I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 28 September 2020

4.00pm

This meeting will be held virtually by Skype

Ngā Hui a te Poari Kaitohutohu mō te Pokapū o Te Tāone Nui o Tāmaki Makaurau /

Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

OPEN AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

Chairperson

Ms Viv Beck

Business Improvement District

Deputy Chairperson

Mr Andrew Gaukrodger

Corporate sector

Members

Ms Noelene Buckland

City Centre Residents Group

 

Mr Greg Cohen

Tourism/Travel

 

Cr Pippa Coom

Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Auckland Council

 

Mr George Crawford

Property Council of NZ

 

Cr Chris Darby

Auckland Council (Mayor’s alternate)

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Auckland Council

 

Mr Matt Harray

Retail sector

 

Mr Mark Kingsford

Corporate sector

 

Ms Amy Malcolm

Tertiary sector (University of Auckland)

 

Mr James Mooney

Urban design/institute of architects

 

Mr Nigel Murphy

Tertiary sector (Auckland University of Technology)

 

Mr Richard Northey

Waitematā Local Board, Auckland Council

 

Mr Adam Parkinson

City Centre Residents Group

 

Ms Anahera Rawiri

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

 

Mr Patrick Reynolds

Transport representative

 

Mr Michael Richardson

Business Improvement District

(Quorum 10 members)

 

Mike Giddey

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Governance Advisor

23 September 2020

Contact Telephone: +64 9 890 8143

Email: mike.giddey@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 

 

 


Terms of Reference

 

(Excerpt –full terms of reference available as a separate document)

 

1.       These terms of reference set out the roles, responsibilities and working arrangements for the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board.

2.       The board is a key advisory body, with no decision-making or autonomous budgetary authority.

3.       The board will assist the Auckland Council, specifically the Governing Body and the Waitematā Local Board and Auckland Council Controlled Organisations to oversee and be a key advisor to the Auckland Council on achieving the vision and strategic outcomes of the Auckland Plan, the City Centre Masterplan, the expenditure of the city centre targeted rate and city centre issues.

 

Membership:

Includes one councillor and one local board member.

 

The board should include members who can provide expert advice on many areas including transport, landscape, environment and youth sectors. The membership includes a position for Mana Whenua. Representatives from CCOs may be board members without voting rights. The number of the board members should be between 16 and 21 at any time.

 

The new panel’s term should end one month prior to the next local government elections in 2019. The membership of the panel may be rolled over for more than one electoral term of three years.

 

Purpose of City Centre Targeted Rate

(Excerpt –full information available in a separate document)

 

Background

 

The City Centre targeted rate is to help fund the development and revitalisation of the city centre. The rate applies to business and residential land in the City Centre area.

Activities to be funded

 

The City Centre redevelopment programme aims to enhance the city centre as a place to work, live, visit and do business. It achieves this by providing a high-quality urban environment, promoting the competitive advantages of the city centre as a business location, and promoting the city centre as a place for high-quality education, research and development. The programme intends to reinforce and promote the city centre as a centre for arts and culture, with a unique identity as the heart and soul of Auckland. The rate will fund expenditure within the following activities: Regional planning; Roads and footpaths; Local parks, sports and recreation.

 

The targeted rate will continue until 2024/2025 to cover capital and operating expenditure generated by the projects in the City Centre redevelopment programme. From 2016/2017, unspent funds from the targeted rate have been used to transition the depreciation and consequential operating costs of capital works to the general rate so that from 2019/2020 these costs will be entirely funded from general rates.

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 September 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

5          Extension of city centre targeted rate to align with the Long-term Plan process 9

6          Nelson Street Slip Lane improvement project concept design                             35

7          Update on the Myers Park project update, Waihorotiu Queen Street Valley Access for Everyone pilot, Wellesley Street bus priorities update, Innovating Streets funding applications update and Forward work programme/progress on items 49 

8          Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

An apology from Mayor P Goff has been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 31 August 2020, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 September 2020

 

 

Extension of city centre targeted rate to align with the Long-term Plan process

File No.: CP2020/13650

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the continuation of the city centre targeted rate beyond the 2024/2025 financial year needs to be considered as part of the Long-term Plan process.

2.       To provide an update on the process for the review of the portfolio and the engagement timeline for the Long-term Plan 2021-2031.

3.       To note that a board working group will be formed to attend workshops in October focused on revising the City Centre Targeted Rate programme and considering extension of the city centre targeted rate.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.       Planning for Long-term Plan 2021-2031 has started with key stakeholder engagement scheduled in late-2020. The city centre targeted rate is an important component of Long-term Plan planning for city centre developments.

5.       This report has two parts, Part A refers to the analysis and advice supporting a extension of the city centre targeted rate, with a view to endorsing this at the November meeting.  Part B outlines the Council’s Long-term Plan process and opportunities for engagement with the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board.

Continuation of the city centre targeted rate beyond the 2024/2025 financial year

6.       The city centre targeted rate makes a significant contribution to delivering the outcomes set out in the City Centre Masterplan. It supports developments and revitalisation projects and leverages major infrastructure construction (such as the City Rail Link) to create a vibrant, accessible and inclusive city centre that contributes significantly to the regional and national economy.

7.       The city centre targeted rate currently ends in the 2024/2025 financial year. The needs for the city centre targeted rate funded activities are likely to continue beyond 2025 as the city continues to grow and evolve. Two options for the extension of the city centre targeted rate were considered:

·        Option one: Extend the end date to the 2030/2031 financial year to coincide with the end date for Long-term Plan 2021-2031.

·        Option two: Remove the end date which can be amended as part of any Long-term Plan future process as required. (preferred option).

8.       Staff recommend option two (remove the end date) to align planning with future Long-term Plan cycles (for example 2024-2034). Planning for significant capex spend needs to start several years before physical work begins on a project. Leaving the end date open provides certainty of funding to allow planning for future years. There is an opportunity to amend the city centre targeted rate every three years as part of the Long-term Plan cycle, if required.   

Key engagement dates for reviewing the forward programme for Long-term Plan 2021-2031

9.       Consideration of the extension of the city centre targeted rate is necessary because it will inform the work underway to put together a forward programme for the city centre targeted rate as part of the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 process.

10.     Two workshops will be scheduled with the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board in October 2020 to discuss and revise the programme and the city centre targeted rate. Staff have also scheduled a workshop in November 2020 to provide a city centre overview of investment, with city centre targeted rate programme being a key component.

11.     Both the city centre targeted rate and forward programme will be incorporated as part of overall Long-term Plan 2021-2031 public consultation in early 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      note the need to consider the extension of the city centre targeted rate beyond the 2024/2025 financial year as part of this Long-term Plan process

b)      nominate members of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board to form a working group for the city centre targeted rate and forward programme

c)      note three workshops have been scheduled in October and November 2020 to discuss and revise the city centre targeted rate and forward programme as part of the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 process.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     The former Auckland City Council adopted a targeted rate in the 2004/2005 financial year to develop and upgrade the city centre. The rate was renewed in 2014 [resolution number BUD/2014/55] as the city centre targeted rate to help fund development and revitalisation of the city centre.

13.     The city centre targeted rate collects around $22 million per annum. It funds activities across the city centre including public realm and streetscape, activation, planning and research, marketing and events expenditure (see Table one and Figure one below).

14.     These city centre targeted rate funded activities have made significant changes in the city centres that support the City Centre Masterplan outcomes by providing a high-quality urban environment, promoting the competitive advantages of the city centre as a business location, and promoting the city centre as a place for high-quality education, research and development.

15.     The city centre targeted rate funded activities also play a major role in leveraging the development of major public infrastructure, such as the City Rail Link (the single largest transport project in New Zealand’s history) and the Downtown programme.

16.     Together, the city centre targeted rate, public infrastructure construction and private development will help the city continue to grow and evolve, and be a great place to work, live, visit and do business, and make it a centre of choice for arts, culture, events with a unique identity as the heart and soul of Auckland.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table one: City centre targeted rate expenditures[1] by categories (financial year 2018/19- 2019/2020)

Type

% Expenditure

Infrastructure – public realm and streetscapes

91.0%

Activation

4.6%

Planning and research

3.9%

Communications, marketing and events

0.5%

Total

100.0%

Figure one: City centre targeted rate expenditure[2] by location (Financial year 2018/19- 2019/2020)

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.    The city centre targeted rate currently ends in the 2024/2025 financial year. Staff have analysed the need for an extension and have begun work to put together a forward city centre targeted rate work programme. Considerations undertaken include COVID-19 impacts and council funding cycles, alignment with City Centre Masterplan and Auckland Plan, and any city centre needs that are not currently being met by general rates or other revenue.

Part A: Extension of city centre targeted rate to support investment in the City Centre needs to be considered as part of the Long-term Plan process

18.     The needs for the city centre targeted rate funded activities are likely to continue beyond 2025 as the city continues to grow. The city centre will continue to be a focus for development and improvement because of its regional and national significance. There is likely to be an increase in major events, tourism, business and residents over the next 20 years.

19.     Businesses who pay the targeted rate are contributing to enhancing the city centre and improving the visitor experience and attractiveness of the city to investors.  This supports economic growth. The targeted rate also contributes to activation of the city and high-quality public space for rest and recreation which is both good for businesses and for residents.  The targeted rate is only used within the city centre and therefore has a direct benefit for those paying the rate.

20.     The impacts of COVID-19 in the city centre will continue to be felt for several years.  The targeted rate paid by businesses and residents will flow back into the city centre, contributing to destination marketing, activation and events among other initiatives, that will encourage people back into the city centre and make it a destination of choice. 

21.     There is a need to ensure the city centre provides quality access for everyone and supports new public transport initiatives, the growth in pedestrians, cyclists, micro-mobility users.  There is already an opportunity to explore making the city centre a safer and greener environment with improved public amenities and public space.

22.     The targeted rate is currently in place until 2024/25. A recommendation needs to be made on whether this will be extended beyond the current period. 

23.     No changes to the purpose of the rate or rate adjustment are proposed at this time. Depreciation and consequential opex within the city centre targeted rate as a result of targeted rate investment will continue to be paid for by general rates.

24.     Two options were considered for city centre targeted rate extension:

·        Option one: Extend the end date to the 2030/2031 financial year to coincide with the end date for Long-term Plan 2021-2031.

·        Option two: Remove the end date which can be amended as part of any Long-term Plan future process as required.

25.     Staff recommend option two (remove the end date) to align planning with future Long-term Plan cycles (for example 2024-2034).

26.     Planning for significant capex spend needs to start several years before physical work begins on a project. Leaving the end date open provides certainty of funding to allow planning for future years. There is an opportunity to amend the city centre targeted rate every three years as part of the Long-term Plan cycle, if required (this means city centre residents and businesses will continue to pay the targeted rate until it is reviewed as part of a Long-term Plan cycle).   

 

Consideration has been taken on whether the targeted rate level should be adjusted and when to do it

27.     Staff have analysed whether the level of city centre targeted rate should be adjusted in order to fund future activities. Given the additional general rates increase and pressure of COVID-19, Long-term Plan 2021-2031 is not considered a good time for a targeted rate increase. A decrease in the rating level has also not been advised, as the targeted rate is currently set until 2024/25 and has been largely allocated within the existing programme. Unallocated budget will be needed to help revitalise the city following the impacts of COVID-19.

28.     The Long-term Plan cycle (every three years) provides an opportunity to review the level of the targeted rate in the future should there be a need to increase or decrease the amount collected.

29.     The proposal to extend the targeted rate will be part of overall Long-term Plan consultation in early 2021.

 

Part B: The Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and engagement process

Collaboration is crucial in developing a forward programme to deliver City Centre Masterplan outcomes

30.     The city centre targeted rate budget is part of Council’s overall budget that will be reviewed as part of the Long-term Plan process.

31.     The city centre targeted rate investment portfolio for Long-term Plan 2018-2028 was approved by the Budget Committee in 2017 [CP2017/26497]. The portfolio was reviewed and refined with the board between September 2018-July 2019. Updates for individual projects have been provided at the monthly meetings, with the latest detailed work programme update provided on 31 August 2020 [reference number: CP2020/11903].  A copy of the CCTR budget portfolio 2020-21 as per the Emergency Budget 2021 is provided in Attachment B.

32.     Council’s Long-term Plan 2021/2031 process has now begun and will complete with the endorsement of a new Long-term Plan in June 2020. Given the financial constraints due to COVID-19, the process will be different than previous years. The council group need to challenge what is being delivering is still needed and the best way to deliver what is still needed.

33.     There will be limited funding available (particularly in the first three years) and Auckland Council’s Long-term Plan programme team will work closely with staff to ensure that robust processes are in place for prioritising and selecting programmes for funding.

34.     Work is already underway to put together the city centre targeted rate forward programme. A key focus of the forward programme is to demonstrate a strong link between the proposed programme and council strategic outcomes and priorities.

35.     Figure two below provides a timeline for the next Long-term Plan (2021-2031) and the next steps to engage with the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board on the city centre targeted rate forward programme:

·    First October Auckland City Centre Advisory Board workshop: Collaborating on forward programme to deliver City Centre Masterplan outcomes, including consideration of extension of city centre targeted rate.

·    Second October Auckland City Centre Advisory Board workshop: Presenting the revised city centre targeted rate programme for feedback

·    November Auckland City Centre Advisory Board workshop: Presenting the city centre overview (Auckland Council, Regional Facilities Auckland, Panuku).

 

Figure Two: Overall Long-term Plan process and planned engagement with Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

2020

2021

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     Urban intensification and city developments have brought climate impact and challenges to the environment.

37.     An extension of the city centre targeted rate and consideration of forward programme would help ensure future projects in the city centre continue to incorporate critical environmental and climate change measures, such as sustainable procurement, recycle-able and re-usable materials, opportunities  to improve water treatment, greening the environment (for example, more trees and planters), monitoring and evaluation of environment measures, compact and low-carbon urban design.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     An extension of the city centre targeted rate will provide certainty of funding that enables early planning and investigations for future development activities for the city centre.  It could also open up opportunities for co-funding on large infrastructure and development projects.

39.     Staff will report to the advisory board meeting on 5 November 2020 to provide a city centre overview of investment in Long-term Plan 2021-2031 (with the city centre targeted rate programme being a key part of it), with contribution from Panuku, Regional Facilities Auckland, Auckland Council and Auckland Transport.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     The City centre is located within the Waitematā Local Board area.

41.     The Waitematā Local Board has previously been supportive of the city centre targeted rate portfolio and has provided co-funding to several projects (such as Meyer’s Park underpass).  City centre targeted rate funded projects contribute to Waitematā Local Board plan outcomes.

42.     Staff will engage with the local board on the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 forward programme for the city centre.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     The City Centre Masterplan 2020 sets out a vision for the city centre to have a sense of place informed by the past and looking to the future, with thriving and authentic tangata whenua identity and culture (Outcome 1: Tāmaki Makaurau - Our place in the world).

44.     An extension of the city centre targeted rate and consideration of the forward programme will help ensure future projects continue to work with mana whenua to deliver this vision. Examples might include use of te reo Māori festivals and events, and incorporation of Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland design approach founded on Māori design for unique architectural and spatial design responses.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     An extension of the city centre targeted rate would provide approximately $22 million per annum each year to fund city centre developments. If the targeted rate is not extended, council is likely to have insufficient funding to realise the outcomes set out in City Centre Masterplan beyond 2024/25.

46.     Advice from Auckland Council’s financial policy team on funding principles for the city centre targeted rate and process will be incorporated in the proposed change in Long-term Plan 2021-2031.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     If the city centre targeted rate is not extended, council is likely to have insufficient funding to realise the outcomes set out in City Centre Masterplan beyond 2024/25.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     Upon receiving the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board’s feedback, the decision on extension of the city centre targeted rate and the forward programme will be incorporated as part of overall Long-term Plan 2012-2031 public consultation in early 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

City Centre Targeted Rate spend 2010-2018 by area

17

b

CCTR budget portfolio 2020-2021 as per the Emergency Budget July 2021

19

c

CCTR LTP Planning ACCAB Sept meeting

21

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nancy Chu - Senior Investment Programme Lead

Authorisers

Liz Nicholls – Manager Investment Programmes

John Dunshea – Lead Officer Support

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 September 2020

 

 



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28 September 2020

 

 

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28 September 2020

 

 

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Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 September 2020

 

 

Nelson Street Slip Lane improvement project concept design

File No.: CP2020/13660

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board on the Nelson Street Slip Lane improvement project concept design.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Nelson Street slip lane concept design (Attachment A) and project business case were completed in June 2020.

3.       Provision for the investment is included in the Long-Term Plan 2018-2028, funded through the City Centre Targeted Rate Programme of Works 20192020 under the Hobson and Nelson Street upgrade budget (resolution number CEN/2019/35).

4.       The proposed capital budget for the Nelson Street slip lane upgrade is approximately $4.7 million.

5.       The Nelson Street Slip Lane improvement project has been deferred under the Emergency Budget 2020/2021. The preliminary and detailed design phase will be on hold until July 2021.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      note the update on the Nelson Street slip lane improvement project concept design.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Nelson Street slip lane project forms part of the broader Hobson and Nelson Street upgrade, which is included in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and will be funded by the approved city centre targeted rate budget for 2019/2020 (resolution number FIN/2019/94).

7.       The proposed capital budget for the Nelson Street slip lane is approximately $4.7 million. The project is fully funded by the city centre targeted rate.

8.       The slip lane is parallel to Nelson Street, located at the southern section of Nelson Street, between Cook Street and Union Street.  The site currently serves as the primary access to three office buildings, Ascent Apartments and Sugartree apartments.  The laneway is the main access to one of the most densely populated residential areas in New Zealand. A site plan is shown in Figure one.

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1- Nelson Street slip lane site plan

9.       The slip lane offers poor amenity for pedestrians with many laneway users describing the streetscape environment as unloved and feeling unsafe.

10.     An uneven footpath with steep and localised grades at driveways and building entrances limits universal access.  Many pedestrians use Sugartree Lane to avoid traversing the southern end of the laneway and other pedestrians avoid the laneway altogether by using the Nelson Street cycleway which is hazardous for all users.

11.     Low levels of lighting and limited opportunities for natural surveillance by ground level tenants creates actual and perceived safety issues.  These issues contribute to a poor user experience.

12.     The key project outcomes are to provide a streetscape that better fits the scale and speed of pedestrians and enhances the amenity of the laneway, encouraging more active use at street level.

13.     The conceptual design addresses the current pedestrian safety concerns and provides an improved link for users of the laneway and residents of the surrounding residential developments.

14.     The concept design phase was completed in May 2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     A concept design (Attachment A) has been developed and a business case prepared for upgrading the slip lane.

16.     The concept design was developed in consultation with impacted stakeholders and followed three forms:

·    User research – conducted to understand areas people have strong or differing opinions about.  Undertaken over three days on the laneway at various times of the day/week.  Primarily through interviews, but also using validation measures to understand hot topics (see Figure two).

A picture containing text, newspaper, white goods, refrigerator

Description automatically generated,Figure 1 - Using Dotmocracy to validate research insights

The objectives of the research were to better understand user perceptions and current experiences of the laneway users and to understand the community’s priorities about changes.

·    Targeted engagement - with mana whenua as well as selected individuals and organisations, including the Auckland City Mission and Freeman’s Bay Primary School.  These meetings were used to understand project expectations about the management of impacts and benefits from the project.

·    Workshops - concept design options were developed in close consultation with a group of residents, business owners and other key stakeholders through three workshops.

·    the first workshop validated the user research and defined the problems and opportunities for the laneway.

·    the second workshop tested the longlist options and developed the priorities.

·    The refined shortlist was then assessed at a final workshop attended by subject matter experts from Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to determine the preferred option.

A detailed assessment of the shortlist was undertaken using multi-criteria analysis (MCA).  This is decision making tool use by council when there are several different alternatives and expectations and a need to find the best solutions with regard to different and often conflicting objectives.

17.     The preferred option identified by stakeholders contributes to a safer pedestrian environment with wider footpaths and a narrower road carriageway.  New street lighting will lift the perceptions of safety in the laneway whilst the new trees and planters will enhance amenity, ecology and landscaping on the laneway.

18.     The concept design provides for a separated cycle path at the southern end of the lane to minimise conflicts between cyclists and pedestrians.  The relocation of the current cycleway crossing from south to north will avoid overlaps with driveways and vehicles.

19.     Provision of on-street parking only for loading and rideshare will help reduce the volume of cars using the laneway.  The proposed wider pedestrian crosswalk at Cook Street intersection and wider footpaths at the northern end of the lane benefit cyclists who reside in the laneway.

20.     The stakeholder preferred option has been assessed against a range of criteria and provides a benchmark for options assessment in the business case process which will progress the option through to the next phases of the project.

21.     Staff anticipated that further planning and detailed design, consenting and other approval processes would take place over the next 12 months to enable construction to start around mid-2021. There is insufficient provision in the Emergency Budget to fund the continuation of design, therefore the preliminary and detailed design will be substantially on hold over the next 10 months and commence in the next financial year 2021/2022, to start from July 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     This project will contribute to Te Tāruka-ā-Tāwhiri Auckland’s Climate Plan by supporting a greater number of people utilising active transport modes in the future.

23.     The preferred option seeks to provide improved drainage and allow for stormwater quality treatments.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Participation of Auckland Transport’s Parking Specialist, Traffic Engineer and Asset Structures Engineer in workshops 2 and 3 revealed a need to ensure that cycling infrastructure is complimentary to the design and aligned with Auckland Transport’s wider cycling strategy, especially visual markings linking with Lightpath and the future East-West Cook Street cycleway.

25.     Auckland Transport’s inputs also determined issues with changes to the aging bridge structure. Access for maintenance and deterring inappropriate activities under the structure were subsequently considered in the design process.

26.     Lighting assessments undertaken during the project determined that lighting standards needed to be lifted in the laneway.  This work has been incorporated into the recommended option.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     The concept design for the Nelson Street upgrade was presented to the Waitematā Local Board on 8 September 2020.

28.     Board members expressed general support for the project and support for the process of engagement undertaken with stakeholders to produce the concept design.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Consultation and engagement with mana whenua representatives from Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei, Ngai Tai ki Tamaki and Te Ākitai Waiohua were initiated during the concept design phase. This consultation included site walkover with mana whenua representatives to introduce the project and provide the project team feedback on how consultation should occur during subsequent phases of the project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     Provision for the investment is included in the Long-Term Plan 2018-2028, funded through the City Centre Targeted Rate Programme of Works 20192020 under the Hobson and Nelson Street upgrade budget (resolution number CEN/2019/35).

31.     On 30 July 2020, Auckland Council’s Governing Body adopted the Emergency Budget for the 2020/2021 financial year (resolution GB/2020/77).

32.     The Emergency Budget 2020/2021 resulted in a reduction in capital expenditure across Auckland Council, including a reduction to expenditure through the city centre targeted rate investment portfolio.

33.     There is insufficient provision in the Emergency Budget to fund the continuation of design, therefore the preliminary and detailed design will be substantially on hold over the next 10 months and re-commence in the next financial year 2021/2022, to start from July 2021.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     A risk register has been prepared for the project and the identified risks have been assessed and mitigation measures are offered:

Risk

Description

Mitigation measure

Stakeholder interests

Stakeholder feedback could be conflicting and managing their expectations could be challenging.

Engage stakeholders throughout the project.  

Project integration opportunities

There could be programmed projects by utility providers and private developers that could impact on the upgrade of the laneway.  Coordination with those parties at early stage of the project could result in opportunities for integration.

 

Consult with utility providers at early stages of the project and at key design phases.  This has already occurred with the lighting solution

Underground services

The proposed road widening impacts on existing underground services in some areas.  These services will need to be relocated and/or protected during construction. 

Ensure a representative from service providers confirms the location of their services on site at detailed design stage.  Service trenching to be undertaken at the detailed design phase of the project.

 

 

Steep footpaths

The southern section of the footpaths has steep gradients and significant level differences between building frontages / accessways resulting in safety and accessibility issues.

The gradients and profiles of footpaths are to be investigated at detailed design stage. 3D vehicle tracking will need to be undertaken for steeper accessways. 

On-street parking

The concept design proposes to reduce number of on-street parking spaces from 20 to five.  This could result in negative feedback from stakeholders.

Parking spaces are to be used as loading bays or car share spaces.  The reasons and benefits of fewer car parking spaces need to be communicated to the community during consultation.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Staff will present the Nelson Street slip lane concept design to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board at its 28 September 2020 meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Nelson Street slip lane concept design

41

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

James Buckley – Project Manager

Authorisers

Oliver Smith – Manager Delivery Programmes

John Dunshea – Lead Officer Support


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 September 2020

 

 

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28 September 2020

 

 

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28 September 2020

 

 

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28 September 2020

 

 

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28 September 2020

 

 

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28 September 2020

 

 

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28 September 2020

 

 

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28 September 2020

 

 

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28 September 2020

 

 

Update on the Myers Park project update, Waihorotiu Queen Street Valley Access for Everyone pilot, Wellesley Street bus priorities update, Innovating Streets funding applications update and Forward work programme/progress on items

File No.: CP2020/13880

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Auckland City Centre on the following matters:

·    Myers Park project update

·    Waihorotiu Queen Street Valley Access for Everyone pilot

·    Wellesley Street bus priorities update

·    Innovating Streets for people funding applications update

·    Forward work programme/progress on items.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The information report is to inform the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board of matters that are in progress and planned across the council group.

Myers Park project update

3.       To update the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board on the Myers Park stage two project – Mayoral Drive underpass following the Waitematā Local Board endorsement of the preliminary design Attachment A).

Waihorotiu Queen Street Valley Access for Everyone pilot

4.       To update the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board on progress of the Waihorotiu Queen Street Valley pilot Access for Everyone pilot (Attachment B).

Wellesley Street bus priorities update

5.       To update the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board on the Wellesley Street bus priorities project (Attachment C).

Innovating Streets for people funding applications update

6.       To update the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board on the Innovating Streets for people funding applications (Attachment D).

Forward work programme/progress on items

7.       To update on progress on issues considered by the board and its forward work programme (Attachment E).

8.       Staff will be available to answer questions at the meeting.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the information report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Myers Park project update

51

b

Waihorotiu Queen Street Valley Access for Everyone pilot update

77

c

Wellesley Street bus priorities update

79

d

Innovating Streets for people funding applications update

81

e

Forward work programme/progress on items

85

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tam White - Senior Governance and Relationship Advisor

Authoriser

John Dunshea – Lead Officer Support

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

28 September 2020

 

 

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28 September 2020

 

 

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28 September 2020

 

 

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28 September 2020

 

 

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28 September 2020

 

 

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28 September 2020

 

 

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28 September 2020

 

 

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[1] Actual figures including both capex and opex.

[2] Figures related to Infrastructure – Public Realms and Streetscapes only.