I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 15 September 2020

2.00pm

This meeting will proceed via Skype for Business.

Either a recording or written summary will be

uploaded on the Auckland Council website

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Aidan Bennett

 

Deputy Chairperson

George Wood, CNZM

 

Members

Trish Deans

 

 

Ruth Jackson

 

 

Jan O'Connor, QSM

 

 

Toni van Tonder

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness

Democracy Advisor

 

9 September 2020

 

Contact Telephone: 021 815 313

Email: rhiannon.guinness@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 5

8          Deputations                                                           5

9          Public Forum                                                                            5

10        Extraordinary Business                                       5

11        Notices of Motion                                                  6

12        Notice of Motion - Member Toni van Tonder -  Vauxhall Village Traffic Calming                         7

13        Auckland Transport Monthly Update - September 2020                                                  31

14        Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants Round One and Multi-Board Round One 2020/2021, grant allocations                                                           73

15        Landowner approval - Devonport Waterfront Festival Event 2021                                           297

16        Belmont Centre Design Initiative - final improvement plan                                             305

17        Project Streetscapes: Weed Management report                                                                  335

18        Local Board Annual Report 2019/2020           375

19        Auckland Council's Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Devonport-Takapuna Local Board for quarter four 2019/2020         379

20        Chairpersons' Report                                       407

21        Elected Members' Reports                              409

22        Ward Councillors Update                                 417

23        Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Workshops August 2020                                  419

24        Governance Forward Work Calendar             429  

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

26        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                         433

18        Local Board Annual Report 2019/2020

a.      Draft 2019/2020 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Annual Report                   433

19        Auckland Council's Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Devonport-Takapuna Local Board for quarter four 2019/2020

b.      Financial performance report                433

C1       Statement of proposal for a new Navigation Safety Bylaw                                                      434  

 


1          Welcome/ Karakia

 

Member Toni van Tonder will iopen the meeting with a karakia.

 

Whakataka te hau ki te uru                 Cease o winds from the west

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga             Cease o winds from the south

Kia mākinakina ki uta                         Bring calm breezes over the land

Kia mātaratara ki tai                            Bring calm breezes over the sea

E hī ake ana te atakura                      And let the red-tipped dawn come

He tio                                                   With a touch of frost

He huka                                              A sharpened air

He hau hū                                           And promise of a glorious day.

Tīhei mauri ora!.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making

when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external

interest they might have.

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected

members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of

Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy. The policy covers two classes of conflict of

interest:

 

i.                A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member.

ii.              A non-financial conflict interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component. It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

 

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members

understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968. The

guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail and provide elected members with

practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of

interest.

 

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office

of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request.

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Relationship Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 18 August 2020, as  true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

Under Standing Order 2.5.1 (LBS 3.11.1) or Standing Order 1.9.1 (LBS 3.10.17) (revoke or alter a previous resolution) a Notice of Motion has been received from <Member Names>  for consideration under item 12.

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Notice of Motion - Member Toni van Tonder -  Vauxhall Village Traffic Calming

File No.: CP2020/12797

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Member Toni van Tonder has given notice of a motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Member Toni van Tonder and Chairperson Aidan Bennet as seconder, is appended as Attachment A.

3.       Supporting information is appended as Attachment A.

 

Motion

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)     request that Auckland Transport investigate and provide a list of recorded accidents in the vicinity of the Vauxhall Shops over the last 10 years.

b)     request that Auckland Transport investigate traffic calming measures at the Tainui/Vauxhall Road intersection to ensure safety of all road corridor users.

c)     request that Auckland Transport investigate a proposed 20km/h zone for the Vauxhall shopping area.

d)     request that Auckland Transport identify opportunities for placemaking, and to increase the public realm in the vicinity of the Vauxhall Shops.

e)     ask that AT reports back to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board on what is and is not feasible for the board’s consideration.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of Motion - Member Toni van Tonder - Vauxhall Village Traffic Calming

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Auckland Transport Monthly Update - September 2020

File No.: CP2020/12800

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the September 2020 Auckland Transport monthly update.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport September 2020 monthly update report and thank Marilyn Nicholls for her presentation and attendance.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Auckland Transport September 2020 Report

35

b

Devonport Towncentre Parking Study

39

c

Milford Parking Study

73

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants Round One and Multi-Board Round One 2020/2021, grant allocations

File No.: CP2020/12476

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants Round One and Multi-Board Round One 2020/2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       This report presents applications received for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants Round One as shown in Attachment B to the agenda report and Multi-Board Round One 2020/2021 as shown Attachment C to the agenda report.

2.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board adopted the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 19 May 2020 as shown in Attachment A to the agenda report. The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

3.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $245,045 for the 2020/2021 financial year.

4.       Forty-four applications were received for Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants, Round One 2020/2021, requesting a total of $399,707.38 and nine multiboard applications were also received requesting a total of $43,116.50.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants Round One 2020/2021 listed in the following table:   

Table One: Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants Round One 2020/2021 grant applications.

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2102-103

The Lake House Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of producing "Lake House Arts Wood Sculpture Symposium 2020" specifically the cost of marketing, studio use, artist director fees, artists per diem, health and safety officer’s fees, equipment hire, woodcraft tools, and materials.

$11,980.00

Eligible

LG2102-114

Pastel Artists of New Zealand Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the workshop and the exhibition, venue hire cost of the "2021 Purely Pastel Convention and Exhibition".

$2,508.00

Eligible

LG2102-123

Youth Arts New Zealand

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of re-printing and installation of banners at the Rose Centre and the delivery of the monthly meetup series at Shore Junction including the cost of catering, marketing, donations for speakers and fees for performers and showcase artists at each event.

$7,816.50

Eligible

LG2102-127

Devonport Heritage 2017 Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the sound design and editing of the film "Celebrate Our Heritage: Mays Street Revival".

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-135

Glass Ceiling Arts Collective Limited

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of lighting and sound for an all-inclusive youth musical production, to be presented at The Rose Centre.

$14,587.75

Eligible

LG2102-140

Restoring Takarunga Hauraki

Arts and culture

Towards the artist fee for preparation time and the workshops.

$3,600.00

Eligible

LG2102-142

Auckland Sinfonietta Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the advertising and printing cost for the concert "A Celebration of Local Music" at the Tindall Auditorium.

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-144

North Shore Theatre and Arts Trust (The PumpHouse Theatre)

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of electrical work at the PumpHouse Theatre, specifically the purchase and installation of a ceiling fan in the foyer, six recessed tilt led fittings to illuminate the Tukutuku panel and two thorn led battens in the Coal Bunker.

$2,500.00

Eligible

LG2102-147

Depot Arts and Music Space Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of the Depot Artspace gallery rental, promotion, programme catalogue design, and printing, and curation for an art exhibition "Creative Destination Devonport" from 3 October to 18 December 2020.

$9,415.00

Eligible

LG2102-148

Biljana Snjegota

Arts and culture

Towards the purchase of art materials, an electric motor with gearbox and electrician labour costs for the art exhibition "Open Minds".

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-151

Arogya Mantra

Arts and culture

Towards the performance and coordination costs for hosting a "Diwali Delight" event at Smales Farm.

$4,050.00

Eligible

LG2102-157

NZ Korean Youth Community Trust

Arts and culture

Towards advertising costs for the “Joyful Orchestra Concert 2020” at Rosmini College.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-101

Rotary Club of Milford (Incorporated)

Community

Towards the purchase of planters, potting mix, and plants for the "Milford Beautification Programme".

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-112

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost for two young people from the local board area to attend the Blue Light life skills programme.

$869.56

Eligible

LG2102-113

The Castor Bay Ratepayers and Residents Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the local beautification project, including marketing, and communication costs, print materials, social media and website development, and for community engagement events such as the local business networking event, Neighbours Day, “Meet the Candidates” and Castor Bay cultural engagement.

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-119

Devonport Senior Citizens Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase and installation of three heat pumps, including the maintenance and painting of the external windows.

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-120

Age Concern Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of delivering activities and classes for Chinese speaking older people at the "Positive Ageing Centre", specifically meeting costs, resources for the English classes, telecommunication, energy bill, volunteer expenses, and salaries.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-126

Well Foundation

Community

Towards the purchase of eight and the partial cost of one, maternity recliner chair for the North Shore Hospital.

$14,450.00

Ineligible

LG2102-129

Takapuna Community Facilities Trust

Community

Towards the cost of the "Sunnynook Placemaking Project" specifically the cost of line marking for distance markers and pop up play activation equipment, mulch for the community house garden, materials for the petanque court, plants for the garden outside the community centre, pots and soil for the shopping area, vegetable seedlings, a raised garden bed, soil and tools for the mini community garden.

$10,851.67

Eligible

LG2102-130

Hapori Marketing Limited

Community

Towards the cost of running the "North Shore Monthly Market" from 24 October 2020 to 23 October 2021 specifically venue hire, social media promotion and marketing, trestle tables, signage and banners, entertainment, and activities.

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-131

Victoria Theatre Trust Board

Community

Towards the cost of building a concrete wheelchair access ramp to the main entrance of The Victoria Theatre, Devonport.

$2,208.90

Eligible

LG2102-132

Transformation Academy Trust

Community

Towards the Youth Navigator's wages, volunteer support, training, and workshop costs to run the “Youth Work Readiness and Skills Development Programme” including stationery and resource materials for 30 vulnerable Maori and Pasifika youth.

$14,800.00

Eligible

LG2102-138

Devonport Community House Incorporated

Community

Towards the annual cleaning costs of the community house.

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-141

Yes Disability Resource Centre

Community

Towards the purchase of a screen, gaming console, games, puzzles, and lego for the “Accidental Connections” area in the Shore Junction.

$3,340.00

Eligible

LG2102-146

Takapuna Senior Citizens Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase and installation of two heat pumps in the Senior Citizens Hall at the Takapuna Community Service Centre.

$8,299.00

Eligible

LG2102-150

Dance Therapy NZ

Community

Towards venue hire, marketing, facilitation, equipment, materials, coordination, programme administration and supervision costs for the "Dance 4 Us North Shore" workshops from 11 February to 24 July 2021.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-133

Rotary Club of Milford (Incorporated)

Environment

Towards the purchase and installation of a Seabin unit.

$12,175.00

Eligible

LG2102-102

Nga Kaihoe o Aotearoa (Waka Ama New Zealand) Incorporated

Events

Towards venue hire, safety boats, and a water hydration trailer for the 2021 Takapuna Beach Cup from 19 February to 21 February 2021.

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-104

The Event Dudes Limited

Events

Towards the cost of Surf Life Saving New Zealand to manage the water safety of the ocean swim and stand-up paddle events.

$7,395.00

Eligible

LG2102-115

Les Mills Takapuna Limited

Events

Towards Auckland Council’s event permit fee.

$320.00

Eligible

LG2102-117

Devonport Folk Music Club Incorporated

Events

Towards the artist fee, sound, and advertising for the "Folk in the Park" event on 14 February 2021.

$3,400.00

Eligible

LG2102-122

North Harbour Triathlon Club Incorporated

Events

Towards event safety for a series of nine races for the “Club Swim Run” event held between November 2020 to March 2021.

$5,735.00

Eligible

LG2102-139

Northshore Rowing Club Incorporated

Events

Towards the cost of sound equipment hire, first aid, and Auckland Council’s event permit fee for the "Bennett Shield Memorial Regatta 2020" and the purchase of a new boat.

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-143

Lofty Ned

Events

Towards the cost of the event's main stage, marquee, shade cover, sound concert system, and insurance for “The Devonport Christmas Festival - Dance and Music in the Park” event on 6 December 2020.

$8,319.00

Eligible

LG2102-149

Arogya Mantra

Events

Towards project coordination, performances, marketing, and event permit costs for a Diwali Celebration event at the Takapuna Town Centre.

$7,712.00

Eligible

LG2102-154

Marie Chang

Historic Heritage

Toward the architect and engineer's fees for the pre-design and early design stages for a building renovation.

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-106

Wakatere Boating Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase and replacement of bi-fold doors for the clubroom.

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-108

Harbour Sport Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of venue hire, coordinator, resources and overheads for the programme "Equip'd" targeting Asian girls aged between 12 to 18 years from Westlake Girls High School.

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-121

Pupuke Golf Cub Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of training aids and the salary of the Resident Professional’s Assistant for the "Pupuke Golf Club School Programme".

$10,000.00

 

LG2102-136

Gymnastics Community Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of seven floor rolls (toppers) to cover and repair the back floor on the recreational gymnastics area of the Eventfinda Stadium.

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-137

Badminton New Zealand Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of shuttlecocks and venue hire for the “New Zealand Under13 and Under 17 Badminton Championships 2020”.

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-152

Milford Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards coaching fees from 1 October 2020 to 31 March 2021.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2102-155

Forrest Hill Milford United Association Football Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the “Director of Football” fees

$9,375.00

Eligible

LG2102-156

Takapuna Bowling Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of signage, a virtual tour of the facility, and painting of the interior and exterior areas of the club.

$9,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$399,707.38

 

 

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Devonport-Takapuna Multiboard Round One 2020/2021, listed in Table Two:

Table Two: Devonport-Takapuna Multiboard Round One 2020/2021 grant applications

 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2021-138

The New Zealand Society of Authors Te Puni Kaituhi o Aotearoa (PEN NZ Incorporated)

Arts and culture

Towards the recording of oral histories of people who have made significant contributions to New Zealand literature.

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-140

The Kids for Kids Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire and production costs for the Kids Youth Choir performance at Bruce Mason Centre

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-104

North Shore Centres of Mutual Aid Incorporated

Community

Towards a proportion of operational costs, excluding wages, for eight centres in the North Shore

$7,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-109

The Parkinson's New Zealand Charitable Trust

Community

A contribution towards the salary of three Auckland Parkinson's Community Educators between November 2020 to November 2021

$5,000.00

Ineligible

MB2021-117

CNSST Foundation, formerly known as Chinese New Settlers Services Trust

Community

Towards classroom rental costs, advertising, and contracted teacher fees for the “Unite Against COVID-19 CNSST Education and Well-being Programme”

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-133

Assistance Dogs New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards operating costs for a four-month period from 2 November 2020 to 28 February 2021.

$3,500.00

Eligible

MB2021-146

Loopy Tunes Preschool Music

Community

Towards Loopy Tunes Preschool Music programme, including performance fees, venue hire (for four venues), travel costs (car hire, petrol and airfares), accommodation, gifts for tamariki (button badges), catered food, administration and advertising costs, and a donation to a local marae.

$3,616.50

Eligible

MB2021-111

Harbour Sport Trust

Events

Towards the transport, first aid, sound, printing, and event timing costs to deliver the "Shore to Shore" 2020 event

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-125

Badminton North Harbour Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the replacement of court lighting at Badminton North Harbour

$7,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$43,116.50

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

1.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

2.       Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

3.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements.

 

4.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board adopted the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 19 May 2020 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

5.       The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

6.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $245,045 for the 2020/2021 financial year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

5.       Due to the current COVID-19 crisis, staff have also assessed each application according to which alert level the proposed activity is able to proceed, under alert level two only 10 people are able to gather. Events and activities have been assessed according to this criterion.

6.       The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

7.       The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·    local food production and food waste reduction

·    decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·    home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·    local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·    education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

7.       Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

8.       The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

9.       Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

10.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

11.     A summary of each application received through Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants, Round One 2020/2021 and multi-board applications is provided in Attachment B and Attachment C.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

12.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Maori. Auckland Council’s Maori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

13.     Fourteen applicants applying to Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants Round One and five applicants applying to the multiboard round one 2020/2021 indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

14.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

15.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $245,045 for the 2020/2021 financial year.

16.     Forty-four applications were received for Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants, Round One 2020/2021, requesting a total of $399,707.38 and nine multiboard applications were also received requesting a total of $43,116.50.

17.      Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

18.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

19.     Following the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board allocating funding for round one of the local grants and multiboard grants, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Grants Programme 2020/2021

87

b

Devonport-Takapuna Local Grants Round One 2020/2021 - grant applications

91

c

Devonport-Takapuna Multi-Board Round One 2020/2021 - grant applications

257

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 


 


 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Landowner approval - Devonport Waterfront Festival Event 2021

File No.: CP2020/12463

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board on land use for the proposed ‘Devonport Waterfront Festival’ event to be held at Windsor Reserve, from 2 March to 23 March 2021

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Devonport Business Association, the event organiser, requests landowner approval to hold an event at Windsor Reserve. The event is called ‘Devonport Waterfront Festival 2021’ and the proposed use of the site is shown on Attachment A of the agenda report.

3.       The Devonport Waterfront Festival 2021 event is proposed to be a family-friendly event hosting a ‘Glow your boat on water’ event, various children’s activities including local music, movies and storytelling. There will also be a screen for the attendees to watch the America’s Cup activity.

4.       The event is proposed to run daily from 10:00am until 10:30pm between 5 March and 23 March 2021. This will be a free event open to the public.

5.       Public access will be maintained to the children’s playground throughout the entire event period.

6.       Resource consent to enable the activity, a building consent exemption, a special alcohol license and a Maritime New Zealand permit will be required to be obtained by Devonport Business Association. The area covered by the liquor license will be separate from the main event site and is shown outlined yellow on Attachment A of the agenda report.

7.       ATEED is supportive of the event and will work with the event organiser to ensure an event permit, issued under the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw is issued before the event can pack in on Windsor Reserve.

8.       Community Facilities staff are supportive of the event proceeding as proposed, and are confident the use of the reserve, risks and local impacts of the event will be appropriately managed by ATEED and the event organiser.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      grant landowner approval to the Devonport Business Association to hold the Devonport Waterfront Festival 2021 event on Windsor Reserve as shown on Attachment A to the agenda report from 5 March to 23 March 2021 subject to any necessary consents being secured and all conditions being adhered to before entry to the site is taken.

b)      grant landowner approval to the Devonport Business Association to enable an application for a Special Liquor license for the area shown outlined in yellow on Attachment A to the agenda report and upon lodgement of a Special Liquor License Application, request that the Alcohol Inspectorate consider that the license hours will extend from 4pm to 9.00pm on the undernoted dates;

I.    Friday 5 March 2021

II.   Saturday 6 March 2021

III.  Friday 12 March 2021

IV.  Saturday 13 March 2021.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Windsor Reserve is used as a location for a range of events, particularly during the summer season.

10.     Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) are working with event organisers, and the Devonport Business Association to hold an event at Windsor Reserve. The event is called Devonport Waterfront Festival 2021.

11.     Devonport Waterfront Festival is a summer festival program for the local community and visitors. During this time the event will show race broadcasts of the America's Cup races on a large outdoor screen. The site at Windsor Reserve will include an open-air stage with live entertainment, cinema in the reserve, storytelling, picnic and jazz, community recitals, mass haka/chant with activities for all ages.

12.     An event requires landowner approval from the delegated landowner, the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board, if they:

·        take place over multiple days (more than 48 hours) including pack in and pack out and/or

·        patron numbers exceed 500

·        liquor will be sold on the reserve under the terms of a Special Liquor License.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Devonport Waterfront Festival 2021 will pack in from 6:00am to 9:00pm on 2 - 4 March 2021. The event will be live from 10:00am to 10:30pm from 6 March to 21 March 2021. Pack out will occur from 6:00am to 9.00pm on 21 to 23 March 2021.

14.     Public access will be maintained to the reserve and the children’s playground through the entire event period.

15.     The event is open and free to public throughout the event period.

16.     Be:Lab, an organisation that supports businesses to ensure events are accessible has been engaged to ensure the Devonport Waterfront Festival 2021 is accessible to all visitors and participants.

17.     Activities will take place daily on Windsor Reserve throughout the live event period. Proposed activities include:

Description

Date

Times

Opening event with live music /

Glow your boat (on water)

5 March

(Alternative date 6 March)

4:00pm - 9:00pm
(sunset 7.54pm)

Big Screen Viewing of 36th America’s Cup

Race Days from 6-21 March

Daily from 4:00pm – 6:00pm

Local music / Race viewing

6 March

3:00pm – 7:00pm

Kids movie

7 March

10:00am

12.00pm

Auld Tub Parade, local music, kid’s activities

7 March

2:00pm

Story Time/Stem

8-12 March

10:00am – 2:00pm

Recital e.g. community group or amateur

8-11 March

10:00am – 2:00pm

Local music / Race viewing

12 March

3:00pm – 7:00pm

Kids movie

13 March

10:00am

12:00pm

Kids Disco/DJ/Live Cam/Bubble

machine

13 March

2:00pm - 4:00pm

Local music / Race viewing

13 March

3:00pm – 7:00pm

Kids movie

14 March

10:00am

12:00pm

Great NZ picnic & Jazz

14 March

2:00pm - 4:00pm

Story Time/Water Safety Programme

15 - 18 March

10:00am - 2:00pm

Movie night

19 March

20 March

21 March

Each night starting at 6:15pm

 

18.     The event will require a resource consent due to the duration of the event and noise limits. A building consent exemption will be required due to the temporary event structures. The event organiser will be responsible for obtaining the appropriate consents.

19.     A special alcohol license will be required as the event organiser is proposing to serve alcohol from 4:00pm to 9:00pm on 5, 6, 12 and 13 March 2021 only. The area, on the part of Windsor Reserve between Flagstaff Terrace and King Edward Parade would be fenced with security on site to ensure a safe environment. The event area is accessible to the public however, to purchase alcohol the relevant restrictions will be in place.

20.     The “bar” structure is yet to be confirmed. If required, a building exemption will be applied for.

21.     There is currently an alcohol ban for this area from 9:00pm to 7:00am.

22.     A waste management plan will be required to be submitted to the Auckland Council Waste Minimisation team for approval.

23.     Vehicle access will be required for pack in and out of the event site.

24.     Portaloos will be provided by the event organisers to cater for attendees. The event organisers will also be requesting access to the public toilets on site.

25.     The stage and marquee area is detailed on the site map on Attachment A.

26.     One 20mLED screen will be installed to enable members of the public to watch America’s Cup racing, refer to Attachment A. 

27.     A proposed parking resolution will be required on Victoria Road (Windsor Reserve park side) between King Edward Parade and Queens Parade between 2-23 March 2021 from 6:00am to 9:00pm. This will be used for the crew/sponsors. This will be applied for through Auckland Transport.

28.     Community Facilities staff have reviewed the event proposal, are supportive of the event proceeding as proposed, and are confident the management of the event will ensure the reserve and assets within will be protected throughout the event duration.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     With a commitment to be a low-waste event as part of their overall ethos, the event organiser will be contracting a waste management company providing a three-bin system that includes, general waste, recycling and compostable material.

30.     This event will be undertaking the following sustainability activities alongside the Auckland Council Zero Waste Event process:

·        Educate people attending the events, via signage (bins) and signage around the site where applicable, and utilisation of the large screen that will be on-site

·        Communication with stakeholders e.g. food and drink (no plastic, only recyclable or compostable packaging) etc

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     The event organisers will work with Community Facilities to ensure all operational requirements are in place to protect the reserve.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     Events can cause disruption to local residents, businesses, and traffic flow. However, events can also increase business and activity by bringing an increased number of people into the area utilising the nearby shops and eateries.

33.     The organisers will also undertake a business / resident event letter drop prior to the event.

34.     The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board have also been given early opportunity to comment on the event details, with a notification distributed on Monday 3 August 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     The event organiser will be required to consult with local iwi through the resource consent process, if required.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     Specific conditions are given as part of the event permit to ensure costs for remedial works that may be required following an event are charged to the event organiser.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     The event is required to provide an event health and safety plan, this will be reviewed by ATEED.

38.     The event includes on water elements and the event organiser will be required to submit nautical maps to Auckland Transport Harbourmaster, along with a Maritime New Zealand permit. On water safety elements must also be included within the health and safety plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     The event organiser will be informed of the landowner approval decision. If approved, the event organiser can progress with the event planning and applying for the appropriate consents and permits.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport Waterfront Festival -  Draft  Site Plan

305

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sarah Jones – Manager Area Operations Community Facilities  

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Belmont Centre Design Initiative - final improvement plan

File No.: CP2020/12266

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of an improvement plan for Belmont local centre with two final options, developed through the Belmont Centre Design Initiative during 2019 and 2020 in conjunction with Auckland Transport’s Lake Road improvements project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A process to develop an improvement plan for the Belmont local centre commenced in October 2019. This project was included in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board 2019/2020 work programme, where the local board allocated $40,000 LDI operational funding towards preparing and consulting on the improvement plan.

3.       The project has worked alongside Auckland Transport’s (AT’s) Lake Road improvements project, for which a detailed business case (DBC) for Lake Road from Esmonde Road to Albert Road is being finalised. The project teams have worked with a local Belmont stakeholder group to develop principles and options for future improvements at the centre.

4.       The local board approved a design proposal for Belmont Centre in February 2020 that went out for public consultation along with proposals for Lake Road improvements in March and April 2020. Feedback saw general support for proposals at Belmont Centre along with a number of concerns including safety, cycling provision and impacts on car parking.

5.       Following consideration of the consultation feedback, final design options have been prepared. Proposals for these options were discussed with Belmont stakeholders in July 2020 and also with the local board at their workshop in August 2020. Two final options have been prepared that reflect the Belmont design principles but utilise the eastern slip road differently, depending on costing and budget availability in the future.

6.       Due to Covid-19 impacts, there is now no funding for the Lake Road improvement project in the Auckland Council Emergency Budget 2020/21. AT will be completing the Lake Road DBC and related design proposals but will not be proceed into the detailed design and implementation phases. This also applies to the Belmont Centre improvement plan.

7.       Future prospects for progressing the next stages will be reported to the local board in due course once AT project funding becomes available.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve the Belmont Centre improvement plan (at Attachment A to the agenda report), containing two final options known as the base option and enhanced option, as the final output of the Belmont Centre Design Initiative.

b)      request staff to use the improvement plan final options as the basis for more detailed design work in future, when Auckland Transport’s Lake Road improvements project is progressed.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

Background

8.       Project 5.2 in the Devonport-Takapuna Area Plan 2014 is to investigate and implement physical improvements to the environment of Belmont local centre in ways that enhance its character. ‘Outcomes for key places’ further on in the area plan seeks that Belmont has an improvement plan prepared through engagement with the local community.

9.       Through the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) 2016 (the AUP), additional business and residential development has been enabled in and around Belmont centre through introducing Business - Mixed Use Zone around the centre and an area of Residential - Terrace Housing and Apartment Buildings Zone (THAB) to the east. 

10.     A key initiative under Outcome 5 of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2017-20 is to ‘develop a town centre plan for Belmont’. The timing and need for a plan were tied to the confirmation and timing of AT’s Lake Road improvements project, for which the detailed business case (DBC) is nearing completion.

The Belmont Centre Design Initiative

11.     The Belmont Centre Design Initiative, a project to develop an improvement plan for Belmont local centre, commenced in October 2019. This project was included in the local board’s 2019/2020 work programme, where the local board allocated $40,000 operational funding towards preparing and consulting on the improvement plan.

12.     The project has worked alongside AT’s Lake Road improvements project, for which a detailed business case (DBC) is being finalised. The council appointed urban design specialists Urbanismplus Ltd in November 2019 to prepare an analysis of issues and opportunities at Belmont, work with project stakeholders to develop principles and options, and prepare the improvement plan for the centre.

13.     A Belmont community stakeholder group of local representatives has assisted and advised the project team across five meetings between November 2019 and February 2020. An internal stakeholder group involving relevant Auckland Council and CCO staff has also assisted in progressing the project.

14.     Design principles for Belmont Centre, developed by the stakeholder group in December 2019, were noted by the local board at its meeting in February 2020 along with a related ‘community concept plan’ that demonstrated the principles. A draft design proposal for the centre was approved by the local board for public consultation during March and April 2020.

15.     The draft design proposal utilised the eastern slip road for additional public space, enabled a short northbound transit lane and protected cycle facilities through the centre. Car parking was rationalised, more public space was created at the corners of the intersection, and a new crossing of Lake Road identified at the School Road intersection thereby establishing a clearer, lower speed core centre area.

16.     The draft design proposal undertook a technical review prior to public consultation. This identified that there was not enough space in the road corridor to introduce an additional north-bound transit lane through the centre, therefore two lanes would continue to merge northwards out of the main intersection. Also, an additional pedestrian crossing was proposed across School Road to the Rose Gardens near to Lake Road.

Public consultation

17.     Consultation on proposals for Lake Road and Belmont Centre improvements was undertaken throughout March and April 2020. 563 submissions were received. Despite the disruptions from the Covid-19 lockdown, mitigations put in place by AT including extending the consultation duration, meant that a reasonable response rate was achieved. A majority of submissions were from local respondents.

18.     The local board received a report in June 2020 from AT regarding the detailed feedback from the consultation and proposed responses to it, as part of the Lake Road DBC process.

19.     In terms of responses to the consultation question asking for feedback on changes proposed for Belmont Centre, the key themes were as follows:

·    Concerns and suggestions regarding safe cycling infrastructure including having a continuous route through town centres and intersections (96 submissions)

·    Concerns and suggestions about congestion, transit lanes will add to congestion and request two-lanes in each direction (68 submissions)

·    Proposal looks good (65 submission)

·    Concerns about loss of street parking including carparks for Williamson Avenue, Belmont and Lake Road shops (50 submissions)

·    Submissions for more trees and greenery (47 submissions)

·    General comments and suggestions (47 submissions)

·    Need well located bike parking (46 submissions)

·    Concerns and suggestions around pedestrian safety and safety of intersections (42 submissions)

·    It does not need changing - proposal does not add any improvement (29 submissions)

·    Remove street parking completely from Lake Road - it will ease congestion (24 submissions)

20.     The project teams have reviewed the consultation design proposals for Lake Road and Belmont Centre in light of feedback received from public consultation and from the local board. A further meeting was held with the Belmont Centre Stakeholder Group on 22 July to discuss the feedback and possible changes to the design proposals.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     In general terms the following refinements have been incorporated into the concept design for Belmont Centre:

·    Cycle lanes to be positioned on the western kerb side of Lake Road and the south side of Bayswater Avenue, inside parallel car parking.

·    Introduction of a clearway on the west side of Lake Road during morning peak traffic period, reverting to car parking for the rest of the day.

·    Additional parking spaces to be located on Williamson Avenue.

22.     The resulting final concept design to be proposed has two options, subject to the level of funding available in the future for the Lake Road improvements project. The final options are shown in Section 5 of Attachment A.

23.     A 'base option' retains a narrower slip road with parallel parking on the eastern side of Lake Road. This option achieves the transport objectives at Belmont and is likely to be acceptable to AT. The base option does not however realise the more extensive public space increase or improvements that were shown in the draft improvement plan and generally supported through stakeholder engagement and public consultation.

24.     Accordingly, an 'enhanced option' is also proposed that retains the same transport outcomes for Belmont but with the removal of the eastern slip road. Car parking is retained but reconfigured as parallel spaces in an indented bay alongside Lake Road.

25.     Ultimately, the selection of which option is most appropriate at Belmont Centre will be based on comparative costings and the available budget, if and when the AT-led Lake Road improvement project becomes funded. It is possible that the achievement of the enhanced option is dependent on additional non-AT funding sources being identified, to achieve an expected level of quality for new and additional public spaces in that option.

26.     Both final concept design options for Belmont represent better outcomes for transport, access, safety and amenity at Belmont Centre for all users. They consider and reflect the design principles established for the centre that included local stakeholder input earlier in the process. They also take account of feedback received through public consultation on Lake Road and Belmont centre improvements, where the design proposals underpinning the final proposed design options received general support.

27.     Feedback was received on the two options from the local board at its workshop on 11 August. Some of the key points made, with a response, are as follows:

·    Clarification of the difference in numbers of car parking spaces between the options was sought, now reviewed to be approximately 5 to 6 spaces less with the enhanced option. This in the context of a centre that is currently well provided with car parking, but the configuration on the eastern side is not supportive of the centre overall.

·    Parallel car parking on the east side of Lake Road in the enhanced option didn’t appear workable and is unsafe, in relation to the lead up to the intersection. This type of arrangement is however common along many of Auckland roads, where parking isn’t only placed where long gaps in traffic may exist.

·    The bus stop outside the Rose Gardens is longer than a normal stop indicating it could be a layover or waiting stop. This hasn’t been confirmed, but a new stop on Lake Road, as in both options, will not be able to be used in this way.

·    Concerns about Bayswater traffic increasing through to Egremont Street and having to queue to turn left at the Lake Road intersection. The likelihood of this is recognised, however driver courtesy will still be a factor in letting vehicles turn into traffic at Egremont Street as at Lake Road currently, and traffic calming measures could be installed. Traffic lights can be re-sequenced, including allowing Bayswater traffic to turn left during a Lake Road right turn phase.

28.     The final report as at Attachment A contains the background and objectives of the project, principles and community concept plan, draft improvement plan, consultation feedback, and the two final design options.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     The Belmont project has been coordinated with the Lake Road improvements project, which is seeking to achieve an increase in the people-moving capacity of Lake Road through introduction of a transit lane and giving greater modal choice for travellers. Together with separated and continuous cycle lanes, improvements in options for travel using other than private vehicles will help reduce carbon emissions derived from transport on Lake Road.

30.     Improvements in pedestrian access and provision of additional public space at Belmont will encourage more walking in and around the centre, contributing to a reduction in carbon emissions from vehicle use. Future more intensive redevelopment of the centre will also help reduce the number of vehicle trips per person in the vicinity of Belmont.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     Auckland Transport has worked closely with Plans and Places staff, who have worked with other council departments including the Parks Policy team, the Auckland Design Office and the Community Empowerment Unit in scoping and developing the project and options.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     Representatives of the local Belmont community have been meeting with the project team since November 2019 to inform its development, principles and options. Community consultation on a draft improvement plan occurred along with the Lake Road improvement project in March-April 2020 and resulted in a good level of feedback.

33.     The initiative is a funded project in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board work programme 2019/20 and carried over for completion in 2020/21. The local board was briefed on the project in October 2019, had workshops on design options and consultation outcomes, and approved the draft improvement plan in February 2020. Two local board members have participated in the community stakeholder group meetings.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     The thirteen iwi who have a stated interest in this location were contacted about the project in 2019 and invited to be engaged on this initiative. Representatives from Ngati Maru and Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki responded with an interest in the project, however no further response from these iwi has been received through the consultation process or other meetings or correspondence.

35.     Project staff representing Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Whai Rawa, the commercial investment company of the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei group, were met with in December 2019 and again in March 2020 regarding the projects and their Devonport precinct development interests. The representatives were supportive of the project and its objectives, which they see as improving the opportunities for future residents of their development sites in and around Belmont. Consultation feedback was provided by them, which was supportive of the draft improvement plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     The local board allocated $40,000 operational funding for the preparation of the Belmont Centre improvement plan. Council staff budgets accounted for project management, plan development and consultation. Approximately $10,000 operational funding budget unspent from 2019/2020 has been carried forward into 2020/2021 to complete the delivery of the project.

37.      Within Auckland Transport’s 2018-28 Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) $47 million was allocated for the Lake Road improvements project design and delivery. The Lake Road DBC has been developed to achieve the project outcomes within this budget, which would have included core transport-related improvements at Belmont Centre shown in the base option. Funding of streetscape upgrades and work substantially beyond the core transport improvements, as shown in the enhanced option, were unlikely to be covered by that budget.

38.      However, due to the impacts of Covid-19 there is now no funding for the Lake Road improvement project within the Auckland Council Emergency Budget approved in July 2020. As such, work on the project will stop with the completion of the DBC and it will be considered again in the prioritisation of the 2021-31 RLTP. Should Lake Road improvements be prioritised in that process, and sufficient budget becomes available, AT will look to recommence the project.

39.     Depending on the re-allocation of funding to the project and any additional or other funding from the Council or the local board towards achieving an enhanced improvement option, decisions will be made by AT in consultation with the local board in the future on the extent of work able to be delivered at Belmont.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     There are risks that future funding will not be allocated to develop and implement either of the design options, in concert with Lake Road improvements. Or that there will be sufficient funding available to implement the enhanced option without additional funding sources other than that provided through the RLTP process. This is noted above.

41.     Risks to the future detailed design and delivery of the project include the level of continued support by the community stakeholders and the local board of the options identified. To date the Belmont stakeholder group have been well involved in the project and have commended its outcomes. The approval of the final improvement plan will enable it however to be used as the basis for the project in future when it is restarted.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     Once the final improvement plan is approved by the local board, it will be completed and distributed to the project stakeholders and published on the local board’s plans and strategies web page.

43.     The report and the final two improvement plan options are intended to be used in the future as the basis for detailed design and delivery at Belmont Centre in the context of AT’s Lake Road improvements project when that project is funded and recommences. Further consultation with affected local stakeholders at Belmont is anticipated as part of that process.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Belmont Centre improvement plan August 2020

313

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ross Moffatt - Principal Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Project Streetscapes: Weed Management report

File No.: CP2020/12729

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the recommended regional methodology to edge and maintain weeds on footpaths, berms and the kerb and channel on more than 5000km of urban roads in the Auckland region.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council manages edges and weeds on footpaths, berms and the kerb and channel in the urban road corridor for statutory, asset protection, amenity, and health and safety outcomes.

3.       The service level for weed management on berms and in the kerb and channel is the same across Auckland. However, the methodologies for edging and weed control on hard surfaces, either plant-based, synthetic herbicides or thermal, e.g. hot water/steam, differ between local board areas. In some cases, different methods are used within the same local board boundaries. This reflects the continuation of legacy council approaches.

4.       In April 2019, Auckland Transport transferred services and budget to the council’s Community Facilities department to manage weeds within the road corridor on their behalf. Auckland Transport retains responsibility for the road corridor as per the Local Government Act 1974 and the Land Transport Act 1998.

5.       The transfer was completed as part of Project Streetscapes (which did not include the Hauraki Gulf Islands), a variation to the Community Facilities outcome-based maintenance contracts. Part of the project included developing recommendations for a regionally consistent approach for edging and weed control on hard surfaces in the road corridor.

6.       Community Facilities has continued with the legacy approach to weed control while completing a review of weed management methodologies. The scope of the review and recommendations are for edging and weed control on hard surfaces within the urban road corridor, excluding the Hauraki Gulf Islands. Rural roads are not included due to differences in population, roading infrastructure and land use in rural areas.

7.       The evaluation criteria for the review’s recommendations include environmental impacts, community input, the council’s commitment to reduce carbon emissions in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan and the objectives of the council Weed Management Policy for effective, efficient, and sustainable outcomes.

8.       A council People’s Panel survey was conducted in October 2019 as one mechanism to gauge how Aucklanders feel about managing weeds on footpaths and kerbs (see Attachment A).

9.       The recommendation of this review is for a combination of plant-based herbicide with spot spraying of glyphosate for difficult to manage weeds. This is estimated to lead to a reduction in glyphosate, carbon emissions and water usage across the region while achieving effective control. This approach is estimated to be achievable within existing operational budgets.

10.     Feedback is sought from local boards to be included in the recommendation to the Governing Body on a standardised approach for edging and weed control on hard surfaces in the road corridor (see Attachment B). This will be presented at the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 12 November 2020.

11.     Should a local board choose to utilise alternative methodologies to those agreed, they have the option of using locally driven initiative (LDI) funding to cover the cost difference between the agreed regional weed management method and the alternative.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the recommended approach to a standardised methodology to managing weeds on footpaths, berms and the kerb and channel across more than 5000km of urban roads.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     Community Facilities carries out edging and weed management on footpaths, berms and the kerb and channel across more than 5000km of Auckland urban roads. This is done for asset protection and amenity, as well as health and safety outcomes, including:

·        preventing root intrusion causing damage to the road surface, kerb and channel, footpaths and other road assets

·        ensuring vegetation growing in the kerb and channel does not interfere with water flow

·        ensuring the safety of pedestrians and road users by maintaining clear sight-lines and minimising trip hazards

·        maintaining the streetscape in a tidy and aesthetically pleasing condition.

13.     Auckland’s moderate and wet climate makes the area particularly vulnerable to the detrimental effects of weeds. The climate causes vigorous growth, easy establishment, and increased infestation of weeds. The road corridor provides a dynamic environment for the spread of weeds including through vehicle and water dispersal.[1]

14.     Uncontrolled weeds on footpaths and the kerb and channel cause damage that can lead to increased repairs and renewals with a funding and environmental impact. This damage may create trip hazards, putting people at risk.

15.     Agrichemicals are used for edging and weed control in the urban road corridor. Edging is required on both sides of the road, which is over 10,000km of footpaths and berms. The Auckland Council Weed Management Policy guides the use of herbicide by the council and supports best practice weed control.[2] All agrichemical use must follow the rules of the Unitary Plan, which ensures that, when used correctly, agrichemicals can make a positive contribution to sustainable land use.[3]

16.     The outcome-based contract specifications for the road corridor do not permit herbicide application outside schools or early learning services on days that these institutions are in use. There are limitations on the time of spraying in urban areas and the contract specifications include instructions to not complete weed control where the berm is clearly being maintained by the adjacent property owner.[4]

17.     All of Auckland is covered by a ‘no-spray register’ for berms adjacent to private property. Any resident who agrees to manage weeds to a specified standard can apply to ‘opt out’ of weed management completed by the council, through recording their intent on the no-spray register. Residents can register through a dedicated form on the council website or through the council call centre.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Weed management in the road corridor

18.     The service level outcomes for weed management on berms and in the kerb and channel are the same across Auckland. However, the methodologies for their maintenance, either plant-based, synthetic herbicides or thermal, e.g. hot water/steam, differs between local board areas. In some cases, different methods are used within the same local board boundaries. These differences reflect the weed control methods and herbicides that were used by the legacy councils of Auckland City Council, Manukau City Council, Waitākere City Council, North Shore City Council, Papakura District Council, Rodney District Council and Franklin District Council prior to amalgamation.

19.     In April 2019, Auckland Transport transferred services and budget to the council’s Community Facilities unit to manage weeds within the road corridor. Auckland Transport retains responsibility for the road corridor as per the Local Government Act 1974 and the Land Transport Act 1998.

20.     Weed management on footpaths, berms and the kerb and channel is now part of the outcome-based Full Facilities contract for streetscapes. These include pest plant control, mowing, town centre cleaning, and waste removal completed on behalf of Auckland Transport.

21.     Community Facilities has continued with the legacy approach for edging and weed control on hard surfaces, while completing a review of the methodologies with a view to making recommendations to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for a consistent regional approach. The scope of the review and recommendations is only for the urban road corridor and does not include rural areas or the Hauraki Gulf Islands. This reflects the differences in population, roading infrastructure and land use in rural areas.

Comparison of weed management methodologies

Synthetic herbicide – glyphosate

22.     The synthetic herbicide used for edging and weed management on footpaths, berms and the kerb and channel in the urban road corridor in Auckland is glyphosate. Glyphosate is used by the council for weed management on parks and reserves, and by most road controlling authorities in New Zealand to control vegetation in the road corridor.[5]

23.     Glyphosate is a low toxicity broad-spectrum non-selective herbicide which is particularly effective on broadleaf weeds and grasses. Glyphosate is a systemic herbicide that is absorbed through green plant tissue and is then translocated throughout the plant, including the root system, to kill the entire plant.[6]

24.     Glyphosate is diluted with water and applied via foliar spray with a small left-hand steer vehicle in the urban road corridor. It is the most cost-effective method as it needs to be applied less frequently than other methods. In the urban road corridor, spot spraying with glyphosate typically occurs six times per year to achieve the desired level of service.

25.     There is some community and international debate about the health risk of glyphosate with several regions no longer using, or minimising the use of, glyphosate for weed control in public areas.

26.     Auckland Council’s agrichemical use is guided by the New Zealand Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in their role as the regulator of hazardous substances in New Zealand. The EPA gathers information from multiple credible sources when deciding whether substances are safe to use. The EPA has granted approval for the use of glyphosate-containing substances in accordance with the EPA code of practice. Should the EPA change their position on glyphosate, the council would respond appropriately.

27.     In October 2019 the EPA stated the following:

Products containing glyphosate are considered safe, provided that all of the rules around their use are followed. …We are aware that some reports linking glyphosate to health impacts are causing concern. We are in alignment with the vast majority of regulatory bodies around the world – including in the European Union, United States, Australia and Canada - which agree that glyphosate is unlikely to cause cancer.[7]

28.     For all agrichemical use, the council complies with the Environmental Protection Agency Code of Practice (NZS 8409:2004 Management of Agrichemicals) for the storage, mixing, use, disposal and certification of contractors.

29.     Glyphosate is strongly absorbed into soil and has no residual activity.[8] Community Facilities only uses approved formulations of glyphosate, with no human hazard ratings, within the road corridor.[9] While the formulation being used within the road corridor is also approved for use in the aquatic environment, it does have a hazard rating for toxicity for aquatic life at high concentrations.[10] As per the Code of Practice, glyphosate is only used in appropriate weather conditions to minimise spray drift by rain and wind.

30.     A caution for the use of glyphosate is the development of resistance in some weed species.[11]

31.     Local boards that use spot spraying of glyphosate for weed management include Franklin, Henderson-Massey, Howick, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Manurewa, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Papakura, Rodney, Waitākere Ranges, and Whau. All methodologies include some mechanical removal of weeds.

Plant-based herbicide

32.     Plant-based herbicides used in the urban road corridor include Biosafe and Bio Weed Blast. The active ingredient is a fatty acid which is a contact herbicide. When applied to weeds, it burns off the foliage, thus preventing or reducing seed production and restricting growth.

33.     As plant-based herbicides are not systemic, i.e. they do not kill down to the root, they must be applied more frequently than glyphosate to meet service levels. Although they can kill annuals, generally they will not kill longer-lived mature perennial weeds, as they re-sprout from specialised (e.g. rhizomes) root tissue after the foliage has been burned off. Fatty acid-based herbicides need to be applied to young or small plants for acceptable weed control.[12]

34.     Plant-based herbicides are diluted with water and applied via foliar spray with small left-hand steer vehicle in the urban road corridor, approximately 12 times per year. The exclusive use of plant-based herbicide is approximately three times more expensive than glyphosate because of the additional frequency and quantity of product required.[13] There is an additional cost consideration due to the corrosive impact of the fatty acid on equipment which needs to be replaced more regularly.

35.     While plant-based herbicides are inactivated on contact with the soil and have no residual activity[14], there is a health and safety risk to be managed by the operators. The active ingredient is an eye, skin and respiratory irritant. There is a strong notable odour from plant-based herbicide which can be, and has been, the source of complaints from the public.

36.     For all agrichemical use, the council complies with the Environmental Protection Agency Code of Practice (NZS 8409:2004 Management of Agrichemicals) for the storage, mixing, use, disposal and certification of contractors.

37.     Plant-based herbicide is approved for use in Auckland and has been used since prior to amalgamation. Although there are no restrictions imposed by the EPA for application within the road corridor, the products have a hazard rating for toxicity for aquatic life. Instructions from the manufacturer include applying when conditions are dry, and rain is not expected in the road corridor within the next two hours.[15]

38.     Local boards that use plant-based herbicide exclusively, include Albert-Eden, Puketāpapa, Waitematā (excluding the central business district), Waiheke and Ellerslie in Ōrākei. All methodologies include some mechanical removal of weeds.

Thermal – steam and hot water

39.     Thermal technologies include steam and hot water. Water heated to high temperatures is applied to weeds with a hose and lance to destroy the foliage. Thermal weed management leaves the roots primarily untreated.[16]

40.     Thermal technology requires significant water use, using between 10-12L of water per minute.[17] Non-potable water sources can be used to mitigate demand on treated water sources, however non-potable water is not currently available in most areas of Auckland. This leaves the implementation of this method vulnerable to water restrictions as we have seen in 2020.[18]

41.     This method utilises mobile diesel boilers to heat water to 98 degrees. Diesel boilers use up to 9L[19] of diesel an hour with associated carbon emissions of 24kg.[20] Thermal technology is more expensive than herbicide. A two-person team is required, and the application rate is slower as it requires a prolonged application to cover the foliage. Application speeds are approximately 1.1km/hr[21] for thermal compared to 1.8km/hr for herbicide.[22] Like plant-based herbicide, thermal weed management needs to be applied more frequently, approximately 12 times a year, to meet weed management service levels.

42.     Local boards that use thermal technology include Devonport-Takapuna, Kaipātiki, parts of Upper Harbour and Hibiscus and Bays. There is some use of spot spraying of glyphosate to address persistent weeds. All methodologies include some mechanical removal of weeds.

 

 

Thermal – hot foam

43.     A product called Foamstream has been trialled in Auckland in 2020. Foamstream is a soluble concentrate which is added to hot water to create a foam and has been used in the United Kingdom for weed management. [23] The foam acts as an insulator to keep the heat higher for longer. The manufacturer claims that the use of foam could reduce the frequency of treatment cycles compared to using steam/hot water alone. A review of the trial is currently underway and, if the product proves suitable, staff will seek approval from Auckland Transport and Healthy Waters for its use in the road corridor.

Combination of synthetic and plant-based herbicide

44.     This approach uses a combination of both glyphosate and plant-based herbicide. Plant-based herbicide is applied throughout the year to manage weeds, with the use of glyphosate by spot spraying at peak weed growing times on difficult to control weeds.

45.     An integrated approach results in a reduction of both products and provides more effective control of persistent weeds than by using plant-based herbicide alone. This methodology is used in the Auckland Botanic Gardens to reduce the use of glyphosate. The use of herbicide with a different mode of action in combination with glyphosate is one of the main strategies to avoid glyphosate resistance.[24]

46.     Local boards that use a combined approach include Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and Ōrākei (except for Ellerslie where only plant-based herbicide is applied). All methodologies include some mechanical removal of weeds.

Methodology comparison

47.     In 2015, a comparison of methodologies was completed (see Attachment C). The data in the table was reviewed by Price Waterhouse Coopers (PWC) and the effectiveness, environmental and human health information was independently peer-reviewed by the firm AECOM.

48.     For the current review, further analysis was completed to estimate quantities of water, herbicide and operational carbon emissions per methodology. This reflects the council’s commitments within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan[25], the Auckland water efficiency strategy and the Weed Management Policy. The data on herbicide volumes has come from contractor reporting for the urban road corridor (as the data includes pest plant control, the use for edging and hard surfaces is expected to be lower). Water usage and fuel consumption are from product specification sheets and supplier data. These are estimates only, with volumes of herbicide and water varying by area, season and weed levels.

49.     For the purpose of this review, updated supplier costings for a regionally consistent approach were requested. The difference in pricing for alternative methodologies compared to glyphosate was expected, reflecting the different frequencies and volume of product needed. For plant-based weed control to achieve similar outcomes, more frequent treatments are required than glyphosate, thereby increasing the costs of materials, labour and fuel. Thermal technology is applied at the same frequency as plant-based herbicide, 12 times a year, with a slower application rate requiring a two-person team. These are estimates only and may not include costs for change implementation e.g. purchase of machinery etc.


 

       Table 1: Comparison of estimated operational carbon emissions, volume of water, herbicide and cost per km per year for each weed management approach

Methodology

Carbon emissions[26]

Water usage

Herbicide

Active Ingredient

(kg)

Application rate

Cost

Glyphosate

(6x per year)

1.1kg

180L

1.8L

0.9kg glyphosate

 

1.8km per hour (single operator)

$783

Combination of plant-based/ glyphosate

(10x per year)

1.9kg

870L

0.7L of glyphosate & 8L of plant-based

0.4kg glyphosate

5.6kg fatty acid

1.8km per hour (single operator)

 

$1293


Plant-based herbicide

(12x per year)

2.3kg

1350L[27]

13.5L

9.5kg

fatty acid

1.8km per hour (single operator)

$2265

Thermal technologies – steam and hot water

(12x per year)

264kg

6545L

Approx. 0.5L of glyphosate

0.25kg

glyphosate

1.1km per hour (two operators)

$3485

 Auckland Council – People’s Panel survey

50.     In October 2019, a People’s Panel survey was conducted as one mechanism to gauge how Aucklanders view management of weeds on footpaths and kerbs. The survey was sent to 39,789 members of the People’s Panel. They were provided with the information on the council website on the different methodologies[28]. However, at the time of the survey, estimated emissions, volume of herbicide, and cost were not available.

51.     Of the 5686 respondents, 66 per cent stated that they ‘care’ about the weeds on our footpaths and kerbs. The results showed that 43 per cent of residents use synthetic herbicide (e.g. glyphosate) for weed management on their own property. Synthetic herbicide (e.g. glyphosate) was the least preferred method for weed management in the road corridor by 52 per cent of respondents.

52.     Nineteen per cent were willing to pay higher rates for the council to use alternatives to synthetic herbicide, 42 per cent were not willing to pay extra, and 36 per cent indicated they may be willing to pay more[29]. There were differences in responses by local board area as detailed in Attachment A (People’s Panel results by local board).

53.     There are members of the community that believe glyphosate should not be used by Auckland Council.

Regional review recommendation

54.     The review of methodologies to manage weeds in the urban road corridor takes into consideration the Auckland Weed Management Policy, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan and community input.


 

Table 2: Summary of the advantages and disadvantages of the different weed management methodologies

Methodology

Advantages

Disadvantages

Synthetic herbicide – glyphosate

Low cost, low frequency of application, effective weed control

Reduced carbon emissions

Risk of community objection to the use of glyphosate

Restricted weather conditions for application

Herbicide resistance in some species

Plant-based herbicide

Reduction in glyphosate used by council for weed control

Immediate effect on weeds

Increased frequency and therefore a greater volume of herbicide compared to glyphosate

Plant-based herbicide is two to three times more expensive than glyphosate

The product is corrosive and has a strong odour

Restricted weather conditions for application

Thermal technology steam/hot water/hot water with a foam additive

Thermal technology does not use herbicide

Can be applied in any weather

Immediate effect on weeds

 

High water usage and carbon emissions

Spot spraying glyphosate is still required on high volume roads and to address persistent weeds

Thermal technology is more expensive than glyphosate

Combination of plant-based and synthetic herbicide, e.g. glyphosate

An estimated region-wide reduction in the use of glyphosate, carbon emissions and water use

Minimising the volume of agrichemical use across the region

Reduction in risk of plants developing glyphosate resistance

An increase in herbicide use in some local board areas

55.     The recommendation for a standardised methodology is a combination of plant-based herbicide with spot spraying of glyphosate for difficult weeds. This is estimated to lead to a reduction in glyphosate, carbon emissions and water usage across the region. There would be an increase in the use of plant-based herbicide. This approach is estimated to be achievable within current operational budgets.

56.     Thermal methodologies, including hot foam, could be used for sensitive areas but are not recommended for a region-wide approach due to their high emissions, water usage and cost. The exclusive use of plant-based herbicide is not recommended due to the additional volume of herbicide required and its cost.

57.     Local board feedback is sought on the standardised regional recommendation and on local priorities for weed control on footpath and kerb and channel (see Attachment B). Local board priorities will be included for consideration by the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 12 November 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

58.     Climate change adaptation – changes in Auckland’s climate may alter the prevalence and spread of weeds within the road corridor. In the future, different methodologies and products may need to be considered depending on weed species.

59.     Climate change mitigation – Auckland Council adopted Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan on 21 July 2020, which includes the reduction target for council to halve its carbon emissions by 2030 and reach zero net emissions by 2050.

60.     The choice of weed management methodologies has an impact on the council’s carbon emissions. The region-wide adoption of thermal would lead to an increase in carbon emissions at an estimated 1335 tons[30] or approximately 5 per cent of the council’s operational emissions for 2018/2019. This reflects the energy required to heat large volumes of water to 98 degrees with diesel boilers. The increase for the regional adoption of this methodology would impact on the council’s ability to meet the reduction targets of the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

61.     Community Facilities undertakes the maintenance of green spaces within the road corridor under contract to and on behalf of Auckland Transport. Auckland Transport “manages and controls” the Auckland transport system as per the Local Government Act 1974 and the Land Transport Act 1998.

62.     Auckland Council adopted a Weed Management Policy for parks and open spaces in August 2013 (resolution number RDO/2013/137). The Weed Management Policy is to guide the management of weeds in Auckland’s parks and open spaces, including the road corridor.

63.     The recommendation for a standardised approach has been provided in consultation with Auckland Transport and with consideration of the objectives of the Weed Management Policy.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

64.     The recommendations of this report will have differing impacts on local boards (except the Hauraki Gulf local boards which are excluded from the regional approach) given the different approaches currently in place. This report is to request feedback from local boards regarding their priorities for an effective, efficient, and sustainable standardised regional weed management methodology (see Attachment B).

65.     Should a local board choose to utilise alternative methodologies to those adopted as the region-wide approach, they are able to use locally-driven initiative (LDI) funding to cover the cost difference between the agreed regional weed management method and their preferred alternative.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

66.     The recommendations of the review take into consideration the Weed Management Policy, with the objective to minimise agrichemicals, and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework which were developed in consultation with mana whenua.

67.     An overview of the current methodologies and the priorities of the review were presented at the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Mana Whenua hui. The analysis and recommendations of the review will be presented to mana whenua for feedback in September 2020.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     Different methodologies to manage weeds have different financial implications. This reflects the associated costs of the methodologies to achieve weed management outcomes.

Table 3: Estimated cost of weed management methodologies per km per annum[31]

Methodology

Estimated cost per km (per annum)

Estimated cost (per annum) across 5055km

Synthetic herbicide, e.g. glyphosate

$783

$3,958,000

Combination of plant-based and synthetic herbicide

$1293

 

$6,536,115

Plant-based herbicide, e.g. biosafe

$2265

$11,499,575

Thermal technology steam/hot water

$3485

$17,616,675

69.     The recommended approach, a combination of plant-based herbicide and spot spraying of glyphosate for difficult weeds, is estimated to be able to be delivered within the existing operational budgets.

70.     To standardise thermal and plant-based methodologies across the region would require an increase in budget to meet weed management service levels. As there is no additional operational budget for streetscape maintenance, methodologies requiring additional expenditure could impact on other Full Facilities services delivered to local boards e.g. town centre and park maintenance, replanting of gardens, and ability to respond to a request for service.

71.     Should a local board choose to utilise alternate methodologies to those adopted as the region-wide approach, they could use LDI funding to cover the cost difference between the agreed regional weed management method and their preferred alternative.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

72.     The outcomes of this project have the following risks:

Options

Risk

Mitigation

No change

Continuing with legacy arrangements, with inconsistent funding

Communication on the rationale for any decision to continue with legacy weed management methodologies

Standardising a regional weed methodology

Depending on the choice of the methodology, there would be different environmental and social impacts, including community concern

Local board decision-making enables the prioritisation of funding for local priorities and the services that their communities most value

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

73.     Local boards provide feedback on the recommended approach to weed management in the kerb and channel and footpaths and rank their priorities for weed management in the road corridor.

74.     Once the feedback is received, it will be collated and included in a report to the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 12 November 2020.

75.     At the meeting of the Environment and Climate Change Committee, a decision will be made on the methodology to be applied across the Auckland region for weed management.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Results of October 2019 People's Panel survey

349

b

Local board feedback on weed management impact priorities

367

c

Weed control methodology table

371

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jenny Gargiulo – Principal Environment Specialist  

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/12434

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2019/2020 Annual Report for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 29 October 2020

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2019/2020 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 29 October 2020. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.           Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached annual report is being presented as confidential.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      adopt the 2019/2020 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A.

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body by 29 October 2020.

c)       note that the draft 2019/2020 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Annual Report (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report) will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2019/2020 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 30 October 2020.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities, and the overall Financial Impact Statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

6.       This story is particularly important this year in light of the impacts Covid-19 had on communities and the council in the third quarter of 2019/2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi relates to the local board area.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area, summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved.

Funding information

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

8.       The Council’s Climate Change disclosures are covered in Volume four of the Annual Report and sections within the Summary Annual Report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

9.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

10.     Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

11.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

12.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

13.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

14.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English, and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

15.     The next steps for the draft 2019/2020 Annual Report for the local board are:

·     Audit NZ review during August and September 2020

·     report to the Governing Body for adoption on 29 October 2020

·     release to stock exchanges and publication online on 30 October 2020

·     physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2019/2020 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Annual Report  - Confidential

Under Separate Cover

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jestine Joseph - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

David Gurney – Manager Corporate and Local Board Performance

Kevin Ramsay - Acting Group Chief Financial Officer

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Auckland Council's Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Devonport-Takapuna Local Board for quarter four 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/11963

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board (the local board) with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter four, 1 April to 30 June 2020, and the overall performance for the financial year, against the agreed 2019/2020 local board work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the local board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2019/2020 financial year.

3.       The COVID19 pandemic has resulted in significant pressure on council’s financial position. In response to the Ministry of Health’s orders and to ensure prudent financial management council’s focus and expenditure shifted to essential services. A pause on spending on non-essential services has had a significant impact on the delivery of work programme activities.

4.       61 of the 146 activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered this year, with an additional 43 multi-year projects that are on track and scheduled to delivered early in the 2020/2021 financial year.

5.       Key activity achievements from the 2019/2020 work programme include:

·    the ability for community partners (i.e. ANCAD, Devonport and Takapuna North Community Facilities trusts) and groups who receive council operational funding (i.e. arts and culture facilities) to quickly adjust their activities and operations to become online-based during the COVID-19 lockdown period;

·    the Out and About Programme (ID 782): All 15 planned activations took place before mid-March across eight locations with a total of 838 attendees.  96 percent of participants were either satisfied or very satisfied with the activations and 80 percent were first time attendees;

·    all programmes (IDs 891, 892, 893, 894 and 895) delivered in both the Devonport and Takapuna libraries were popular and well attended by the community up until the COVID-19 lockdown;

·    the Devonport-Takapuna North-West Wildlink Assistance Programme (ID 505) is an ongoing project which continues to produce excellent environmental outcomes across the local board area;

·    All Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) and External Partnerships work programme projects were delivered this year.  This included completed funding agreements which support the three business improvement districts to undertake a range of local economic development (including tourism) projects and events;

·    Windsor Reserve – renew playground (ID 2109): project completed and opened to the public in June 2020;

·    Lake Pupuke – renew and develop south walkways & foreshore structure (ID 3324): project completed in June 2020;

·    Kennedy Park – remedial work to reinstate staircase (ID 3339): staircase was reopened to the public in December 2019, and project formally completed in May 2020;

·    Sunnynook Park – upgrade various sport fields and lighting (ID 2107): In February 2020, field three was opened, and in May 2020 fields one and two were opened.  The project was formally completed in June 2020; and

·    Takapuna Library – replace air handing unit and refurbish boiler equipment (ID 2046): project was completed in December 2019.

6.       The 2019/2020 financial performance report is attached but is presented under confidential cover.  This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX, on approximately 30 September 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter four and year ending 30 June 2020.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2019/2020 are released to the New Zealand’s Exchange (NZX) which are expected to be made public 30 September 2020.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The local board has an approved 2019/2020 work programmes for the following operating departments:

Date approved

Council department and

Resolution number

18 June 2019

·   Infrastructure and Environmental Services (I&ES)

·    Community Services, which includes:

o Arts, Community and Events (ACE);

o Libraries and Information (L&I)

o Parks, Sport and Recreation) (PSR)

o Service Strategy and Integration (SS&I)

·    External Partnerships (EP)

·   ATEED: Local Economic Development (LED)

·    DT/2019/110

·    DT/2019/107

 

 

 

 

·    DT/2019/111

·    DT/2019/109

25 June 2019

·   Community Facilities (CF)

·   Community Leases (CL)

·    (DTCF/2019/20

·    (DTCF/2019/20

 

8.       Work programmes are produced annually to meet the local board outcomes identified in the 2017-2020 local board plan.  The local board plan outcomes are:

·    Quality parks, beaches and open spaces that everyone can enjoy;

·    A place of natural beauty and rich culture;

·    Efficient public transport and roads that keep people moving;

·    Our communities are empowered, engaged and inclusive; and

·    Our area has a thriving local economy and vibrant, unique town centres.

9.       The COVID19 pandemic has resulted in significant pressure on council’s financial position and ability to deliver agreed 2019/2020 work programme activities.  In response to the orders made by Director General of Health on 25 March 2020 under Section 70 of the Health Act 1956, council’s focus and expenditure shifted to essential services only.  Physical distancing requirements and measures to ensure prudent financial management meant that only essential activities and services could continue.

10.     Asset based services (i.e. libraries, recreation centres and community houses) were significantly impacted as all regional and community facilities were either fully or partially closed depending on the Ministry of Health’s guidelines for each COVID19 alert level.

11.     Spending on contracts was restricted to essential services while in Alert Level 4.  These restrictions were reviewed as alert levels changed.  There are currently no restrictions, however, there continues to be extra spending approvals in place to ensure prudent spending and delivery of value for money for ratepayers.

12.     Reporting on quarter three reporting was not supplied to the local board as council staff working from home during the lockdown had limited capacity to access information and systems which affected their ability to deliver reports in a robust and meaningful way.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board work programme snapshot

13.     The work programme activities have two statuses: RAG status which measures the performance of the activity by colour (amber and red show issues and risks); and activity status which shows the stage of the activity.  These two statuses create a snapshot of the progress of the work programme activities.

14.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey).  It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red), and activities that have been cancelled/deferred / merged (grey).

15.     The Red Amber Green (RAG) status reflects the delivery at the end of the financial year: Red = incomplete, Amber = multi-year project/activity which has not progressed as expected for 2017/2018, Green = activity delivered as expected or multi-year project/activity which has progressed as expected for 2017/2018.  The year-end RAG status for each department work programme is shown in the table below:

RAG

Status

ACE

LED

CF

CL

SS&I

EP

I&ES

L&I

PSR

P&P

Green

Completed

18

1

21

6

-

4

1

8

3

-

In progress

-

1

39

-

-

-

-

-

1

On hold

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

Amber

Completed

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

Deferred

-

-

-

9

-

-

-

-

-

-

In progress

1

-

11

 

2

-

-

-

3

-

On hold

1

-

4

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

Red

Deferred

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

In progress

 

-

1

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

 Grey

Cancelled

2

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

Deferred

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

Totals

Total

22

2

82

18

2

4

1

8

6

1

 

Overview of work programme performance by operating department

Arts, Community and Events work programme

16.     18 of the 22 Arts, Community and Events (ACE) work programme projects were delivered this year.  

17.     One of the notable and positive aspects of the ACE work programme was the ability for community partners (i.e. ANCAD, Devonport and Takapuna North Community Facilities trusts) and groups who receive council operational funding (i.e. arts and culture facilities) to quickly adjust their activities and operations to become online-based during the COVID-19 lockdown period.  Some of the positive outcomes that arose from the lockdown period include:

·    Capability and Capacity Building (ID 46): staff partnered with Kai for Communities and North Shore Centres of Mutual Aid to prepare and supply frozen meals to isolated older people impacted by COVID-19;

·    Youth Development and Activities (ID 50): YouNite continued having fortnightly online meetings and also recruited three new members during the lockdown period.  They have also developed a social media strategy and supported connection and wellbeing amongst youth in the local board area;

·    ANCAD, Devonport and Takapuna North Community Facilities (TNCFT) trusts (IDs 47, 48 and 53): ANCAD delivered webinars on governance during COVID-19, dealing with distressed financial positions, crowdfunding and organisational COVID-19 response coaching.  TNCFT delivered online with ‘Growing Food in Small Spaces’ sustainable living workshops and ‘It Takes a Village’ parenting networking, while Devonport Peninsular Trust continued with their Seniors Forum and Community Resilience meetings online;

·    The Pumphouse Theatre and The Lake House Arts (IDs 51 and 523): The Pumphouse engaged its community through a monologue project and a Creative Talk series through their website, Facebook and Youtube, while the Lake House provided free online Art Club classes and held a Locked Down Art Pop Up exhibition. 

18.     Several work programme projects were significantly impacted, or not delivered due to the COVID-19 lockdown.  The following table outlines the impacted projects and programmes:

Activity name

ID

Description

Anzac Services

210

Both services cancelled.

Movies in Parks

213

Both events at Milford Reserve, Milford and Woodall Park, Narrow Neck cancelled.

Local Civic Events

211

Planning and delivering events (i.e. playground openings) could not be undertaken during COVID-19 lockdown. 

Citizenship Ceremonies

209

All citizenship ceremonies were cancelled.

Capability and Capacity Building

46

The proposed Poi activation programme for quarter four was cancelled. Staff will reassess this programme for low impact physical activity for older persons delivered in partnership with Awataha Marae in 2020/2021.

Youth Development and Activities

50

Shore Junction’s official venue launch was delayed until November 2020. The venue will open to young people in August 2020, and in the meantime, staff have been engaging young people to test equipment and plan programmes and policies.

Community-led placemaking: Devonport Peninsula Trust

53

The Winter Fun programme was cancelled.

Community-led placemaking: Takapuna North Community Trust

48

Public events were cancelled until lockdown restrictions were lifted.

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

19.     Three of the six Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR) work programme projects were delivered this year.  Highlights and points to note from the work programme include:

·    Out and About Programme (ID 782): All 15 planned activations took place before mid-March 2020 across eight locations with a total of 838 attendees. 96 percent of participants were either satisfied or very satisfied with the activations and 80 percent were first time attendees;

·    Ngataringa Park Service Assessment (ID 772): The assessment has been delayed due to COVID-19, however a final draft was presented to a workshop for feedback in quarter four.  The final report will be presented to the local board for approval in quarter one of the 2020/2021 financial year;

·    Takapuna Pool and Leisure Centre: Operations (ID 380): Reopened once COVID-19 alert level two began.  During levels three and four, all memberships were suspended, and teams began supporting communities with online content and calls to vulnerable members.  Gyms and childcare facilities re-opened on a limited basis on 21 May 2020, with managed social distancing and recommended public health measures. 

Pools re-opened under regional drought stage one water restrictions from 2 June 2020. As one of Auckland’s largest consumers of potable water, a staged approach to re-opening was undertaken that also included effective COVID-19 public health practices and processes to effectively manage our water consumption.  Childcare, holiday programmes and group fitness classes all resumed with reduced enrolments and/or restricted timetables in order to meet new financial and operational constraints.

·    Ecological volunteers and environmental programme (ID 740): Staff were unable to complete the programme due to COVID-19 restrictions.  Volunteer activities in local parks were severely reduced due to COVID-19 restrictions, especially during April and May 2020.  Regular working bees were established at O'Neill's and Paddy's Bush, tackling invasive blue morning glory and maintaining previous plantings.  Preparations are well underway for school and community plantings at O'Neill's, Philomel, Kawarau reserves and Sylvan Park. 

Northshore Birdsong are preparing community plantings along the Wairau Estuary and Bryan Byrnes Reserve.  Ongoing baiting along the northern shoreline of Devonport peninsula (a Significant Ecological Area) is being undertaken, however the key April 2020 baiting period was missed due to lockdown.

 

Libraries work programme

20.     All Libraries work programme projects were delivered this year.  Highlights and points to note from the work programme include:

·    all programmes (IDs 891, 892, 893, 894 and 895) delivered in both the Devonport and Takapuna libraries were popular and well attended by the community up until going into COVID-19 lockdown.  These programmes resumed once the libraries reopened on 5 June;

·    good value for money by providing subsidised access to the community room at the Devonport Library (ID 3355), up until the COVID-19 lockdown; and

 

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

21.     The Devonport-Takapuna North-West Wildlink Assistance Programme (ID 505) is an ongoing project which continues to produce excellent environmental outcomes across the local board area.  For the:

·    Takapuna North/North Shore Birdsong Project: Planting will occur at the end of July 2020 in Smith's Bush East, working with Takapuna Normal Intermediate School.  Volunteers have doubled bait lines in Lyford Reserve and installed a new trapline at Wairau Stream.  Patuone Reserve has been adopted by AGE School and will have a new line of traps installed.

Volunteer support is increasing in response to positive media articles, with over 20 new trappers joining the network and becoming street champions following lockdown.

·    Devonport/Restoring Takarunga Hauraki: Volunteer activity has increased for the removal of pest plants in Achilles Reserve, Jutland Road, Philomel Reserve and Maungauika/North Head with weekly events organised.  Trapping efforts have increased with a new plan currently being developed to concentrate on making Maungauika pest free.

 

Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development work programme

22.     All Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) work programme projects were delivered this year.  Highlights include the Young Enterprise Scheme (ID 1180), where the local board contributed $3,000 of operational funding towards this regional initiative. The programme provides business experience to year 12 and 13 students, and helps deliver Kickstart events.  The northern Kickstart event was held at AUT University’s Akoranga Campus in February 2020;

 

External Partnerships work programme

23.     All External Partnerships work programme projects were delivered this year.  Funding agreements which support the three business improvement districts to undertake a range of local economic development projects and events were completed in quarter one of the 2019/2020 financial year.

 

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

24.     Both Service Strategy and Integration work programme projects are multi-year projects and will continue into the 2020/2021 financial year.  Highlights from this work programme include that the local board has:

·    received the findings from the Takapuna Community Needs Assessment (ID 3232); and

·    endorsed the scope and engagement approach for development of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Parks Management Plan (ID 1232).

 

Plans and Places work programme

25.     The Belmont town centre project (ID 1238) is a multi-year project and is on track to be completed in the 2020/2021 financial year.  During quarters three and four, public consultation was undertaken alongside Auckland Transport’s Lake Road Improvements Project, where feedback was very supportive for the proposed design.

 

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

26.     71 of the 82 Community Facilities (CF) work programme projects were either delivered or are in progress to be completed.  Highlights from the work programme include:

·    Windsor Reserve – renew playground (ID 2109): project completed and opened to the public in June 2020;

·    Lake Pupuke – renew and develop south walkways & foreshore structure (ID 3324): project completed in June 2020;

·    Kennedy Park – remedial work to reinstate staircase (ID 3339): staircase was reopened to the public in December 2019, and project formally completed in May 2020;

·    Sunnynook Park – upgrade various sport fields and lighting (ID 2107): In February 2020, field three was opened, and in May 2020 fields one and two were opened.  The project was formally completed in June 2020; and

·    Takapuna Library – replace air handing unit and refurbish boiler equipment (ID 2046): project was completed in December 2019.

 

Community Leases work programme

27.     Four of the 18 Community Leases work programme projects were completed this year, while a further nine projects have been deferred and to be completed in the 2020/2021 financial year.  The following leases in the work programme were completed:

·    Taharoto Park, Taharoto Road, Takapuna: Lease to Takapuna City Association Football Club Incorporated;

·    Taharoto Park, 13 Taharoto Road, Takapuna: New lease to North Shore Brass Incorporated: (ID 1343);

·    18 Richards Ave Forrest Hill Shoreside Phoenix Arts Centre Trust (ID 1352); and

·    Clarence Street. Devonport Community House (ID 3484).

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     This report informs the local board of the performance for quarter ending 30 June 2019 and the performance for the 2019/2020 financial year.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     The local board’s work programme contains a number of projects which provide direct outcomes for Māori, these include:

·    the local board’s grants programme provides a range of activities, events and programmes for both Māori community groups and organisations, and wider community groups who propose and promote broader Māori outcomes;

·    providing programmes and activities at community houses that meet the needs of young Māori in the local board area; and

·    as part of delivering the Local Maori Responsiveness Action Plan (ID 686), presentations have been delivered to provide a better understanding of Matariki, tikanga and other Maori protocols.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     This report is provided to enable the local board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2019/2020 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Overview of work programme performance by department’ section.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     This is the final update and monitoring report for the 2019/2020 work programmes. 

35.     Focus and reporting will now shift to 2020/2021 work programmes, which were adopted by the local board in August 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Full local board work programme update for quarter four, 2019/2020 financial year

391

b

Financial performance report - Confidential

Under Separate Cover

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tristan Coulson - Senior Local Board Advisor Devonport-Takapuna

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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15 September 2020

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Chairpersons' Report

File No.: CP2020/12423

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues relevant to the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thank Chairperson A Bennett for his verbal report

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Elected Members' Reports

File No.: CP2020/12424

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the members of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues they have been involved in since the August18 2020 Meeting

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thanks Deputy Chairperson G Wood for his written report

b)      receive and thank members for their verbal reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Deputy Chairperson G Wood Monthly Report - September 2020

413

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Ward Councillors Update

File No.: CP2020/12425

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board allocated a period of time for Ward Councillors, Chris Darby and Richard Hills, to update the board on activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      Thank Cr Chris Darby and Cr Richard Hills for their update to the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Workshops August 2020

File No.: CP2020/12426

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a record of Devonport-Takapuna Local Board workshops held during August 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on 04 August 2020, the board was briefed on:

·    DPT

-     Topic

3.       At the workshop held on 11 August 2020, the board was briefed on:

·    DPT

-     Topic

4.       Records of these workshops are attached to this report.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the records of the workshops held in August 2020

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Workshop Record - 04 August 2020

423

b

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Workshop Record - 11 August 2020

425

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2020/12429

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the board for 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by the local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance to staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The September 2020 governance forward work calendar for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board is provided as Attachment A. The information contained within this attachment is as accurate as possible under covid-19 circumstances.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      note the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board governance forward work calendar for September 2020 as set out in Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar - Septmeber 2020

433

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Relationship Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

PDF Creator

     

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

18        Local Board Annual Report 2019/2020 - Attachment a - Draft 2019/2020 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Annual Report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at June 30 2019 that require final Audit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange .

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

19        Auckland Council's Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Devonport-Takapuna Local Board for quarter four 2019/2020 - Attachment b - Financial performance report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.
In particular, the report contains detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 31 July 2020 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C1       Statement of proposal for a new Navigation Safety Bylaw

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

In particular, the report contains a working draft of a bylaw yet to be approved for consutation.

s7(2)(f)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain the effective conduct of public affairs through the protection of such members, officers, employees and persons from improper pressure or harassment.

In particular, the report contains a working draft of a bylaw yet to be approved for consutation.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

   



[1] Waitākere Ranges Strategic Weed Management Plan 2015

[2] Auckland Council Weed Management Policy

[3] E34 Agrichemicals and vertebrate toxic agents - Unitary Plan

[4] Streetscapes Specifications - 19 March 2019_

[5] Transport Authorities - Glyphosate use

[6] Novachem Manual - Glyphosate 510

[7] https://www.epa.govt.nz/news-and-alerts/latest-news/use-of-glyphosate-in-new-zealand/

[8] Novachem Manual - Glyphosate 510

[9] Product Label Green Glyphosate 510

[10] Supplementary material glyphosate

[11] http://resistance.nzpps.org/index.php?p=herbicides/glyphosate

[12] Vegetation management Trial 2002

[13] Review PwC Weed Management Cost

[14] Novachem – Bio Safe

[15] Information provided by Kiwicare

[16] Back to the future - electrothermal, systemic, weedkiller

[17] Water use from Weedtechnics A4-SW900-Product-Specifications and Foamstream M1200 – Weedingtech spec sheet.

[18] Watercare - Drought response

[19] Weedtechnics A4-SW900-Product-Specifications

[20] Measuring Emissions: a guide for organisations – Emission factors for stationary combustion fuels Diesel 1 litre = 2.66 kg CO2/unit

[21] Linear km covers both side of the road e.g 2.2km. (average walking speed of between 2.9 kilometres per hour (km/h) and 6.5 km/h).

[22] Review PwC Weed Management Cost 15092015

[23] Best Practice Guidance - Notes for Integrated and Non-chemical Amenity Hard Surface Weed

[24] http://resistance.nzpps.org/index.php?p=herbicides/glyphosate

[25] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/environment/Pages/auckland-climate-action-plan.aspx

[26] Emissions from direct/production and electricity use, but not including “embodied” or “life cycle emissions”. These emissions do not include fuel for the boiler pump or motorized sprayer.

[27] Water use -Bio Blast

[28] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/environment/plants-animals/pests-weeds/Documents/weedcontrolmethods.pdf

[29] People Survey - 2019

[30] 264 kg x 5,055km road corridor. This could be mitigated by the use of battery power, there are no options currently available in New Zealand

 

 

[31] Costings should not be treated a final pricing but as an indication of pricing differences between methodology.