bays)

6,000

Eventing Auckland Inc

Puhinui International Horse Trials

15,000

The Preparatory Committee of New Zealand Taiwan Day Trust

New Zealand Taiwan Day 2020

10,000

Footy For All Charitable Trust

National Communities Football Cup (NCFC) 2020

17,500

The Auckland Children's Christmas Parade Trust

Farmers Santa Parade

15,000

Nga Kaihoe o Aotearoa (Waka Ama New Zealand) Incorporated

Takapuna Beach Cup 2021

9,000

The New Zealand Ukulele Trust

The New Zealand Ukulele Festival

12,500

Interacting

InterACT 2021!

14,000

YMCA North

Walk the Line 2021

4,000

Crackerjack Promotions Limited

Auckland International Buskers Festival

33,000

Auckland Anniversary Regatta Incorporated

Auckland Anniversary Day Regatta

15,000

Mahurangi Action Incorporated

Mahurangi Regatta

4,000

New Zealand AIDS Foundation

Ending HIV Big Gay Out

15,000

North Harbour Hockey Association Incorporated

Rankin Cup & India Shield Tournament

4,000

New Zealand Dance Festival Trust

Tempo Dance Festival #GoingDigital 2020

10,000

Total Sport

The Partners Life DUAL

7,500

Total Sport

The Coastal Challenge

7,500

Total Sport

XTERRA Auckland Trail Run / Walk Series

7,500

Show Jumping Waitemata

Show Jumping Waitemata World Cup Festival

10,000

New Zealand Rugby League Incorporated

National Secondary Schools Tournament 2021

12,000

Pacific Music Awards Trust

2021 Pacific Music Awards

20,000

Aktive - Sport and Recreation Auckland

Iwi of Origin 2021

15,000

Aktive - Sport and Recreation Auckland

Mauri Toa - Mau Rakau Wānanga events

4,000

Aktive - Sport and Recreation Auckland

M2M

10,000

Aktive - Sport and Recreation Auckland

Te Whare Tapere o Matariki

5,000

Waiheke Jazz, Art & Music Festival

Waiheke Jazz, Art & Music Festival 2021

7,500

SMC Events on behalf of the Polyfest Trust

ASB Polyfest

55,000

New Zealand Eid Day Trust

NZ Eid Day - Eid Al Fitr 2021

10,000

Condor Rugby Football Club Incorporated

NZ Secondary Schools National Condor Sevens

10,000

Te Tohu Taakaro o Aotearoa Charitable Trust

Aotearoa Māori Sports Awards 2020

5,000

Total

$400,000

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The 2020/2021 Emergency Budget established an Arts, Community and Events regional grants budget of $1,636,976. From this, it is recommended that $400,000 be allocated to fund externally organised regional events through a contestable grants scheme.

6.       The opening of the Regional Event Fund grant round for applications this year was postponed due to the delayed adoption of the Emergency Budget. Advice from Finance and Business Performance was that the grant round should only be opened once the impact of budget changes was confirmed and the Emergency Budget approved.

7.       Applications opened on 17 July 2020 and closed 28 July 2020. The closing date was set to enable grant decisions to be confirmed at the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee meeting on 20 August 2020. This was necessary to ensure the ability to consider applications for events from September 2020 onwards that had previously received funding.

8.       A number of applicants were unable to complete their submissions within this short timeframe and it was necessary to provide them with an extension.  We believe all potential applicants we were aware of were provided an opportunity to make a submission if desired.

9.       Some events that have received grants in previous years have elected not to hold their event in the current year due to actual or potential COVID-19 associated impacts.  Reasons for this include difficulty in confirming funding, increased risk of the event being unable to be held, additional complexity in organising the event and reduced availability of volunteer time.

10.     Staff received 36 applications (Attachment A) for the sole round this year totaling $871,976. This compares with 46 applications totalling $1,201,449 for the two rounds held in 2019/2020 (excluding one application for $1,300,000).

11.     In 2018/2019, the Community Development and Safety Committee approved $55,000 per annum multi-year regional event funding for ASB Polyfest until 2020/2021 (COM/2018/22), which includes an allocation from this funding round for 2020/2021 as part of the funding agreement.This has been included in the schedule of applications considered for this report.

12.     In 2019/2020, the Community Development and Safety Committee approved $40,000 per annum multi-year regional event funding for Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park until 2021/2022 (COM/2019/47), which also includes an allocation from this funding round for 2020/2021 as part of the funding agreement.  The organisers of the event have advised that it will not be held in December 2020 but is still currently planned for 2021.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Staff assessed each application against regional event funding criteria outlined in the policy (Attachment B).

14.     Each application has been assigned an overall score as an initial guide to establish where funding might be prioritised (Attachment C).

15.     Scores reflect how well the events align with the following criteria, with percentages indicating the weighting applied to each area:

·    Supports key priorities - 12 per cent.

·    Delivers desired impacts - 12 per cent.

·    Expands the variety or range of events on offer - 12 per cent.

·    Level of positive community benefits generated - 10 per cent.

·    Amount of community support, involvement and/or active partnerships - 12 per cent.

·    How effectively the event was run in the past or how well planned - 12 per cent.

·    Other considerations as outlined in the policy - 12 per cent.

·    Alignment with Māori priority - eight per cent.

·    Alignment with youth priority - eight per cent.


 

16.     Staff also considered the event budget, plans, organiser experience, accessibility, previous event outcomes, and whether the event connected with key Auckland occasions such as Matariki, or Auckland Anniversary weekend and whether the applicant had received significant other funding from the council group for the same event.

17.     In the current year, grants programmes will also be informed by Our Strategy 2022: Kia Manawaroa Tātou -Together we can rise to the challenge. Grants specifically support the goal:

Focus on communities that need us most:

-     Use our resources wisely to better serve our communities that need us most

-     Back communities, Māori, and other providers to deliver what is needed

18.     Within the portfolio of funded events, many are free/low cost to attend and deliver to a range of Auckland’s diverse communities and are accessible to those in need.

19.     Events deliver on a range of outcomes, and benefit communities through building and maintaining a sense of place and connection which is fundamental to wellbeing and supports recovery.  The return of regular annual events is also a sign of positive change as communities return to a sense of normality and use events to build resilience.

20.     Maintaining funding to events assists with the economic recovery of businesses in the events and associated sectors, many of which have been facing a major downturn in activity.

21.     During the lockdown period, the Arts, Community and Events department (ACE) surveyed community organisations, arts and venues partners from across the Auckland region to gather insights and data on the impacts of COVID-19.  The top three challenges or concerns as reported by community organisations overall were:

·    Meeting increased need in the community

·    Coping with changes in the funding environment/reduction in funding streams

·    Ensuring organisations can reach the most vulnerable populations with services they need.

22.     Reflecting this feedback, consideration has been placed towards maintaining levels of funding at previous levels where applications continue to support this.     

23.     The events recommended for funding include a balance in regional location and in representation of sporting, arts and cultural themes.

24.     Of the thirty-two events recommended for funding, sixteen are sports related and sixteen relate to arts and culture.

25.     The geographic spread of applications recommended for funding is shown below:

26.     The recommended funding allocations are based on the scores from assessment against policy criteria, consideration of the additional factors and comments from the review panel.

Applications recommended for funding

27.     Staff recommend 32 events to be approved for funding and four to be declined.

28.     Some applications align with priorities for event funding, as well as other council grant funds such as arts and culture and sport and recreation.

29.     Staff considered overlaps to ensure a coordinated approach is taken to the overall provision of council funding to these events. In some situations, grants will be provided from one grant fund, and in others the total funding may be shared between two or more grant funds.

30.     The allocation proposed for The Farmers Santa Parade of $15,000 supplements $45,000 which has already been established as a non-contestable dedicated budget and maintained in the Emergency Budget. The $15,000 grant represents the level of contestable funding that was provided in the 2018/2019 and 2019/2020 years and has been recommended for funding again this year.  Consideration will be given to consolidating these budgets into one amount in the upcoming long-term plan to ensure consistency and transparency of decision making in future years.

31.     Table One outlines the events that are recommended to be approved, including funding amount and their alignment with key priorities as outlined in the funding criteria.

Table One: Events recommended for funding and strategic alignment

Event

Alignment with key priorities

Requested funding

Recommended funding

Auckland Pride Festival

Diverse Communities

50,000

25,000

Sir Graeme Douglas International Track & Field Championships 2021

Sport, celebration of excellence

15,000

5,000

Swim the Shore

Sport, distinctive event

25,000

6,000

Puhinui International Horse Trials

Sport, celebration of excellence

30,000

15,000

New Zealand Taiwan Day 2020

Cultural festival

20,000

10,000

National Communities Football Cup (NCFC) 2020

Diverse Communities, sport.

45,000

17,500

Farmers Santa Parade

Christmas, families and children

65,000

15,000

Takapuna Beach Cup 2021

Māori, Pasifika, youth, sport, celebration of excellence

20,000

9,000

The New Zealand Ukulele Festival

Children and youth

18,976

12,500

InterACT 2021!

Youth, Diverse Communities

22,000

14,000

Walk the Line 2021

Youth, celebration of excellence

15,000

4,000

Auckland International Buskers Festival

Anniversary weekend

33,000

33,000

Auckland Anniversary Day Regatta

Anniversary weekend

17,000

15,000

Mahurangi Regatta

Anniversary weekend

6,000

4,000

Ending HIV Big Gay Out

Diverse Communities

40,000

15,000

Rankin Cup & India Shield Tournament

Youth, sport, celebration of excellence

5,000

4,000

Tempo Dance Festival #GoingDigital 2020

Arts, free events

25,000

10,000

The Partners Life DUAL

Sport, distinctive event

25,000

7,500

The Coastal Challenge

Sport, distinctive event

15,000

7,500

XTERRA Auckland Trail Run / Walk Series

Sport, distinctive event

15,000

7,500

Show Jumping Waitemata World Cup Festival

Sport, celebration of excellence

15,000

10,000

National Secondary Schools Tournament 2021

Māori, Pasifika, youth, sport, celebration of excellence

40,000

12,000

2021 Pacific Music Awards

Pasifika, celebration of excellence

20,000

20,000

Iwi of Origin 2021

Māori, youth, low season, sport

20,000

15,000

Mauri Toa - Mau Rakau Wānanga events

Māori, youth

10,000

4,000

M2M

Māori, youth

10,000

10,000

Te Whare Tapere o Matariki

Māori, youth, sport

5,000

5,000

Waiheke Jazz, Art & Music Festival 2021

Arts, City of Music

15,000

7,500

ASB Polyfest

Māori, Pasifika, youth, celebration of excellence

55,000

55,000

NZ Eid Day - Eid Al Fitr 2021

Cultural event

15,000

10,000

NZ Secondary Schools National Condor Sevens

Māori, Pasifika, celebration of excellence

15,000

10,000

Aotearoa Māori Sports Awards 2020

Māori, Pasifika, youth, sport, celebration of excellence

5,000

5,000

Total

 

$731,976

$400,000

 

Applications with reduced funding

32.     With a lower budget available this year, some reductions in proposed amounts were necessary compared to grants previously allocated. Table Two shows the applications that staff recommend have funding reduced from that provided previously, with the key reasons outlined.


 

Table Two – Events recommended for reduced funding

Event

Reason for Reduced Funding

Reduction $

Sir Graeme Douglas International Track & Field Championships 2021

Level of grant is more closely aligned to audience numbers and outcomes delivered relative to other events.

2,500

Puhinui International Horse Trials

Reverts level of grant to that provided prior to an increase in the last two years covering specific requirements.

2,500

Tempo Dance Festival #GoingDigital 2020

Digital delivery model is less aligned with events outcomes sought.

10,000

The Partners Life DUAL

Level of grant is more closely aligned to other similar paid entry events.

7,500

Aotearoa Māori Sports Awards 2020

Applicant requested a lower amount this year.

5,000

 

Applications recommended for decline

33.     Table Three shows the four applications that staff recommend be declined, with the key reasons.

Table Three – Events recommended to be declined

Event

Reason for Decline

Noir Events Ltd - Tūrama

Receives significant ATEED funding.

Connected Media Charitable Trust - The Someday Festival

Application focused around a film competition with limited live audience. May be more suited to Creative New Zealand funding

Quantum Events Ltd - The Bean Rock Swim

Delivers on similar outcomes as the Swim the Shore event. Limited budget does not support additional funding in this area.

NZ Korean Youth Community Trust - 10th Anniversary Celebration performance

Funding request was focused more on the choir rather than the performance. Not clear what the event proposed was.

Applications not submitted

34.     Applications were not received for some events that have received regular annual funding in the past where organisers have decided they will not hold the event this year.  These include events such as: Coca-Cola Christmas in the Park, Japan Day, Te Ahurea Tino Rangatiratanga Secondary Schools Kapahaka, Auckland Highland Games and Gathering. It is expected they will apply again next year.

Event Evaluation

35.     Staff evaluate the delivery of funded events through post event reports prepared by organisers, information from the event facilitation/permitting team, attendance on the day, media and online coverage of the event, along with attendee feedback including elected members.


 

36.     The focus of evaluation is on the outcomes desired, these being primarily that:

·    the event is delivered largely in the manner described in the funding application

·    the event is well supported and enjoyed by participants, audiences, and the wider community;

·    council policy priorities are supported by the event.

37.     Experienced events staff attend funded events to obtain insights into how well the event is run and performs.  This also offers the opportunity to provide feedback to organisers on what is working well and areas that may be improved.

38.     This evaluation process then informs future funding application assessments and recommendations.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

39.     The climate impact of most regional events is associated mainly with waste management and transportation to or from an event.

40.     Some focus on these areas is already made in the event permitting process and in grant funding agreements through promotion of a range of transport options and zero waste.

41.     It had been intended that grant funding application forms this year would highlight council’s focus on mitigating climate impacts. We were to seek information on how organisers would support this through waste management and low emission transport alternatives, and this would be considered as part of the assessment process. Post event reporting would also request information on what was implemented and achieved.  Due to the short timeframe for completion of applications this year and the added pressures facing organisers in the current environment, this change will be deferred until next year.

42.     The impact of climate change may progressively affect events through increased weather variability and severity.  This may result in an increasing number of event cancellations, greater costs to mitigate weather impact, and impact on availability of certain sites for events.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

43.     Applications may be for events that connect with other areas of council delivery. These may include events taking place in council venues, on council land or receive council funding for other aspects of their work. In these cases, staff consult relevant bodies that may have an interest in the projects and take this information into account when presenting recommendations for funding.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

44.     Local boards were consulted on, and contributed to, the development of the Events Policy.  The administrative process associated with the assessment and allocation of the regional event fund applies principles and criteria outlined within the policy.

45.     Regional event funding occurs in parallel with, and is complementary to, local event funding rounds operated by local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

46.     The Events Policy recognises a responsibility to engage and build relationships with Māori stakeholders in designing, planning and delivering regional events of mutual interest.

47.     The Events Action Plan in the policy also places a particular focus on support for Māori events in the context of a diverse, balanced region-wide programme. This priority is indicated in fund information and guides to encourage applications for Māori events.

48.     Table 4 shows comparative analysis of grants provided to events with a Māori focus including having significant Māori content, participation and/or audience.

Table 4 – Regional funding provided to events with a Māori focus

Funded regional events with a Māori focus

2020/2021
(proposed)

2019/2020

2018/2019

Number

7 out of 36

8 out of 41

9 out of 44

Total value

$103,000

$136,000

$143,000

Percentage of total round value

25.8%

22.7%

23.8%

49.     The seven events considered to have a Māori focus in 2020/2021 are:

·    ASB Polyfest

·    Aotearoa Māori Sports Awards 2020

·    Mauri Toa Mau Rakau Wānanga

·    M2M

·    Te Whare Tapere o Matariki

·    Takapuna Beach Cup 2021

·    Iwi of Origin.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

50.     Staff recommend confirming grants totalling $400,000 as the proposed allocation from the total 2020/2021 Arts, Community, and Events regional grants budget of $1,636,976.

51.     Funding for any events which do not proceed due to reasons, including a resurgence of COVID-19, will be returned to the regional grants budget and be available for allocation to other grants programmes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

52.     There is a risk that events will not be successfully delivered in accordance with event plans submitted in grant applications. Staff mitigate this risk through the evaluation process and by considering the experience of event organisers and prior experience of holding the event and by attendance at events.

53.     In many cases, council is one of several funders of an event and the ability of event organisers to raise funding from multiple sources increases confidence based on the independent assessment of other funders.

54.     Health and safety measures are addressed via the event permitting process, should we return to a higher COVID-19 alert level. Should any events not occur due to a resurgence of COVID-19, funds will be returned to the regional grants budget for allocation to other programmes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     Following approval from the PACE Committee, staff will create funding agreements for recipients and funding will be distributed once agreements have been signed.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Event Fund 2020/2021 Application Summaries

19

b

Event Policy - Prioritisation Criteria

105

c

Regional Event Fund 2020/2021 Summary Schedule

107

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David McIntosh - Senior Business Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

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Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

Regional Arts and Culture grant allocation: Round two 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/11219

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve grants to regional arts organisations and artists through round two of the 2019/2020 Regional Arts and Culture grants programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Regional Arts and Culture grants programme is designed to enable organisations, communities and artists to deliver arts and culture projects and activities across the Auckland region. Grants delivered through this programme support the implementation of Toi Whītiki, Auckland’s Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan.

3.       The contestable programme had a budget of $1,141,976 for 2019/2020. The scheme allocates grants through two funding rounds each year.

4.       In the 2017/2018 and 2018/2019 financial years, ten multi-year strategic relationship grants were approved. The commitments for these multi-year grants in 2019/2020 totalled $400,000, leaving a balance of $741,976 for additional contestable grants.

5.       The Community Development and Safety Committee approved grants totalling $443,850 in round one leaving a balance of $298,126 for round two. (19/09/2019 Resolution number: COM/2019/51)

6.       Forty-seven applications were received in round two, requesting a total of $783,576.

7.       Staff recommend approving a total of $288,126 (Attachment A):

- $212,074 to twenty-three audience development and programming grants applicants

- $51,052 to five business and capacity project grants applicants

- $25,000 to one returning strategic relationship grantee.

Impact of COVID-19

8.       The COVID-19 outbreak has had significant negative effects on the arts sector. Staff are having ongoing discussions with Creative New Zealand around best practice for grant funding at this time, and the recommendations in this report are informed by these discussions.

9.       Applications were to be considered by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee in April 2020. Due to COVID-19, that meeting was cancelled.

10.     All applicants have been periodically advised of the delay in consideration of the grants round and have been asked to provide staff with updates on their proposed projects. Only one recommended project has been cancelled to date.

11.     Staff will request a new project timeline from each organisation in the letter advising of the grant, with payment contingent on an updated project timeline that falls within the grant period (12 months from the date of approval), or alternative delivery (e.g. online).

12.     Staff will also recommend that applicants develop a COVID-19 risk management plan and follow all public health guidance available on the government’s COVID-19 website.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve the following allocations of funding to arts organisations for the Regional Arts and Culture grants programme round two 2019/2020:

 

Organisation

 

Activity

Funding

Allocation ($)

 

Audience development and programming grants

 

 

Te Pou Theatre

Koanga Festival

$20,000

 

LGM Productions

Matariki Glow Show

$10,000

 

Deaf Wellbeing Society

Art creative days

$3,800

 

Mangere East ACCESS Trust

Korowai classes

$12,500

 

The Massive Company Trust

Te Whare Kupua, emerging artists production

$10,000

 

Sharu Loves Hats / Aroha Awarau

EXCLUSIVE, a play by Aroha Awarau

$7,500

 

Atamira Dance Collective Charitable Trust

Ngā Wai, dance work

$16,500

 

Objectspace

Hostile Architecture exhibition

$10,000

 

Choirs Aotearoa

Auckland concerts

$10,000

 

The New Zealand Dance Advancement Trust

Night Light

$15,000

 

Auckland Chamber Orchestra

Concert programme

$5,506

 

Indian Ink Theatre Company

Paradise Tours development

$7,500

 

Tuatara Collective Ltd

Over my dead body:UNINVITED

$15,000

 

Auckland Fringe Trust

Community workshops

$7,800

 

Tim Bray Theatre Company

Greedy Cat tour

$10,000

 

Show Me Shorts Film Festival Trust

Filmmaking guide for teachers

$5,000

 

Circability Trust

Power of Inclusion youth programme

$5,000

 

New Zealand Comedy Trust

Sign language comedy shows

$8,540

 

Experimental Dance Week

A week of experimental dance

$3,000

 

Storylines Children's Literature Charitable Trust of New Zealand

Children’s festival

$5,000

 

NZ Music Theatre Company

Music Theatre Unleashed

$8,000

 

Audio Foundation

Programming 2020/2021

$13,428

 

Bach Musica NZ Inc

Concert programme

$3,000

 

 

Total

$212,074

 

Business  and capacity project grants

 

 

 

The Mixit Charitable Trust

Organisational leadership capacity building and strategy

$11,132.00

 

Te Pou Theatre

Website development

$14,500.00

 

Artspace Aotearoa Trust

 

Website development

$10,000

 

Red Leap Theatre Charitable Trust Board

 

Business capacity development

$3,420

 

Nightsong (formerly Theatre Stampede Charitable Trust)

 

Strategic and business planning

$12,000

 

 

Total

$51,052

 

Strategic relationship grants

 

 

 

Show me Shorts

Show me Shorts film festival, schools programmes, practitioner development, workshops

$25,000 per annum for three years

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     The Regional Arts and Culture Grants Programme has been developed in accordance with Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy as adopted at the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee meeting on 4 December 2014 (REG/2014/134).

14.     The regional sector investment budget for arts and culture for 2019/2020 is $2,236,494. The investment programme comprises:

·        the contestable Regional Arts and Culture grants programme, which includes project grants and strategic relationship grants, $1,141,976 as per Para 3.

·        asset-based term grants with regional organisations Q Theatre and Te Tuhi, $1,019,830.

·        a term grant for the Auckland Festival of Photography, $74,688.

15.     The Regional Arts and Culture Grants Programme budget is allocated under the following three categories:

·        Audience development and programming project grants: These grants support the delivery of a wide range of high quality arts and cultural experiences that would not otherwise be economically viable. These projects should be capable of attracting audiences from across the Auckland region.

·        Business and capacity development project grants: These grants are intended to increase the professionalism and build the sustainability of regional arts and culture organisations through the development of strategic, business and marketing plans; feasibility studies; organisational development and digital/web development activities.

·        Strategic relationship grants: These grants are single or multi-year funding relationships with a small number of strategic organisations operating at the regional level. These organisations are, or are capable of becoming, the ‘cornerstones’ of a thriving arts and culture sector in Auckland.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     Staff and external arts sector professionals assessed the applications and made recommendations based on the arts and culture assessment matrix criteria (Attachment B).

17.     Twenty-eight applications are recommended for funding and seventeen are recommended to be declined. One application that was recommended for funding by the assessment panel was withdrawn by request of the applicant as the project is not going ahead. Two applications were ineligible before the assessment panel met due to timing of projects.

18.     Staff recommend allocating $212,074 to twenty-three audience development and programming grants; $51,052 to five business and capacity project grants and $25,000 to one strategic relationship grant.  

19.     The Community Grants policy provides direction to prioritise multi-year funding relationships with a small number of strategic organisations operating at the regional level. The term lengths are staggered to ensure an even and cyclic renewal opportunity for partners and to enable long term predictability of funding and planning.

 

 

20.     The strategic relationship application recommended for funding in this round is from an organisation previously approved funding for a two-year strategic relationship grant in 2018. Following a full report back on the grant, and a well-received presentation to the assessment panel, a recommendation to fund for three years was made. Due to timing issues and the impact the delay in the decision would have for this strategic relationship partnership, funding for the first year was approved by the General Manager Arts, Community and Events. This delegated authority approval met the guidance on payment of grants and other funding during the COVID-19 Alert.

 

Impact of COVID-19

21.     The COVID-19 outbreak has had significant detrimental effects on the arts sector. Staff are having ongoing discussions with Creative New Zealand around best practice for grant funding at this time, and the recommendations in this report are informed by these discussions alongside council’s Community Grants policy.

22.     Recent recommendations from Creative New Zealand to local government indicated that in a time of crisis and recovery, local government’s role around promoting the social and cultural wellbeing of its communities, as required by the Local Government Act 2002, becomes even more critical. Specific recommendations from Creative New Zealand include maintaining existing levels of funding for arts and culture organisations.

23.     The strategic relationship and business development projects will not be impacted by COVID-19 and are recommended as per the assessment panel recommendations.

24.     Many (though not all) audience development projects have been impacted in their timeframes by venue closures due to COVID-19. Staff will request a new project timeline from the applicant in the letter advising of the grant, with payment contingent on an updated project timeline that falls within the grant period (12 months from the date of approval). This is in line with recommendations from Creative New Zealand for funding arts organisations to the benefit of the sector.

25.     One project for which funding was recommended has been cancelled and the application withdrawn.

26.     Staff will recommend that all applicants develop a COVID-19 risk management plan and follow all public health guidance on the government’s COVID-19 website.

27.     Funding the recommended projects will allow council to:

·        strengthen its relationship with regional arts organisations, including strategic partnerships

·        invest in building capacity and capability so that the organisations are better able to deliver their services effectively

·        provide arts opportunities to support community wellbeing and connectedness

·        assist in recovery in the arts sector which has been severely impacted by COVID-19.

 

28.     The reasons for not recommending applications for funding are varied, but fall into the following areas:

·        projects that do not align sufficiently with the priorities and aims of the Regional Arts and Culture grants programme policy

·        projects that do not show a clear focus on the programme or project they are applying to; for example, a strong focus on audience or building business capacity

·        applications and projects that require further development; for example, budgets are not clear

·        applications more closely aligned with priorities for other council grant funds are referred to these programmes

·        requests for grants exceed the available funds.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     Many of the recommended projects are developing or delivering online content. This will have a positive impact on climate change due to the reduced need for people to travel to reach these services. The arts sector has responded quickly, creatively, and effectively to deliver online content.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     Several applications are for projects that connect with other areas of council delivery. These include projects taking place in a council venue, or receive council funding for other aspects of their work. In these cases, staff consult relevant bodies that may have an interest in the projects and take this information into account when presenting recommendations for funding. Ongoing conversations will be held where the project is taking place in a council venue.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     Local boards can advise staff of organisations that have applied for local board funding but are ineligible and require regional funding.

32.     There are exceptional circumstances where local organisations are able to apply for a regional fund. These circumstances occur when the activity or project is so specialised or unique to the region that it is considered to be regional, and therefore should be eligible for the Regional Arts and Culture Grants Programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     This funding supports both Māori and non-Māori organisations and artists helping to deliver arts and culture outcomes for Māori.

34.     All applications were assessed for their delivery of Māori outcomes. One assessment panel member was Māori and advice was sought from the Arts and Culture Pou Arahi Māori.

35.     In this round, four applications recommended for funding are from Māori organisations, and ten projects will deliver strong Māori outcomes through work with Māori practitioners.

36.     The delivery of Māori outcomes is included in the funding agreements for all approved strategic relationship grants.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     Staff recommend allocating a total of $288,126 for round two, noting that $25,000 has already been paid to Show me shorts and leaving $263,126 payable following approval of these grants.

38.     Budget of $263,126 has been approved as a carry-forward from 2019/2020 unspent budget and added to the 2020/2021 budget. Provision was made in the Emergency budget for this.

39.     If another COVID-19 outbreak occurs which causes the delivery of projects or programmes to be delayed, staff will work with organisations to ensure project outcomes will be achieved by other delivery mechanisms (e.g. online) and will develop new timelines for delivery. If projects or programmes are cancelled, staff will pursue a refund of the allocated funding in accordance with funding documentation terms and conditions.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     The risk of projects not going ahead due to COVID-19 remains of concern in light of new incidences of community transmission in August 2020. The risk will be mitigated by staff requesting a new project timeline from the applicant, with payment contingent on an updated project timeline that falls within the grant period (12 months from the date of approval). Ongoing relationship management with applicants will continue to manage expectations and provide advice on future applications.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     Once funding allocation decisions have been confirmed, funding agreements will be prepared in line with current Auckland Council standard practice, and including the additional steps outlined above.

42.     Where grants are awarded that do not meet the full amount requested, appropriate outcomes for the level of funding will be negotiated with the recipients and this will be reflected in the funding agreement.

43.     All applicants will be offered the opportunity to discuss their application and be coached on areas for future development.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Arts and Culture Grants Summary 2019/2020 Round 2

115

b

Arts and Culture Assessment Matrix

117

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Catherine George - Regional Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

PDF Creator


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

PDF Creator


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

ACE regional contestable grants priorities FY 20/21

File No.: CP2020/10722

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm the priorities, budget allocation and funding rounds for the Regional Arts and Culture, Events, and Community Development grants programmes for FY2020/2021 – 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Arts, Community and Events (ACE) department administers three regional contestable grants programmes: Arts and Culture, Community Development, and Events. These grants are a way of supporting community-led initiatives that share council’s goals for Aucklanders.

3.       The combined total ACE regional grants budget for FY2019/2020 was $2,036,976. The emergency budget FY2020/2021 sees a reduction to the ACE regional grants of $400,000 to $1,636,976.

4.       The ACE regional grants programmes are guided by the Community Grants policy. As per the policy, the aim of funding priorities is to provide clear guidance to potential applicants on what the governing body wants to fund. The governing body may review these priorities from time to time.

5.       Current priorities for the regional grants programmes respond to and align with the goals of Toi Whītiki - Auckland Arts and Culture strategic action plan, Thriving Communities action plan, I am Auckland Children and Young People’s strategic action plan, and the Events policy.  These priorities are reflected in the assessment and recommendation process for grants.

6.       The current priorities also allow for the grants programmes to be informed by Our Strategy 2022: Kia Manawaroa Tātou -Together we can rise to the challenge.

7.       Acknowledging the overall reduction of $400,000 to the ACE regional grants budget in the emergency budget, retaining a similar funding split based on existing allocations for the three regional grants programmes would mean that: 

·        The funding rounds could open immediately and respond to community need and project delivery

·        The allocation will provide a clear starting point for application assessment and recommendations

·        The current application and assessment processes would be retained, reflecting alignment with COVID-19 recovery aspirations and Our Strategy 2022: Kia Manawaroa Tātou

·        The grants programmes will align with the Community Grants policy.

8.       The regional events grant round 2020/2021 opened immediately after the approval of the emergency budget to ensure community organisations had enough time to design and plan events.

9.       Opening the remaining two grant rounds together (Arts and Culture, and Community Development) will allow flexibility when assessing and allocating the remaining budget.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      reconfirm the current priorities for the ACE regional grants programmes:

Arts and Culture Priorities

Community Development Priorities

Events Priorities

Māori aspirations

Māori aspirations

Māori aspirations

Reflecting diversity

Reflecting diversity

Reflecting diversity

Balance of provision

i.e. art-form split

Social innovation

Balance of provision

i.e. low season

Engaging unengaged Aucklanders

Transformative social change

Youth

Removing barriers to participation

Community-led placemaking

 

Building organisational capacity and capability

Building organisational capacity and capability

 

 

b)      approve the ACE regional grants budget ($1,636,976) being allocated as follows:

 

ACE Regional Grants programmes

Proposed budget 2020/21

Proposed number of funding rounds 2020/21

Regional Arts and Culture

$941,976

1

Regional Events

$400,000

1

Regional Community Development

$295,000

1

 

$1,636,976

3

 

c)      endorse the funding round dates for both the regional arts and culture and the regional community development grant programmes:

i)          Applications open 24 August 2020

ii)         Applications close 18 October 2020

iii)        Decisions made by the PACE Committee at its 10 December 2020 meeting.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Arts, Community and Events (ACE) department administers three regional contestable grants programmes: Art and Culture, Community Development, and Events. These grants are a way of supporting community-led initiatives that share council’s goals for Aucklanders.

11.     The combined total ACE regional grants budget for FY2019/2020 was $2,036,976. The emergency budget FY2020/2021 sees a reduction to the ACE regional grants of $400,000 to $1,636,976.

12.     The ACE regional contestable grants programmes are guided by the Community Grants Policy and the goals of Toi Whītiki - Auckland Arts and Culture strategic action plan, Thriving Communities action plan, I am Auckland Children and Young People’s strategic action plan and the Events policy. 

13.     Guided by the Community Grants Policy, to be considered ‘regional’, applicants must be able to show that their service, project or activity displays the following characteristics:

·    Primarily addresses regionally determined priorities 

·    Regional in terms of scale and/or significance

·    Regional in terms of impact and/or reach.

14.     The Community Grants policy also provides direction through the regional grants programme to prioritise multi-year funding relationships with strategic organisations operating at the regional level. These grants enable long term sustainability of funding and planning.

15.     Grant rounds are always oversubscribed, conveying the demand for grant funding to support arts, community and events activities and outcomes. Auckland Council recognises and acknowledges the important role that community organisations have to support community recovery and build community resilience post-COVID-19 through arts and culture, community development and events.

16.     During the March/April 2020 lockdown period, ACE connected with community organisations and arts and venue partners from across the Auckland region to gather insights and data through surveys on the impacts of COVID-19.  The top three challenges or concerns as reported by community organisations overall were:

·    meeting increased need in the community

·    coping with changes in the funding environment/reduction in funding streams

·    ensuring organisations can reach the most vulnerable populations with services they need.

17.     The top five types of support needed by community organisations included:

·    funding

·    alternative modes of delivery (e.g. online)

·    flexibility in existing funding arrangements

·    building strategic partnerships

·    exploring social innovation and partnerships.

18.     Organisations that indicated they needed urgent support:

·    77% of those supporting Pacific peoples

·    71% of those supporting Māori

·    68% of those supporting youth.

19.     Recent recommendations from Creative New Zealand to local government indicated that in time of crisis and recovery, local government’s role around promoting the social and cultural wellbeing of its communities, as required by the Local Government Act 2002, becomes even more critical. Specific recommendations from Creative New Zealand include maintaining existing levels of funding for arts and culture organisations.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Regional grants funding priorities

20.     As per the Community Grants policy, the aim of funding priorities is to provide clear guidance to potential applicants on what the governing body wants to fund. These might be types of activities, population groups or spatial priority areas, or a combination of these. The governing body may review these priorities from time to time.

21.     Current priorities for the grants programmes respond to and align with the goals of Toi Whītiki - Auckland Arts and Culture strategic action plan, Thriving Communities action plan, I am Auckland Children and Young People’s strategic action plan, and the Events policy.  These priorities are reflected in the assessment and recommendation process for grants.

22.     The current priorities were confirmed at a meeting of the Community Development and Safety Committee in May 2017 and have been informed by ongoing advice from the committee.

Table 1: Current priorities for the ACE regional grants programmes

Arts and Culture Priorities

Community Development Priorities

Events Priorities

Māori aspirations

Māori aspirations

Māori aspirations

Reflecting diversity

Reflecting diversity

Reflecting diversity

Balance of provision

i.e. art-form split

Social innovation

Balance of provision

i.e. low season

Engaging unengaged Aucklanders

Transformative social change

Youth

Removing barriers to participation

Community-led placemaking

 

Building organisational capacity and capability

Building organisational capacity and capability

 

 

23.     The aim of priorities is to provide clear guidance to applicants. A small number of priorities with clear focus is recommended as an expanded range of variables could add confusion to the application and assessment process.

24.     The above priorities allow for the grants programmes to be informed by Our Strategy 2022: Kia Manawaroa Tātou -Together we can rise to the challenge. Grants specifically support the goal:

Focus on communities that need us most:

·    Use our resources wisely to better serve our communities that need us most

·    Back communities, Māori, and other providers to deliver what is needed.


 

Regional grants budget

25.     The combined total ACE regional contestable grants budget for FY2019/2020 was $2,036,976 which included $1,141,976 for Arts and Culture regional grants, $600,000 for Events regional grants and $295,000 for Community Development regional grants.

26.     The emergency budget FY2020/2021 sees a reduction to the ACE regional grants of $400,000 to $1,636,976.

27.     The emergency budget proposed the regional events grants be reduced $200,000 (to $400,000), and the overall ACE grants budget be reduced an additional $200,000 (reducing regional arts and culture and regional community development combined to $1,236,000).

28.     Some points to factor in when considering the allocation of the grants budget:

·    The regional events funding this round for 2020/2021 has closed and recommendations will be considered by Committee on 20 August 2020

·    The regional community development budget is the lowest at $295,000 and is significantly oversubscribed annually

·    Contestable grants are just one way ACE supports community projects, alongside non-contestable grants, community programming and council operated facilities and events

·    The regional arts and culture grants programme supports several key regional arts organisations with strategic relationship grants.

29.     Acknowledging that the emergency budget proposed allocating $400,000 to Regional Events, and that the Regional Events application process for FY2020/2021 is now closed, staff recommend: 

·    that the ACE regional grants budget is allocated as outlined below

·    the grants rounds for the arts and culture and community development are run in the same timeframes to allow for flexibility in the budget.

Table 2: Recommended allocation of the ACE regional grants programme 2020/2021

Grants programme

Budget 2019/20

Number of funding rounds 2019/20

Proposed budget 2020/21

Proposed number of funding rounds 2020/21

Regional Arts and Culture

$1,141,976

2

$941,976

1

Regional Events

$600,000

2

$400,000

1

Regional Community Development

$295,000

1

$295,000

1

 

$2,036,976

 

$1,636,976

 

 

30.     This approach would allow flexibility in the allocation of the pooled funding while taking into account the following benefits:

·    Community organisations are familiar with current grant processes and would experience no change in how they might apply for a grant

·    The funding rounds could open immediately and respond to community need

·    The allocation will provide a clear starting point for application assessment and recommendations

·    The current application and assessment processes would be retained, reflecting alignment with COVID-19 recovery and Our Strategy 2022: Kia Manawaroa Tātou

·    The grants programmes will align with the Community Grants policy

·    There will be no additional staff resource required

·    The Regional Community Development budget will not be decreased at a time of high community need

·    The Regional Arts and Culture budget would provide sufficient funding to meet strategic relationship grant commitments ($230,000 in 2020/2021), support returning Arts and Culture strategic relationship partners, and fund project grants for one funding round (rather than the usual two rounds).

31.     If the Regional Events funding is not fully allocated, any excess budget could be returned to the funding pool for Arts and Culture and Community Development grants.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     Many projects that are funded through the ACE regional grants programmes are to develop or deliver online content. This will have a positive impact on climate change due to the reduced need for people to travel to reach these services. The arts sector and community development sector have shifted quickly, creatively, and effectively to deliver online content.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     The Arts, Community and Events regional contestable grants programmes are three of the regional grants programmes run by Auckland Council and guided by the Community Grants Policy.

34.     Grant applications are often for projects that connect with other areas of council delivery. These include projects taking place in a council venue or to organisations that receive council funding for other aspects of their work. In these cases, staff consult relevant bodies that may have an interest in the projects and take this information into account when presenting recommendations for funding.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.     Auckland Council’s community grants programme has two main components:

·        Local board grants programme (incorporating multi-board grants)

·        Regional grants programme

36.     Local board grants provide a direct, tangible way of supporting local community aspirations and responding to local needs and opportunities. Each local board develops a set of specific priorities based on their Local Board plan.

37.     Local boards operate the following types of grant scheme as part of their local grants programme:

·        Quick Response Local Grants (generally up to $2,000)

·        Local Grants (generally over $2,000).

38.     The total local board community grants allocated for FY19/20 was $4.350 million. These grants were contestably allocated to applications received through local board grant rounds.

39.     Local boards can advise staff of organisations that have applied for local board funding but are ineligible and require regional funding.

40.     There are exceptional circumstances where local organisations are able to apply for a regional fund. These circumstances occur when the activity or project is so specialised or unique to the region that it is considered to be regional.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     The ACE regional contestable grants programmes support Māori and non-Māori organisations and artists to deliver and contribute to improved outcomes for Māori.

42.     Responding to Māori aspirations is a priority for all three ACE regional contestable grants. 

43.     All applications are assessed for their delivery of Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     The proposed allocation of the grants funding matches the 2020/2021 budget of $1,636,976.

45.     Through this allocation the $400,000 savings approved in the Emergency budget will be achieved.

46.     If another COVID-19 outbreak causes the delay of delivery of projects or programmes, staff will work with organisations to ensure project outcomes will be achieved by other delivery mechanisms (e.g. online) and will develop new timelines for delivery before funding is allocated. If projects or programmes are cancelled, staff will pursue a refund of the allocated funding in accordance with funding documentation terms and conditions.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     The risk of projects not going ahead due to COVID-19 will be mitigated by staff requesting a new project timeline from the applicant, with payment contingent on an updated project timeline that falls within the grant period (12 months from the date of approval). Ongoing relationship management with applicants will continue to manage expectations and provide advice on future applications.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     Once funding priorities and allocation decisions have been confirmed, Arts and Culture and Community Development grant rounds will open on 24 August and will come back to the PACE committee for decision in December 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Catherine George – Regional Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme

File No.: CP2020/00198

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the allocation of funding to applicants from the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme 2020/2021.

2.       To approve the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme 2021/2022 opening and closing dates and funding budget of $508,000.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme supports regional sport and recreation organisations to deliver regional projects through the allocation of grants for operational project costs.

4.       Twenty-six applications were received requesting a total of $1,419,254 from an available funding pool of $508,000. Staff assessed applications for eligibility against the Community Grants Policy 2014 and the assessment matrix criteria.

5.       Fourteen applications from sport and recreation organisations are recommended for funding allocation following the assessment process.

6.       The support the grants programme offers will contribute towards mitigating some of the effects of Covid-19 by encouraging community cohesion and wellbeing through sport and recreation programmes.

7.       All applicants will be contacted by staff following allocation of budget. Successful applicants will then enter into funding agreements with council that include agreed outcomes and reporting requirements.   

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve the following allocation of funding from the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme 2020/2021 budget, for the amounts outlined below:

Organisation

Project description

Funding Allocation $

Hockey New Zealand

Junior participation programmes

$30,000

Fencing North

Fencing equipment

$13,500

Aktive – He Oranga Poutama

Tāmaki Tākaro Tahi project

$20,000

Aktive - Greater Auckland Aquatic Action Plan

Water Skills for Life swimming lessons

$40,000

John Walker Find Your Field of Dreams Foundation

Children and young people swimming, sports and recreation programmes

$180,000

 

Tai Chi Earth

Tai Chi and wellbeing programme

    $16,000

 

Blind Sport New Zealand Incorporated

Youth Sports programme

    $16,000

Cerebral Palsy Society New Zealand

Beach access equipment

$19,000

New Zealand Golf

Youth and women golf programme

$20,000

Tuileapa Youth Mentoring Services

Youth basketball programme

   $10,000

YMCA North

 

Snorkelling and underwater safety programme

$30,000

North Harbour Softball Association

Game Development Programme

$25,000

Student Volunteer Army

Recreation with purpose programme

$18,500

KI o rahi Tāmaki Makaurau

 

Te Toa Takitini programme – Ki o rahi

$70,000

Total

$508,000

 

b)      approve the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme 2021/2022 to open for applications on 25 January 2021 and close on 5 March 2021, allocating $508,000 from July 2021, in accordance with the Community Grants Policy (2014).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Auckland Council’s region-wide investment programme in sport and recreation seeks to inspire Aucklander’s to be more physically active.

9.       The Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme (Attachment A) primarily grants operational funding for regional initiatives delivered by community sport and recreation entities.

10.     The purpose of the programme is predominantly to enable children and young people to participate in sport and recreation.

11.     The programme also provides affordable access to vulnerable groups with low participation rates: Māori, people with health and wellbeing needs, and people facing other barriers.

12.     The following strategic documents inform the outcomes and implementation of the programme:

·        Community Grants Policy (2014)

·        Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039

·        Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (ASARSAP).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The 2020/2021 grants programme opened to applicants on 24 January and closed on 6 March 2020. Twenty-six applications were received requesting a total of $1,419,254 from an available funding pool of $508,000.

14.     Fourteen applications were considered strongly aligned (Attachment B), eight partially aligned and four not aligned. Alignment is to the Community Grants Policy (2014) and the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan.

15.     Funding requests were for salary, programme costs and equipment costs. There was a wide range in both the quality and size of applications received and amounts requested ranged from $3,000 to $260,000.

16.     Grant applications were received before the Covid-19 lockdown however feedback has been sought from grant applicants about the possible effects of Covid-19 on their projects. All strongly aligned applicants provided assurance they will be able to deliver their projects with minimal delays.

17.     Fourteen strongly aligned applicants, the greatest number in the six years the programme has existed, are recommended to be funded which will increase the reach and spread of investment into Auckland communities.

18.     Auckland communities are experiencing economic uncertainty and social disruption as a result of Covid-19. Council seeks to mitigate some of these challenges by providing investment into the physical wellbeing of its communities through the grants programme.

19.     The eligible applications were assessed by staff using the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme’s assessment matrix. The matrix weightings comprise of:

Assessment area

Weighting

Inputs and outputs: financial and non-financial contribution required / explanation of project outputs

20%

Evidence of demand: how the project will target groups in need

25%

Evidence that the programme will result in an increase in sport and recreation participation and other benefits

25%

Alignment with strategic priorities: how the project will address ASARSAP outcomes and target the grants purposes

15%

Detailed project information

15%

 

20.     The assessment process includes an outcome measurement tool modelled on the Treasury’s CBAx model. This model provides a clear line-of-sight between council investment and Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan outcomes. It also improves the monitoring and evaluation of the grants programme.

21.     Staff and assessors have considered the applications and grouped them into three categories: strongly aligned, partially aligned, and not aligned, as determined by the Community Grants Policy:

·        ‘strongly aligned’ applications were received from regional sector organisations, showed clear regional benefit and aligned to the policy outcomes

·        ‘partially aligned’ applications were not as strongly aligned to the policy outcomes and in most cases did not demonstrate strong regional impact

·        ineligible applications were ‘not aligned’ to the policy outcomes, were not considered to provide regional impact or had underdeveloped project plans.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     Staff consider there is no immediate climate change impact associated with the recommendation presented in the report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Staff from Community and Social Policy and Parks, Sport and Recreation have provided input to the assessment of the applications.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Projects supported through the programme are primarily regional, however they are often delivered at a local level in schools, sports centres and facilities.

25.     The projects impact local communities by offering affordable access to physical activity opportunities and experiences to children and young people with low participation rates.

26.     Local boards were consulted during the development of the Community Grants Policy (2014), council’s new sport investment plan – Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 and the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan.

27.     These policies and plans inform the outcomes and implementation of the programme.

28.     During consultation, local boards acknowledged that there are organisations and projects that do not qualify for local board funding and need a regional funding option that is offered through the programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Sport and recreation participation contributes directly to the following ‘Māori Identity and Wellbeing’ outcome in Auckland Plan 2050:

Māori Identity and Wellbeing

·        Direction 1 – ‘Advance Māori wellbeing’

·      Focus area 1 – ‘Meet the needs and support the aspirations of tamariki and their whānau’

30.     Sport New Zealand data tells us that weekly sport and recreation participation of Māori in Auckland (73.7 per cent) is lower than European (83.0 per cent) and Pasifika (74.0 per cent), but higher than Asian (67.1 per cent).

31.     Research shows pockets of sedentary Māori who do not have adequate opportunities to participate in sport. It also shows Māori have different preferences for sport and recreational activities compared to other ethnic groups.

32.     Two of the grants programme’s primary outcomes are to increase Māori participation in sport and recreation activities. These include the strongly aligned applications from:

·        KI-o-rahi Tāmaki Makaurau for the Te toa Takitini programme which provides KI o rahi to children while teaching Te Ao/Te Reo Māori and connecting with local maunga

·        He Oranga Poutama which supports Māori sports programmes and clubs.

33.     Other strongly aligned applications, such as North Harbour Softball, target populations that specifically include Māori communities and participants.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     The programme currently has a budget of $508,000 per annum within the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.  The budget remained unchanged in the emergency budget 2020/2021.

35.     Successful applicants enter into a funding agreement with council and the organisations performance will be monitored against reporting and accountability requirements.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     Staff mitigate risks through carrying out a robust assessment process when considering the applications.

37.     The financial risk to council is mitigated through the practice of paying the annual grant in part-payments. This enables staff to withhold payment if late or substandard reports are received or the organisation’s performance is poor.

38.     Staff will mitigate the risk of programme delivery delays due to Covid-19 restrictions through or extending the term of delivery into 2021/2022 where required.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Over the next few weeks, all applicants will be notified of the funding allocation decisions made by this committee.

40.     Staff will offer support to organisations whose applications were partially or not aligned to the Community Grants Policy 2014. This support may include encouraging the organisations to seek other funding options or working towards developing their application for next year.

41.     Staff will also meet with successful applicants and agree on project plans, funding agreement outcomes, measures and reporting requirements. Funding will be available to successful applicants once the funding agreements are signed.

42.     It is proposed the Regional Sport and Recreation Grants Programme 2021/2022 opens for applications on 25 January 2021 and closes on 5 March 2021. A total of $508,000 will be allocated from July 2021, in accordance with the Community Grants Policy 2014.  This is subject to funding approved in the 2021-2031 Long-term plan.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Policy

133

b

Attachment B - Strongly aligned applications

135

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Geraldine Wilson - Activation Advisor - Outdoors

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 


 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 


 


 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

Community Access Scheme Review - extension to current funding agreements

File No.: CP2020/00197

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the extension of the current Community Access Scheme funding agreements for one year, from 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021, while a review of the scheme continues.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Community Access Scheme was established in 2016 to facilitate community access to sport and recreation facilities where there are identified gaps in the regional network.

3.       In June 2018, the Environment and Community committee indicated that it would be timely to undertake a review of the scheme as the existing agreements are close to expiry [CP2018/06192].

4.       A preliminary review has found that although the existing funding agreements have good track records of meeting the funding agreement key performance indicators (KPIs):

·    there is no direct link to the participation outcomes set out in the new sport investment plan adopted in July 2019 [ENV/2019/93]

·    the scheme funding has mostly been used to fund operating costs of legacy council agreements rather than to directly provide community access, as originally intended

·    there are efficiency and fairness issues associated with the scheme

·    there is also a growing demand for operational grants as new facilities are developed.

5.       This report seeks approval to extend the existing funding agreements for one year, from 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021. This will allow time to complete a review of the scheme and align with the Long-term Plan timeline.

6.       The review will incorporate feedback from current funding recipients, local boards and stakeholders. The engagement will focus on financial implications (for the funding recipients), local sport and recreation needs, and the impact on the network of facility provision.

7.       Staff will also seek feedback on the broad future direction for the scheme including:

·    status quo: continue funding current recipients under the existing Community Access Scheme Guidelines

·    repurpose the investment to another form of investment (for example, an operational grant or direct funding for community access through programmes and services)

·    continue funding current recipients through local boards’ locally driven initiatives (LDI’s).

8.       Staff have identified limited reputational, operational and financial risks associated with extending the scheme funding agreements for one more year while the review is completed. Staff consider risks can be partly mitigated with proactive communication with stakeholders.

9.       Staff will report back to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee with an impact analysis and future options in quarter two or three of 2020/2021.

10.     The Tamaki College Community Recreation Centre Trust Board is currently undergoing a Trustee appointment process in accordance with the Trust Deed. Staff will ensure this is concluded before a funding agreement extension is entered into.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve funding through the Community Access Scheme as outlined below from 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021.

Recipient organisation

Facility

Funding per annum

AUT Millennium Ownership Trust

Sovereign Stadium

$60,000

Auckland Netball

Auckland Netball Centre outdoor courts etc

$150,000

Avondale College

Stadium, turf, courts

$40,000

North Harbour Netball

Netball North Harbour outdoor courts / toilets

$28,000

East City Community Trust

Barfoot Thompson Stadium

$90,000

Waiheke Recreation Centre Trust

Waiheke Recreation Centre

$80,000

Te Puru Community Trust

Te Puru Community Centre

$325,000

Kolmar Charitable Trust

Kolmar-Papatoetoe Sports Centre

$150,000

Total

 

$923,000

b)      approve funding through the Community Access Scheme for $100,000 from 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021 to Tamaki College Community Centre Trust Board subject to the General Manager, Parks, Sport and Recreation’s satisfaction of the Trust’s ongoing governance and management.

c)      note staff will present findings from the review of the Community Access Scheme and future options in quarter two or three of 2020/2021.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Following amalgamation Auckland Council inherited legacy sport and recreation operational funding agreements.

12.     The funding agreements were deemed out of scope of the Community Grants Policy due to primarily being community access grants to third parties to deliver asset-based services.

13.     As a result, the Community Access Scheme was developed and guidelines (Attachment A) were approved in July 2016 [PAR/2016/49] after consultation with local boards, existing grant recipients and key sector partners.

14.     The aim of the scheme is to facilitate access to sport and recreation facilities where there are identified gaps in the regional network, encourage greater use of existing assets and support multi-sport and multi-use facilities.


 

15.     The scheme supports the implementation of the Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan. The scheme is part of a suite of investment tools that deliver on three (Participation, Infrastructure, Sector Capability) of the four priority areas and key actions of the plan.

The review will assess the scheme against the new sport investment plan

16.     Previous engagement with the Governing Body indicated that it would be timely to undertake a review of the scheme as the existing agreements are close to expiry [CP2018/06192].

17.     The conversation indicated the review should focus on whether the scheme is still fit-for-purpose, based on the council’s new sport investment plan– Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039, adopted in July 2019 [ENV/2019/93].

18.     The sport investment plan guides all council investment in sport for the next twenty years.

19.     This includes the $1.5 billion allocated for sport and recreation in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 for its vast sport and recreation facility network as well as, relationships with local communities and sport organisations through:

·    grants (including Community Access Scheme)

·    leases

·    partnership.

Tamaki College Community Recreation Centre Trust

20.     In 2001, the Board of Trustees of Tamaki College and Auckland City Council entered into a facility partnership arrangement where council contributed $1.15 million to the capital cost of the construction of the Tamaki Recreation Centre. Through a facility sharing agreement Tamaki College agreed to make the recreation centre available for community access for a period of twenty years (to 2026) through a license arrangement with the Tamaki College Community Recreation Centre Trust.

21.     The Tamaki College Community Recreation Centre Trust board is currently undergoing a trustee appointment process. Staff will support the trust through the process and monitor continued adherence to the Trust Deed before entering into an extension of a Community Access Scheme funding agreement.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Preliminary review found current recipients have good track records but lack strategic alignment

22.     To date, the review has found that although the existing funding agreements have good track records of meeting the funding agreement KPIs, there is no direct link to the participation outcomes set out in the new sport investment plan.

23.     The plan is focused on one single outcome – increase the level of community sport participation in Auckland. This ensures a focused and people-centric approach to meet the changing needs of Auckland’s diverse community.

24.     The plan requires all future sport investment decisions to be guided by four investment principles:

·    Equity (40 per cent of assessment): Sport investment should ensure equity of outcomes across the population regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status or location.

·    Outcome-focused (30 per cent of assessment): There needs to be a clear ‘line of sight’ between each investment and the outcomes it delivers.

·    Financial sustainability (20 per cent of assessment): Investment decisions need to be financially sustainable for council and sports organisations.

·    Accountability (10 per cent of assessment): Auckland Council has responsibility to act in the best interests of Aucklanders and invest in the most effective, efficient, transparent and consistent way that provides value for money.

 

Table 1: Assessment of the legacy funding against the four investment principles in the new investment plan

Principles

Equity

Outcome-focused

Financial sustainability

Accountability (value for money)

Assessment results

No clear evidence showing legacy agreements effectively addresses communities with greatest need.

The scheme mostly funds operating, maintenance and renewal costs rather than directly buying community access that directly improves participation rates.

The scheme has helped to cover operational costs, but it is difficult to know whether these costs could be covered by other funding sources. It is also difficult to know how access to the facilities would change if the scheme funding changed or was redirected.

There is no clear evidence showing the scheme is being used in the most efficient and effective way and creating the best value for money.

 

 

25.     The review will seek evidence to determine whether the current funding agreements are being used in the most strategic and equitable way to address the greatest access needs in the system.

26.     The review will also consider the relative scale of gaps in the current sport and recreation facility network and whether the current agreements address any supply shortages.

27.     Demand for operational grants is expected to grow as new facilities are developed. The review will consider efficient and equitable methods of addressing this demand.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     Staff consider there is no immediate climate change impact associated with the recommendation presented in the report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     Parks Sport and Recreation (PSR) staff will draft and monitor the extension of the funding agreements.

30.     PSR staff and Local Board Services will facilitate workshops and forums during the review process.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     Local board views were included in the development of the new investment plan adopted in July 2019. The review will consider the alignment between the scheme and the outcomes of the new investment plan.

32.     Staff will seek local board feedback in workshops during quarter one and two of 2020/2021 on the broad future direction of the scheme. Any decisions and potential changes to the scheme will be communicated and workshopped with local boards in quarter one and two of 2021/2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     Sport and recreation participation contributes directly to the following ‘Māori Identity and Wellbeing’ outcome in Auckland Plan 2050:

Māori Identity and Wellbeing

·        Direction 1 – ‘Advance Māori wellbeing’

·      Focus area 1 – ‘Meet the needs and support the aspirations of tamariki and their whanau’

 

34.     According to Sport New Zealand data, weekly sport and recreation participation of Māori in Auckland (73.7 per cent) is lower than European (83.0 per cent) and Pasifika (74.0 per cent), but higher than Asian (67.1 per cent).

35.     Research shows pockets of sedentary Māori who do not have adequate opportunities to participate in sport. It also shows Māori have different preferences for sport and recreational activities compared to other ethnic groups.

36.     The review of the scheme will consider links to the outcomes in the new investment plan which states that sport investment should ensure equity of outcomes across the population regardless of age, ethnicity, socio-economic status or location.

37.     As part of the review, staff will seek feedback through the Mana Whenua Forums on the broad future direction of the scheme.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     Staff have gained agreement from the Commercial Manager, Financial & Business Performance Commercial, on the financial implications of this advice.

39.     The Community Access Scheme currently has a budget of $1,023,000 per annum within the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

40.     The recommended extension of the funding agreements will total $1,023,000 and is budgeted within 2020/2021.

41.     The review will consider financial implications of any potential scheme changes that are presented to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee in quarter two or three of 2020/2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     The extension of the funding agreements will provide operational continuity to the current recipient organisations during the review.

43.     A preliminary risk assessment has identified reputational, operational and financial risks associated with the recommendation to extend the funding agreements and continue the review.


 

Table 2: Risk and mitigation

Risk Type

Risk

Mitigation

Reputational

Moderate risk – the public may consider the extension of the funding agreements is not providing equitable community access across the region.

Clear communication with key stakeholders and funding recipients, clearly articulating the purpose of extending the funding agreements and the review. Including how the review will help council investment to be more effective in addressing disparities through the review. 

Operational

Minimal risk – the extension of the funding agreements and the review will require additional staff resource.

Planning and support from the wider sport and recreation team will enable the extension of the funding agreements and completion of the review within the FY21 work programme timeline.

Financial (current recipients only)

Minimal risk – funding recipients will only have certainty of funding for one year.

The review of the scheme will involve clear communication with current recipients to enable financial operational planning within their organisation.

 

44.     Once a decision is made about the extension of current funding agreements, the review will continue and include a full risk assessment of any potential scheme changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     If approval is given to extend the existing funding agreements, staff will contact current recipients to notify of the decision and develop funding agreements.

46.     Staff will continue the review of the scheme and seek feedback from all local boards and stakeholders and report back to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events committee with an impact analysis and future options workshop and business meeting in quarter two or three of 2020/2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Community Access Scheme Guidelines

145

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Geraldine Wilson - Activation Advisor - Outdoors

Authorisers

Dave Stewart - Manager Sport & Recreation

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 


 


 


 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

Cultural Intiatives Fund - grant recommendations for 2020/2021

File No.: CP2020/10299

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To review and approve the Cultural Initiatives Fund grants for marae and papakāinga/Māori housing for the 2020/2021 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Marae offer a range of services that contribute to and support whānau and community wellbeing. They are a critical cultural connection for mana whenua and Māori communities. 

3.       Several marae stood up as emergency hubs during the Covid19 lockdown providing essential aid such as distribution of food and provision of social and health services.  Marae often manaaki (host/welcome) the wider community in times of need.

4.       In recognition of the critical role marae provide in the community and the wide range of unmet needs of marae, a funding envelope for marae and papakāinga/Māori housing development is included in the Long Term Plan 2018-2028.  This is known as the Cultural Initiatives Fund.

5.       The Cultural Initiatives Fund for 2020/2021 opened for applications for eight weeks on 30 March 2020.  The fund was kept open for longer than usual to ensure applicants had a fair opportunity to apply given the impact of lockdown due to Covid19.

6.       Interim funding guidelines for the Cultural Initiatives Fund were developed during lockdown.  The new guidelines provided applicants with more certainty and scope to address an emerging range of marae needs.

7.       Auckland Council received 12 applications for the 2020/2021 funding round.  Two marae were ineligible.  The remaining applications requested a total of $1,489,449 from an available budget of $1.2m.

8.       It is recommended that nine applications are supported.  Seven of these at the value requested and two at a reduced value based on a revised scope of works.

9.       It is recommended that one application for marae development funding, from Te Mahurehure Marae, be declined. Te Mahurehure marae development is already supported by council through the Marae Infrastructure Programme and it is recommended their other application, for papakāinga/Māori housing, is supported.

10.     The total funding recommended to be granted is $1,199,000.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve the following 2020/2021 Cultural Initiatives Fund grants, at a total value of $1,199,000, subject to a range of conditions as detailed in this report:

·        Manurewa Marae Trust - $169,000

·        Te Kia Ora Marae - $128,000

·        Makarau Marae Reservation Trust - $170,000

·        Komiti Marae Orakei Trust - $90,000

·        Te Herenga Waka o Orewa Marae - $9,000

·        Te Motu a Hiaroa Charitable Trust - $170,000

·        Te Tira Hou Marae - $170,000

·        Mataatua Marae - $123,000

·        Te Kāinga Atawhai - Te Mahurehure Marae - $170,000

 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     The Auckland Plan identifies “investment in marae to be self-sustaining and prosperous” as  a priority.  Marae are hubs for the Māori community and some marae support the community as a whole. They physically and spiritually anchor Māori identity, and function as focal points for Māori social, economic and cultural leadership.  Hapū and iwi marae provide the tūrangawaewae for their people.

12.     Several marae stood up as emergency hubs during the Covid19 lockdown providing essential aid to the community such as distribution of food and provision of social and health services. 

13.     Marae manaaki (host/welcome) the wider community in times of need.  As the region grows and as we look to build a more resilient region marae are likely to play an increasing role as community hubs. 

14.     The Auckland Plan also identifies the need to “grow intergenerational wealth”. The plan identifies ways that this can be done including whānau-centric housing models (such as papakāinga which grow hapū and iwi asset bases) and improving regulatory processes and collaboration for Māori land development. 

Cultural Initiatives Fund – history and guidelines

15.     The Long Term Plan (LTP) 2015-2025 established a funding envelope to enable thriving and self-sustaining marae and to support establishment of papakāinga/Māori housing across Auckland. This funding was reaffirmed in the current LTP. This is known as the Cultural Initiatives Fund (CIF); CIF is a contestable grant fund. 

16.     The funding round for 2020/2021 opened for applications on 30 March 2020, during the Covid19 lockdown, and it was kept open until 30 May 2020.  This application period was longer than usual to ensure applicants had a fair opportunity to apply with some of the time being after lockdown restrictions had lifted.

17.     Applicants were invited to submit using the SmartyGrants website which is the platform used for council community grants. Staff provided guidance to applicants throughout the application period.

18.     During lockdown a range of pressures on marae were identified and requests for more support were received. These requests included support for:

·        replacement mattresses and cleaning to address hygiene concerns

·        more scope within the fund to be able to apply funding to a wider range of initiatives that enabled marae to achieve their vision e.g. mahi toi and marae based project managers

·        expanding the list of marae that can apply for funding

·        expanding the scope of land that the papakāinga/Māori housing fund could apply to

19.     This feedback was received through Te Kotahi a Tāmaki (a marae collective) and council staff who regularly checked in with individual marae. 

20.     Interim funding guidelines for the CIF were developed during lockdown and adopted by the Māori Outcomes Steering Group (which oversees Māori outcomes from the across the council group). In the past, the CIF operated under draft guidelines that aligned with the Community Grants Policy. 

21.     The new guidelines, based on the previous drafts, provide applicants with certainty and scope to address the range of marae needs. Given the timeframe and the complexity of the issues no changes were made to the list of marae that the fund applied to nor did the scope expand the land that the papakāinga/Māori housing fund could apply to.  These requests will be looked at in 2020/2021 and reported to the PACE Committee in 2021.

22.     The interim CIF guidelines are included in Attachment A and B and summarised here (changes from past practice are underlined):

·    marae must be a trust, authority or other formally recognized body, or gazetted or set apart as a Māori Reservation can apply for papakāinga/Māori housing funding

·    the maximum grant value is $170,000 (previous maximum value $150,000)

·    for marae applications, a marae must be included on the list or be a new marae where they meet the criteria

·    marae development grants support:

capital works (including purchase of small assets and mahi toi/art work)

maintenance (including materials and labour)

project management (contractor or marae staff) up to $20,000

feasibility and concept design reports

strategic, financial or business planning

first year of audited accounts

governance and asset management planning

·    papakāinga/Māori housing grants support:

planning and regulatory costs

development costs (development contributions and infrastructure growth charges)

feasibility and concept design

strategic planning.

2020/21 Cultural Initiatives Fund assessment panel

23.     The assessment panel was made up of three members. Two members had previously participated on the assessment panel with experience in marae and papakāinga development.  They were joined by the Māori Outcomes Lead with accountability for the marae outcome across the council group. Two of the panel were staff members and the third was an independent contractor and qualified quantity surveyor. 

Update on the 2019/2020 recipients

24.     The 2019/2020 applications were approved in June 2019. Six of the marae funded have indicated works will be completed and funds expended. This will be confirmed through accountability reports and invoicing which is due in August 2020 (not available at the time of writing this report). 

 

 

25.     Manurewa Marae Trust Board received funding FY18/19. This funding was carried forward into 2019/20. They shared the following feedback:

“By having the resources has allowed us to ensure when we have a roopu on the marae, we are able to accommodate and manaaki tangata to a higher standard. All showers are now functioning and useable, they are more user friendly when manuhiri and whanau come to the marae.  The ablution block is the main marae facility and we were having to get groups to schedule showers for men, and women to use one block of showers in the women’s facility.

The completion of the new ablution block project was opened in time for the wharenui Matukurua 20th and Matukureia 31st birthday celebrations. Auckland Council was acknowledged for their support on all birthday celebration material advertised.

We have received anecdotal kōrero from marae users about how great the bathrooms are and how much warmer they are with windows that can close. 

Learnings to do differently are establish an overall property development plan to ensure our whare are looked after appropriately.”

26.     The Papakura Marae Society received papakāinga/Māori housing funding for their kaumatua housing project in the 2019/2020 financial year. Landowner, planning, and regulatory matters are all approved. Construction is anticipated to commence late August 2020. The resources council have contributed to this project have been publicly acknowledged and are reflected in the following comments:

‘Auckland Council’s Māori Housing Unit had been pivotal in knocking down barriers, garnering support and just getting on with it’… ‘the support of the Papakura Local Board has transformed a housing vision into a reality’

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

27.     Auckland Council received 12 applications for the 2020/2021 funding round. Two were ineligible as they are not marae listed as being supported by council in the guidelines. The remaining applications requested a total of $1,489,449. The fund was oversubscribed noting the available funding envelope is $1.2m. 

28.     One of the applications is for papakāinga/Māori housing funding and nine are for marae development funding. One applicant, Te Mahurehure Marae, applied for both parts of the fund. 

29.     A summary of each of the applications received is included in Attachment C.

30.     The assessment criteria used by the assessment panel is included in Attachment D. 

31.     The initial assessment identified a number of questions and gaps and these were put back to the marae to respond to.  As a result of feedback received the assessment panel were able to reach a consensus on the recommendations for funding which are included in this report. 

32.     A brief commentary on the questions asked by panel members, the responses and the recommended grant values and the conditions is included in the recommendations section of the summary of each application (Attachment C). 

33.     It is recommended that nine applications are supported. Seven of these are at the value requested, including a consistent allowance for contingency funding, and two are at a reduced value based on a revised scope of works. This brings the total value of applications supported to a maximum value of $1,199,000.

34.     It is recommended that one application for marae development funding, from Te Mahurehure Marae, be declined. This is on the basis that Te Mahurehure marae development is already supported by council through the Marae Infrastructure Programme and their other application, for papakāinga/Māori housing, is supported in the recommendations.

35.     After the assessment process concluded, staff invited Councillors and PACE committee members to drop in sessions on 27 and 29 July 2020 to hear about the applications received, the process undertaken and the draft recommendations. Six councillors attended these two drop in sessions. 

36.     The same information was presented to the Māori Outcomes Steering Group. This provided an opportunity to check in with other managers working with marae across the council group.

37.     The graphs below show applicant types and suggested funding allocation, as well as recommended regional distribution for both marae and papakāinga/Māori housing:

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Many marae are planning for climate change. 

39.     The CIF grant is a contestable grant intended to enable marae to have the capacity to realise their own vision.  Application and assessment criteria includes consideration of sustainability. This section of the application is about ensuring that any council investment has an enduring effect and it also supports the principles of reducing emissions and adapting to climate change, which are goals of the Auckland Climate Plan. 

40.     Most of the works included in the current applications are overdue major maintenance on existing infrastructure. Two applicants have identified installation of solar panels. In wider discussion with a range of marae climate change initiatives being undertaken or planned include; raising and upgrading sewerage treatment plants; developing large māra kai (food gardens) to enable food sovereignty for the whānau and the community; reducing energy consumption or switching to renewable energy, para kore (a vision for all marae to be working towards zero waste by 2025); and ecological restoration.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     The Marae Infrastructure Programme, Auckland Transport and Watercare Services all partner with marae to upgrade infrastructure. These programmes apply to marae who express an interest in partnering with the council group. Once there is agreement with marae, relevant council group partners scope the infrastructure needs and carry out the project works. These programmes focus on compliance, safety and ensuring current infrastructure is fit for purpose.  The Marae Infrastructure Programme, Auckland Transport and Watercare Services work programmes are all run independently from the CIF grants however there is good communication between the teams running these programmes to ensure a coordinated effort.

42.     There are no other council group impacts. 

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

43.     Applicants are invited to engage with local boards and include any local board support in their application.  Most applicants indicated they have a good working relationship with local boards. This is summarised in the application summaries in Attachment C.

44.     As noted earlier, many marae play a vital role as community hubs and have a range of positive local community impacts.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

45.     Marae play a critical role in Māori communities. This was strongly demonstrated over Covid19 lockdown as several marae stood up as emergency hubs to provide essential food, social and health services. 

46.     The interim guidelines have responded to feedback from marae and further work on the guidelines will occur in 2020/2021 to review the outstanding questions. 

47.     The Māori Outcomes Framework, includes Kia Ora te Marae as a priority outcome. This framework has had input from mana whenua and mataawaka. This input is captured in the following mana outcome statement:

Marae are centres of excellence for whānau Māori and have an abundant presence in communities.

Marae in Tāmaki Makaurau aspire to be self-sustaining and thriving. They provide cultural connection and kaitiakitanga for mana whenua and Māori communities. Mana whenua marae carry the responsibility of ahikā; mataawaka marae manaaki whānau and the community.

Marae offer services that contribute to and support whānau and community wellbeing, such as civil defence centres, kōhanga reo and early childhood education. Marae often deliver a range of health, education and social services. Marae have a leadership role to manaaki and foster whanaungatanga for Māori and the wider community, this requires appropriate resource and support.

48.     The scope and intent of the CIF grant aligns closely with this mana statement as detailed elsewhere in this report. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

49.     The 2018-28 LTP consolidated the Māori outcomes budget across council which equated to $150m across 10 years. The CIF is included in this overall Māori outcomes budget. A total of  $1.2m has been ringfenced within this budget annually for the CIF contestable grant. This funding has been retained in the 2020/2021 emergency budget.

50.     Within the $1.2m annual funding there is no split between papakāinga/Māori housing and marae development. It is the role of the assessment panel to recommend to the PACE Committee who will decide on the spread between these outcomes. 

 


 

 

51.     The value of grant funding sought in 2020/2021 versus the recommended value is detailed in the table below:

Marae

Funding request

Recommendation

Manurewa Marae Trust

$168,513

$169,000

Te Kia ora Marae

$170,000

$128,000

 Makarau Marae Reservation Trust

$170,000

$170,000

Te Mahurehure Cultural Marae

$170,000

$0

Komiti Marae Orakei Trust

$170,000

$90,000

Te Herenga Waka o Orewa Marae

$8,063

$9,000

Te Motu a Hiaroa Charitable Trust

$170,000

$170,000

Te Tira Hou Marae

$170,000

$170,000

Mataatua Marae

$122,873

$123,000

Te Kāinga Atawhai - Te Mahurehure Marae

$170,000

$170,000

 

$1,489,449

$1,199,000

 

52.     A small administration fee is also payable for the use of the SmaryGrants system used to administer these grants.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

53.     The processes supporting the CIF grants align with the community grants processes which have been audited. These processes include high levels of transparency and accountability.

54.     This is a current operational programme and no new risks have been identified.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     Following the funding decisions made by this committee, staff will work with the relevant councillors and notify all applicants of the outcome.

56.     Funding agreements will be prepared for all successful applicants. Recipients must provide council with regular update reports including photos. Payments will be made on receipt of invoices from third party suppliers in line with applicant’s funding agreements. This will occur throughout the year as work is complete.

57.     The funding agreement requires recipients to acknowledge Auckland Council’s support.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Interim CIF Marae Development Guideline_May 2020

157

b

Interim CIF Papakāinga and Māori Housing Guideline_May 2020

163

c

summaries of applications

169

d

CIF Assessment Criteria

189

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jane Aickin - Māori Outcomes Lead, Ngā Mātārae – Customer and Community Services

Authoriser

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 


 


 


 


 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 


 


 


 


 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

Implementing a cross-sectoral approach to homelessness

File No.: CP2020/02279

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement of the Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa (Auckland’s regional cross-sectoral homelessness plan) Strategic Framework, and approval of the Auckland Council Implementation Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Homeless is an important issue in Auckland. Over 18,000 Aucklanders were considered homeless in 2018. This represents a decline of nearly 1900 since 2013. 

3.       Homelessness affects a broad range of Aucklanders – the 2013 census found that nationally, 52 per cent of homeless people were employed, in education or both. Some groups are disproportionately affected including Māori and Pacifica communities.

4.       In 2017 the council agreed its position that homelessness should be ‘rare, brief and non-recurring’.

5.       To give effect to the agreed position and role on homelessness, Council has two key roles:

·        leading and coordinating the development, implementation and monitoring of Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa (the regional, cross-sectoral plan)

·        strengthening council levers (council-only actions).

6.       Auckland Council has developed Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa with stakeholders. The plan sets out a common purpose, and focus areas for collaboration. The Strategic Framework and Monitoring and Evaluation Framework are presented for approval. 

7.       Priority actions for collective implementation and an Auckland Council Implementation Plan will be progressively delivered and updated to adapt to a rapidly evolving sector.

8.       In February 2020 the government released the Aotearoa New Zealand Homelessness Action Plan (2020-2023) with $337million funding. The national and regional plan closely align.

9.       COVID-19 responses have accelerated the housing of most rough sleepers in Auckland. Government has committed $107million support the COVID-19 response through to 2021.

10.     The national plan, the COVID-19 response, new funding, and financial and capacity pressures on the council and NGOs have created both uncertainty and opportunity.

11.     The key risk for the Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa approach is the level of uncertainty about future resources in the sector and in council. To mitigate this risk, we will take an adaptive management approach to ensure flexibility and responsiveness.

12.     The short-term priority is to coordinate and support collaborative proposals for the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development’s Local Innovation/Partnership, and He Taupua funds.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      endorse the Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa Strategic Framework, and Monitoring and Reporting Framework in Attachments B and C of the agenda report.

b)      approve the Auckland Council Implementation Plan in Attachment D of the agenda report.

c)      note that council will take an adaptive management approach to manage the uncertainty in the current period while maintaining a focus on the goal that homelessness is rare, brief and non-recurring.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     Homelessness is defined by StatsNZ as living situations where people are:

·        without shelter

·        in temporary accommodation, temporarily sharing overcrowded accommodation

·        living in uninhabitable housing and have no other options to acquire safe and secure housing.

14.     Problems with Census 2018 mean that it has not produced reliable homelessness data.

15.     Researchers at Otago University have combined the census data with data from other sources to develop an estimate of the level of homelessness in 2018. The nature and scale of homelessness in Auckland in 2018 is illustrated in Figure 1.

16.     Current data shows an overall decline of nearly 1900 people in Auckland since Census 2013.

 

17.     Homelessness disproportionately affects Auckland’s Māori and Pacific people. Working families, women and children, young people and rainbow youth are increasingly affected.

18.     Nationally 52 per cent (2013 census) of those homeless are employed, in education or both.

19.     The most recent homelessness statistics indicate homelessness continues to disproportionately impact Māori:

·    nearly 13,000 people identified as homeless in New Zealand were Māori (Census 2018)

·    Māori are twice as likely to be homeless in New Zealand than the general population (Census 2018)

·    over 4,000 Māori in Auckland were estimated to be homeless - a greater proportion than any other region (Census 2013)

·    over 40 per cent of people experiencing homelessness in Auckland identified as Māori (Ira Mata, Ira Tangata the 2018 point in time count) 

·    50 per cent of those who were homeless before COVID-19, now housed in motels identify as Māori (Provider survey 2020).

20.     Because problems with Census 2018 particularly affected the Māori and Pacific response rates, data for these groups in Auckland has not been produced.

21.     Māori experience additional complexities and risk factors relating to homelessness and are more likely to be affected by structural disadvantage (such as unemployment) and other risk factors.

22.     The nature and scale of homelessness varies across the Auckland region. It is concentrated and visible in the central city, the west and the south of the region.

23.     Homelessness is caused by a range of interacting personal and structural factors. In recent years, people with fewer personal risk factors have faced homelessness. The economic impacts of COVID-19 will increase the risk.

All elements of the 2017 decision on council’s role are being addressed

24.     In August 2017 the council agreed its position on improving, ending and preventing homelessness in Auckland is that it is ‘rare, brief and non-recurring’ (ENV 2017/118).

25.     The Committee also agreed that council’s role should be to provide strategic leadership for a regional, cross-sectoral approach, and to strengthen established levers.

26.     The summary in Table 1 below shows that all parts of the decision are being implemented, except for the elements relating to a sustainable funding base and costings.

Councils two key roles: leading Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa, and strengthening our levers

27.     To give effect to the agreed position and role on homelessness, the council has two roles:

·        leading and coordinating the development, implementation and monitoring of Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa

·        strengthening council levers (council-only actions).

28.     Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa is Auckland’s regional, cross-sectoral homelessness plan.

29.     It has been developed with key stakeholders and sets out focus areas for collaboration to address homelessness across the region. Auckland Council plays a ‘backbone’ support role as part of a collective impact approach.

30.     The development of Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa has involved:

·    working with key government agencies, NGOs, iwi and philanthropy

·    building strong relationships, consensus and commitment to collective impact

·    a research report that informed the policy advice on council’s position and role

·    engagement meetings with agencies and participation in a range of forums

·    system mapping and analysis

·    convening the cross-sectoral Leaders’ Group (comprised of senior staff from stakeholder organisations)

·    journey mapping research with single mothers and frontline service providers

·    regional stakeholder workshops

·    engagement with local boards and advisory panels.

Aotearoa New Zealand Homelessness Action Plan aligns with Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa

31.     In February 2020, government released the Aotearoa New Zealand Homelessness Action Plan 2020-2023.

32.     Council staff and stakeholders involved in Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa contributed to development of the national plan.

33.     The national plan closely aligns with council’s position and Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa.

34.     The plans share the vision: ‘homelessness is prevented where possible, or is rare, brief and non-recurring’.

35.     The national plan identifies 18 actions to be implemented in 2020 and 18 longer term actions. A progress report about implementing the actions in due in August 2020.

36.     This plan is backed by $337million of new funding. This includes:

·    $16.6million for a Local Innovation and Partnership fund

·    $20million for He Taupua to build capability and address homelessness for Māori ($3million in 2020/21).

37.     Details of the funds are due to be announced by the Ministry for Housing and Urban Development before the end of the year.

38.     Council will undertake further work to develop a sustainable funding base and costings once decisions about allocation of this funding in Auckland are known.

The COVID-19 response to homelessness has been transformational

39.     COVID-19 followed soon after the national plan was announced.

40.     People sleeping rough were at high risk of COVID-19 due to their living conditions, health risk profile, high level of mobility, and minimal ability to socially isolate.

41.     The sharp reduction in tourism caused by COVID-19 created significant spare motel capacity. The government, council and NGOs used this opportunity to house people sleeping rough.

42.     This is not an appropriate long-term solution, but it is a short-term improvement.

43.     On 1 May 2020, 1208 motel units had been secured nationwide, over a third in Auckland.

44.     On 22 July 2020, there were 514 people in emergency accommodation in motels in Auckland. This number has been higher at some points.

45.     Figure 2 describes some characteristics of the people experiencing homelessness who were housed in motels during COVID-19. Note that these figures are nationwide.

46.     People who had previously resisted leaving the street have been housed. Service providers describe profound improvements in the wellbeing of those now housed in motels.

 

47.     An additional $107million was provided in Budget 2020 to enable continued use of motels for accommodation through to 2021.

48.     Those who are homeless are also receiving wrap around support, regular meals, improved access to primary health care, and other social support.

49.     Agencies are also working to provide a pathway to affordable, stable, healthy and fit for purpose housing.

50.     The COVID-19 response has strengthened cross-sectoral collaboration in Auckland towards a shared purpose and continues to have a very positive impact on homelessness outcomes.

51.     Some of the processes and systems set up in Auckland are now being considered as models for operations in other parts of the country.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

 

52.     This report seeks endorsement of Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa – a cross sectoral homelessness plan for Auckland and approval of council’s Implementation Plan.

53.     This will demonstrate council’s ongoing commitment to Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa and will provide a mandate for council’s continued role as the ‘backbone’ agency.  

Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa - activating collaboration to address homelessness

54.     The purpose of Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa is to develop and progress the cross sectoral homelessness plan for Auckland. This will help to guide, enable and activate collaboration (rather than individual agency actions) across Auckland.

55.     Its sets out a common vision that “All Aucklanders have a place to call home”, and that homelessness should be “rare, brief and non-recurring”.

56.     Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa interacts with the national plan for homelessness and has three key components:

·    Strategic Framework

·    Monitoring and Evaluation Framework

·    Indicative priorities for action.

Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa: Strategic Framework

57.     The Strategic Framework (Attachment 2) highlights the vision, domains and purpose. It includes a matrix of 23 focus areas structured around:

·    three domains: housing, integrated health and social services, and connections within homes and communities such as employment opportunities

·    an intervention continuum: prevention, early intervention, support for people experiencing homelessness, and establishing the foundations of an effective system, such as leadership, workforce and data.

58.     The Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa Strategic Framework includes an adaptive management approach. This recognises that decisions cannot wait until uncertainties are reduced, and progress can continue while adapting and making changes as required.

59.     The individual Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa Leaders’ Group agencies who have helped to develop the plan are managing decisions about formal approval from their organisation.

60.     Government agencies who are partners to the Aotearoa New Zealand National Homelessness Action Plan have signalled their support for regional approaches consistent with this plan. They have not endorsed Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa.

Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa: Monitoring and Evaluation Framework

61.     Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa includes a Monitoring and Evaluation Framework (Attachment 3) to measure progress and inform reporting to the Committee and stakeholders every 18 months.

62.     The Framework includes measures of outcomes (linked to indicators of rare, brief and non-recurring homelessness), system improvements, and implementation of the priority actions.

63.     The council will coordinate development of the monitoring report. This will include identifying data sources, and initiating data projects to address gaps and to improve data quality.

64.     The first report will establish baseline measures against which trends and progress can be monitored in the future. The reports will inform future priority actions.

 

Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa: Priority Actions

65.     The indicative priorities for action 2020/21 are:

·    Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa (regional collaborative actions)

Lead and coordinate collaborative funding proposals

Support and strengthen implementation of the Aotearoa New Zealand Homelessness Action Plan in Auckland

Implement other agreed Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa priority actions

Monitoring, research and evaluation.

·    Auckland Council Implementation Plan (council-only actions):

Identifies the key levers and actions including business as usual, 2020/21 priorities and additional actions to be scoped or developed into proposals.

66.     Priority actions include those already under way and can be progressed in the short term. Other actions are contingent on national action plan implementation and securing funding.

67.     The indicative priority actions in 2020/21 are summarised in Table 2 (further detail Attachment 4).


 

Strengths and Weaknesses of Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa

68.     The key strengths and weaknesses of Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa are outlined below.

Strengths:

·    established a common vision, objectives and priorities

·    taking a systems approach, rather than ad hoc action

·    enabled members to gain knowledge and skills on sustaining collaboration and a collective impact approach

·    provides an effective forum for information and knowledge sharing.

Weaknesses:

·    requires significant resources to manage and maintain progress

·    some key groups such as Pacific and rainbow are not well represented

·    tensions exist between service delivery outcomes and the work needed for collective systems approach (i.e. resourcing regional priorities can be difficult).

Sector uncertainty and new opportunities require an adaptive approach

69.     The indicative priority actions were initially developed in 2019 with external stakeholders (particularly the Leaders’ Group) and internal stakeholders. The national plan, the COVID-19 response, financial and capacity pressures on the council and NGOs, and new funding have created significant uncertainty and opportunities.

70.     While there is broad agreement, the actions have been reconsidered (using an adaptive management approach) to take account of the uncertainties and opportunities such as new funding.

71.     The priority actions and Implementation Plan will be progressively updated using an adaptive management approach to respond to evolving challenges and opportunities in the sector.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

72.     Those who are homeless are likely to be more exposed to the effects of climate change, such as increases in the number of hot days and the frequency of extreme rainfall.

73.     Addressing homelessness will increase resilience for people who are homeless.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

74.     The Implementation Plan includes the council’s actions related to Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa and strengthening council levers.

75.     The actions to strengthen council levers have received endorsement in principle from the relevant parts of council. Resourcing challenges are expected over the short term.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

76.     Local Boards were engaged in the early phase of developing Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa.

77.     Local Boards were in general agreement that homelessness was either a prominent or emerging issue in their area. They acknowledged a lack of awareness and understanding of the scale of ‘hidden’ homeless and required more data on this form of homelessness.

78.     The council will continue to provide advice and support local boards on their initiatives and local responses.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

79.     The most recent homelessness statistics indicate homelessness continues to disproportionately impact Māori.

80.     The Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa embeds responsiveness to Māori through:

·    principles: Kāinga, Te Tiriti, Enquiry, and evidence-based (which highlights the over-representation of Māori in homelessness data)

·    desired outcomes: Māori have housing that meets their needs; and Māori kāinga aspirations are achieved

·    prioritising Māori as one of Auckland’s most vulnerable populations.

81.     The priority actions aim to improve outcomes for Māori. In particular, the following specific actions are included:

·    supporting national initiatives such as expanded financial literacy (a programme for Māori is being jointly developed by Te Puni Kokiri and the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development)

·    developing funding proposals for the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development’s Local Innovation and Partnership, and He Taupua funds, such as a regional network of kaupapa Māori, marae-based information and outreach hubs, possibly starting in the south and west

·    streamlining the regional collaboration and coordination system, including engagement with Māori, and people with lived experience

·    the Monitoring and Evaluation Framework includes Māori outcome, system and implementation indicators

·    engagement with people at risk or with lived experience of homelessness in the development, implementation and monitoring of initiatives.

82.     Council will continue to engage with Māori through our relationships with central government, Iwi, NGOs and other bodies (such as Te Matapihi) to ensure responsiveness to Māori needs and aspirations. A short-term priority is to convene a hui with these agencies to agree the ongoing approach to engagement and partnership.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

83.     Under Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa, council will coordinate proposals for the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development’s homelessness funding to support the priority actions. The outcome will shape how Auckland Council allocates its operational budget.

84.     The Auckland Council Implementation Plan will be progressed through existing baselines. Where this cannot be achieved business cases will be produced to seek funding through Annual Plan and Long-term Plan processes.


 

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

85.     The following table shows the major risks for Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa and the mitigations for these risks.

Risk (If…)

Consequence (Then…)

Mitigation

The sector, particularly NGOs, struggle to engage because of competing priorities

It may be difficult to agree and make progress on collaborative activities under Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa

Will engage proactively with NGOs to understand pressures and availability. Council will be able to take a lead role in the short-term to progress some initiatives

The response to the COVID-19 pandemic reduces available resources

Progress may be slower than planned

This risk will be mitigated by the collaborative approach that underpins Kia Whai Kāinga Tātou Katoa and by being flexible and adaptive to changing circumstances

There are reduced staff or financial resources within council

It may be difficult to make progress on the Auckland Council Homelessness Implementation Plan

Reconfirming activities given recent changes. Activities for 2020/21 will focus on those that can be implemented with limited resources

 

86.     Risks are being managed using council’s normal project management mechanisms and by adopting an adaptive management approach. Each of the council Implementation Plan actions will have a project plan that will identify risks and mitigations.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

87.     Council’s next priority is to lead and coordinate collaborative funding proposals for the Ministry of Housing and Urban Development Funds. This will shape the work programme and future priorities for action, including allocation of council’s operational funding for homelessness.

88.     Council will also commence the “streamlining project”, including focused engagement with Māori, and convening a cross-sectoral COVID-19 review and learning forum.

89.     Progress will be reported every 18 months against the Monitoring and Evaluation Framework to the Committee, and the findings will inform updates to the priority actions.

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

National Homelessness Action Plan Summary

205

b

Kia Whai Kainga Tatou Katoa

207

c

Monitoring and Evaluation Framework

211

d

Auckland Council Implementation Plan

213

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben Brooks - Team Leader Community Policy

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki – General Manager - Community & Social Policy

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 


 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 



Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 


 


 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

I Am Auckland Implementation and Evaluation Annual Update and COVID-19 Impacts

File No.: CP2020/02880

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on child and youth activity across the Auckland Council group, in accordance with I Am Auckland implementation and evaluation, including early insights and recommendations on the impact of COVID-19.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       I Am Auckland is Auckland Council’s strategic plan to support the wellbeing of children and young people in Auckland. It has seven key goals aligned to Auckland Plan outcomes.

3.       In 2019, pre-COVID-19, the council had made good progress on implementation, with delivery aligned to achieving positive life outcomes for our children and young people.

4.       Solid progress has been made towards increasing delivery in Goal 7: Whakapuawai: Rangatahi tu Rangatira/All rangatahi will thrive. This was identified as an area for improvement, and delivery is now in line with four of the other six goals.

5.       Evaluation of child and youth initiatives across the Auckland Council whānau has become more routine, with evaluation requirements often forming part of contracting arrangements.

6.       Early insights on the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, and the corresponding economic downturn, on young people include:

·    unemployment has increased at twice the rate of older cohorts. Young people tend to be employed in retail, tourism and hospitality sectors-severely impacted by COVID-19

·    higher rates of loneliness and isolation were reported by young people during lockdown

·    34 per cent of homeless people who were housed in motels by Lifewise during lockdown were young people aged from 0-29 years.

·    tamariki and rangatahi Māori are more likely to be negatively impacted across all areas of social and economic life, with COVID-19 exacerbating inequities in outcomes (see Attachment B).

7.       The council whānau have responded to COVID-19, delivering services online and implementing new ways of engaging children and young people.

8.       The council Emergency Budget has seen reductions in funding for some regional programmes, events and grants. This may have an impact on the delivery of some child and youth activities.

9.       The retention of Local Board Local Discretionary Initiatives funding in 2020/21 means local boards will have the ability to continue to support local youth programmes.

10.     In response, staff are looking for ways to focus and reprioritise reduced budgets to those most in need and to leverage across programmes to create new service opportunities.

11.     Some parts of council such as the Southern Initiative and ATEED have been able to secure new government investment. This will support recovery and employment outcomes for targeted young people in areas of high need in South and West Auckland. 

12.     Staff will continue to monitor and provide updates on the impacts of COVID-19 and a full three year I Am Auckland status report will be reported in 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      receive the 2020 I Am Auckland Implementation and Evaluation Annual Update as set out in Attachment C of the agenda report

b)      agree that staff will develop a series of communication to highlight the council responses to COVID-19 impacts on children and young people, using channels such as OurAuckland

c)      agree that staff will monitor and report regularly on COVID-19 impacts and council responses for children and young people

d)      request that staff as delegated through the Chief Executive report back a three year I Am Auckland status report in 2021

Horopaki

Context

13.     I Am Auckland is Auckland Council’s Child and Youth Strategic Action Plan. Adopted in 2013, it reflects the council’s commitments to create a city that supports the wellbeing of Auckland’s children and young people.

14.     It has seven goals and related action areas. This provides direction to the council and council-controlled organisations (the council whānau) about support for Auckland’s children and young people.

15.     In 2017 the council published the first I Am Auckland Status Report, which reviewed how the council whānau has delivered on the plan. The key recommendations were:

·        improve coordination, implementation monitoring and evaluation impact

·        increase delivery on Goal 7: Whakapuawai: Rangatahi tu Rangatira/All rangatahi will thrive, as well as monitoring implementation and evaluating the impact we are making.

16.     In December 2018 the council agreed an implementation plan and evaluation framework ENV/2018/171 (Diagram 1).

17.     The diagram below sets out the governance, management, oversight and delivery of I Am Auckland.

18.     This is the first annual update as specified by the I Am Auckland Implementation Plan and Evaluation Framework including insights on the impacts of COVID-19 pandemic, as well as the corresponding economic downturn, on young people.

19.     More detailed information on the implementation of I am Auckland, the insights and impacts and council responses to COVID are provided as follows:

·        I Am Auckland COVID-19 impacts – Attachment A

·        Rangatahi report – Attachment B 

·        I Am Auckland Annual Reporting – Attachment C.

The child and youth population in Auckland continues to grow

20.     A third of Auckland’s population, 537,528 people, are aged 24 or younger.

21.     The largest group is the primary school aged group (5-12), followed by the post-school group (18-24) (Diagram 2).

The largest ethnic group is European, followed by Asian, with some growth in the Asian (from 20 to 23 per cent) and Māori (13 to 14 per cent) child and youth populations (Diagram 3).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

COVID-19 has had a significant impact on young people

22.     Unemployment for young people has likely increased at twice the rate of older cohorts.

23.     This is partly due to young people working in retail, hospitality, and construction sectors, often without permanent contracts, or very early in their careers.

24.     Young people are also less likely to have built up a financial safety net.

25.     Adolescence, social media, leaving school, and the transitions associated with that, can all have challenging and isolating impacts on a young person’s life and wellbeing.

26.     This is particularly true for people who have moved or separated from a social and economic support network. The lockdown period exacerbated these issues.

27.     Higher rates of loneliness and isolation were reported by young people during COVID-19 than in the general population.

28.     A recent report on the impacts of lockdown found young people experienced greater levels of negative emotions such as anger, stress, and sadness.

29.     Thirty-six per cent of young people who experienced economic loss reported feeling anger a lot during the day compared to 19 per cent of those young people who did not report economic loss[i]. Mood breakdowns by age is provided (Diagram 4) below:

30.     According to Lifewise, of the 514 homeless people housed in motels during lockdown:

· 11 per cent were aged from 0-19 years

· 23 per cent or 123 were aged 20-29 years.

Impacts of COVID-19 likely to be greater for tamariki and rangatahi Māori

31.     The impacts of COVID-19 on whānau and rangatahi Māori are likely to be greater than those of the general population. Key findings include:

·        significant number of rangatahi Māori were working in industries impacted by the COVID-19 economic crisis such as accommodation, tourism, hospitality and retail.

·        limited safe and secure emergency housing available for rangatahi Māori to access.

·        only 50 per cent of iwi whānau had an internet-enabled mobile phone in the household which tamariki were attempting to use for their remote learning during COVID-19, impacting on their ability to access education.

·        whānau and tamariki in low income households faced food security challenges before and during lockdown, particularly when panic buying was widespread.

32.     These issues will mean it is likely tamariki and rangatahi experienced heightened stress and anxiety during lockdown.

The council whānau adapted during lockdown

33.     During Level 3 and 4 lockdowns, the council whānau were able to pivot and respond to the needs of young Aucklanders. Teams provided more services online and developed new ways of engaging children, young people and their whānau:

·        Active Recreation: used the Goosechase app to create bubble-friendly ‘missions’ that families were able to complete to win prizes. The #WeGotThisNZ challenge included child-friendly content and could be completed solo, as a family team or with flatmates

·        Youth Empowerment: worked with many youth voice groups to deliver programmes online and supported groups in the community to continue their youth engagement

·        Adullam Boy’s Club in Ōtara-Papatoetoe: continued engaging weekly with rangatahi, ensuring welfare needs were met, providing a safe place to discuss issues, learning from home and what a new normal would be like for themselves and their whānau

·        MOTAT: developed a new platform for children and young people called www.motat.fun. The aim of this was to share MOTAT content, support learning in the home and to provide a safe online space for younger Aucklanders

·        The Southern Initiative: were able to pivot and re-deploy some rangatahi into essential service jobs, as well as providing additional scholarships to address Māori under representation in the tech sector

·        ATEED: ran employment schemes that prioritise rangatahi Māori

·        Auckland Emergency Management: establish a welfare 0800 support number and partnered with NGO’s to provide food parcels to whānau in need during lockdown. The highest demand for was from South and West Auckland where high Māori populations and many rangatahi Māori reside.

Adapting services post COVID and Emergency Budget

34.     In 2020/21, the council whānau are continuing to plan and deliver programmes for children and young people, in keeping with the I Am Auckland strategy.

35.     The Emergency Budget funding reductions for community and arts facilities and regional programmes (including events and grants). This may impact on some youth delivery, particularly through council’s community and arts centres.

36.     In response, council staff are re-prioritising and focusing programming for young people and those most in need. Using the learnings of lockdown, staff are looking to develop new and innovative ways of delivery and to leverage across programmes to create new opportunities.

37.     An example of this is the adaption of the “Stand Out Stand Up” programme. While the programme will be smaller in scale, young musicians will get the chance to perform at Music in Parks this summer. 

38.     The retention of Local Board Discretionary Initiatives (LDI) funding will enable local youth programmes to continue, for example all youth voice groups have been able to resume.

39.     Council has successful programmes in place regarding youth employment, engagement, participation and to prevent youth homelessness which can help mitigate the impacts of COVID-19.

40.     The Southern Initiative and ATEED secured new government funding through the Pacific Skills Shift to mitigate the impact of the economic crisis on Pacific aiga, and young people. (see Attachment C for more on this).

Pre-COVID Annual Update: During 2019, we made good progress on implementation

41.     Over 2019, the council whānau delivered a large number of child and youth initiatives.

42.     Improved coordination mechanisms have supported the tracking and collation of over 150 child and youth activities across the Auckland Council whānau.

43.     Council delivery is especially strong towards Goal 4: Fair Go and Goal 6: Opportunity, but we could do more towards our other goals (Diagram 4).

44.     Delivery towards Goal 7: Whakapuawai has improved:

·        10 more initiatives identified for this progress report

·        the current level of activity more in line with four of the other six goals

·        28 initiatives were identified showing a substantial increase from the five identified in the 2017 I Am Auckland Status Report.

45.     Other notable changes from 2017 include:

·        Goal 3: Health and Wellbeing – increasing from seven initiatives to over thirty

·        Goal 2: Belonging – more than doubling from 13 to 32.

46.     Council’s delivery is strongly aligned with protective factors for young people, with recent research demonstrating that positive life opportunities such as education, employment, leisure and recreation support young people to cope with adversity[ii].

Indicators of progress towards I Am Auckland Goals have been established

47.     Between 2018 and 2020, 16 council evaluations of activities that contribute to the I Am Auckland goals were initiated. The evaluations are increasing capability across council, as well as supporting a culture change to assess the impact of our activities and services on children and young people.

48.     Evaluation of initiatives are also becoming more of a norm, with monitoring and evaluation requirements generally forming part of contracting arrangements.

49.     Indicators of progress towards I Am Auckland goals have been established.

50.     The measures captured in the Table 1 below are drawn from the Auckland Plan, Quality of Life data and the Child and Youth Wellbeing Strategy. Where the indicator is blank, data is not currently available, but will be included for the next status update.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

51.     This is an update report with no climate impacts. However, there are many activities that have an environmental focus or deliver positive climate outcomes as part of I Am Auckland.

52.     The Young Leaders Programme for Sustainability in an example.

 


 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

53.     The implementation update includes child and youth activities from across the Auckland Council whānau. Our Community of Practice includes members from across the council, as well as Panuku, Auckland Zoo, ATEED and Regional Facilities Auckland.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

54.     Eighteen local board plans specifically mention children and young people.

55.     Some local board activities, such as youth voice groups, have been included in the implementation update. There are also many examples of localised delivery.

56.     Local boards deliver actions for children and youth outcomes through their discretionary funding and grants.

57.     Comparatively low numbers of activities have been recorded towards Goal 1: Voice. This could be affected by local board activity being captured only broadly – i.e. local youth voice is recorded as one activity, but includes the many different youth councils, youth boards and youth groups that local boards fund.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

58.     Māori represent 14 per cent of Auckland’s children and young people.

59.     I Am Auckland has a Māori outcomes goal, Goal 7: Whakapuawai, which has seen increased initiatives and delivery towards since the 2017 review.

60.     Tamariki and rangatahi Māori have been identified by the Ministry of Health as being more at risk of longer-term mental health impacts because of COVID-19. They are also more likely to be negatively impacted than those of the general population in terms of employment, housing, education, and food security.

61.     In response to COVID-19 and restricted resource, council staff are re-prioritising and focusing programming for young people and those most in need, such as tamariki and rangatahi Māori.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

62.     This is an update report with no financial implications.


 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

63.     We have identified two key risks for the delivery of the I Am Auckland Evaluation Framework and Implementation Plan, as described in the table below.

Risk

Impact

Mitigation

Stretched resources across council.

Delivery of programmes evaluations are under pressure and timelines are extended.

Maintain and/or priorities staff support and resources.

Turnover in key staff.

Reduced coordination, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, harder to acquire updates.

Community of Practice and Managerial Reference Groups to strengthen relationships and number of contacts.

Changes in budget impact on programme delivery for children and young people.

We are less able to deliver against I Am Auckland goals, leading to potential for poorer outcomes for children and young people.

Less resources are focussed on innovation and programme delivery for children and young people with the greatest need in the region.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

64.     Staff will continue to monitor and report on the impacts of COVID-19 on Auckland’s children and young people, especially as more data becomes available.

65.     Given the wide range of child and youth activities undertaken across council, not all will have been included in the implementation plan. Where gaps exist, we are using the growing community of practice to fill these in time for the next three-year Status Report.

66.     The three-yearly I Am Auckland Status Report is due to be completed in the 2020/21 financial year. Staff will work with the Youth Advisory Panel to deliver this to reinforce the shared ownership of I Am Auckland.

67.     The Status Report will be reported to the committee in 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

I Am Auckland COVID-19 Impacts

227

b

Rangatahi Report

277

c

I Am Auckland Annual Reporting

289

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Breanna Hawthorne - Policy Analyst

Liz Civil - Manager Community Policy

Joanna Maskell - Principal Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - GM - Community & Social Policy

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

Open space acquisition 2019/20

File No.: CP2020/10581

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the annual summary of parks and open space acquisition for the 2019/20 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each year staff provide a summary of all open space acquired in the previous financial year. It serves as a public record of land acquired through confidential negotiations for Aucklanders to use for sport and recreation. 

3.       Eight new parks and open space covering a land area of approximately 103 hectares were acquired in the 2019/20 financial year. This included the acquisition of 95 hectares for inclusion in Mahurangi East Regional Park.

4.       A short animation has been developed to highlight council’s investment in public open space. It can be used to draw Aucklanders attention to the new parks and open spaces.

5.       A total of $27.091 million was spent acquiring the new parks and open space.

6.       The remainder of 2019/20 open space acquisition budget was moved to the outyears of the Long-term plan due to the significant impact of COVID-19 on council revenue.

7.       The ongoing financial impact of the pandemic means that $15.659 million was allocated by the Governing Body to open space acquisition in 2020/21 as part of the Emergency Budget.  

8.       Staff will need to manage low financial and reputational risks in order to fit within this fiscal envelope. These risks can be mitigated by timing settlement with subdivision completion under the Resource Management Act 1991 and payment of development contributions.

9.       There is sufficient budget allocated in 2021/22 and outyears under the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 for council to acquire all of the open space already approved by the governing body.

10.     Staff will develop a series of communication initiatives to highlight the ongoing acquisition programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      note that Auckland Council acquired eight new parks and open space covering a land area of approximately 103 hectares in the 2019/20 financial year.

b)      acknowledge, with thanks, the generous bequests from the John Turnbull and Margaret Turnbull philanthropic trusts that supported the acquisition of 95 hectares of land for inclusion in the Mahurangi East Regional Park.

c)      approve a series of communication initiatives to highlight the new parks and open spaces using channels such as Our Auckland and social media.

d)      invite elected members and staff to share the open space animation using social media such as Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Each year staff provide a summary of all open space acquired in the previous financial year. It serves as a public record of land acquired through confidential negotiations for Aucklanders to use for sport and recreation. 

Eight new parks and open space were acquired in 2019/20

12.     Eight new parks and open space covering a land area of approximately 103 hectares were acquired in the 2019/20 financial year.

13.     The acquisition of 95 hectares for inclusion in the Mahurangi East Regional Park accounted for a large part of the overall land area. This land, and an easement for access, was acquired for $11.75 million and was partially funded by bequests from the John Turnbull and Margaret Turnbull philanthropic trusts ($5.28 million).

14.     Approximately 5.7 hectares was acquired in Spedding Road to complete the acquisition of a 10.1-hectare sport park in Whenuapai. It adjoins 4.3 hectares of land acquired in Trig Road last year.

15.     Other acquisitions included six neighbourhood parks.

16.     The neighbourhood park acquisition at 1 Oro Lane, Wainui, involved payments of $1.5 million in 2018/19 and a final settlement of $0.9 million in 2019/20.

17.     Table 1 below outlines the address, park type, local board area, land area and costs of each acquisition.

Table 1: Summary of parks and open space acquisition 2019/20

Number

Address

Park type

Local Board

Size (ha)

Cost

1

4 Jackson Crescent, Martins Bay (Mahurangi East Regional Park) A

Regional Park

Rodney

95.000

$5,337,564

2

4 Spedding Road, Whenuapai

Sport Park

Upper Harbour

5.7389

$8,385,508

3

1 Oro Lane, Silverdale North B

Neighbourhood Park

Hibiscus and Bays

0.2999

$902,309

4

39 Island View Road, Hingaia

Neighbourhood Park

Papakura

0.4000

$1,053,561

5

41 Tir Conaill Avenue, Flat Bush

Neighbourhood Park

Howick

0.3971

$3,474,625

6

148 Thomas Road, Flat Bush

Neighbourhood Park

Howick

0.4000

$3,305,371

7

3 Archibald Drive, Wainui

Neighbourhood Park

Rodney

0.3679

$2,408,615

8

129 Ahutoetoe Road, Wainui

Neighbourhood Park

Rodney

0.5012

$2,224,005

 

Total

103.105

$27,091,558

Notes

A The total purchase price excluding costs was $11.75M. Funding of $5.287M was provided by the Turnbull trusts and there is a payment of c.$1.1M to be made in 2020/21.

B Reported in 2018/19 as 157 Grand Drive, Silverdale North. Total acquisition cost was $2.40M, with $1.50M paid in 2018/19, and $0.90M in 2019/20.

18.     The map below indicates the location of these new parks and open spaces.

Figure 1: Location of new parks and open space

Two other acquisitions were at no capital cost under the Chief Executive’s delegations

19.     The General Manager, Community and Social Policy, used delegated authority to approve the following two minor open space acquisitions at no capital cost under the Chief Executive’s delegations (as amended in June 2017):

·       141mat Range View Road to widen and improve the Range View Road accessway to Murray Halberg Park, Owairaka

·       37mto widen and improve the Dunkirk Terrace accessway to Murray Halberg Park, Owairaka.

20.     This delegation is used infrequently. It was used in this instance on the basis that the acquisitions were:

·       minor

·       consistent with council policy

·       offered at no cost to council

·       assessed as having minimal consequential maintenance cost, which can be accommodated within existing maintenance budgets

·       supported by the local board.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     Staff have developed an animation highlighting the growing number of new parks and open space in Auckland. This was in response to resolutions of the Environment and Community Committee [ENV/2018/104 and ENV/2019/137 refer] to:

“approve the development of a series of communication initiatives to highlight the new parks and open spaces acquired…for Aucklanders’ use and enjoyment.”

22.     The animation seeks to inform Aucklanders that:

·       Auckland Council is actively acquiring open space and planning for growth

·       Auckland Council delivers parks that are close to where people live because proximity is closely linked to participation

·       new parks and open spaces have a range of amenity values

·       they are part of a comprehensive network of more than 4000 parks and open spaces across Auckland.

23.     This animation can be used in various communication channels including:

·       corporate communications platforms (Our Auckland webpage and existing social media channels)

·       elected members and staff using its existing social media channels such as Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram.

24.     Staff recommend the development of a series of communication initiatives to highlight the new parks and open spaces acquired in 2019/20 using these channels.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     Parks and open space serve as ecological and biodiversity corridors. They promote and protect native plants and animals. Vegetation and woodland process carbon to help slow the accumulation of greenhouse gases.

26.     Grassed areas help reduce maximum temperature ranges in urban and suburban areas. Parks and open space also act as collection points for surface and run-off water, reducing flood risks during storms.

27.     Parks and open space must be managed in environmentally sensitive ways to achieve these benefits. This includes energy and waste reduction and conserving water resources.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     This is an information report for reporting purposes only.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     The relevant local boards were consulted on each acquisition of open space.

30.     Local boards have decision-making responsibility for the development of new parks and open space. This includes responsibility for maintenance.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     Quality parks and open spaces help to facilitate Māori participation in sport and recreation.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     A total of $27.091 million was spent acquiring the new parks and open space.

33.     The remainder of 2019/20 open space acquisition budget was moved to the outyears of the Long-term plan due to the significant impact of COVID-19 on council revenue.

34.     The ongoing financial impact of the pandemic means that $15.659 million was allocated by the Governing Body to open space acquisition in 2020/21 as part of the Emergency Budget.  

35.     Staff will need to manage low financial risks in order to fit within this fiscal envelope. These risks can be mitigated by timing settlement with subdivision completion under the Resource Management Act 1991 and payment of development contributions.

36.     There is sufficient budget allocated in 2021/22 and outyears under the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 (see Table 2 below) for council to acquire all of the open space already approved by the governing body.

Table 2: Open space acquisition budget

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

2027/28

$15.659M

$80.351M

$79.024M

$130.712M

$109.471M

$74.579M

$66.245M

$64.224M

37.     These budgets may be subject to change as part of the forthcoming Long-term Plan process.

38.     Development and maintenance costs for new parks and open spaces are provided for as a percentage of the acquisition cost in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     This report may help dispel the reputational risk that council is disposing of open space land.

40.     In 2019/20 council disposed of four sites zoned as open space. The total land area of these four sites was 0.37 hectares. This represents less than one percent (0.36%) of the total land area acquired by council.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     Each year council receives media enquiries about the sale of open space land.

42.     Staff will develop a series of communication initiatives to highlight the ongoing acquisition of open space.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Paul Marriott-Lloyd - Senior Policy Manager

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki – General Manager - Community & Social Policy

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020

 

Regional Parks Management Plan - approval to notify intent to prepare new plan

File No.: CP2020/10537

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve public notification of the intention to prepare a new regional parks management plan and release a discussion paper for consultation.

2.       To approve the engagement approach and final scope of the review of the regional parks management plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       On 11 June 2020, the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee (the Committee) approved commencing a comprehensive review of the Regional Parks Management Plan 2010 (Resolution number PAC/2020/16).

4.       This report recommends initiation of the first consultation phase for the regional parks management plan review for a six week period.

5.       Formally notifying the intention to prepare a new regional parks management plan by 30 August 2020 meets the statutory deadline to review the management plan every 10 years under the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area Act 2008 and the consultation requirements in section 41(5) of the Reserves Act 1977.

6.       This report also presents the discussion paper (Attachment A) to introduce the review to the public as a key component of the first round of consultation. This paper is intended to provide background information and introduce topics to prompt public feedback to inform the review.

7.       We recommend authority to approve final changes to the discussion paper are delegated to the Chair and Deputy Chair to reflect any changes requested in the consideration of this report. 

8.       Initiate a six-week consultation period, aiming for the period of 1 September to 12 October 2020 and implement the engagement approach.

9.       We have initiated engagement with mana whenua and planned an engagement approach to support the first consultation round.

10.     On 11 June 2020 the Committee confirmed the scope of the review and requested staff provide further advice on the inclusion of two regional parks: the Auckland Botanic Gardens and leased regional park land on Te Motu a Hiaroa / Puketutu Island.

11.     After consideration of the advantages and disadvantages, we recommend the Auckland Botanic Gardens not be included in this review. Instead we recommend that review of the Auckland Botanic Gardens Management Plan 2001 be scheduled to start in 2021/2022 to build on the policy work that will be undertaken in this review.

12.     With respect to Te Motu a Hiaroa / Puketutu Island, we recommend that potential inclusion of the park-lease area into the Regional Parks Management Plan be considered once the master plan for the wider island has been developed to ensure that the management direction reflects the mana whenua vision and intent for the motu. 


 

13.     In June 2020 Motukorea / Browns Island was included within scope of this review (Resolution number PAC/2020/16). The 2015 resolution (PAR/2015/92 (b)) for the motu to be included in the conservation management plan for the Hauraki Gulf/Tikapa Moana inner motu needs to be revoked for consistency.  

14.     The costs of public notification and engagement activities will be met from existing budget, confirmed in the Emergency Budget 2020/2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee:

a)      approve public notification of the intention to prepare a new management plan for the regional parks and invite written suggestions following the requirements of s.41(5) of the Reserves Act 1977

b)      approve a public consultation period of at least six weeks commencing in early September 2020

c)      approve the attached draft discussion paper (as per Attachment A) for release as part of the public consultation in resolution b), subject to any changes requested at this meeting

d)      delegate to the Chair, Deputy Chair and the Independent Māori Statutory Board representative the authority to approve the final changes to the discussion paper

e)      endorse the engagement approach outlined in paragraphs 30 to 39 of this report

f)       endorse a review of the Auckland Botanic Gardens Management Plan 2001 to follow this review, commencing in 2021/2022

g)      note that the land subject to a park-lease at Te Motu a Hiaroa (Puketutu Island) will be considered for inclusion in the management plan once the master plan for the wider motu has been developed

h)      revoke subclause b) of the Parks, Sports and Recreation Committee resolution PAR/2015/92, which is:

b)      support the incorporation of Browns Island (Motukorea) in the conservation management plan for the Hauraki Gulf/Tikapa Moana inner motu, that is being prepared in accordance with the Ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau Collective Redress Act 2014, subject to the part of the plan relating to Browns Island (Motukorea) being developed and approved by Auckland Council.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

15.     The regional parks network comprises more than 41,000 hectares of park land in 30 regional parks.

16.     The network has been managed via an omnibus management plan since 2002. The current plan was prepared in 2010 and covers 25 regional parks.

17.     On 11 June 2020 the Committee approved the initiation of a comprehensive review of the Regional Parks Management Plan 2010 following section 41 of the Reserves Act 1977 (Resolution number PAC/2020/16).

18.     The review includes the 25 regional parks under the current plan and additional regional parks and parkland not covered by the current plan:

·   Glenfern Sanctuary on Aotea / Great Barrier Island

·   Motukorea / Browns Island

·   Mutukaroa / Hamlins Hill

·   Mahurangi East extension (acquired in January 2020).

19.     The Committee also confirmed that the unfinished Te Ārai variation to the 2010 plan will be incorporated into this review.

20.     Further advice on the exclusion of the remaining two regional parks, the Auckland Botanic Gardens and the regional park lease on Te Motu a Hiaroa / Puketutu Island is provided in paragraphs 40-47 of this report.

21.     At a workshop on 1 July 2020, the committee considered the proposed content of the discussion paper, the engagement approach, and proposed timing of the Auckland Botanic Gardens management plan review. Local board chairs were invited to join this workshop and 10 local board representatives participated.

22.     The discussion paper (refer Attachment A) and engagement approach reflects guidance provided at the workshop.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Notifying the review and calling for suggestions is the first public step under the Reserves Act 1977

23.     To develop a regional parks management plan compliant with both the Reserves Act 1977 and the special consultative procedure set out in section 83 in the Local Government Act 2002, we will prepare the plan applying the procedures for developing reserve management plans set out in section 41(5) of the Reserves Act.

24.     The Reserves Act requires two formal rounds of public consultation. The first round is triggered by the committee notifying its intent to prepare a new management plan and inviting written suggestions.

25.     This report seeks approval for the first round of public consultation to seek feedback to inform the development of a draft plan.

26.     Notifying the intention to prepare a new plan by 30 August 2020 meets the requirement under the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area Act 2008 to review the Waitākere Ranges Regional Park section of the management plan every ten years.

27.     We recommend at least a six-week consultation period to provide sufficient time for wide community reach and multiple engagement channels.

Discussion paper

28.     The aim of the discussion paper (Attachment A) is to support the first round of public consultation by prompting feedback from the community on matters that impact how council manages the regional parks network.

29.     The following topic areas are covered in the discussion paper.

Topic

Includes:

Protecting what is valued

·    how the management plan aims to protect the intrinsic, natural, cultural, heritage, landscape values of regional parks while enabling people to enjoy them for recreation or respite from the urban environment

·    the significance of Māori heritage

·    steps being taken to protect biodiversity

·    the valuable contribution of volunteers

·    challenges of managing kauri dieback.

Climate change and regional parks

·    the impact climate change will have on regional parkland, including sea-level rise

·    the council’s climate emergency declaration and response in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to prepare for change and to reduce council emissions by 50% by 2030

·    taking an adaptive approach to infrastructure development in response to sea level rise

·    carbon footprint of regional parks

·    types of actions that are and could be taken on regional parks to sequester carbon and reduce emissions

·    prompts for people to identify the role of regional parks in response to climate change.

Managing visitor experiences

·    how people of all ages, abilities and ethnicities use and enjoy the regional parks and the many different activities that take place on regional parks

·    regional parks’ contribution to walking, tramping and camping opportunities

·    changes in the use of regional parks

·    the general principle of access at no cost, and explanation of when charges are applied on parks (such as to attend events).

Other topics

·    presented in graphic form to prompt suggestions.

Directions for particular parks

·    invites people to provide suggestions relating to parks they are familiar with

·    a proposed management focus and direction for each of the four parks to be included in the management plan, with a map showing existing assets on each of these parks.

30.    In each topic area questions are posed to prompt responses and ideas that will help inform the review. Readers are invited to refer to the 2010 management plan and to provide more detailed comment on that plan.

Engagement approach

31.     We will undertake proactive and inclusive engagement with:

·      mana whenua, from the outset and throughout the review

·      mataawaka, focusing effort during two formal public consultation rounds

·      key stakeholders and the public through the two formal consultation rounds:

the first period to seek suggestions for the review

the second period to present a draft plan, for written submissions and hearings.

32.     Targeted engagement is also likely to occur with key stakeholders who have detailed knowledge of particular parks and/or topic areas.

Engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka

33.     In July 2020 mana whenua were invited, through the iwi chairs, to be involved in this review. The engagement will be on an individual basis with each iwi or hapū, in line with council’s commitment under Te Tiriti and the Auckland Plan. Options to explore engagement on a collective basis with ngā mana whenua are being explored at the time of writing this report. A verbal update can be provided in the meeting.

34.     The initial objectives of mana whenua engagement are to:

·      acknowledge Te Tiriti and legislative obligations following Treaty settlements relating to some parks

 

·      seek to understand iwi priorities for their involvement

·      confirm how to engage with the 19 iwi across the parks with which they have associations.

35.     The Independent Maori Statutory Board (IMSB) will be kept informed of the process of engagement with mana whenua throughout the review.

36.     Mataawaka will be reached through mataawaka organisations and through channels available to the council through community broker networks, such as radio interviews and community forums. Mataawaka responses will be primarily gathered through the online AK Have Your Say portal.

Engagement during the first consultation round

37.     The purpose of the engagement in the first public consultation round is to reach Auckland’s diverse community and prompt people to provide suggestions to inform the drafting of the revised regional parks management plan.

38.     The primary channel for receiving suggestions is the AK Have Your Say online portal, including several channels:

Channel

Characteristics

·  Online questionnaire

Poses open questions about regional parks based on the topics in the discussion paper (refer to paragraph 28).

·  ‘Social Pinpoint’

Enables respondents to use an online map to write comments about specific parks.

·  Discussion threads and quick polls on particular topics

Allows people to post their ideas into topical discussions and to up-vote others’ suggestions. These will be used to attract people to the site via social media posts.

39.     Participants may also respond via email, posted letter, and in person at drop-in sessions. If Covid-19 social distancing restrictions are re-introduced, the place-based sessions will be replaced with online sessions promoted online and via email.

40.     The promotional channels and the audiences they are expected to reach are summarised below. The ‘harder to reach’ audiences are diverse and include young people, Asian, Pasifika peoples and newer migrants.

Promotional channels and relevance to different audiences

Promotional channels

Mana whenua

Mataawaka

Park users

Public

Service delivery partners

Harder to reach

(Social) media and advertising

 

 Y

Y

Y

 Y

 Y

Print (posters in libraries and parks)

 

 Y

Y

Y

 

Y

Direct contact (email and conversation)

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Place-based (including drop-in sessions)

 

 

Y

Y

Y

 Y

Network-based (reaching communities via the advisory panels and strategic brokers in local board offices)

 

Y

 Y

 Y

Y

Y

Mana whenua fora

Y

 

 

 

 

 

Kanohi ki te kanohi with iwi leaders

Y

Finalising the regional parks within scope

The Auckland Botanic Gardens

41.     We have considered whether the Auckland Botanic Gardens should be included in this review or undertaken through a separate management plan process.

42.     The Auckland Botanic Gardens Management Plan was adopted in 2001 and is out of date. The development of the gardens is guided by a master plan developed in 2009, which has a long-term planning horizon for development and continues to be relevant (but does not cover all aspects of management).

43.     Staff considered the advantages and disadvantages of including the Auckland Botanic Gardens in this review.

Advantages

Disadvantages

Role of the Auckland Botanic Gardens considered within the context of Auckland’s regional open space network.

Auckland Botanic Gardens has a distinct function that is different to regional parks.

Process efficiencies through joint reporting and project management.

There is a distinct and different set of stakeholders and unique issues to consider (reducing the process efficiencies).

Auckland Botanic Gardens face some similar issues to regional parks, e.g. management of different types of recreational use.

There are more distinct management issues for the gardens.

44.     The proposed approach is to schedule a review of the Auckland Botanic Gardens Management Plan commencing in 2021/2022.

45.     This would enable the Auckland Botanic Gardens review to consider and reflect the policy work on similar matters that will be undertaken in the Regional Parks Management Plan review. Scheduling it separately will also enable sufficient focus on the unique issues and stakeholders relating to the Botanic Gardens.

Regional park on Te Motu a Hiaroa / Puketutu Island

46.     Land on Te Motu a Hiaroa / Puketutu Island is leased from Te Motu a Hiaroa Charitable Trust (comprising three mana whenua landowners) in perpetuity and co-managed through a management trust. The management trust comprises representatives from the charitable trust, the council, and Watercare (the previous owner).

47.     The management trust is commissioning the development of a master plan for the motu, with completion targeted for November 2020.

48.     Once the master plan is complete, the question of whether the part of the island within the park-lease would best be managed under the omnibus regional parks management plan could be considered.

Motukorea / Browns Island Regional Park

49.     In June 2020 Motukorea / Browns Island was included in the regional parks management plan (Resolution number PAC/2020/16). An earlier resolution of the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee on 18 November 2015 needs to be partly revoked for consistency:

That the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee:

b)   support the incorporation of Browns Island (Motukorea) in the conservation management plan for the Hauraki Gulf/Tikapa Moana inner motu, that is being prepared in accordance with the Ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau Collective Redress Act 2014, subject to the part of the plan relating to Browns Island (Motukorea) being developed and approved by Auckland Council.

50.     When the council decided to resume management of Motukorea / Browns Island in 2015, the Parks, Recreation and Sport committee had envisaged the park would be included in the conservation management plan (CMP) for the Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana inner motu which includes Motuihe Island / Te Motu-a-Ihenga, Motutapu Island and Rangitoto Island. Project planning for the CMP is currently on hold.

51.     Operationally Motukorea / Browns Island is now managed as a regional park so staff recommended its inclusion in the regional parks management plan. The motu will continue to remain within the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park, to retain its associations with the area.

52.     We recommend that resolution number PAR/2015/92 (b) be revoked.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

53.     Regional parks will be impacted by climate change, through inundation caused by sea level rise, a drier climate and risk of damage caused by more intense storms.  Regional parks will have to prepare for change.

54.     Regional parks can also contribute to sequestering carbon and helping to reduce the council’s emissions. The whole-of-council target of a 50 per cent reduction in emissions by 2030 is within the intended life of the regional parks management plan to be developed under this review.

55.     The extent and direction of the council’s response to climate change through the regional park management plan is a topical matter for this review and is a key question posed in the discussion document. The responses will inform policies and priorities for responding to climate change across the regional parks network.

56.     The climate change section of the discussion paper is described in paragraph 26 of this report. This section was prepared with the support of staff involved in preparing Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

57.     This review involves subject matter experts across many relevant areas of the council, including sustainability, policy, heritage, environmental services, parks, community facilities, and events. A group representing many of these areas is guiding the review, to ensure alignment, integration and best practice.

58.     Topics within the review are relevant to the work of other members of the council group including Auckland Transport, Watercare, and Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development and we will seek their input at relevant points during the review.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

59.     The review of the Regional Parks Management Plan 2010 is of interest to communities and local boards throughout the region.

60.     Local board involvement in the review is following the Local Board Involvement in Regional Policy, Plans and Bylaws Agreed Principles and Processes 2019.

61.     Ten representatives from local boards attended the committee workshop on 1 July 2020 and provided feedback on the topic areas and questions to be included in the discussion document.

62.     We will report to local boards for formal feedback during the drafting of a new plan and after feedback is received on the draft plan for public consultation.

63.     To date 10 local boards have indicated their interest to have workshops in February or March 2021 during the plan drafting stage: Franklin, Henderson-Massey, Hibiscus and Bays, Manurewa, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Rodney, Waiheke, Waitākere Ranges, Waitematā and Whau Local Boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

64.     Mana whenua in Tāmaki Makaurau have deep connections and ancestral links with the whenua within the regional parks network, and an ongoing interest in their use and management.

65.     The approach to engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka was outlined at the committee workshop on 1 July 2020 and since then engagement has been initiated with mana whenua.

66.     Mana whenua have expressed a high level of interest. A verbal update can be provided at the meeting as this is progressing in parallel to this report. We aim to confirm engagement approaches with individual iwi by mid-October 2020, by the time the first public consultation round closes.

67.     Engagement with mataawaka will be focused in the public consultation period, as set out in the engagement plan section of this report.

68.     In June 2020 staff advised the mana whenua representatives associated with Motukorea / Browns Island (Ngāti Tamaterā and Ngā Tūpuna Taonga o Tāmaki Makaurau Trust) of the intention to include Motukorea / Browns Island in the regional parks management plan. They have been invited to be involved in the regional parks management plan review.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

69.     The cost of the plan review will be met within existing budgets and resources, confirmed in the Emergency Budget 2020/2021.

70.     Revising the management plan does not commit the council to future expenditure. The feedback received during the review and direction in the management plan will guide priorities within available funding for regional parks.

71.     The discussion paper explains that the management plan does not set funding for the regional parks but helps to set priorities for consideration of funding through other processes such as annual and long-term plans.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

72.     The table sets out risks and mitigations relating to this step of the review.

Risk

Mitigation

If the committee does not initiate the first round of consultation by 30 August 2020, the council will miss a statutory deadline in the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area Act, which requires a management plan for the Waitākere Ranges to be reviewed every 10 years.

·    Notify the council’s intention to prepare a plan and initiate the first round of consultation at the 20 August meeting.

If there is any move back into a higher level of Covid-19 Emergency during the engagement period, this may disrupt the planned direct contact methods of engagement during the first consultation round.

If this were to occur, some people may become distracted and not take the opportunity to engage with the review.

·    Continue to identify with mana whenua and mataawaka their level of interest and capacity to participate and work flexibly to meet their needs.

·    A greater focus would be placed on reaching people through social media and online networks.

·    Review the range of feedback received at the end of the consultation period and determine if any other steps are needed to obtain sufficient responses.

The review may raise expectations for a higher level of facilities or services on regional parks. 

·    Manage expectations regarding the review scope in the discussion document and other communications.

If we do not follow the correct processes under the Reserves Act 1977 and other legislation, the review process could be open to challenge.

·    Confirm the legal status of regional park land holdings and check the statutory and other obligations over each land parcel to ensure compliance.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

73.     Subject to the committee’s approval, we will:

·   finalise the discussion paper with the Chair and Deputy Chair

·   initiate a six-week consultation period, aiming for the period of 1 September to 12 October 2020 and implement the engagement approach.

74.     We will continue to engage with mana whenua, schedule workshop dates with local boards, and plan for the next phase of the review.

75.     A detailed check of the status of the land parcels within the regional parks is being undertaken to confirm any requirements over the land. We will report any classification actions of land to this committee by December 2020.

 

 


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Parks Management Plan Review Discussion Paper

335

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Matthew Ward - Service & Asset Planning Team Leader

Jo Mackay - Project Manager

Authorisers

Justine Haves - Head of Service and Asset Planning

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

 


Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee

20 August 2020