I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitematā Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 18 August 2020

1:00pm

Town Hall – Reception Lounge
Level 2
Queen Street
Auckland

 

Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chair

Richard Northey, (ONZM)

 

Deputy Chair

Kerrin Leoni

 

Members

Adriana Avendano Christie

 

 

Alexandra Bonham

 

 

Graeme Gunthorp

 

 

Julie  Sandilands

 

 

Sarah Trotman, (ONZM)

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Priscila  Firmo

Democracy Advisor

 

12 August 2020

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 353 9654

Email: Priscila.firmo@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Sathya Mithra Ashok  - Social Enterprise Auckland                  5

8.2     Deputation - Kristian Eek - The importance and benefits of the film industry    6

8.3     Deputation - Mike LeRoy-Dyson: Proposal for a new way of supporting homeless people in Auckland                                                                            6

8.4     Deputation - Gael Baldock: Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Park Development Plan                                                                                                6

8.5     Deputation - Wendy Gray: Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Park Development Plan                                                                                                7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

9.1     Public Forum – Miles Harty                                                                                 7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                9

11        Ward Councillor's report                                                                                             11

12        Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea park development plan                           31

13        Panuku Development Auckland Six Monthly Report from 1 September 2019 to 29 February 2020                                                                                                               39

14        Auckland Transport August 2020 Update to Waitematā Local Board                   49

15        Approval of the Waitematā Local Board External Partnerships work programme 2020/2021                                                                                                                      61

16        Approval of the Waitematā Local Board Local Economic Development work programme 2020/2021                                                                                                 67

17        Approval of the Waitematā Local Board Community Facilities work programme 2020 - 2023                                                                                                                             73

18        Approval of the Waitematā Local Board community services work programme 2020/2021                                                                                                                    105

19        Approval of the Waitematā Local Board’s environment work programme 2020/2021                                                                                                                                     127

20        Chairperson's report                                                                                                 149

21        Board member reports                                                                                              163

22        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      177

23        Waitematā Local Board workshop records                                                            181  

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 21 July 2020, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Sathya Mithra Ashok  - Social Enterprise Auckland

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To highlight the work done by Social Enterprise Auckland and how the enterprise support local communities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Sathya Mithra Ashok will be in attendance to speak about Social Enterprise Auckland.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Sathya Mithra Ashok for her attendance.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Kristian Eek - The importance and benefits of the film industry

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To highlight to the board the importance and benefits of the film industry particularly in times of COVID-19 recovery.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Kristian Eek, Production Manager will be in attendance to highlight the importance and benefits of the film industry.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Kristian Eek for his attendance.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Mike LeRoy-Dyson: Proposal for a new way of supporting homeless people in Auckland

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To speak to the board on a Proposal for a new way of supporting homeless people in Auckland.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Mike LeRoy-Dyson will be in attendance to speak about a Proposal for a new way of supporting homeless people in Auckland.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Mike LeRoy Dyson for his attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Mission Attic Proposal.................................................................................. 191

 

 

 

 

 

8.4       Deputation - Gael Baldock: Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Park Development Plan

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To speak to the board on the Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai ōrea Park Development Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Gael Baldock will be in attendance to speak about the Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai ōrea Park Development Plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Gael Baldock for her attendance.

 

 

 

8.5       Deputation - Wendy Gray: Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Park Development Plan

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To speak to the board on the Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai ōrea Park Development Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Wendy Gray will be in attendance to speak about the Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai ōrea Park Development Plan.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Wendy Gray for her attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To speak to the board on tactical urbanism in his business and the process of dealing with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Miles Harty will be in attendance to speak about tactical urbanism in his business and the process of dealing with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank Miles Harty for his presentations and attendance at the meeting.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 

Ward Councillor's report

File No.: CP2020/10505

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the opportunity for Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor Pippa Coom, Ōrākei Ward Councillor Desley Simpson and Albert-Eden Roskill Ward Councillors Christine Fletcher and Cathy Casey to update the local board on regional issues that they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waitematā Local Board’s Standing Orders clauses 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provide provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board, or on any matter the Governing Body member wishes to raise with the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written report update from the Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Pippa Coom and the verbal or tabled Ward Councillor reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ward Councillor Pippa Coom report August 2020

13

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila  Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 

Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea park development plan

File No.: CP2020/09752

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek adoption of the draft Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai ōrea Park Development Plan (August 2020).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waitematā Local Board requested staff to prepare a development plan for Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai ōrea in the financial year 2017-2018 work programme.

3.       The direction for the plan was to provide a clear design framework to guide how Western Springs Lakeside and its interface with surrounding reserves and facilities should be improved over the short, medium and long term.

4.       The development of the draft plan initially involved consultation with the Waitematā Local Board, mana whenua, stakeholders and council staff to set key themes and desired outcomes for the park. These outcomes define the key objectives in the draft Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai ōrea (lake of eels) Park Development Plan (August 2020), and focuses on improving the existing values of the reserve rather than seeking significant change.   

5.       Public consultation was carried out in July and August 2018 and there was generally a high level of satisfaction with the way the plan aims to improve key service outcomes. These outcomes include improvements in water quality, connectivity, celebration of the site’s history and provision for events. Ecological and water quality improvements were identified as the highest priority outcomes desired by users. 

6.       The results from the survey and the final approved plan will help the local board align renewals, transport capital funds and local board budgets with outcomes that are needed and supported by the users of the park.   

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai ōrea Park Development Plan August 2020 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      use the Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Development Plan to inform decisions on future work programme allocations of renewals and LDI capex funding.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai ōrea is a popular 26-hectare destination park that is enjoyed by visitors from across the Auckland Region and beyond. It is highly valued as a site that provides for walking, refuge from the city, children’s activities, events and a place where people can connect with nature.  

8.       The intent of the plan is to provide a clear design framework that will guide board decisions and help realise the community’s vision for the park.

Consultation

9.       The draft plan was consulted on in two phases.

10.     The first phase of pre-design consultation was undertaken with project partners to identify what was valued about the park and needed to be retained and what were the key issues and ambitions that would guide improvements to Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai ōrea.

11.     This has resulted in the plan focusing on the following vision objectives that look to improve existing values at the site without major change to the parks current layout:

·     water quality

·     refuge

·     connectivity

·     events

·     interpretation of the site’s history.

12.     The draft plan was reviewed by the Waitematā Local Board, mana whenua, stakeholders and council staff to ensure that improvements appropriately addressed key concerns and ambitions for Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai ōrea. Feedback from this process included:

·      support for the plan, with only minor amendments suggested

·      enthusiasm for the water quality improvements.

13.     In February 2018 the Waitematā Local Board approved the draft Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Park Development Plan for public consultation (resolution WTM/2018/12) which marked the second phase of consultation with the wider public and users of the park.

14.     The consultation period ran from 30 July to 27 August 2018 and involved making the plan, plus questionnaire, available online. The process was widely advertised by:

·      presenting information on the local board’s website and Auckland Council’s ‘have your say’ page

·      notifying all relevant stakeholders and distributing 1300 flyers to local residents

·      advertising the consultation on site through signage 

·      holding one ‘drop-in day’ on site (18 August 2018).

15.     People’s views were sought by means of a questionnaire, with 198 questionnaire responses received and seven submissions submitted.

16.     The questionnaire asked people to rate the effectiveness of the design solutions identified in the plan with the following question:   

How would you rate the development plan’s proposals for providing and upgrading the facilities listed (bench seats, picnic tables, toilets, pathways and walkways, signage, rubbish bins, bbq)?

17.     Feedback to this question was positive with the following percentages indicating the level of support:

 

18.     The final question in the survey asked respondents to select their first, second and third priority projects. Responses were weighted, and combined to give the following percentage priority rating: 

1.         Ecology                            35%

2.         Water quality                    31%

3.         Connectivity                     11%

4.         Other park facilities            8%

5.         Play                                    6%

6.         Signage                              5%

7.         Events                                4%

 

19.     Submissions on the plan were made by Auckland Zoo, the Museum of Transport and Technology (MOTAT), the Friends of Maungawhau, St Lukes Environmental Protection Society (STEPS) and New Zealand Heritage plus two individual submitters. Feedback from these and the survey included the following:  

20.     Additional feedback focusing on the site’s ecological significance, both in a local and regional context, was presented through a deputation at the board’s business meeting in March 2019. The board resolved (WTM/2019/26) that staff consider changes to the plan on the strength of the presentation material. 

Draft plan changes in response to feedback

21.     In response to all survey and submission feedback the following changes were made to the plan:

·  A greater focus on the site’s ecological importance both in a local and regional context.

·   Greater recognition of, and protection for, the lava rock forest plus wetland area and additional restoration plan focus on lake edge and wetland planting. 

·   Recognition that planting will be dominated by native species.

·   Minor amendment to greenways route around the playground and extending playground footpath to Zoo kiosk.

·   Removal of the bird feeding platforms and design features that would accommodate and promote the feeding of eels from the ‘eel themed’ bridge.

22. Careful consideration was given by the previous board in retaining the double hump bridge on the western side of the lake. The argument for retaining the bridge made by one the submitter was on the basis that the structure is an iconic landscape feature. However, the previous board approved the draft plan intent to replace this bridge because of accessibility issues caused by steep inclines on the bridge’s two humps and its narrowness.      

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

23.     Feedback to the survey indicated that ecological and water quality improvements were regarded as high priority areas that future investment should focus on.

24.     Improving connectivity, park assets (toilets and drinking fountains), the playground and interpretive signage were viewed as medium priorities.

25.     Provision for events was considered the lowest priority.

26.     There was a high level of satisfaction with how the plan aims to improve service outcomes such as water quality, connectivity, celebration of the site’s history and provision for events.

 

Feeding of Birds

27.     The feeding of birds on the lake contributes to poor water quality outcomes and in the first version of the draft plan, land-based bird feeding platforms were proposed to address this issue. The decision to remove the bird feeding platforms from the draft plan was made by the previous board at their August 2019 business meeting.

28.     Bird feeding has historically been a popular activity enjoyed by many and the feeding platforms were a design feature that would have allowed visitors to feed birds out of the water, thereby limiting negative impacts on water quality. However, feeding artificially raises the park’s bird population and results in the following outcomes that significantly impact on park amenity, recreation and ecological values:

·    an unhealthy bird population

·    water and landscape pollution

·    reduction of native bird numbers both in terms of species and population numbers.

   

29.     These negative impacts were considered to outweigh the amenity benefits associated with bird feeding and for this reason the feeding platforms have been removed from the final plan version.

30.     Two additional changes to the draft plan have been made. These relate to amendments to the proposed footpaths through the forest area and dropping the lake water level in order to enable extensive emergent planting to be undertaken. These two changes, as outlined below, have been made to the draft plan submitted for approval. 

Forest footpaths

31.     Formal endorsement of the draft plan was deferred in August 2019 pending the Environment Court’s decision regarding removal of the pine trees in the forest area at Western Springs Lakeside Park Te Wai ōrea.

32.     The forest forms a small part of a large Significant Ecological Area (SEA) that encompasses the entire park.

33.     The pines were planted in 1923 and once comprised a densely stocked forest. However, the stand has thinned significantly as the trees have aged and become vulnerable to windthrow. A resource consent to enable removal of the stand of remaining mature pines was sought by council through the Environment Court in 2019. That consent has now been granted but the management approach to this forest area is still to be confirmed and formalised by the board.

34.     Because of this the new sections of path through the forest area proposed in earlier draft versions of the plan have been removed and the approach to future path development has been articulated in the final draft plan version as follows:

New footpath connections and any upgrade to the existing path through the forest area (pines with native understory) will only be considered once the management regime for the pines has been confirmed and after full consultation on route options with relevant stakeholders has been undertaken.

35.     The long-term goal for the forest area is to return it to native forest as per the objective set out in the 1995 Western Springs Lakeside Park Plan.

Emergent planting and lake water levels

36.     The approach to emergent planting in the lake has changed in so far as decisions relating to a permanent drop in the lake water level, in order to maximise emergent planting outcomes, won’t be made until the result of planting trails in 2021 have been analysed.

37.     The outcomes sought by undertaking buffer (out of water) and emergent (in water) planting are to: 

· reduce levels of sediment and contaminants entering the lake

· intercept and assimilate nutrients

· restrict public access to the lake edge to discourage feeding of birds

· maintain views across the lake

·     incorporate appropriate native species which are consistent and in keeping with existing vegetation.

38      It is not currently clear if the lake water levels will need to be lowered in order to maximise successful emergent plant establishment around the majority of the lake edge. Challenges to successful lake emergent planting include health and safety issues, the presence of large rocks in much of the substrate, a lack of gradation in depth and also variable depth around the lake edge. Planting will be most successful within a certain depth range and the trial is necessary to ascertain what the optimal depth range is and what drop in the level of the lake would be required to maximise the extent of lake edge planting.   

39.     The intent is to undertake test planting in 2020/2021 with only a temporary lowering of the lake water level over several days while the planting is being undertaken.

40.     The pre-planting of emergent plants in fully biodegradable coir (coconut fibre) matting will need to be arranged with a suitable nursery in advance and grown specifically for the project (at least a year prior to scheduled planting).

41.     The success of the planting trial will be analysed, reported to the board and decisions around a requirement to lower lake water levels made at a later date and on the back of the planting trial.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

42.     Auckland Council has declared a climate emergency and has key policy documents that set out how to tackle this emergency and at the same time deliver the Auckland Plan’s environmental vision. These policy documents include Auckland’s Climate Action Framework, Auckland Growing Greener and the Low Carbon Strategic Action Plan

43.     The development plan outcomes will help manage flood risk and reduce urban heat leading to better air and water quality and a more pleasant urban environment. The environmental value of the park and connections between blue (water) and green (land) is extremely high and these healthy ecosystems store carbon. The healthy, connected ecosystems of Te Wai ōrea and the objectives set out in the development plan will provide increased climate resilience.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

44.     The plan has been compiled with input from the following key departments/units:

·   Parks, Sports and Recreation (PSR)

·   Community Facilities

·   Environmental Services

·   Healthy Waters.

 

45.     The draft plan has also been shared with Auckland Transport, Regional Facilities Auckland and Watercare and it is considered that the plan generally aligns with aspirations and outcomes sought by the range of council departments working in, or close to, the Western Springs precinct area. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

46.     Local board workshops at which the development plan was discussed were held in October 2018, February and August 2019 plus June 2020. The following local board feedback was given on the draft plan:

·   develop a project implementation plan

·   align budgets with the Timeframes and Priorities table (page 87 of draft plan)

·   commit to planting native species 

·   support an eco-themed playground

·        ensure popular play experiences provided at the current playground are carried over to the new playground

·   remove the bird feeding platforms and proposed additional forest footpaths.

 

47.     The draft plan has been amended accordingly and aligns with outcome 2 in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017, which aims to deliver ‘attractive and versatile public places that meet our communities’ needs’. The development plan provides a clear strategic framework to guide future development at Western Springs Te Wai Ōrea in order to successfully deliver on this local board objective.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.     The plan was developed with input from mana whenua to address impacts on Māori and   engagement was undertaken at key points throughout the plan’s preparation to enable mana whenua to shape and influence the content of the plan.

49.     In August 2017 staff undertook pre-design engagement with mana whenua.  Feedback included:

·    the water quality of the park needs to be looked at as the priority for the plan

·    mana whenua request to provide input on the playground design

·    consideration needs to be given to indigenous revegetation of the forest area, given the declining condition of the pine trees north of the lake.

50.     In October 2017 staff workshopped the water quality issues with mana whenua. 

51.     After each workshop, appropriate changes were made to the plan’s scope and drafting process to take account of impacts on Māori.

52.     Board representatives also met with Te Ākitai Waiohua (Adrian Lee Pettit) and Ngaati Whanaunga (Martin Te Moni) in July 2019 to review the draft plan. They endorsed the water quality, plus other plan objectives and requested that:

a)  references to Māori history are consolidated on page 30 of the plan 

b)  events at the park are ‘zero waste’ based

c)  a series of cultural indicators be allowed for within the delivery of some of the plan outcomes, particularly those related to water quality

d)  council continues to work towards wider water catchment improvements. 

53.     Bullet point ‘a’ has been actioned, ‘b’ is as per the event guidelines for the park, ‘c’ will be determined by the board on a project by project basis and ‘d’ remains a council wide goal, noting that this aspiration extends well beyond park boundaries.  

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

54.     The purpose of the plan is to ensure that limited budgets are invested in outcomes that will derive maximum public benefit and into areas that are a priority for users. It is also to ensure that all works, including renewals, are coordinated, complementary and help realise the long-term vision articulated in the development plan.  

55.     Plan outcomes will result in lower maintenance costs in specific areas. Wild fowl management promoted through the plan endorses keeping bird numbers, for species such as geese, below threshold levels resulting in lower maintenance costs associated with path cleaning and lawn repairs. Improving water quality through emergent / buffer planting reduces the rate of lake sedimentation and the frequency by which costly sediment removal needs to take place. 

56.     To date budget has only been allocated to the renewal of the playground and a draft lakeside and wetland restoration plan. 

57.     All other projects are currently unfunded but will be delivered through a combination of renewals, discretionary LDI capex/opex and with partners such as MOTAT.

58.     Customer and Community Services (Community Facilities and Parks, Sport and Recreation) have worked on the programming of all projects by splitting projects into short (1-3yrs), medium (4-6yrs) and long term (7-10yrs) time frames, as set out on page 87 of the draft plan. It is possible that some of these time frames will be extended as the longer-term economic and financial effects of COVID-19 become apparent.

59.     Delivering the development plan was always going to be a staged process and extending delivery timelines is not considered problematic. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

60.     The main risks that apply to the plan and associated projects are that:

·   the content of the draft plan does not align with wider public desires

·   the aspiration for the forest area is challenged

·   concerns are raised regarding lake water levels

·   that there are insufficient funds to deliver all aspects of the plan.

61.     Given the level of public consultation undertaken and feedback obtained, the likelihood of the draft plan failing to align with wider public desires is considered low.

62.     The management approach to the forest area mirrors the intent of the old Western Springs Lakeside plan which has been in effect, and unchallenged, since 1995.

63.     Thorough emergent planting trials will be undertaken to help inform decisions linked to appropriate lake water levels and ensure the quality of the wetland is not threatened by any future works. While the optimal lake level for establishing vigorous emergent planting, and at the same time protecting wetland ecology, has yet to be quantified, future level changes if approved by the board are anticipated to be minor rather than major. 

64.     Because of the aspirational nature of the plan, it’s possible that funds are not available to deliver all its components in the ten-year timeframe anticipated. However, it is considered preferable to extend the delivery period, and also accept that some projects may not be delivered, rather than trim some aspects of the plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

65.     Once the development plan is adopted by the Waitematā Local Board, it is intended that the funding of identified projects will be guided by the Timeframes and Priorities table (p 87 of the plan).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Park Development Plan August 2020  (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David Barker - Parks & Places Team Leader

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 

Panuku Development Auckland Six Monthly Report from 1 September 2019 to 29 February 2020

File No.: CP2020/08022

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the reportguidance

To update the Waitematā Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) activities within the local board area for the six months from 1 September to 29 February 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Panuku is charged with balancing financial and non-financial outcomes in order to create and manage sustainable and resilient places where people want to live, work, invest, learn and visit. The activities of Panuku cover four broad areas: 

·        redevelopment of urban locations, leveraging off council owned land assets, mostly within existing suburbs

·        review of, and where appropriate, redevelopment of council non-service property

·        management of council property assets including commercial, residential, and marina infrastructure

·        other property related services such as redevelopment incorporating a service delivery function, strategic property advice, acquisitions and disposals.

2.       Panuku Development Auckland currently manages 115 commercial and/or residential interests in the Waitematā Local Board area.

3.       No properties were purchased or sold in the Waitematā Local Board area during the  reporting period.

4.       Two properties are currently under review as part of the rationalisation process.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Panuku Development Auckland Local Board Six-Monthly Report 1 September 2019 to 29 February 2020.

 

b)      adopt the name Amey Daldy Park for the Wynyard Quarter open space currently referred to as Wynyard Common on the corner of Daldy Street and Pakenham Street West

 

c)      adopt the name Freda Barnes Plaza for the Wynyard Quarter open space currently referred to as N.Cole Plaza located at 8 Madden St

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland, from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

6.       The Auckland Plan is the roadmap to deliver on Auckland’s vision to be a world class city, Panuku plays a significant role in achieving the ‘Homes and Places’ and ‘Belonging and Participation’ outcomes.

7.       Panuku leads urban redevelopment in Manukau, Onehunga, Wynyard Quarter, Waterfront, Northcote, Avondale, Takapuna, Henderson, Papatoetoe, Ormiston and Flat Bush, Panmure, Pukekohe, City Centre and redevelopment of the Haumaru Portfolio.

8.       Panuku manages around $3 billion of council’s non-service property portfolio, which is continuously reviewed to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio, or release land or property that can be better used by others. “Non-service properties” are Council owned properties that are not used to deliver Council, or CCO, services.

9.       Panuku’s managed regional property portfolio comprises 1674 properties, containing 1035 leases. This includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres, and a large portfolio of residential rental homes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     Panuku is contributing commercial input into approximately fifty region-wide council-driven renewal and housing supply initiatives.

11.     Panuku works with partners and stakeholders over the course of a project. It also champions best practice project delivery, to achieve best value outcomes within defined cost, time and quality parameters.

12.     Below is a high-level update on activities in the Waitematā Local Board area.

Transform Waterfront

Westhaven

13.     Construction work at the Westhaven Marine Village started on the 9 September 2019, with completion expected in October 2020.

14.     Construction of the boardwalk structure for the Westhaven Marina Promenade Stage 2 project commenced in October 2019.  Completion date is tracking for October 2020.

15.     Dredging for the Pile Berth Redevelopment started on the 16 January 2020. A Kaitiaki Engagement Plan Forum has been set up to for the purpose of review and engagement with mana whenua through the resource consent.

16.     Enabling works to prepare for the landing of the Auckland Harbour Bridge Pathway continue to progress. 

Wynyard Quarter

17.     A review of strategic and technical work commenced with the purpose of updating the Wynyard Quarter Precinct of the Waterfront Plan.  This work will inform a draft masterplan which will be widely consulted on from September 2020

18.     The site known as ‘Site 18’ – Orams Marine Refit Facility lease commencement conditions were satisfied in October 2019, following receipt of the prepaid rent to Auckland Council. This has enabled Orams Marine to begin the first stage of their development in time for America’s Cup.

19.     Work continued on the redevelopment of the Vos Shed which will be completed in October 2020.

20.     Over summer, Silo Park hosted a range of large and small events consisting of outdoor cinema, live music, craft activities and cultural performances. The Highlights of the season were the two Silo Session events, one being Milk & Honey, an afternoon of music celebrating International Women's Day and Christmas at Silo Park.

21.     Following the 19 February 2019 Local Board Business Meeting endorsement for the naming of the two open spaces in Wynyard Quarter of Amey Daldy Park and Freda Barnes Plaza (WTM/2019/12), Panuku consulted and sought approval from the National Council of Women on the use of the names.  Further advice was sought from Council Legal Services given no living relatives could be contacted on the use of the names. Legal advice is that we have complied with the Local Board resolution, and there is no other legislation that applies so these names are able to be adopted.  An update on the scheduled work of each open space and opening will be advised later in 2020.

Viaduct and Queens Wharf

22.     Mediation between appellants and Auckland Council progressed on the matter of the Queens Wharf Dolphin appeal.

23.     To assist with the Downtown Infrastructure delivery programme (DIDP) Panuku continued to liaise with Auckland Transport to ensure that on the intersection between Quay Street, Lower Hobson and Eastern Viaduct can be delivered.

24.     Queens Wharf received a total of 3,742 people who enjoyed the 2019 - 2020 Summer on Queens Wharf programme, and Auckland Anniversary weekend saw visitor numbers on par with previous years. Events included; Morning People, Sunrise Yoga, Drawing Club, Cloud markets, basketball tournaments and live music.

America’s Cup

25.     Contractual negotiations were completed between Auckland Council, the Crown (through Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment) Americas Cup Events Limited (ACE) on the Host Venue Agreement (HVA) which is the contract for the event.  Panuku began works to ensure that Wynyard Quarter was ready to receive visitors over the event period. This included the upgrade of some current facilities, new toilets at Silo Playground and the extension of current services including CCTV.

26.     Three major project milestones were completed in December 2019: the successful relocation of SeaLink, the completion of the demolition of BST tanks, and the handover of the Bulk Storage Terminal a.k.a Tank farm (BST) site to the Wynyard Edge Alliance (WEA) to complete the remaining team bases and new public open space.

27.     Panuku worked with WEA to create a new public space - an extension to Silo Park, with repurposed tanks, and a shade structure designed with a mana whenua artist that will be opened in October this year.

28.     Works started on the re-instatement of tram tracks in the Wynyard Quarter and 'Expression of Interest' for third party operators for the Auckland Dockline Tram closed in December 2019 with three selected suppliers proceeding to the 'Request for Proposal' stage.

29.     In February 2020 Panuku, ACE and Emirates Team New Zealand finalised the allocation of new superyacht berths for the duration the event.  

 

City Centre

Civic Administration Building (CAB)

30.     Refurbishment of the CAB began in mid-2019. Asbestos removal is underway, piling for the basement and podium is complete and bulk excavation is about to commence. Completion is expected November 2021. Once complete, the CAB will provide approximately 110 apartments.

Britomart Precinct

31.     Britomart Group is progressing a resource consent application for a new building on its central site. The Hotel Britomart located on the corner of Gore and Galway St is near completion and expected to open in October 2020. Hotel Britomart is the first hotel in New Zealand to achieve a 5 GreenStar rating. It has a confirmed design rating and will be aiming to achieve a 5 GreenStar ‘as-built’ rating.

 

Properties managed in the Waitematā Local Board Area

32.     Panuku currently manages 111 commercial and 4 residential interests within the local board area.

Portfolio strategy

Optimisation

33.     Optimisation is a self-funding development approach targeting sub-optimal service assets approved in 2015. The process involves an agreement between Community Facilities, Panuku and local boards and is led by Panuku. It is designed to equal or enhance levels of service to the local community in a reconfigured form while delivering on strategic outcomes such as housing or urban regeneration with no impact on existing rate assumptions.

34.     Using optimisation, underperforming assets will have increased utility and efficiency, lower maintenance and operating costs, as well as improved service delivery benefiting from co-location of other complimentary services or commercial activities. Optimisation will free up a range of undercapitalised development opportunities such as air space, full sites, or part sites.

35.     Using optimisation as a redevelopment and funding tool, the local board can maximise efficiencies from service assets while maintaining levels of service through the release of some or all of that property for sale or development.

36.     Local boards are allocated decision making for the disposal of local service property and reinvestment of sale proceeds in accordance with the service property optimisation approach.

Portfolio review and rationalisation

Overview

37.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets. This includes identifying properties from within the council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. Panuku has a focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes.

38.     Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades, by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

Performance

39.     Panuku works closely with Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to identify potential surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

            Target for July 2018 to June 2019:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio review

$30 million disposal ‘recommendations’

$30.4 million disposal recommendations.

          July 2019 to June 2021 Target:

Unit

Target

Achieved

Portfolio Review

$45m disposal recommendations.

$20 million disposal recommendations as at 23 February 2020.

40.     The surplus properties targets listed above are Statement of Intent (SOI) targets, not the 10-year budget/Emergency Budget revised targets It is likely the new SOI target will be amended as well, but that hasn’t been signed off yet. 

 

Process

41.     Once identified as no longer delivering the council service use for which it was acquired, a property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council departments and CCOs, the local board and mana whenua. This is followed by Panuku board approval, engagement with the local ward councillors, the Independent Māori Statutory Board and finally, a Governing Body decision.

Acquisitions and disposals

42.     Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. Panuku purchases property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other services. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

Acquisitions

43.     Panuku does not decide which properties to buy in a local board area. Instead, it is asked to negotiate the terms and conditions of a purchase on behalf of the council.

44.     Panuku has purchased 8 properties for open space across Auckland in the time period at a cost of $31.5 million.

45.     No properties have been purchased in the Waitematā Local Board area during the reporting period for open space.

46.     All land acquisition committee resolutions contain a confidentiality clause due to the commercially sensitive nature of ongoing transactions, and thus cannot be reported on while in process. 

Disposals

47.     In the reporting period, the Panuku disposals team has entered into seven sale and purchase agreements, with an estimated value of $7.5 million of unconditional net sales proceeds. 

48.     Panuku 2019/2020 disposals target is $24 million for the year. The disposals target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis. 

49.     No properties have been sold in the Waitematā Local Board area during the reporting period.

Under review

50.     Properties currently under review in the Waitematā Local Board area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the Governing Body.

 

Property

Details

3 Ponsonby Road, Freemans Bay

An endowment property that was vested in the former Auckland City Council by the Crown in 1875 for the improvement and benefit of the City of Auckland.

Since July 1999 the property has been leased as an artistic workspace on a monthly tenancy agreement.

The board has an advocacy initiative for a Ponsonby Road Arts Precinct and supports the creation of an arts precinct at 1-3 Ponsonby Road through transferring 3 Ponsonby Road from a commercial lease to a community arts facility.

To inform the business case for the proposed arts precinct, the board commissioned an Arts and Creative Industries Needs Analysis and Stocktake of Community Space 2018 for the Waitematā Local Board Area. The report and its key findings were received by the board in May 2019.

In September 2019 Panuku undertook further consultation with council departments and CCOs regarding an alternate public work requirement or planned and funded future strategic need for 3 Ponsonby Road.

The results of the internal consultation were discussed with the board in March 2020, with no public work requirement being identified.

In May 2020 3 Ponsonby Road was identified as a possible disposal candidate for council’s Emergency Budget asset recycling programme as it has no identified current or future public work requirement.  Asset recycling is an important lever for the council allowing capital to be invested in the most strategically important activities.

Public consultation was undertaken by council on the Emergency Budget in June 2020. A list of properties which could potentially be utilised for asset recycling was included in the Emergency Budget public consultation.  No site-specific feedback regarding 3 Ponsonby Road was received as part of the Emergency Budget consultation. 

At its 16 July 2020 Finance and Performance Committee meeting, the committee agreed to dispose of 3 Ponsonby Road subject to further work being undertaken to ensure the disposal of the endowment property is in accordance with the relevant sections of the LGA 2002.

200 Victoria Street West, Auckland Central

An endowment property that was vested in the former Auckland City Council by the Crown in 1875 for the improvement and benefit of the City of Auckland.

Council owns the land only. The property is subject to two ground leases, held by the same lessee, that together cover the entire site. The leases were granted in 1916 and are perpetually renewable at the lessee’s option. The improvements, being a commercial building with retail and office uses, are owned by the lessee. The property has not been used to deliver a council service since at least 1916. Accordingly, it was identified as a property that could potentially be recommended to the council for disposal.

The rationalisation process commenced in March 2019. Any alternative use or development potential is constrained by the ground leases and no current or future council service use has been identified through the consultation undertaken.

The board supported the disposal of 200 Victoria Street West at its May 2019 business meeting.

Council’s Finance and Performance Committee on 20 August 2019 approved that the property be divested in accordance with conditions set out in section 141 of the LGA 2002, specifically:

·    The proceeds of sale must be used for a purpose consistent with the purpose of the endowment; and

·    The council must notify the Minister for Land Information and the Minister in Charge of Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations of the proposal to sell the land.

Panuku is undertaking due diligence prior to the property being brought to the market.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

51.  The Panuku Priority Location programmes support regeneration of existing town centres, developing underutilised sites within the urban area, close to transport links. Increasing the density of housing results in reduced carbon emissions through improved utilisation of existing infrastructure and transit-oriented development. The provision of easy, safe and attractive walking and cycling routes reduces reliance on private motor vehicles and enables low carbon lifestyles. Panuku has adopted a minimum standard of a Homestar 6 rating for all homes, resulting in warmer, drier and more energy efficient buildings.

52. Climate change increases the probability of hotter temperatures and more frequent flooding and drought in the Waitematā Local Board Area. Panuku seeks to future-proof our communities by:

a)   specifying adaptation and resilience in the design of buildings and spaces.

b)   specifying that infrastructure and developments are designed to cope with warmer temperatures and extreme weather events.

c)   use of green infrastructure and water sensitive design for increased flood resilience, ecological and biodiversity benefits

d)   provision of increased shade and shelter for storm events and hotter days.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

53.     The views of the council group are incorporated on a project by project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

54.     Any local or sub-regional impacts related to local activities are considered on a project by project basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

55.     Panuku work collaboratively with mana whenua on a range of projects including potential property disposals, development sites in the area and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum who have a broader mandate.

56.     Panuku will continue to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing.   

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

57.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

58.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

59.     The next six-monthly update is scheduled for October 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Perin Gerrand - Engagement Coordinator

Authorisers

Lisa Gooding - Senior Engagement Advisor

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport August 2020 Update to Waitematā Local Board

File No.: CP2020/10945

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on Auckland Transport activities in the Waitematā Local Board area and a summary of the local board transport capital fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report covers:

·    A summary of Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area

·    An update on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund and Community Safety Fund projects and budgets

·    A summary of general information items sent to the local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport August 2020 update report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. As set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan, we report on a monthly basis to local boards. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important role local boards play within the governance of Auckland Council on behalf of their local communities. 

4.       This report updates the Waitematā Local Board on Auckland Transport (AT) projects and operations in the local board area, it updates the local board on their advocacy and consultations and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and Community Safety Fund (CSF).

5.       With the Council’s emergency budget now confirmed the LBTCF for the 2020/2021 Financial Year has been set at $5.0 million, for allocation across the 21 Local Boards. Allocation will still be based on the Local Board Funding Policy. Decisions about the 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 financial years will form part of the Long-term Plan / Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) discussions but early indications are that these years will also see a more constrained capital programme, than prior to the COVID-19 crisis. The specific budget available for the LBTCF in 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 will be determined by the prioritisation of the capital programme through the RLTP and will be subject to the usual consultation and submission processes.

6.       The Community Safety Fund is funded from Auckland Transport’s safety budget and is dependent on the level of funding Auckland Transport receives from council. Current indications are that this level of funding will be significantly constrained. Public consultation and the design work informed by this consultation, is progressing, with a view to having projects designed and ready to go, when money becomes available.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland Transport projects and operations in the local board area

7.       The table below has a general summary of projects and activities of interest to the local board with their current status. Please note that all timings are indicative and are subject to change:

Item

Update

Access for Everyone (A4E) Pilot

Auckland Council are leading the Queen St A4E pilot and will provide updates on this project. Various Auckland Transport departments are involved and are supporting the council.

 

The tender for a Programme Business Case is being underway to investigate the preferred implementation programme for A4E, including identifying the supporting workstreams (e.g. legal, logistics and regulatory changes). The business case will be informed by and receive monitoring data from the Queen St pilot.

City Gateway Treatments – works to signal to drivers as they enter the City that they are entering a slower speed zone.

Sign installation complete. Supporting coloured surfacing installation, roundel speed markings and raised pedestrian crossings in progress.

Connected Communities, Great North Road - Project to improve travel choice by providing an enhanced street environment, dedicated bus priority measures, separated cycle lanes, and improved road and pedestrian safety.

Project designs are being progressed and local stakeholders will be re-engaged over the next month. The team is working towards public consultation in late September/early October. The plan will be brought to the board for comment prior to consultation commencing.

Grafton Road – midblock pedestrian signal outside of University of Auckland.

Complete however signal commissioning still remains. There were delays. It will be complete in August 2020.

Grey Lynn parking scheme extension - proposed extension to the existing parking scheme to Prime Road and Elgin Street.

A resolution was passed by the Traffic Control Committee and it is in the final stages of implementation.

The Permits Team are working on opening the application process for residents to apply for permits starting from 7 August 2020 and close on 31August 2020.

The area will go live 1 September 2020.

Herne Bay cycling and walking improvements – proposed changes to encourage slower driving speeds and improve routes for people walking and cycling.

Six out of eight treatments completed. Construction still going ahead as normal. Five further speed tables and eight speedhumps that are part of package 2 in the wider scope of works has been awarded to Fulton Hogan to continue with the works. The works are planned to be completed by November 2020.

 

Karangahape Road Enhancements Project – streetscape upgrade.

Ø Section A (Northside From Ponsonby Road to Howe Street ): 100% complete  except some minor works

Ø Section B (Northside Motorway Over bridge) : 100% complete 

Ø Section G (Southside from Upper Queen Street to Mercury lane):  98% completed, landscape work is in progress  

Ø Section F (Southside from Symonds Street to Upper Queens Street):  100 % Completed except traffic signal pole installation, Soft opening of cycleway is planned from 10th of August 2020.

Ø Section E (Northside from Symonds St to Upper Queen St): In progress expected completion by end of Aug 2020  

Ø Section I (Southside Motorway over bridge): Completed

Ø Section H (Southside from Mercury Lane to motorway Bridge) – 50 % completed

 

Detailed pilot trenching and CCTV investigation are continuing to be carried out for future sections for early identification of any potential clashes with underground services.

Regular meetings are being held with the CRL team and key stakeholders including the K Road Business Association.

 

Nelson Street Phase 3 - a cycling facility linking Nelson Street via Market Place into the Viaduct.

The project’s public consultation has been closed out in July. About 80 percent of the submissions generally support the proposal. The construction of the cycleway on Market Place has been put on hold due to budget constraints of the Walking and Cycling programme. The project is ‘shovel ready’ for construction once budget becomes available.

 

Newmarket and Remuera Residential Parking Zone (RPZ)- proposed permit scheme for residents and businesses

The go live date for both Remuera and Newmarket RPZ’s is 17 August 2020. Auckland Transport has already opened the process to apply for residential permits. Advisory signs informing about the opening date have been installed around these residential streets.

 

Newmarket Bus Layovers Off Street

Auckland Transport has initiated the conversation with NZTA to buy the land under the Public Works Act in 2015.
This is subject to legal review and it is Auckland Transport’s preference to buy the land out right Capex vs Lease as it is an ongoing Opex.

Parnell East Residential Parking Zone (RPZ) – project to install a residential parking zone and safety improvements on St Stephens Avenue, Lichfield Road and Crescent Road.

This is now complete and live.

Princes Street and Eden Crescent intersection - upgrade including raised zebra crossings.

This work has now been completed.

Pt Chevalier to Westmere cycleway - A dedicated cycle route along Pt Chevalier Road and Meola Road ending near the Westmere Shops. 

Public consultation report published on 16 July 2020.
Detail design phase incorporating public feedback currently on-hold as a part of Auckland Council's Emergency budget 2020-21
Construction currently on-hold as a part of Auckland Councils Emergency budget 2020-21.

 

Tamaki Drive cycle route (Quay Street to Ngapipi Bridge)

The temporary traffic management with three lanes operation tidal flow during peak hours is operating well.  The construction works continue to progress well in multiple locations: south side of Tamaki Drive west of Ngapipi Bridge and north side of Tamaki Drive between Port entrance and Parnell Bath overhead pedestrian Bridge.  Piling work on the new pedestrian bridge next to the Point Resolution Estuary Bridge has completed.  The two super Ts for footbridge will be install from 10pm Friday 14 August to evening of Sunday 16 August 2020, full traffic lane closure is required for the installation (pedestrian and cyclists will remain access).

The project team are still working towards completing the main construction work before Americas Cup races begin in December 2020, the landscaping work will continue after Americas Cup races finish.

The Strand intersection – road safety improvements to the intersections at Tamaki Drive and Gladstone Road

 

This project is currently on hold and is subject to Emergency budget priorities.

 

Victoria Street East-West

cycleway - dedicated cycle route along Victoria Street West, from the Beaumont Street intersection to the Hobson Street intersection.

The Victoria Street road pavement reseal was completed in July. New coloured surfacing, new road markings and concrete separator islands are to be installed for the new cycleway. The construction is anticipated to complete in September.

 

Waitematā Safe Routes project, the two routes open for feedback are Route 1: Surrey Crescent to Garnet Road and Route 2: Richmond Road.

1) Surrey Crescent to Garnet Road 

Work on reviewing the 2018 design for route 1 is ongoing.

Construction has been deferred until July 2022 onwards and is subject to the Emergency budget priorities.

 

2) Richmond Road incl. West Lynn Village

The detailed designs for the footpath and drainage remediation works has been issued to AT and is being reviewed by all stakeholders.

Work on the design for the rest of route 2 is ongoing.

 

Construction of the remediation works is planned for August onwards.

 

Construction for the remainder of the route has been deferred until July 2022 onwards and is subject to Emergency budget priorities.

Wellesley Street and Sale Street – new intersection signals.

Award of contract to be held until FY2021 budget and project priorities are confirmed. If budget is approved, construction to commence in September/October 2020.

 

Wellesley Street Bus Improvement Project (formerly Midtown bus route) – Improving how city centre buses operate.

The Detailed Business Case has now been paused due to funding constraints stemming from the Council’s Emergency Budget. The team is wrapping up work to date and focusing on how to deliver interim bus improvements in time for Wellesley Street’s re-opening by Link Alliance in 2021.

 

Wynyard Quarter Street and park upgrades - central construction package.

Majority of works are now complete. Unfortunately, due to the current water restrictions the laying of grass and some planting within the Wynyard Quarter open space on Daldy Street has been deferred. This deferral of works will mean the park will stay fenced off to the public. Also as previously reported, some of the Daldy Street linear park works have also been deferred due to a delay in land transfer. This land transfer has now occurred however, the landowner has still not fully vacated the site which is causing further delay. All works are now due be completed mid-November.

 

 

Downtown Programme

8.    The table below has an update on the Downtown Infrastructure programme.

Item

The revised timeline has been released following a review of delays due to COVID-19 restrictions and technical difficulties encountered with the now complete jet grout piling section of the seawall. The programme delay is four months, with a revised completion date of June 2021.

The six projects will be individually completed and gradually returned to public use.

Projects to be completed by June 2021:

·    Quay Street strengthening mid-2019 to December 2020

·    Quay Street enhancement: mid-2019 to June 2021.

·    Ferry Basin redevelopment – stage 1: mid-2019 to April 2021

·    Galway Street enhancement: Late 2019 – November 2020

·    Lower Albert Street bus interchange: late 2019 – December 2020

·    Te Wānanga (the downtown public space): early 2020 – February 2021

 

To minimise the impact of prolonged works on the local community the Downtown Programme is proposing closure of the eastbound traffic lane on Quay Street between Lower Hobson Street and Lower Queen Street from August 2020 to February/March 2021. This will enable us to complete construction 8 weeks earlier and return Quay Street to Aucklanders in April 2021.

First week of August 2020

Coring into the existing seawall for the final inclined anchors has re-commenced. 14 out of 29 new inclined anchors are now installed and being tensioned. Installation of the remaining anchors will commence after the coring is complete.

On Tuesday 4 August the second concrete pour for Te Wānanga took place. This massive pour required around 200 cubic metres of concrete and up to 34 concrete trucks to complete and is a significant step forward in the construction of the exciting waterfront public space.

Access to Princes Wharf has switched over to the eastern side so the streetscape enhancement and pavement upgrade works can continue. 

Full access into the Philips Building has been reinstated with only a couple of small fenced areas remain around utility pits. This area will continue to open up over next week and final kerb construction and paving will be complete by end August.

Quay Street Enhancements works on the Northern side continue with, utility installation, concrete pours for the new footpath and rain garden excavation at various stages of progress across the different sections.

In Lower Albert Street, construction of the new western footpath continues with ducting installation and paving works. The western footpath along Lower Albert Street will start re-opening in stages from late July with completion expected late September 2020.

Night works will be taking place until mid-August (5pm to midnight, Monday to Friday) on the new deck in the Ferry Basin. If noisy activity is required it will cease by 10pm, with only quiet works until midnight.

 

Traffic Control Committee resolutions

9.      Auckland Transport's resolution and approval process ensures the most appropriate controls and restrictions are put in place and can be legally enforced. The decisions made by Auckland Traffic’s Traffic Control Committee in the Waitematā Local Board during May 2020 is as follows:


Street Name

Report Type

Nature of Restriction

Decision

Williamson Avenue and Surrounding Streets Grey Lynn

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

Parking Zone / P120 Parking

Carried

Beaumont Street Auckland Central

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

No Stopping At All Times / Bus Stop / Traffic Island

Carried

Princes Street Auckland Central                                         

 

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Event)

Temporary Traffic and Parking Controls

Carried

St Paul Street Auckland Central                             

 

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Event)           

Temporary Traffic and Parking Controls

Carried

Jervois Road
Herne Bay                                         

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Works)

 Loading Zone

Carried

Hobson Street Auckland Central                                         

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

No Stopping At All Times / Bus Stop / Loading Zone / P5 Parking

Carried

Mayoral Drive / Wakefield Street Auckland Central                             

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

No Stopping At All Times / Bus Stop / Bus Parking – At Metro Only / Edge Lines / Flush Median / Lanes / Lane Arrow Marking

Carried

 

Community Safety Fund (CSF)

10.     The CSF planned to deliver a total of $20 million over two years distributed across all 21 local boards. It is strictly for road safety initiatives and is to deliver safety projects identified by the local board and Ward Councillors.

11.     A local board’s share of the fund is derived from a formula that assesses the number of deaths and serious injuries in that area.

12.     Waitematā Local Board share of the CSF was $1,450,000.

13.     Waitematā has five CSF proposed projects and these are listed below:

a)  Safe Schools Toolbox – Newton Central School

b)  Pedestrian Crossings - on West End Road / Fife St by the bus stops next to the Westend tennis club

c)  Pedestrian crossings formalised on Lower Domain Drive at Lovers Lane and at Domain Drive

d)  Pedestrian crossing outside ACG Campus on Davis Cres to Olympic Reserve

e)  Hopetoun Street Improvements

14.     Now that Auckland Council’s emergency budget is confirmed, Auckland Transport is reviewing all CSF projects. It is possible that projects are delayed or even stopped. At this time, we will continue to record the projects and their project to date; when the budget process is complete, information that is more detailed will be provided to the board.

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

 

15.     With the Council’s emergency budget now confirmed the LBTCF for the 2020/2021 Financial Year has been set at $5.0 million, for allocation across the 21 Local Boards. Allocation will still be based on the Local Board Funding Policy. Decisions about the 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 Financial Years will form part of the LTP/RLTP discussions but early indications are that these years will also see a more constrained capital programme, than prior to the COVID crisis. The specific budget available for the LBTCF in 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 will be determined by the prioritisation of the capital programme through the RLTP and will be subject to the usual consultation and submission processes.

Response to resolutions

16.     Response to resolution number WTM/2020/151: “request a report from Auckland Transport on what actions could be undertaken in West Lynn in the near future to address the current accessibility issue.”

17.     Following the usual agreed process with the Local Board the next step will be that Auckland Transport will hold a workshop with the Board when the design for the project is advanced enough for a discussion. A memorandum will be produced for the Board as part of the workshop process. Following this workshop and should the Board consider there to be issues of accessibility, the Local board can give feedback on that basis.

18.     Response to resolution number WTM/2020/133:

“b) endorse the Queen Street Access for Everyone Project and request urgent action to progress this project.

c) request Auckland Transport urgently to investigate and take appropriate action on:

i) options to maintain the current configuration of Queen Street as one lane in each direction

ii) restricting access for private vehicles from Queen Street between Customs Street and Mayoral Drive, including the closure of the intersections of Shortland Street and Wyndham Street

iii) changing the existing local business bays on Queen Street to loading bays

iv) restricting access for commercial traffic using loading bays between 11am and 6pm

v) ensuring the provision of adequate disabled parking on the side streets off Queen street

19.     The Access for Everyone (A4E) Pilot is being led by the Development Programme Office (DPO) at Auckland Council, Auckland Transport has passed this feedback to the DPO for a response. 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

21.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.       The impact of information in this report is mainly confined to Auckland Transport.  Where LBTCF projects are being progressed by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities group, engagement on progress has taken place. Any further engagement required with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.


 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no local, sub-regional or regional impacts.

General information items sent to the board:

24.     Please see below for a summary of items sent to the local board for their information or feedback:

Item

Date sent to Board

FYI: Parking Tariff Upper Queen Street

02/07/20

FEEDBACK: Park Avenue, Grafton - Broken Yellow Lines [BYL-464]

07/07/20

FYI: Karangahape Road Enhancements Project - new project completion date

08/07/20

FYI: Grafton Mews parking Plan

08/07/20

FYI: Pt Chevalier Improvements

10/09/20

FYI: Ferry integration fare

16/07/20

FYI: Grafton Mews and Grafton Road, Grafton - Parking change/traffic control

17/07/20

INFO: Victoria Street Cycleway

24/07/20

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The proposed decision of receiving this report has no financial implications as outlined in the resolutions, analysis and advice.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.       Auckland Transport is reviewing our Programme in response to Auckland Council’s emergency budget.

28.     Auckland Transport’s capital and operating budgets have been reduced so we can expect that some projects we had planned for 2020/2021 may not be able to be delivered and we expect this will be disappointing to communities that we had already engaged with.

29.     Both the Community Safety Fund and the Local Board Transport Capital Fund are impacted by these budget reductions. 

30.     Auckland Transport will be mitigate this risk by clearly communicating with the Board on the outcomes and new funding levels so that the Board may make the best use of their available funds.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board next month.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Caroline Tauevihi - Elected Member Relationship Manager

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon - Elected Member Team Manager

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 

Approval of the Waitematā Local Board External Partnerships work programme 2020/2021

File No.: CP2020/10535

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Waitematā Local Board External Partnerships work programme 2020/2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the local board’s External Partnerships work programme and associated budget for approval for delivery within the 2020/2021 financial year (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcome and objective that the local board identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017:

·    Outcome 1: An innovative, productive and resilient local economy.

Objective: Support our business associations to drive local growth and innovation.

4.       The COVID-19 pandemic has exerted considerable pressure on the council’s financial position. In July 2020, the Governing Body adopted the council’s Emergency Budget 2020/2021, which has reduced both capital and operating budgets. However, locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational funding has not been reduced.

5.       The board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The board indicated its support for the following project, with budget as listed below:

·          Support for the Grey Lynn Business Association - $10,000

6.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $10,000, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2020/2021 financial year.

7.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the External Partnerships work programme 2020/2021 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the work programme.

9.       The COVID-19 pandemic has exerted considerable pressure on the council’s financial position, which has had flow on effects for the budgets available in the 2020/2021 financial year. Given the new financial realities facing Auckland, the council has adopted an Emergency Budget 2020/2021, which has reduced both capital and operating budgets from those anticipated prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, this does not include a reduction of locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational funding.

10.     The COVID-19 pandemic occurred part way through the planning cycle for the development of the 2020/2021 local board work programmes. This led to local boards undertaking a reprioritisation exercise for all proposed activity.

11.     The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017. The specific outcome reflected in the work programme is:

·    Outcome 1: An innovative, productive and resilient local economy.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s External Partnerships work programme 2020/2021 are detailed below. See Attachment A for further detail.

Support for the Grey Lynn Business Association – $10,000

13.     To provide funding to continue building the capabilities of the Grey Lynn Business Association (GLBA) to assist the association to increase its membership base and provide administration support. Develop COVID-19 business recovery initiatives for local businesses. To work with Business Grey Lynn group to align activities. Consider and investigate the establishment of a Business Improvement District (BID) programme.

Presenting the proposal to the local board

14.     Before the end of the first quarter (September), GLBA will present to the local board its detailed proposals on how they propose to utilise the funds. After local board considerations and feedback has been received, a funding agreement will be developed and forwarded to GLBA for signing.

15.     The External Partnerships work programme progress will be reported directly to the local board as part of the quarterly local board work programme report produced by Local Board Services.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The proposed work programme does not significantly impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The proposed External Partnerships work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2019 to July 2020. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

19.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori, then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The proposed External Partnerships work programme budget for 2020/2021 is $10,000 of the board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2020/2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

22.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery of local board work programmes if the COVID-19 Alert Level changes (New Zealand’s 4-level Alert System specifies measures to be taken against COVID-19 at each level). The deliverability of some activities will decrease if there is an increase to the COVID-19 Alert Level.

23.     Table 4 shows the identified significant risks associated with activities in the proposed 2020/2021 work programme.

Table 4: Significant risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Supporting GLBA

Not implementing the planned initiatives

Quarterly reporting on progress

Low

 

24.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2021. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

26.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā External Partnerships work programme 2020/2021

65

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 

Approval of the Waitematā Local Board Local Economic Development work programme 2020/2021

File No.: CP2020/10737

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Waitematā Local Board local economic development work programme 2020/2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the board’s local economic development work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2020/2021 financial year (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017:

·          An innovative, productive, and resilient local economy

4.       The COVID-19 pandemic has exerted considerable pressure on the council’s financial position. In July 2020, the Governing Body adopted the council’s Emergency Budget 2020/2021, which has reduced both capital and operating budgets. However, locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational funding has not been reduced.

5.       The board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The board indicated its support for the following projects, with budgets as listed below:

·          Business Growth Accelerator - $5,000

·          Young Enterprise Scheme - $5,000

6.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $10,000, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2020/2021 financial year.

7.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the Waitematā local economic development work programme 2020/2021 (Attachment A to the agenda report) including associated budgets as summarised in the table below:

Activity name

2020/2021

Business Growth Accelerator

$5,000

Young Enterprise Scheme

$5,000

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the work programme.

9.       The COVID-19 pandemic has exerted considerable pressure on the council’s financial position, which has had flow on effects for the budgets available in the 2020/2021 financial year. Given the new financial realities facing Auckland, the council has adopted an Emergency Budget 2020/2021, which has reduced both capital and operating budgets from those anticipated prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, this does not include a reduction of locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational funding.

10.     The COVID-19 pandemic occurred part way through the planning cycle for the development of the 2020/2021 local board work programmes. This led to local boards undertaking a reprioritisation exercise for all proposed activity.

11.     The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017. The specific outcome that is reflected in the work programme is:

·    An innovative, productive and resilient local economy

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s local economic development work programme 2020/2021 are detailed below. See Attachment A for further detail.

Business Growth Accelerator – $5,000 

13.     The Business Growth Accelerator aims to provide practical and accessible support to help micro businesses recover from the COVID-19 crisis and enable them to grow their business operation through innovation as well as learning best practice from their peers. Micro-businesses are the target audience. A series of workshops will be designed to develop business capability in the areas such as finance, digital marketing, e-commerce capability, and social media promotion. It’s envisaged that the workshops will be delivered online. These workshops would be recorded and shared to wider business community.

Young Enterprise Scheme – $5,000

14.     Auckland Business Chamber, on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust, delivers the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) in Auckland. YES is a practical, year-long programme for year 12 and 13 students.

 

15.     Fostering youth entrepreneurship is a key requirement for developing an innovative economy and creating employment pathways for our young people. Through the programme, students develop creative ideas into actual businesses, complete with real products and services and real profit and loss. Students learn key work skills and business knowledge including: business fundamentals, planning, interpersonal relations, financial, decision making, reporting, risk management and team work. YES helps create a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship amongst Auckland’s young people.

 

16.     The funding from the local board will support the delivery of the overall YES program, including the Kick Start days in February 2021 where the Auckland Business Chamber will specifically acknowledge local board support. The Kick start days are the first day students get to meet the Young Enterprise team, and find out about their 2021 year, what YES is about, and what is in store for them. All schools in the local board area that have shown an interest in YES are invited. In addition, the invite is extended to those schools who have not shown an interest to enable them to make a decision as to whether to participate.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Table 2 outlines the activities in the 2020/2021 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

Table 2: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Climate impact

Business Growth Accelerator

The programme will be delivered online and virtually. This will reduce the need for attendees to travel

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The proposed local economic development work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2019 to July 2020. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

20.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     Table 3 outlines the activities in the 2020/2021 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes.

Table 3: Māori impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Māori impact

Business Growth Accelerator

Māori businesses would benefit from participating in the course and further develop their capabilities and business skills

Young Enterprise Scheme

In implementing the YES Māori students at participating schools will be able to benefit from the experience and learnings from the YES.

 

22.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

 

23.     The proposed local economic development work programme budget for 2020/2021 is $10,000 of the boards locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2020/2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery of the local board work programmes if the COVID-19 Alert Level changes (New Zealand’s 4-level Alert System specifies measures to be taken against COVID-19 at each level). The deliverability of some activities will decrease if there is an increase to the COVID-19 Alert Level.

25.     Table 4 shows the identified significant risks associated with activities in the proposed 2020/2021 work programme.

Table 4: Significant risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Business Growth Accelerator

Budget from ATEED to fund this programme is not available.

The project scope will be reviewed and reduced to meet available budget level.

Medium

Business Growth Accelerator

The project supplier is unable to deliver to the reviewed scope. Finding a new supplier is causing delay to the programme delivery.

 

Multiple suppliers will be contacted to ensure a suitable supplier is found as soon as possible

Low

Young Enterprise Scheme

There is a risk that the Kick Start days do not proceed due to changes in the COVID-19 alert levels. As a result, the sponsorship provided to the Auckland Business Chamber may not be required.

To maintain contact with the Auckland Business Chamber on the running of the event to ensure that if the events are cancelled the full impact on the need for the local board support is identified.

Medium

 

26.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2021. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

28.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jonathan Sudworth – Local Economic Development Advisor – ATEED

Authorisers

John Norman – Strategic Planning Manager LED – ATEED

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 

Approval of the Waitematā Local Board Community Facilities work programme 2020 - 2023

File No.: CP2020/10670

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Waitematā Local Board Community Facilities work programme 2020/2021 and approve the 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 work programmes in principle.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Community Facilities department is responsible for the building, maintaining and renewing of all open spaces and community buildings. This includes the community leasing and licensing of council-owned premises.

3.       This report presents the Waitematā Local Board’s Community Facilities work programme and associated budgets for approval for the 2020/2021 financial year and for approval in principle for the subsequent two financial years, 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 (see Attachment A).

4.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017:

·    Inclusive communities that are vibrant, healthy and connected

·    Attractive and versatile public places that meet our communities’ needs

·    The natural environment is valued, protected and enhanced

·    A high-quality built environment that embraces our heritage

5.       The council’s financial position has been severely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Council’s Emergency Budget for 2020/2021 has reduced both capital and operating budgets from those anticipated prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

6.       The reduction in anticipated budgets has required the reprioritisation of projects and activities that can be accommodated within the local board’s revised budget.

7.       The local board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund in anticipation of its reduced budgets in a series of workshops between November 2019 and July 2020.

8.       A number of projects in the work programme for the 2021/2022 or 2022/2023 financial years have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP). Approval is sought for these projects to commence at the beginning of the 2020/2021 year so that they can be delivered early in the event that projects approved for delivery in 2020/2021 are delayed for any unforeseen reason. 

9.       The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional programmes, including local and sports field development (growth), coastal renewals, slips prevention and the Natural Environment Targeted Rate programmes. Inclusion of these projects in the local board work programme is subject to approval by the relevant Governing Body committees. 

10.     It is recommended that the local board approve the inclusion of these projects in the work programme and provide feedback for consideration by the relevant Governing Body committees.

11.     Additionally, there are some external sources of funding not held by council that contribute to projects such as Panuku and Auckland Transport funding.

12.     Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the local board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the Community Facilities work programme 2020/2021 and associated budget. (Attachment A – Build, Maintain, Renew and Attachment B – Community Leases to the agenda report).

b)      approve in principle the Community Facilities work programme 2021/2022 and 2022/2023. (Attachment A – Build, Maintain, Renew and Attachment B – Community Leases to the agenda report).

c)      approve the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) projects identified in the work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report) as projects that will commence and may be delivered in advance of the expected delivery year, if required to meet expected financial expenditure for the 2020/2021 financial year.

d)      note that approval of budget allocation in the 2020/2021 year for multi-year projects implies the local board’s support for the projects in their entirety.

e)      note that the inclusion in the work programme of projects that are funded from the Coastal Renewals, Slips Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development and Natural Environment Targeted Rate budgets are subject to approval of the identified budget allocation by the relevant Governing Body committees.

f)       provide feedback for consideration by the relevant Governing Body committees in relation to the projects funded from the Coastal Renewals, Slips Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets.

g)      note that budget allocations for all projects in the Community Facilities work programme are best current estimates, and amendments may be required to the work programme to accommodate final costs as the year progresses.

h)      note the cancellation of Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) capex for work programme activities ‘Waitematā - LDI minor capex fund 2019/2020’, resolved in the 2019/2020 financial year (Resolution WTM/2019/121) and ‘Waitematā - LDI minor capex fund 2018/19’, resolved in the 2018/2019 financial year (Resolution WTM/2018/93). New minor capex improvement works will be delivered as part of activity line ‘Waitematā - Parks Improvement Projects – LDI’. Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) capex funding of $80,000 to be returned for reallocation within the 2021/2022 financial year.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     Work programmes are presented to local boards for approval each year. The 2020 – 2023 Community Facilities Work Programme, detailed in the attachments, contains information on all proposed projects to be delivered by Community Facilities, including capital works projects, leasing and operational maintenance. The projects identified in the work programme have been prioritised for investment based on a combination of local board feedback through a series of workshops, staff assessments of assets and key stakeholder input.

14.     The COVID-19 pandemic has exerted considerable pressure on the council’s financial position, which has had flow on effects for the budget for the 2020/2021 financial year. Given the new financial realities facing Auckland, council has adopted an Emergency Budget 2020/2021, which has reduced both capital and operating budgets from those anticipated prior to the COVID-19 pandemic.

15.     The COVID-19 pandemic occurred part way through the planning cycle for the development of the 2020/2021 work programme. This resulted in a disruption to the work programme development process, including requiring a reprioritisation exercise for all proposed activity. 

16.     The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017. The specific outcomes that are reflected in the work programme are:

·    Inclusive communities that are vibrant, healthy and connected

·    Attractive and versatile public places that meet our communities’ needs

·    The natural environment is valued, protected and enhanced

·    A high-quality built environment that embraces our heritage

17.     The following adopted strategies and plans also guided the development of the work programme:

·    Becoming a Low Carbon Community Action Plan

·    Grey Lynn Park Development Plan

·    Myers Park Development Plan

·    Waitematā Greenways Plan

·    Auckland Urban Forest (Ngahere Strategy)

·    Ponsonby Road Plan

·    Area Plans - Parnell Plan, Newton Eden Terrace Plan and Newmarket Laneways Plan

18.     The Community Facilities work programme is a three-year programme, this clearly demonstrates the phasing of project delivery and enables the organisation to prepare for delivery.  The local board is asked to approve a new three-year work programme each year (approve year one and approve in principle years two and three).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     The proposed work programme is made up of activities continuing from previous financial years and new initiatives supported by the local board.

20.     Due to COVID-19 impacts, the Emergency Budget means that the budgets available to the local board are reduced from those previously anticipated and as a result, some activity that was previously proposed for 2020/2021 has been deferred or removed from the draft work programme through a reprioritisation exercise.

Capital works programme

21.     Investment in the capital works programme will ensure that council facilities and open spaces in Waitematā Local Board area remain valuable and well-maintained community assets.

22.     The overall capital works programme includes projects for which the local board has discretion to allocate budget, referred to as the local programme, and projects from regional programmes. 

23.     Specific projects within the work programme may have budget allocated from two or more budget sources, including budgets from both local and regional programmes.

24.     The work programme includes both new projects and existing projects that have been continued from the previous financial year where those projects require multiple years for delivery (multi-year projects). All projects include actual anticipated spend as there will be no carry forward of capital funding from the 2019/2020 financial year.

Local Programme

25.     The local programme includes those projects that the local board is funding from its discretionary capex budgets, including:

·    Renewals
The local board can allocate its renewals budget towards the renewal of any council owned asset.

·    Locally Driven Initiative (LDI)
The local board has the discretion to allocate its LDI capex budget to any project that delivers a council asset or as a capital grant to a third party to deliver an asset made available for public use. The Emergency Budget includes a reduction in the LDI capex budget available for each local board from that anticipated prior to the COVID emergency.

26.     In preparing recommendations for the local programme, a number of matters have been considered, including:

·    strategies and plans

·    service assessment input from Community Services

·    asset condition assessments

·    input from operational maintenance teams and staff working within facilities

·    budget availability.

27.     Table 1 shows key projects included in the work programme.

Table 1: Key projects in the work programme

ID number

Activity name

Activity description

FY21 Budget

Total Budget

Line item 2

192 Parnell Road (Heard Park Plunket) - renew building interior and exterior

Renew the interior and exterior of the premises to ensure the building is building compliant and fit for purpose with the reinstatement of the toilets. Heard Park Plunket currently occupy the premises.

FY19/20 - investigate and design

FY19/20 to FY20/21 - physical works

$260,000

$300,740

Line item 12

Central Library - comprehensive roof remediation (areas 1 through 12)

Renew the roof and cladding of the main library building.

FY19/20 - investigate and design 

FY19/20 to FY21/22 - physical works

$6,000,000

$10,017,883

Line item 18

Grey Lynn Park - develop new changing rooms

Develop four changing rooms and four toilets at the park.

FY19/20 to 20/21 - physical works

$1,015,000

$2,261,838

Line item 21

Heard Park - renew and upgrade park assets

Renew and upgrade assets in Heard Park in alignment with the recommendations of the Heard Park concept plan, to be adopted in 2020/2021. 

FY20/21 - investigation and design

FY20/21 - physical works (stage one renewals)

FY21/22 - physical works (proposed second stage renewals and development)

$300,000

$300,000

Line item 24

Home Reserve - renew play space, hard stands and landscaping

Home Reserve - renewal of the play space, basketball court, all gardens, fencing and hard surfaces in the reserve, including pathways, car turning area and passive amenity areas.

FY18/19 - investigation and design (consultation)

FY19/20 - concept design

FY20/21 - physical works

$374,898

$553,000

Line item 27

Myers Park Mayoral Drive access way - renew stairway access to the park

Renewal of the stair access way to be included in the wider plans for access to Myers Park, to be delivered by the Development Programme Office (DPO) of Auckland Council.

FY20/21 - investigation and design (detailed design, obtain required consents)

FY21/22 - physical works (to align with DPO works)

$100,000

$100,000

Line item 30

Ngahere (Urban Forest) Strategy - Waitematā Action Plan Delivery 2019/2020

The Ngahere Strategy is entering year two, the 'growing' phase which includes finding space for planting new trees using partnerships, including community groups, schools and the Million Trees Program.

FY20/21 - physical works (planting)

$45,000

$45,000

Line item 43

Outhwaite Park - renew playspace and adjacent carpark

Renew playground and adjacent carpark at Outhwaite Park.

FY18/19 - investigate and design

FY19/20 - concept design (including consultation)

FY20/21 - physical works.

$458.477

$41,523

Line item 54

Studio One Toi Tu - comprehensive renewal

Renew and refurbish interior and exterior of Studio One Toi Tu buildings including the cell block, the toilet and the main building in consultation with the Council heritage team.

FY18/19 - investigation and design, seismic assessment

FY19/20 - concept plan

FY20/21 - physical works

$140,262

$325,000

Line item 66

Western Springs Lakeside Park - renew play space

Renewal and upgrade of the playground as a destination play space in alignment with the Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Development Plan.

FY19/20 - investigation and design (consultation, obtain required consents)

FY20/21 - physical works

$941,951

$1,472,802

 

28.     Of particular note in the work programme is the bringing forward of the design and consenting stage for the Myers Park Mayoral Drive stair access way to the park. This will ensure the physical works of the renewal and upgrade, as part of wider plans for access improvements into Myers Park, by the Development Programme Office (DPO) of Auckland Council, are able to be constructed in 2021/2022.

29.     The completion and adoption of concept plans for Basque Park and Heard Park, and a development plan for Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea in 2020/2021, will enable the planning for the physical works stages to be progressed.

30.     Prioritising the delivery of one project may mean other projects have to be phased into later years to meet budget requirements. For example, the prioritisation of delivery timing of such key play space renewal and upgrade projects as Home Reserve, Outhwaite Park and Western Springs Lakeside Park. To enable these projects to complete construction in 2020/2021, projects such as the renewal of heritage assets Symonds Street toilet, St Stephens pathways and Myers Park Caretakers Cottage and shed will have their delivery phased into later years. These assets will be continued to be monitored and maintained as until their renewal works can progressed.

31.     The proposed work programme in Attachment A contains:

·    Number of projects (excluding leases and contract lines) over three years: 67

·    Indicative cost for proposed projects in the 2020/2021 financial year: $12,236,129


 

Regional Programme

32.     The Long-term Plan 2018 - 2028 includes budgets which support the delivery of regional programmes. These budgets are allocated to specific projects within a regional programme by the Governing Body.

33.     Where budget is allocated to a project in the regional programme that falls within a local board decision making allocation (e.g. a local park), that project is included in the local board work programme. The local board then has decision making responsibility for that project, within the parameters set by the governing body, namely location, scope and budget. For Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) projects, the local board has decision making responsibility within the parameters of the targeted rate framework and the national kauri dieback programme standards for protection of kauri.

34.     Regional budgets include:

·    Local parks and sports field development (growth)

·    Coastal renewals

·    Slips prevention and remediation

·    Natural Environment Targeted Rate funding (NETR).

35.     Projects in the local parks and sports field development programme are identified and prioritised based on consideration of a number of factors, including:

·    Extent to which residential growth is generating demand for the project

·    Current levels of provision

·    Available budget.

36.     Projects in the coastal renewals and slips prevention and remediation programme are identified and prioritised based on consideration of a number of factors, including:

·    Asset condition

·    Relative hazard and risk

·    Available budget.

37.     The allocation of budget to specific projects will be approved by the relevant Governing Body committee post local board work programme adoption.

38.     The local board has an opportunity to provide formal feedback on the growth, coastal and slips allocations, through resolution to this report, for consideration by the relevant Governing Body committee prior to approval of the regional programmes.

39.     The Natural Environment Targeted Rate programme is a regional budget under the decision making of the Environment and Climate Change Committee and reported to individual local boards.

Capital Programme Delivery

Cost estimates subject to change

40.     Budget allocations within the work programme are best estimates only. Project costings are subject to change and refinement as projects progress through the design and delivery process. Greater clarity will be determined around the specific work required and the cost of delivery of that work once the details are defined.

41.     The delivery of individual projects is managed within the overall work programme budget for each local board. Where significant changes to project budgets may need to be considered, or if new projects are added to the work programme, changes may be required to the programme to accommodate final project costs as the year progresses.


 

Risk adjusted programme

42.     A number of projects have been identified in the work programme as “risk adjusted programme (RAP)” projects.

43.     Approval is sought for these projects to commence at the beginning of the 2020/2021 year so that they can be delivered early in the event that projects approved for delivery in 2020/2021 are delayed for any unforeseen reason

Changes to the work programme

43.   Local boards have given a general delegation to the Chief Executive subject to terms and conditions contained in the local board delegation protocols.

44.   In relation to work programmes, the delegation protocols require local boards to approve work programmes annually and require staff to seek a decision from the board for “any proposed variations to the approved work programme that may result in an overspend.” The protocols also include a range of more general requirements for reporting to boards, including “decisions of a politically sensitive nature”, “any other matters specified by the Local Board Chair”, and to report other matters on request of the Chair.

45.   Staff propose that in addition to proposed work programme variations “that may result in an overspend”, other proposed variations that impact on the agreed outcomes of approved projects or the delivery of the overall approved work programme should also be referred to the board for a decision. Such changes include:

·    changes to an approved projects activity description or activity benefit

·    changes to project budget or timing that impact other approved projects in the programme

·    cancellation of a project

·    addition of a new project

46.   More minor changes that do not substantially alter the approved work programmes will be made by staff under general delegation, following discussion with the board, and noted in the quarterly reports.

Operational maintenance work programme

47. The regular maintenance of all council-owned built and open space assets plays an important part in:

·    increasing the long-term durability of Community Facilities assets

·    improving the safety of Community Facilities assets

·    ensuring the enjoyment of Community Facilities assets by the users.

48. In the Community Facilities Work Programme, there are three-line items dedicated to all maintenance in the local board area:

a.   Full Facilities Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all buildings, parks and open space assets, sports fields, coastal management, storm damage response and streetscapes maintenance

b.   Arboriculture Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include all tree management and maintenance

c.   Ecological Restoration Maintenance Contracts – these contracts include pest plant management within ecologically significant areas and animal pest management across all parks and reserves

49. Staff will be able to provide regular reporting on maintenance through monthly updates to the local boards and through the quarterly report. Community Facilities is also providing additional regular updates to all elected members on contractor performance.

 

Leasing work programme

50. Community leases are a valuable way in which the council provides support to not-for-profit community organisations across the region. These groups provide a wide range of community activities and services aligned with recognised local priorities and are a key part of the mosaic of community activity and infrastructure in Auckland.

51. The detailed list of the community leases and licences that will expire or are due for renewal over the 2020/2021 financial year is provided in Attachment B. Following approval of the work programme staff will proceed with review and renewal of these leases and licences as appropriate during the course of the financial year.

52. Two additional project lines include those leases and licences proposed to be progressed in the 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 financial years respectively.

53. Straight forward lease renewals without variations will be processed in accordance with agreed delegations with a written memo to the local board providing the opportunity for the local board to request further information or a formal report. Expired and more complex community leases will be reported to the local board at a business meeting.

Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational activities

54. The project ‘Waitematā - urban forest restoration’ as part of the 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme had budget allocated from the Waitematā Local Board locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget in 2019/2020. The remaining unspent budget of $4,000 LDI Opex is being carried forward to the new financial year 2020/2021.

55. The project ‘Rose Road Gully - weed control maintenance and planting’ as part of the 2019/2020 Community Facilities Work Programme had budget allocated from the Waitematā Local Board locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget in 2019/2020. The unspent budget of $10,000 LDI Opex is being carried forward to the new financial year 2020/2021.

56. In addition to this project being carried forward there are three new LDI Opex projects in the 2020/2021 programme with a combined budget allocation of $146,108.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

57. Many of the activities in the 2020/201 work programme will have impact on greenhouse gas emissions and contribute towards climate change adaptation. These impacts will be considered as projects progress and will be reported to the local board at future reporting opportunities. The sorts of impacts to be considered include:

a.   Maximum upcycling and recycling of old material

b.   Installation of energy efficiency measures

c.   Building design to ensure the maximum lifetime and efficiency of the building is obtained

d.   Lifecycle impacts of construction materials (embodied emissions)

e.   Exposure of building location to climate change hazards (sea level rise, flooding (floodplains), drought, heat island effect)

f.    Anticipated increase in carbon emissions from construction, including contractor emissions

g.   Lifecycle impacts of construction materials.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

58. The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

59. The Community Facilities work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2019 to July 2020. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

60. Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of the local board area. They contribute to building strong, healthy and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

61. The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017 outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

62. The Community Facilities Work Programme ensures that all facilities and open space assets continue to be well-maintained assets that benefit the local community, including Māori. When developing and delivering work programmes consideration is given to how the activities can contribute to Māori well-being, values, culture and traditions.

63. Karanga Atu! Karanga Mai! relationship approach responds to Māori aspirations and delivers on council’s statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. It guides staff to deliver on agreed work programme activities and support the local board to achieve the outcomes in its local board plan.

64. Waitematā - urban forest restoration as part of the 2020/2021 work programme recognises the Māori connection to natural environments and mana whenua as their role as guardian. The Local Board will partner with mana whenua on such projects aimed at protecting and restoring our environment and reviving the mauri of our waterways.

65. Planning of all renewed and new public spaces will consider Māori design principles and artwork.

66. Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken, to ensure they align with the outcome ‘Māori are empowered, and their identity and culture is visible’ as part of the Local Boards proposed Local Board Plan 2020.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

67. Financial implications of COVID-19/Emergency Budget have resulted in a reduced renewals budget per local board and significantly reduced development budgets such as growth.

68. Table 3 summarises the relevant budgets, proposed allocation and the balance of unallocated budget available.

 

 

 

Table 3: Budget allocation

Local Budgets

2020/2021

2021/2022

2022/2023

Renewals - Budget

$10,834,387

$10,586,801

$5,292,133

Renewals - Proposed Allocation

$10,834,387

$10,586,801

$5,292,133

Renewals - Unallocated budget

$0

$0

$0

 

 

 

 

Growth and Development - Allocation

$1,015,000

$0

$0

Coastal Renewals - Allocation

$0

$0

$0

Slips Prevention – Allocation

$76,727

$521,743

$0

 

 

 

 

LDI Capex - Proposed Allocation

$103,126

$30,000

$0

 

 

 

 

LDI Opex - Proposed Allocation (including carry forwards)

$160,108

$0

$0

 

 

 

 

One Local Initiative (OLI) Allocation

$0

$120,848

$0

 

 

 

 

LTP Specific Projects

$0

$0

$0

 

 

 

 

External Funding

$46,781

$2,181,775

$0

 

 

 

 

Kauri Dieback (NETR) Funding

$0

$0

$0

 

69. The proposed work programme can be accommodated within the available local board budgets. Approval of the work programme does not have significant financial implications unless projects experience a significant overspend or underspend.

70. Regular updates on the delivery of the programme will be provided to the local board. These updates will identify progress of all projects and potential amendments to the approved programme including changes to budget allocation and timing.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

71. Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.  This risk is mitigated by utilising the risk adjusted programme (RAP) to progress those projects identified as ready to proceed under the RAP at the beginning of the financial year.

72. If the proposed Community Facilities work programme is not approved at the business meeting, there is a risk that the proposed projects may not be delivered within the 2020/2021 financial year.

73. The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery local board work programmes if the COVID-19 Alert Level changes (New Zealand’s 4-level Alert System specifies measures to be taken against COVID-19 at each level). The deliverability of some activities will decrease if there is an increase to the COVID-19 Alert Level.

74. Staff believe that the proposed work programme is deliverable within existing resources. Delivery progress will be monitored through the year. Any resourcing challenges arising will be brought to the local board’s attention alongside consideration of implications and options to address challenges.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

75. Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2021. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

76. Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Board Community Facilities 2021 - 2023 Work Programme

87

b

Waitematā Local Board Community Lease Work Programme 2020/2021

103

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Katrina Morgan - Senior Project Manager

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor WaitematāLocal Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 

Approval of the Waitematā Local Board community services work programme 2020/2021

File No.: CP2020/11035

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the community services work programme 2020/2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the local board’s community services work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2020/2021 financial year (see Attachment A).

3.       The community services work programme includes activities to be delivered by the following departments:

·    Arts, Community and Events.

·    Libraries.

·    Parks, Sport and Recreation.

·    Service, Strategy and Integration.

4.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017:

·    Inclusive communities that are vibrant, healthy and connected.

·    Attractive and versatile public places that meet our communities’ needs.

·    The natural environment is valued, protected and enhanced.

·    A high-quality built environment that embraces our heritage.

·    An innovative, productive and resilient local economy.

5.       COVID-19 put significant pressure on Auckland Council’s finances. The Emergency Budget 2020/2021 was adopted by Governing Body in July 2020 (GB/2020/76).

6.       While the budget has reduced capital and asset-based services (ABS) operating budgets, locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational funding has not been reduced.

7.       The local board provided feedback to staff on the activities it would like to fund in anticipation of its reduced budgets in a series of workshops.

8.       The proposed work programme has a total LDI operational budget value of $1,155,783, which can be funded from within the local board’s LDI operational budget for the 2020/2021 financial year.

9.       ABS budgets were reduced due to the Emergency Budget and specific reductions have been detailed in the Analysis and Advice section of this report. The local board Customer and Community ABS operational budget for 2020/2021 is $16,700,732. This budget is direct operational expenditure only and does not include revenue and excludes depreciation and finance costs if applicable.

10.     Projects from 2019/2020 LDI operational budget have been carried forward where there was an agreed scope and cost which have not been delivered. These are shown as separate activity lines in the work programme.

11.     Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the local board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve the community services work programme 2020/2021 and associated budget (Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      note that activities with locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget carried forward from 2019/2020 are included in the work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. Local board feedback from these workshops have informed the work programme.

13.     The work programme responds to local boards priorities as expressed in its local board plan.

14.     The COVID-19 pandemic has exerted considerable pressure on council’s financial position, which has had flow on effects for the budgets available in the 2020/2021 financial year.

15.     Given the new financial realities facing Auckland, council has adopted an Emergency Budget 2020/2021.

16.     The budget reduced both capital and operating budgets from those anticipated prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. This does not include a reduction of locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational funding.

17.     COVID-19 occurred part way through the planning cycle for the development of the 2020/2021 local board work programmes. This led to local boards undertaking a reprioritisation exercise for all proposed activity.

18.     Table 1 shows the business objectives and strategic alignment for community services departments. These also guided the development of the work programme.

Table 1: Adopted community-based strategies and plans

Department

Business objectives

Strategies and plans

Arts, Community and Events

Provision of services, programmes, events and facilities that strengthen and connect communities and create a sense of belonging and pride

·  Hire Fee Framework

·  Events Policy

·  Toi Whītiki

·  Thriving Communities

Libraries

Provision of library services and programmes that support Aucklanders with reading and literacy, and opportunities to participate in community and civic life

·  Auckland Libraries Strategy 2020

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation

Provision of services to actively engage Aucklanders to lead healthy lives, connect with nature and value our cultural identity

·  Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan

·  Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan

·  Auckland Growing Greener Framework

·  Urban Ngāhere Strategy

Service, Strategy and Integration

Provision of service and asset planning advice and support more integrated delivery of community outcomes

·  Community Facilities Network Plan

·  Parks and Open Space Strategic Action Plan

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     The proposed work programme is made up of activities continuing from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects and ongoing programmes. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board.

Asset Based Services (ABS) operational activities

20.     The Emergency Budget reduced the anticipated asset-based services (ABS) operational budgets across all 21 local boards. This has required a reduction in asset-based services (ABS) operational budgets in the local boards community venues, libraries and facilities.

21.       Staff provided advice about how services delivered from community facilities could be adjusted to achieve the savings of the Emergency Budget. Staff discussed proposed changes at workshops with the local board in July 2020.

22.     Proposed changes to community venues, facility programming and opening hours in response to budget constraints are:

Community venues: Studio One Toi Tu / Ellen Melville Centre

23.     Auckland Council provides art facilities, community centres and hire venues that enable Aucklanders to run locally responsive activities, promoting participation, inclusion, and connection.

24.     Staff have been requested to provide advice about how the ACE venues service can be adjusted to achieve the savings of the Emergency Budget. 

25.     The total proposed savings for ACE venues in the Waitematā area is $58,238:

 

Pre-COVID programming budget

Savings at 3.5%

Total FY21 programming budget

 

Studio One Toi Tu

184,363

- 36,786

147,576

Ellen Melville Programmes

                                        107,510

- 21,451

                                      86,058

Total

                                        291,873

- 58,238

                                    233,634

 

26.     It is proposed in the draft work programme that the local board allocates $20,000 of LDI budget to top up programming at Ellen Melville Centre due to reductions in ABS budget.

Libraries: Central Library, Grey Lynn Library, Leys Institute Little Library, Parnell Library

27.     Libraries will have no reductions to approved standard opening hours: 219 hours per week across four libraries.

28.     Efficiencies will still be required and will be managed across the library network. Analysis of staffing resource vs customer use has shown where efficiencies can be achieved by optimising staffing levels within the local board area.

29.     The local programming budget has been reduced. There will be a reduction in the number of external partners coming in to support programming, however, programmes will continue to be run by staff within libraries for 2020/2021.

Pools and leisure centres

30.     Maintaining access to, and the safe provision of, core services is a minimum service level that will continue:

·    ensuring aquatic facilities are available every day and are staffed with lifeguards who can help people stay safe in the water.

·    ensuring leisure centres are open and staffed to provide the local community with access to active recreation services. 

31.     Staff considered the following options to reduce budgeted spend and improve operational efficiencies in pools and leisure centres:

·    optimise services based on utilisation and prioritise the communities that need our services the most.

·    assess alternative delivery options, for example, contracting or partnering to provide term, holiday and sports programmes.

·    adapt frequency of value-add activities due to pressure on staff budgets and availability, for example, use of aqua run in the pool or fitness boot camps.

32.     At the July 2020 workshop staff recommended that no additional LDI funding be allocated for the pools and leisure service because operational efficiencies and sustainable cost savings are achievable through ongoing business improvement activities.

Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational activities

33.     LDI operational activities in the work programme respond to the local board plan and local board feedback. Community services LDI activities are detailed at Attachment A.

34.     The proposed work programme has a total LDI operational budget value of $1,155,783 which can be funded from within the local board’s LDI operational budget for the 2020/2021 financial year.

35.     The Corporate and Local Board Performance team have identified projects from the LDI operational budget 2019/2020 where there was an agreed scope and cost which have not been delivered. Carry-forwards are shown as separate activity lines in the work programme.

COVID-19 impacts on the community were considered while developing the work programme

36.     Staff acknowledge that our communities have faced significant challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic lock down.

37.     In preparing recommendations for the 2020/2021 work programme, a number of COVID-19 related matters have been considered. The 2020/2021 work programme seeks to prioritise activity that responds to these needs:

·        newly vulnerable communities

·        financial constraints

·        accessibility restrictions

·        community resilience

·        community response and recovery.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Table 2 outlines the activities in the 2020/2021 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

Table 2: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

ID number

Activity name

Climate impact

 

 

183

184

185

Recreation centre operations:

Pt Erin Pool

Tepid Baths 

Parnell Baths

In partnership with Community Facilities operations, pools and leisure facility managers are identifying opportunities to reduce climate impact by reducing energy consumption.

191

Local Parks Ecological volunteers and environmental programme

Integrating nature into urban environments
• increase in native forest/ urban cooling.
• offset carbon emissions.
• protect water quality by planting along rivers and coastlines.
• improve our living environment.
• soil retention, erosion control and flood mitigation and coastal protection.
• Nitrogen sequestration.

1343

Placemaking: Waitematā gardens, food and sustainability

Support and grow the network of local community groups with an interest in local community gardens, food production and sustainability initiatives.

 

Fund Gardens 4 Health to provide capacity building through education and maintenance of the local community garden network.

 

Strengthen connections between council projects to increase cross-council collaboration with Waitematā Low Carbon Action, Waste Minimisation, the Compost Collective, civil defense, community-led pollinator paths, Resilient Communities and implementation of local area plans.

2221 and 2265

Urban Ngahere Reforestation 

• Increase in native forest/ urban cooling
• Offset carbon emissions.
• Improve air quality, reduce UV exposure
• Improve water quality.
• Reduce the load on stormwater infrastructure system through rainfall interception by increasing tree canopy cover.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     The activities in the proposed work programme provide important community services to the people of the local board area. Work programme activities support the outcomes and objectives outlined in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017.

41.     They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing services and spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities.

42.     These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

43.     The community services work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2019 to July 2020. The feedback received from the workshops has informed the proposed work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Table 3 outlines the activities in the 2020/2021 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes.

Table 3: Māori impact assessment of proposed activities

ID number

Activity name

Activity description

1353

(Libraries) Whakatipu i te reo Māori - we grow the Māori language

Celebrating te ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori - Waitematā

Champion and embed te reo Māori in everyday communication.

 

Celebrate and promote te ao Māori through events and programmes including regionally coordinated and promoted programmes: Te Tiriti o Waitangi, Matariki and Te Wiki o te Reo Māori.

 

Seek opportunities to engage with local iwi and mana whenua to collaborate on initiatives.

1362

Māori Responsiveness: Local Māori aspirations in Waitematā

Identify opportunities to work with mana whenua and mataawaka to increase responsiveness to local Māori priorities and aspirations, building and fostering relationships and sharing information including supporting an annual hui.

2264

Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) tranche one

Māori naming (and associated story telling) of parks and places in partnership with mana whenua to value and promote Auckland’s Māori identity and use of te reo Māori. 
Aligns with local board plan initiatives to work with mana whenua and mataawaka to make Māori heritage more visible; and identify wāhi tapu and other taonga.

 

45.     Karanga Atu! Karanga Mai! relationship approach responds to Māori aspirations and delivers on council’s statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. It guides staff to deliver on agreed work programme activities and support the local board to achieve the outcomes in its local board plan.

46.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant interest or impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

47.     Activities are funded from one or multiple budget sources which include: ABS operational expenditure and LDI operational expenditure.

48.     The total community services work programme LDI operational budget for 2020/2021 is $1,155,783. This budget was unaffected by the Emergency Budget.

49.     ABS budgets were reduced due to the Emergency Budget and specific reductions have been detailed in the Analysis and Advice section of this report. The local board Customer and Community ABS operational budget for 2020/2021 is $16,700,732. This budget is direct operational expenditure only and does not include revenue and excludes depreciation and finance costs if applicable.

50.     Each activity line has a budget allocation, which covers the delivery for the 2020/2021 period. Where activity lines show a zero-dollar budget, this reflects that the implementation costs are met through staff salary or other funding sources.

51.     Where activities are cancelled or no longer required during the financial year, the local board can reallocate the budget to an existing work programme activity or to create a new activity.

52.     Project where budget has been carried-forward from 2019/2020 are shown expressed as separate activity lines in the work programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

53.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery local board work programmes if the COVID-19 Alert Level changes. New Zealand’s 4-level Alert System specifies measures to be taken against COVID-19 at each level.

54.     The deliverability of some activities will decrease if there is an increase to the COVID-19 Alert Level. Some activities can be adapted to be delivered at different COVID-19 Alert Levels.

55.     Resourcing of the work programmes is based on current staff capacity within departments. If changes to staff capacity have an impact on work programme delivery, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

56.     The key risks for activities that are managed through the work programme are non-delivery, time delays and budget overspend.

57.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

58.     As the work programme includes ongoing activity and annually occurring events or projects, the associated risks have been identified and managed in previous years. Additional risk management for these activities is ongoing and can be reported quarterly.

59.     Risks and mitigations for new activity lines were considered during the scoping phase. There may be risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year. These will be continually assessed and reported to the local board through quarterly reporting when required.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

60.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2021. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

61.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Community services work programme 2020/2021

113

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Graham Bodman - General Manager Arts, Community and Events

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Justine Haves - General Manager Service Strategy and Integration

Authorisers

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 

Approval of the Waitematā Local Board’s environment work programme 2020/2021

File No.: CP2020/10607

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Waitematā Local Board’s environment work programme 2020/2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the board’s environment work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2020/2021 financial year (see Attachment A).

3.       The Waitematā Local Board identified an aspiration in its 2017 Waitematā Local Board Plan that ‘the natural environment is valued, protected and enhanced.’ To give effect to this aspiration, staff developed a number of projects for the local board to consider funding through its 2020/2021 work programme.

4.       The COVID-19 pandemic has exerted considerable pressure on the council’s financial position. In July 2020, the Governing Body adopted the council’s Emergency Budget 2020/2021, which has reduced both capital and operating budgets. However, locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational funding has not been reduced.

5.       The local board provided direction to Infrastructure and Environmental Services staff on the projects it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The board indicated its support for the following projects, with budgets as listed below:

·        Regenerative urban farm and low carbon diet engagement programme - $40,000

·        Low Carbon Activator – $40,000

·        Low Carbon Network – $11,000

·        Low Carbon Lifestyles – $35,000

·        Urban Ark community conservation coordinator – $15,000

·        Industrial Pollution Prevention Programme - Eden Terrace – $10,000

·        Newmarket/Middleton Stream restoration – $8,250

·        Te Wai Ōrea Lake and Wetland restoration – $35,000

·        Waipapa Stream restoration programme - Parnell – $20,000

·        Waipāruru Stream restoration – $17,000

·        Waitītiko (Meola) Stream community restoration project – $21,000.

6.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $252,250, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2020/2021 financial year.

7.       In addition to the above projects, $27,000 has been carried forward from the board’s 2019/2020 budget to the 2020/2021 financial year. This budget will support the continuation of the following projects, which were not able to be completed in 2019/2020, due to COVID-19 restrictions:

·    Te Wai Ōrea restoration plan – $22,000

·    Low Carbon Multi-Unit Dwellings – $5,000.

8.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      approve its environment work programme 2020/2021 (Attachment A to the agenda report) including associated budget as summarised in the table below:

Activity name

2020/2021

Regenerative urban farm and low carbon diet engagement programme

$40,000

Low Carbon Activator

$40,000

Low Carbon Network

$11,000

Low Carbon Lifestyles

$35,000

Urban Ark community conservation coordinator

$15,000

Industrial Pollution Prevention Programme - Eden Terrace

$10,000

Newmarket/Middleton Stream restoration

$8,250

Te Wai Ōrea Lake and Wetland restoration

$35,000

Waipapa Stream restoration programme - Parnell

$20,000

Waipāruru Stream restoration

$17,000

Waitītiko (Meola) Stream community restoration project

$21,000

Total

$252,250

b)      note that the following activities not completed in 2019/2020 have been carried forward into the 2020/2021 financial year, and are included in this work programme as summarised in the table below:

Activity name

Budget

Low Carbon Multi-Unit Dwellings

$5,000

Te Wai Ōrea restoration plan

$22,000

Total

$27,000

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the work programme.

10.     The COVID-19 pandemic has exerted considerable pressure on the council’s financial position, which has had flow on effects for budgets available in the 2020/2021 financial year. Given the new financial realities facing Auckland, the council has adopted an Emergency Budget 2020/2021, which has reduced both capital and operating budgets from those anticipated prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, this does not include a reduction of locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational funding.

11.     The COVID-19 pandemic occurred part way through the planning cycle for the development of the 2020/2021 local board work programmes. This led to local boards undertaking a reprioritisation exercise for all proposed activity.

12.     The proposed work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017. In particular, the work programme will support the board to achieve its outcome ‘the natural environment is valued, protected and enhanced’.

13.     The development of the work programme was guided by regional plans and strategies such as the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan, the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management and the Regional Pest Management Plan.

14.     The proposed work programme also responds to the Waitematā Low Carbon Community Action Plan, in particular Action Area 5: Champions of Change and Action Area 6: Engaging Householders.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The proposed work programme is made up of activities continuing from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects and ongoing programmes. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board.

16.     The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s environment work programme 2020/2021 are detailed below. See Attachment A for further detail.

New project: Regenerative urban farm and low carbon diet engagement programme - $40,000

 

17.     Regenerative farming is a system of farming principles and practices that increases biodiversity, enriches soils, improves water quality, and enhances the surrounding ecosystem. Low carbon diets include food produced using low carbon farming technologies and organic fertilisers, food that is locally produced and therefore has lower food miles, and food with intrinsically lower biological emissions such as plants.

18.     This project will assess a range of potential sites for establishing a regenerative urban farm in the Waitematā Local Board area and undertake a high-level feasibility study to determine site viability.

19.     Information provided by this study will inform design and delivery of subsequent project stages for a regenerative urban farm in the Waitematā Local Board area.

20.     The first stage of the project will consist of three key activities:

·        site options assessment, including developing assessment criteria with key identified stakeholders and mana whenua, identifying potential sites, and assessing them in accordance with these criteria

·        a high-level feasibility study of at least one site to scope the potential to become a productive regenerative urban farm, including indicative budget and timeline

·        high-level community insights research to understand barriers and motivations for people making low carbon food choices.

21.     Identifying viable sites for a regenerative urban farm will enable the local board to make informed choices about the establishment of a farm and the potential for it to contribute to reducing carbon emissions, supporting community climate action, improving water quality and minimising waste.

22.     Relationships with key stakeholders and greater community insight will inform design of a behaviour change programme that will enable more Aucklanders to adopt low carbon diets.

23.     Exploring ways to enable residents and businesses to learn about and adopt low more carbon diets will have a positive impact on residents’ carbon footprint and contribute to carbon emissions reduction targets.

24.     Once the feasibility study has been completed and a site has been scoped, community composting work will also be supported within the available budget. This will contribute towards the first stage of creating the urban farm infrastructure.

New project: Low Carbon Activator – $40,000

25.     This new project proposes an activator to identify initiatives that achieve the local board’s commitment to carbon reduction as well as develop a work programme to implement the board’s Low Carbon Community Action Plan. This could include a refresh to reflect Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan and emerging local opportunities.

26.     The activator will:

·        lead the implementation of a low carbon work programme across the local board area, and report on implementation progress in alignment to the board’s Low Carbon Community Action Plan outcomes 

·        support a range of community-led and local business low carbon activities aligned to the Low Carbon Community Action Plan

·        leverage existing community networks and build partnerships, working with the local Low Carbon Network to align the work programme with community groups and events

·        work with mana whenua and mataawaka to identify and deliver low carbon outcomes for Māori

·        be a dedicated resource to drive implementation of the Low Carbon Community Action Plan and guide local actions that respond to the Auckland’s climate emergency declaration

·        create opportunities to amplify local low carbon activities and encourage greater action towards reducing carbon emissions.

27.     This project aims to reduce emissions by enabling implementation of priority actions in the board’s Low Carbon Community Action Plan, including reducing energy use, increasing access to active transport, changing purchasing habits and reducing carbon footprints.


 

Low Carbon Network – $11,000

28.     The Low Carbon Network is a collection of individuals, households, groups and businesses operating across the Waitematā, Puketāpapa and Whau Local Board areas to promote, support and implement community level low carbon activities.

29.     The network provides an opportunity for networking and collaboration for residents, businesses and practitioners undertaking low carbon activities in or connected to the local board area, as well as a forum for promoting and hosting low carbon events.

30.     The community low carbon broker supports the network to be more community-led and empowered, increasing community resilience by building community connections and skill sharing.

31.     The project contributes to implementation of the Waitematā Low Carbon Community Action Plan in collaboration with the local board and neighbouring low carbon networks. In particular, this project promotes action 5.1, which is to ‘build a network of local organisations and individuals who can support the Waitematā Local Board to implement this plan.’

Low Carbon Lifestyles – $35,000

32.     This project has the dual objectives of supporting households to create warmer, drier homes, and to reduce household energy use and associated carbon emissions.

33.     The project involves door knocking at homes in defined geographic area and holding a doorstep conversation with residents. This conversation includes:

·        giving residents personalised information on the costs and carbon emissions relating to their energy use

·        recommending specific actions including information on associated cost savings

·        encouraging residents to make a commitment to take up to three actions per household

·        providing an information sheet that records any recommendations and commitments that were made

·        providing a fridge magnet and a five-minute sand flow shower timer to act as prompts and encourage action to reduce hot water use.

34.     A proposed change to the project from previous years is to offer a follow-up visit to private rental tenants who experience issues with mould or fuel poverty and owner-occupiers who experience fuel poverty. Fuel poverty is when a household is unable to afford adequate household energy to reach and adequate indoor temperature.

35.     The follow-up visit would provide more in-depth tailored advice, free resources and practical interventions such as LED lightbulb fitting, draught stopping, hot water cylinder wrap and moisture management resources according to the needs of the household. These measures can reduce household energy costs.

36.     This project helps to implement action 6.1 in the local board’s Low Carbon Community Action Plan, which is ‘to implement programmes to support householders to transition to a low carbon lifestyle’.

New project: Urban Ark community conservation coordinator – $15,000

37.     Urban Ark Manawa Taiao is a collaborative community-led initiative that works at a landscape scale, currently working across both Waitematā and Albert Eden Local Board areas. The group helps to coordinate and support community conservation groups in the central suburbs of Westmere, Point Chevalier, Kingsland, Western Springs, Morningside and Grey Lynn, with a goal of providing habitats where indigenous wildlife can thrive.

38.     This is a new project which aims to expand the work of Urban Ark Manawa Taiao through funding coordinator and facilitator costs.

39.     Funding provided to this project will support community groups to restore native habitat and protect native biodiversity by undertaking pest control and planting native trees and shrubs.

40.     Urban Ark has received funding from the natural environment targeted rate for a part-time coordinator to support and help coordinate conservation groups within the area. Local board funding would be in addition to the targeted rate funding and would enable an expansion of the group’s work to carry out citizen science and community monitoring projects, as well as creating an education program for conservation.

New project: Industrial Pollution Prevention Programme - Eden Terrace – $10,000

41.     This new project is an educational programme which informs industry about the impacts their activities may be having on local waterways. The project contributes to improved water quality and increased awareness about how businesses contribute to water pollution as well as improved business practices and a reduced risk of pollution events.

42.     The programme involves a site inspection and discussion with business owners about potential issues around pollution, waste minimisation techniques and spill training. If changes are recommended, a report is sent to the business and a follow up visit is conducted. The programme also involves a mapping exercise to ensure that commercial businesses understand how the stormwater network connects to local waterways.

43.     This project will focus on Eden Terrace, which consists of a mixture of small businesses, hospitality, and some retail. The target is 40 businesses visited, with a particular focus on visiting hospitality and industrial businesses.

Newmarket/Middleton Stream restoration – $8,250

44.     To achieve the local board plan initiative to ‘undertake localised solutions to restore our key waterways such as Newmarket Stream’, the local board has indicated it would like to continue supporting the Newmarket/Middleton Stream community restoration project. The local board allocated $8,250 to this project for the 2019/2020 financial year.

45.     This project is jointly funded with Ōrākei Local Board as the stream passes through both local board areas. Ōrākei Local Board has a higher proposed investment of $15,000 for the 2020/2021 financial year as more of the stream is in the Ōrākei Local Board area.

46.     The project supports a community led initiative to implement the restoration plan for Newmarket Stream, including weed control, animal pest control and native planting. This restoration work will continue to improve biodiversity and enhance the waterway by mitigating issues such as contamination, erosion and sedimentation.

Te Wai Ōrea Lake and Wetland restoration – $35,000

47.     In the 2019/2020 financial year, Waitematā Local Board supported the development of a restoration plan for Te Wai Ōrea / Western Springs wetland and lakeside. The local board allocated $30,000 to this project for the 2019/2020 financial year.

48.     The plan outlines the following work for the 2020/2021 financial year:

·        inspection and maintenance of plantings

·        planting preparation and weed control

·        a community planting day, involving lake edge planting with Conservation Volunteers New Zealand support (2,750 plants)

·        some contractor planting in more complex areas

·        wetland planting trials.

49.     Implementation of the planting plan will improve lakeside amenity and provide habitat for native species as well as improving water quality in the lake.

Waipapa Stream restoration programme - Parnell – $20,000

50.     To achieve the local board plan initiative to ‘undertake localised solutions to restore our key waterways such as Waipapa Stream’, the local board has indicated it would like to continue supporting the Waipapa Stream community restoration project. The local board allocated $20,000 to this project for the 2019/2020 financial year.

51.     This project is a continuation pest plant control and replacement native planting along Waipapa Stream.

52.     This will be year nine of a 10-year restoration plan that includes tree replacement, habitat enhancement for fish and increased local community engagement and participation in the area.

53.     Benefits of the project include increasing terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity by creating ecological corridors and restored riparian margins and empowering local communities to advocate for their natural environment.

Waipāruru Stream restoration – $17,000

54.     This is the third year of the implementation of the ecological restoration plan for Waipāruru Stream, which was commissioned by the Waitematā Local Board in 2019. The local board allocated $22,000 to this project for the 2019/2020 financial year.

55.     Pest animal and plant control will be carried out to protect the native flora and fauna present in the riparian margins. The project will also involve further planting as well as maintenance for previous years’ planting.

56.     The project will reduce erosion and water contamination and improve biodiversity while providing a green corridor for native species.

Waitītiko (Meola) Stream community restoration project – $21,000

57.     This project supports a catchment approach to restoring the Waitītiko Stream by empowering community and school groups to undertake water quality monitoring and riparian restoration planting. The local board allocated $19,200 to this project for the 2019/2020 financial year.

58.     This project is jointly funded with Albert-Eden Local Board as the stream passes through both local board areas. Albert-Eden Local Board has a higher proposed investment of $28,000 for the 2020/2021 financial year due to a higher number of restoration sites in the Albert-Eden Local Board area.

59.     Well established groups and schools will continue to be supported in their work to restore the riparian margins of the stream, with the addition of Saint Lukes Environmental Protection Society (STEPS) beginning work at the Kanuka Street site. The project will encourage new groups through community events and education, as well as create linkages to local pest control initiatives.

60.     For the 2020/2021 financial year the Roy Clements Treeway project will be included within this project to encompass the whole of the Waitītiko catchment.

Activities carried forward from 2019/2020

61.     The Corporate and Local Board Performance team have identified projects from the Waitematā Local Board locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget 2019/2020 where there was an agreed scope and cost which were not been delivered. These projects total $27,000. 

62.     Table 1 outlines the carried forward activities and budgets that have been confirmed as part of the Emergency Budget, which have been added to the work programme to be delivered in 2020/2021. These projects experienced delays in 2019/2020 due to COVID-19 restrictions.


 

Table 1: Activities with LDI operational budget carried forward from 2019/2020

Activity name

Budget

Low Carbon Multi-Unit Dwellings

$5,000

Te Wai Ōrea restoration plan

$22,000

Total

$27,000

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

63.     Attachment B outlines the activities in the 2020/2021 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

64.     The projects outlined in the attached work programme respond to Auckland Council’s climate emergency declaration and commitment to address climate change by supporting and enabling community climate action. Projects aim to reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts, using currently available solutions for immediate progress. Community climate action involves local residents reducing or responding to climate change in personal lifestyle or local community-based ways, creating new social norms.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

65.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

66.     Infrastructure and Environmental Services staff delivering restoration projects such as Newmarket, Waipapa, Waipāruru and Waitītiko Stream restoration will work with Community Facilities and Parks, Sports and Recreation staff, as some of the restoration work takes place on public land.

67.     Healthy Waters staff will work closely with Community Facilities and Parks, Sports and Recreation on work undertaken in Western Springs to ensure that the Te Wai Ōrea Lake and Wetland restoration project aligns with the wider Western Springs Development Plan.

68.     The regenerative urban farm and low carbon diet engagement programme will involve extensive collaboration with stakeholders across council, including the Chief Planning Office, Community Facilities and Parks, Sports and Recreation. Meetings with multiple council departments were held during the initial project development phase to ensure that internal council stakeholders would have input into the project.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

69.     The projects proposed for inclusion in the board’s environment work programme will have positive environmental outcomes across the Waitematā Local Board area. Particular focus areas for the 2020/2021 work programme include Waitītiko (Meola) Stream, Waipapa Stream, Waipāruru Stream and Te Wai Ōrea Western Springs Lakeside.

70.     The projects noted above align with the local board plan outcome ‘the natural environment is valued, protected and enhanced’. The proposed environment work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2019 to July 2020. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

71.     It is recognised that environmental management, water quality and land management have integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

72.     Table 2 outlines the activities in the 2020/2021 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes.

73.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken. These activities may include the Waipapa and Waitītiko stream restoration projects, the Urban Ark community conservation coordinator and projects which implement the Waitematā Low Carbon Community Action Plan.

Table 2: Māori impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Māori impact

Low Carbon Activator

The activator will work with mana whenua and mataawaka to identify and deliver low carbon outcomes for Māori.

Newmarket/Middleton Stream restoration

This project will help to restore the mauri of the Newmarket Stream by implementing the management plan developed by Te Ngahere. Plants for riparian planting will be sourced from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

Te Wai Ōrea Lake and Wetland restoration

Mana whenua engagement was undertaken to develop the Te mahere whakawhanake i te papa rēhia o Te Wai Ōrea Western Springs Lakeside Te Wai Ōrea Park Development Plan. This project was identified in the plan as an opportunity to have a positive impact on water quality. Where possible plants will be eco-sourced from the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei nursery.

Waipāruru Stream restoration

Mana whenua representatives have provided input into the development of the ecological restoration plan for Waipāruru Stream and a site visit undertaken with the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei kaiwhakahaere kaupapa ā iwi (planning manager). Some changes were made to the restoration plan in response to feedback from mana whenua. Where possible plants will be eco-sourced from the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei nursery.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

74.     The proposed environment work programme budget for 2020/2021 is $252,250 of the boards locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2020/2021.

75.     The attached work programme also includes a total of $27,000 carry forward for the continuation of the following projects:

·        Te Wai Ōrea restoration plan – $22,000

·        Low Carbon Multi-Unit Dwellings – $5,000.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

76.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery local board work programmes if the COVID-19 Alert Level changes (New Zealand’s 4-level Alert System specifies measures to be taken against COVID-19 at each level). The deliverability of some activities will decrease if there is an increase to the COVID-19 Alert Level.

77.     The identified risks and proposed mitigations associated with activities in the proposed 2020/2021 work programme have been outlined in Attachment C.

78.     Resourcing of the proposed work programme is based on current staff capacity within departments. If changes to staff capacity have an impact on work programme delivery, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity. Staff will also signal if any other unforeseen circumstances may impact on the delivery of the activities outlined in this report, alongside options to address such challenges.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

79.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2021. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

80.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme 20_21

137

b

Waitematā Infrastructure and Environmental Services Climate

143

c

Waitematā Infrastructure and Environmental Services Risks and mitigations 20_21

145

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Cowie - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


 


 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2020/10511

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the opportunity for the local board chairperson to provide an update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for the Waitematā Local Board Chair to update the local board on activities he has been involved in since the last meeting.

3.       In accordance with Standing Order 2.4.7, the chairperson may, by way of report, bring any matter to the attention of a meeting of the local board or its committees that is within their role or function to consider.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the Chair’s report for August 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair Richard Northey report August 2020

151

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila  Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 

Board member reports

File No.: CP2020/10512

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the local board’s elected members to update the Waitematā Local Board on matters they have been involved in following the previous month’s meeting and other matters of interest to the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for members of the Waitematā Local Board to provide a written or verbal update on their activities for the month or any other matter they wish to raise with the board.

3.       This is an information item and it is optional for board members to provide a written board member report for inclusion in the agenda.

4.       At the time of publishing the agenda member A A Christie’s report was not available and therefore will be tabling her report at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written report from member A Bonham and member G Gunthorp the tabled report from member A A Christie and the verbal board member reports for August 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Board member A Bonham report August 2020

165

b

Board member G Gunthorp report August 2020

173

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila  Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitemaāa Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


 


 


 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2020/10478

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waitematā Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Waitematā Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work calendar (attachment A to the agenda) as at 18 August 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar August 2020

179

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila  Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 

Waitematā Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2020/10484

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Waitematā Local Board to receive the records of its recent workshops held following the previous local board business meeting. Attached are copies of the proceeding records taken from the workshops held on:

·   21 July 2020

·   23 July 2020

·   28 July 2020

·   4 August 2020

·   11 August 2020

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance to Standing Order 12.1.4, a record of the proceedings of every Waitematā Local Board workshop held over the past month, including the names of the members attending and the general nature of the matters discussed during the workshop, shall be circulated to the members of the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)   receive the Waitematā Local Board workshop records for the workshops held on 21 July 2020, 23 July 2020, 28 July 2020, 4 August 2020 and 11 August 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Local Board workshop records August 2020

183

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Priscila  Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 

    

  


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.3      Attachment a    Mission Attic Proposal                                   Page 191


Waitematā Local Board

18 August 2020