I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Environment and Climate Change Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 10 September 2020

10.00am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te Taiao / Environment and Climate Change Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Richard Hills

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Pippa Coom

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

 

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

IMSB Member Glenn Wilcox

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

IMSB Member Karen Wilson

 

Cr Shane Henderson

Cr Paul Young

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

Suad Allie

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

 

7 September 2020

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 977 6953

Email: suad.allie@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with environmental and climate change activities.   The committee will establish an annual work programme outlining key focus areas in line with its key responsibilities, which include:

 

·         climate change mitigation and adaptation policy, and implementation (with other committee chairs where cross over of responsibilities exists)

·         coastal renewals, slips and remediation

·         Auckland’s Climate Action Framework

·         natural heritage (including ecology, biodiversity and biosecurity matters, such as kauri dieback)

·         protection and restoration of Auckland’s ecological health

·         water, including Auckland’s Water Strategy

·         waste minimisation

·         acquisition of property relating to the committee’s responsibilities and in accordance with the LTP

·         grants for regional environmental outcomes.

 

Powers

 

(i)      All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities, including:

(a)     approval of a submission to an external body

(b)     establishment of working parties or steering groups.

(ii)      The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iii)     If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Environment and Climate Change Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Planning Committee and/or the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, then the Environment and Climate Change Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committee(s). For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of these committees for decisions.

(iii)     The committee does not have:

(a)     the power to establish subcommittees

(b)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2).

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·           Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·           Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·           Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·           In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·           The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·           However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·           All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·           Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·           Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·           All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·           Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·           Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·           Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 September 2020

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          7

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

8          Panuku climate change work programme and Strategy                                           9

9          Establishing partnerships and governance for Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan                                                                                                                 13

10        End of year report for natural environment and water quality targeted rates 2019/2020                                                                                                                      29

11        Waters Strategy and Long-term Plan update                                                           51

12        Consultation on hard-to-recycle plastics and single use items: submission development                                                                                                                 55

13        Consultation on Building for Climate Change: Transforming operational efficiency and reducing whole-of-life embodied carbon                                                        131

14        Summary of Environment and Climate Change Committee information memoranda and briefings - 10 September 2020                                                                          181  

15        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 21 July 2020, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 September 2020

 

Panuku climate change work programme and Strategy

File No.: CP2020/12860

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Environment and Climate Change Committee on the Panuku climate change work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As a Council Controlled Organisation, Panuku is committed to responding to the Climate Emergency and taking prompt, meaningful action to address climate change. Panuku has been closely involved with the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan and is currently developing its response to this Plan.

3.       Panuku has a role to play in delivering on Auckland Council’s emission reduction targets through its urban regeneration activities. Our core business is to deliver urban regeneration in town centre locations. Panuku has an estimated pipeline of around 11,000 dwellings over 10 years in existing, transport-oriented urban centres. The delivery of these dwellings will play a significant role in reducing transport emissions which make up the largest proportion of emissions in the Auckland region.

4.       Panuku has a number of projects either completed or ongoing that demonstrate our commitment to addressing both mitigation and adaptation to climate change, including: Homestar rated residential developments such as the Haumaru development in Henderson and in Wynyard Quarter (all at least Homestar 7 rated); climate resilient green infrastructure projects – Puhinui and Te ara Awataha and masterplanning work with design that will accommodate future sea level rise at Onehunga Wharf.

5.       Panuku also has a commitment to reduce emissions from our corporate operations. We have achieved Carbon reduce certification through Toitū Envirocare and have a management plan in place to reduce our emissions. As part of our efforts to reduce our corporate emissions, developing sustainability literacy and empowering action by our staff is an area of focus for Panuku. We have an active sustainability champions network and deliver awareness raising and behaviour change programmes in relation to waste management in the office and sustainable choices for staff travel and commuting. Additionally, our office has a 5 star NABERSNZ rating in recognition of its energy use.

6.       Priority actions for Panuku in furthering our climate change response include the following:

·    Piloting the use of Life Cycle Analysis to measure and understand the carbon impact of Panuku developments and to drive improved outcomes.

·    Undertaking an assessment of future climate impacts, risks and vulnerabilities for all priority locations.

·    Working with Auckland Transport to explore mixed use development options on underutilised transport sites.

·    Rolling out low carbon standards for commercial developments.

·    Development of standards for our public realm projects.

·    Accelerating sustainable procurement activity.

·    Developing a work programme to address climate impact across our asset management function.

·    Developing a process to undertake climate compatibility assessments at the business case stage for all new developments and infrastructure to identify to what degree a proposal supports or conflicts with our climate goals over its lifecycle.

·    Continuing to build sustainability awareness and action into Panuku culture and increase staff engagement and sustainability literacy

7.       In response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri, Panuku is developing a Climate Change Strategy which is intended to be a public document for our communities and stakeholders.  The document will set out the context to Panuku's activities and our approach to deliver coordinated actions across the two functional areas of our business – urban regeneration and portfolio management, and in our supporting corporate operations. It also aims to articulate what climate action means to Panuku, through a series of case studies and sets out our vision, objectives, principles, and priorities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      receive this information report and presentation.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Locally and internationally awareness is growing of the need for urgent climate action. In 2019 the Auckland Council declared a Climate Emergency, the government passed the Climate Change Act and we saw thousands of people across the world attending climate strikes.

9.       As a member of the C40 network of cities, Auckland has a commitment to plan for zero emissions by 2050, and to set emission targets consistent with a 1.5° global temperature rise. Auckland Council has developed Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan which addresses both mitigation (reducing CO2e emissions) and adaptation (planning for resilience in response to climate change impacts).

10.     Panuku has been involved in the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan at both working and steering group levels. Panuku recognises it has a role as a delivery partner for council's emission reduction targets due to our role in urban regeneration and the associated transport emission reductions that a compact urban form and Transit-Oriented Development can deliver.

11.     Along with Auckland Council, Watercare and Auckland Transport, Panuku joined the Climate Leader’s Coalition in 2018. This involves a commitment for Panuku to take climate change seriously in its business and to: measure greenhouse gas emissions and publicly report on them; set a public emissions reduction target consistent with keeping within 2° of warming; and work with suppliers to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

12.     Sustainability has been an ongoing focus for Panuku since its inception building on the leadership in this space by Waterfront Auckland.

13.     Development of a Climate Change Strategy as a response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri and to consolidate and extend Panuku's existing sustainability and climate change work programme was considered and supported by the Panuku Board in December 2019.

14.     A Draft Strategy was developed in 2020 which has been endorsed by the Panuku Board and has since been discussed with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum and their feedback received. The Strategy will be finalised and published later this year.

15.     Delivery of Panuku’s climate change work programme encompasses ongoing, planned or potential initiatives under the following themes:

 

Themes

·   Ensuring climate risk and resilience is addressed in planning and design

·   Continuing application of Green star – Communities

·   Fostering community resilience in priority locations

·   Leading regenerative thinking in identified Panuku locations and supporting a wider network of regenerative practice across Tāmaki Makaurau

·   Prioritising and facilitating the use of sustainable transport modes in all priority locations

·   Ensuring future-proofed housing development

·   Ensuring low carbon and climate resilient public realm projects

·   Promoting, encouraging, and developing blue-green networks in urban regeneration.

·   Facilitating accelerated delivery of low carbon buildings.

·    Promoting and facilitating low carbon lifestyles

·    Ensuring sustainable, low carbon operations at Wyndham St

·    Embedding sustainability in contracts and procurement

·    Reducing fuel use across business operations and staff commuting

·    Managing operational impacts across portfolio

·    Reducing electricity consumption in Marinas and Wynyard Quarter public space

·    Addressing climate-related operational risk

·    Considering climate impacts in governance and decision-making

·    Delivering best practice waste management within marinas and public space

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     Delivery of Panuku’s climate change work programme ensures that Panuku contributes to delivery of Auckland Council and central government targets and that mitigation and adaptation of climate change are considered and addressed in delivering Panuku's functions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     Panuku’s work on climate change is fully consistent with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan (ACP). Panuku staff have been involved with the development of ACP and have worked closely with Auckland Council and Council Controlled Organisation staff as part of both ACP working and steering groups.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     It is anticipated that there will be positive impacts on the communities within Panuku neighbourhoods through the delivery of Panuku’s climate change work programme and opportunities for engagement with communities and local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     In developing Panuku's climate change work programme and Climate Change Strategy, relevant actions in the Panuku Mana Whenua Outcomes Framework have been incorporated.  Our wider climate change work programme and the draft strategy has been presented to the mana whenua governance forum and feedback provided as to some identified priorities for forum members. Feedback from mana whenua forum members included a request for Panuku to continue to raise its standards in relation to sustainability (e.g. building standards) and for Panuku to do more work in relation to reducing construction and demolition waste.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     Some of the actions delivered under Panuku’s climate change work programme have financial implications but these are assessed on a project by project basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     Delivering a climate change work programme and taking action is not considered to present any significant risks to the organisation. However, not having the ability to demonstrate that action is being taken presents reputational risk and would not align with the approach taken by Auckland Council and the commitment to climate action expected of Council Controlled Organisations. Further, considering climate adaptation in our priority location planning will help to mitigate future physical, legal and reputational risks associated with climate change.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Panuku will continue to work closely with Council to deliver its climate work programme and implement Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri.  To demonstrate and articulate its response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri, Panuku will look to finalise and publish its Climate Change Strategy later this year.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kristen Webster – Head of Corporate Responsibility

Authorisers

Brenna Waghorn - GM Strategy & Planning

David Rankin - Chief Executive (acting)

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 September 2020

 

Establishing partnerships and governance for Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

File No.: CP2020/12309

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse in principle the approach to regional partnership and governance of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan; approve establishment of a Climate Political Reference Group and appoint members to this; and delegate endorsement of the Leadership Group membership to the Climate Political Reference Group.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In July 2020, the Environment and Climate Change Committee unanimously adopted Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan (ECC/2020/29).

3.       The adopted text is in the process of being digitised before the digital plan is launched later this year.

4.       The plan is a regional one, setting out the strategic direction for the next 30 years to deliver against our climate goals:

·    to halve our emissions by 2030 and reach net zero by 2050

·    to take a precautionary approach to planning for the impacts of climate change.

5.       Our climate goals cannot be achieved by council alone as evidenced through the extensive emissions modelling and risk analysis carried out for the plan. Implementation of the plan will require significant, coordinated effort across the region by various stakeholders. The need for council to establish regional partnerships was also a key theme in feedback on the plan.

6.       To address the feedback received and the need for a regional, cross-sectoral approach to delivery, various levels of governance and partnerships are proposed (see Figure 1 below).

7.       This includes a regional Leadership Group, made up of leaders from various sectors to champion climate goals and drive delivery of climate programmes in their respective sectors.

8.       In addition, staff recommend establishing a Climate Political Reference Group, an agile group to give feedback and direction to staff and remove roadblocks on the implementation and delivery of the plan (in this fast-evolving area). 

9.       After analysing three options for how elected members could best provide direction on implementation of the plan, staff recommend establishing a relatively small and agile group.

10.     This would include five councillors (including the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Environment and Climate Change Committee as the parent committee for the group), five local board members, a member of the Independent Māori Statutory Advisory Board and broader mana whenua representation.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      endorse the proposed partnership and governance approach in principle, as set out in Figure 1 of this report, subject to input from mana whenua

b)      approve establishing a Climate Political Reference Group to advise and direct staff on the implementation and delivery of the plan

c)      appoint the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Environment and Climate Change Committee, and three councillors to the Climate Political Reference Group

d)      invite the Independent Māori Statutory Board to appoint a member to the Climate Political Reference Group

e)      invite the Local Board Chair’s Forum to select five local board members to join the Climate Political Reference Group

f)       invite Mana Whenua to propose a format for selecting and appointing representation to the Climate Political Reference Group

g)      delegate endorsement of the Leadership Group and Rangatahi Rōpū membership to the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Environment and Climate Change Committee and an Independent Māori Statutory Board member

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     In July 2020, The Environment and Climate Change Committee unanimously adopted Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan (ECC/2020/29).

12.     Auckland Council took a leadership role in facilitating the development of the plan and will need to continue to lead by example.  However, not all actions identified are the responsibility of Auckland Council and meeting our climate goals will require ambitious action from across sectors and individuals. 

13.     The plan was developed collaboratively with mana whenua, central government, council group, district health boards, businesses, communities and individuals involved in the identification of actions and priorities.

14.     In addition, over 80 organisations provided extensive feedback on the consultation draft of the plan, from major industry to community groups.

15.     Throughout engagement the common theme emerged of the need for council to take a leadership role and establish partnerships across the region to support delivery of the plan.

16.     It is also clear from emissions modelling and risk analysis that without region-wide partnerships and commitment we cannot deliver our climate goals to reduce emissions by 50% by 2030 and reach net zero by 2050, while preparing for the impacts of climate change.

17.     Council has committed to on-going facilitation of the plan, using levers and leadership to work with partners across the region and influence greater systemic change.

18.     Implementation of the plan will be reviewed on an annual basis with a more detailed analysis every three years. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Political oversight of delivery of the plan – Auckland Council focused

19.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets the strategic direction for the region in addressing climate change.  Within the plan are eight priorities and associated action areas. 

20.     Currently, fortnightly updates are provided to the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Mayor’s Office, with key decisions taken to the bi-monthly Environment and Climate Change Committee as appropriate. 

21.     Workshops provide an opportunity to gain feedback from councillors more broadly, but these cannot be held on a regular basis. Because of the demands on councillors’ time, workshops can usually only be scheduled when they directly link to a decision-making report that is being taken to committee. Because of the fast-evolving nature of climate change and the need for rapid and sustained climate action, a more agile response mechanism is needed.

22.     However, the regional nature of the plan, as well as the potential for the impacts of climate change and climate action to be unequally distributed through the Auckland region, also means that broad representation from across the region will be an important consideration for the plan’s successful implementation.

23.     Through the development of the plan and public feedback on the draft climate action framework, it was also identified that Aucklanders were seeking an opportunity to be more actively involved in checking and challenging progress against the plan’s objectives.

24.     Options have been assessed for consideration:

Option

Breadth of representation

Timeliness and agility

Opportunities for public input

1.   Status quo - Staff direction provided through the Chair and Deputy Chair of Environment and Climate Change Committee.

Meetings occur fortnightly.

(note these regular meetings are expected to continue in every option).

 

û

Does not allow for local board input or involvement of the Independent Māori Statutory Board, mana whenua or other councillors aside from Chair and Deputy Chair.

 

üüü

Fortnightly meetings mean elected members provide regular guidance and advice to staff in a timely fashion.

ü

No opportunity for public involvement except through existing mechanisms such as public input at committee meetings.

2.   Establish small, agile political reference group (recommended option)

Membership of the group would include:

·   Chair and Deputy Chair of the committee

·   three councillors

·   five local board members

·   a member of the IMSB.

·   Mana whenua representation

Meet: Every two-three months or by exception as is needed

Public and community group representatives invited to attend annual or bi-annual sessions and give feedback on our implementation of the plan.

Representatives from each of Auckland’s 19 iwi authorities to be invited to attend annually or bi-annually.

üü

Allows for local board input and representation of the Independent Maori Statutory Board, mana whenua and two other councillors aside from Chair and Deputy Chair.

 

üü

Opportunity for members to address emerging issues or opportunities, provide feedback and direction to staff on the implementation and delivery of the plan and associated programmes and projects, and for staff to provide more regular updates to councillors.

Smaller group with easier scheduling of meetings means additional meetings can be held if urgently needed (for example, to provide input on a submission).

 

Consistent with other groups and representation from across the region

üü

Provides opportunities for public input through annual session where community members can speak to small group of elected and other members in an informal setting and give feedback on implementation of the plan.

3.   Whole Environment and Climate Change Committee, Local Board Chairs and mana whenua receive regular updates and provide guidance outside committee meetings through workshops.

Frequency: Six monthly

(note that additional workshops could still be schedule for key decisions)

üüü

This approach would mean all councillors and Independent Māori Statutory Board members are kept up to date on progress and are able to provide input. Local board chairs could also potentially be invited.

û

Due to demands on councillors’ time it would be difficult to schedule workshops more regularly than six months at the most.

This would make it harder for the committee to provide timely and meaningful input.

ü

No opportunity for public involvement except through existing mechanisms such as public input at committee meetings.

 

25.     It is proposed that a political reference group (option 2) be established to provide an opportunity for members to address emerging issues or opportunities, for members to provide feedback and direction to staff on the implementation and delivery of the plan and for staff to provide more regular updates to councillors.

26.     As the plan will be implemented both regionally and locally, staff recommend that membership of the group comprise five councillors (including the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Environment and Climate Change Committee as the parent committee for the group); five local board members (ideally with a regional spread); a member of the Independent Māori Statutory Advisory Board (IMSB) and mana whenua representation.

 

 

 

27.     To respond to feedback from public consultation that wider public input on progress against the plan’s objectives is needed (see “Regional partnerships and governance for delivery”), it is also proposed that this group provides an opportunity for members of the public to provide feedback on an annual or bi-annual basis. Progress reports will be provided in advance to support the meeting and discussions.

28.     The group would not be a decision-making entity.  Decisions on the plan’s implementation requiring political input will be sought from the appropriate committee.

Mana whenua and council partnership

29.     Mana Whenua, through the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum, gifted the cultural narrative of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. This contribution is deeply acknowledged, and this cultural expression is central to the plan.

30.     A Tāmaki and climate change subject matter expert rōpū was established in March 2019, which has been supporting and advising mana whenua and council on climate change issues for Māori and providing direct advice and narrative for the plan and for on-going mahi in identification and implementation of actions.

31.     For the plan to succeed, continuation of the partnership between council and mana whenua is vital.  This will require not only representation in the above groups but on-going collaboration and support in capacity building across the region in the principles established through the foundational Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau wellbeing framework and Te Puāwaitanga ō te Tātai.

32.     The Chief Sustainability Office will continue to work with the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum, as well as engaging directly with iwi in prioritisation of actions and implementation of the plan.

33.     This partnership needs to continue in addition to (and regardless of) the Climate Political Reference Group.

Regional partnerships and governance for delivery

 

34.     Delivery of the plan and its goals will need commitment and buy in from across the region.  At the same time, we know from our People’s Perception survey that Aucklanders have limited awareness of current action in relation to climate change or what to do themselves, highlighting a need to increase engagement and communication.

35.     To address this, different levels of partnership are proposed to address different needs in the regional implementation of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Schematic of proposed regional governance and partnerships structure  

Leadership Group

36.       These are the champions of the climate goals and should have high influence across the region. The group would be made up of leaders from various sectors to champion climate goals and drive delivery of climate programmes in their respective sectors.

37.       Key responsibilities would be identifying and resolving barriers and utilising networks to further expand and increase action across the region.  The group would meet three times per year, setting direction and assessing delivery.

38.       It is proposed that representation on this group is sought from council group, mana whenua, central government, business leaders, community leaders, District Health Boards, youth and C40 Cities.

39.       This group does not necessarily need to include climate experts, rather those who are best placed to influence widely.  Support to this group will be provided through capacity building sessions focussed on increasing knowledge around climate implications, the climate actions set out within the plan requiring region delivery, and the focus of the plan on Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau.  Tailored sector-specific messaging will need to be developed and opportunities sought for speaking and networking.

Independent Review Groups

40.       It is proposed that the Independent Advisory Group, the Rangatahi Rōpū and Advisory Panels provide independent reviews of plan implementation and delivery of our goals. 

41.       Auckland’s mayoral-appointed Independent Advisory Group has provided input throughout development of the plan. This group consists of internationally recognised climate change experts and as agreed in the terms of reference of the group, they will continue to provide feedback on progress.

42.       Through development of the plan and consultation feedback, two additional areas of independent review were identified that Aucklanders would be interested in seeing: 

i.  A Rangatahi Rōpū to act as a channel, create a collective movement for change (as detailed within the plan) and review and feedback on progress.  This group has been agreed in the plan and is currently in review as to membership and coordination with the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum.

ii. An opportunity for Aucklanders to be more actively involved in checking and challenging progress against the plan’s objectives.

43.       Council already has well-established Advisory Panels to provide insights and communicate the interests and preferences of the community in relation to a number of specific portfolios.  A specific climate interest group comprising members from Council’s existing Advisory Panels is being explored by Democracy Services. This climate interest group could be used to provide feedback and insights on the implementation or non-implementation of the plan from the perspective of their representative community groups. The panels will also continue to be engaged directly as the plan is implemented.

44.       In summary, it is proposed that:

·    the mayoral-appointed Independent Advisory Group continues to provide expert feedback on progress against the plan’s objectives

·    a Rangatahi Rōpū acts as a channel, creates a collective movement for change and reviews and provides feedback on progress against the plan’s objectives

·    the Advisory Panels, directly and through a specific climate interest group, provide broader  feedback and insights on the implementation or non-implementation of the plan from the perspective of their representative community groups

·    direct public feedback on progress against the plan’s objectives is sought (via the Climate Political Reference Group) on an annual or bi-annual basis.

Establishing regional commitments

45.       To support delivery of the plan, it is proposed that the commitment made by council to the climate goals is sought from other stakeholders across Auckland.

46.       As part of their role on the Leadership Group, organisations will be asked to sign up to the climate goals to reduce emissions and prepare for climate change and to provide annual updates on progress within their sectors.

47.       Wider commitment across the region will be sought as the plan is implemented and the groups are established.

Secretariat support

48.       As organisational lead for Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, the Chief Sustainability Office will provide secretariat support to the proposed governance and partnerships structure.

Update on development of climate actions for investment 

49.       In June 2019, the Environment and Community Committee resolved that staff should develop ‘detailed and costed actions for Auckland Council as its contribution to climate action, for consideration by the appropriate Committee as input to the Long-term Plan (ENV/2019/71).’ 

50.       Since this resolution was passed staff have been progressing the development of detailed and costed options for a climate action investment package. 

51.       To develop options for investment, the Chief Sustainability Office first engaged with departments across the council parent and Council Controlled Organisations. This process identified over 350 projects that support delivery on the action areas set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. 

52.       Base case - What we are already doing: Of these 350 projects, over 150 were projects that Auckland Council is already progressing. Some of these projects are directly driven by climate change such as:

·        initiatives to reduce our own corporate footprint through electrifying our vehicle fleet

·        developing coastal management plans to support communities to respond to the effects of climate change on our coastlines 

53.       Auckland Council also funds many other programmes which are not driven by climate change, but that have significant climate co-benefits.  

54.       This includes, for example, our significant investment in public transport and the Urban Cycleway programme.

55.       No climate impact analysis or cost versus impact analysis has been done for these projects and initiatives as part of this workstream.

56.       Progress outside Long-term Plan: Staff also identified over 100 projects that are not yet underway but that could be progressed without additional investment through the Long-term Plan. Many of these initiatives are relatively low cost and focus on advocacy, carrying out research and pilot studies or partnering with other organisations. 

57.       Climate action package for Long-term Plan: In addition to the projects described above, staff also identified over 100 projects that could be put forward to the Long-term Plan. 

58.       Through a process of review and consolidation, these projects have been combined into 38 climate action programmes. Key focus areas for these include: 

·        reducing the council’s own corporate footprint to achieve our goal of a 50 per cent reduction in corporate emissions by 2030 

·        further work to support coastal adaptation and resilience 

·        protecting and restoring freshwater and land-based ecosystems to increase their resilience to climate change impacts and growing our urban / rural ngāhere 

·        zero waste initiatives that encourage the reuse and upcycling of materials, reducing consumption emissions 

·        communications and behaviour change initiatives to support and enable Aucklanders to make low-carbon lifestyle choices 

·        planning initiatives to encourage a quality, compact urban form (reducing future emissions and/or reducing future risk exposure). 

59.       These programmes do not include projects related to transport, as these will be progressed through the Regional Land Transport Plan. They also do not include initiatives related to water supply as these are being considered through a joint working party involving Auckland Council and Watercare. 

60.       The climate action package will be integrated with the transport and water supply workstreams, forming council’s overall climate action response. This will be consulted on with the public through the draft Long-term Plan and Regional Land Transport Plan in February-March 2021. 

Cost and impact assessment of climate action programmes

61.       Staff have carried out an extensive cost and impact assessment of these programmes. The primary focus of this assessment was the impact on: 

·        reducing emissions – including the likely total amount of emissions reduced and also the level of certainty about these emissions reductions 

·        supporting Auckland to adapt to climate risks and become more resilient to climate change impacts.  

 

62.       The assessment also considered many broader factors, including the impact on: 

·        Māori outcomes, from a Te Ao Māori perspective 

·        equity, in terms of the potential benefits or negative impacts of programmes on disadvantaged groups. 

63.       The impact of programmes on these factors has also been reviewed and moderated by expert advisory groups, including a group of Māori outcomes specialists who considered the impact of programmes from a Te Ao Māori perspective. 

64.       Based on this analysis, staff will now develop some climate action investment package options.  

65.       Staff will seek feedback on these options from the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum on 17 September and whether programmes should be prioritised for either: 

·        becoming Māori-led 

·        investment through a climate-action package. 

66.       Staff will also seek input directly from iwi chairs on the packages. 

67.       The climate action package options for investment will be presented to elected members for their feedback at a workshop on 23 September 2020. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

68.       Establishment of partnerships and governance directly supports delivery of the climate plan and its goals to reduce emissions and prepare for the impacts of climate change.

69.       Day-to-day management of the partnerships and associated meetings and events will look to minimise any travel and production of materials.

70.       Internally, the proposed Climate Political Reference Group will support the implementation of Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan by providing oversight and advice and addressing blockages where appropriate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

71.       Regular meetings and workshops took place across the council group for development of the plan and a working group was established from the outset to provide expertise from across the council group, central government and district health boards.

72.       Proposed partnerships and governance were workshopped with the working group early on in plan development. 

73.       Council Group representation will be sought for the Leadership Group and many of the CCOs directly lead on programmes and projects being delivered through the plan.

74.       The working group will be maintained into plan implementation to provide continuity and oversight.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

75.       Local Boards have been engaged throughout the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan as reported at previous committee meetings.

76.       Local Boards are key to delivery of the plan and this is reflected in roles and responsibilities and the governance and partnerships structure.  Further engagement is underway to support integration of climate change into local board plans and reports as implementation of the plan will require action at both regional and local levels.

77.       It is proposed that local boards are represented within the Climate Political Reference Group to enable on-going input and views to be reflected in delivery of the plan.  Ideally representation would be geographically spread across the region.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

78.       Climate change impacts and associated policy and action will have significant impacts for Māori communities, some of which are further discussed throughout Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

79.       In addition, mana whenua, through the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum, have taken a lead role in anchoring and guiding a Māori response to climate change, working closely with Māori community organisations.

80.       Staff therefore recommend the continuation of this core partnership to delivery of the plan and representation across proposed levels of partnerships and governance as detailed in the mana whenua and council partnership section of this report.

81.       Staff also recommend inclusion of a member of the Independent Māori Statutory Board on the recommended Climate Political Reference Group to provide input on issues of significance to Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau and ensure council acts in accordance with our responsibilities under Te Tiriti.

82.       Climate action investment options – All programmes that have been put forward for investment through the climate action lane have been assessed from a Te Ao Māori perspective.

83.       This assessment was first done by the programme owners, who were asked to consider the impact that their programme would have in relation to Māori risks and values

84.       These scorings were then reviewed and moderated by the Māori outcome leads for the relevant divisions.

85.       As outlined above, staff will seek feedback on climate action investment package options from both the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum and iwi chairs.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

86.       The costs associated with the establishment of the Climate Political Reference Group and the proposed governance and partnership structures can be met within existing departmental budgets for 2020/21.

87.       This applies to establishing membership, terms of reference and agreeing commitments.  Costs will be minimised through ways of working, minimal travel and production of resources.

88.       However, in order for the Leadership Group to effectively influence, there is a need for capacity building, networking and sector-specific resources and this will require additional budget from 2021.

89.       Funding for this programme of work will be sought through the 10-year budget and may be subject to change as part of the Long-term Plan process. For context and disclosure purposes, the funding that will be sought through the Long-term Plan process is provided here. Committee is however not requested to make any decision in this regard. It should also be noted that investment in governance could be scaled up or down through the Long-term Plan discussions and decision-making process.


 

 

90.       The total proposed budget over the 10-year period is $1.595m. 

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

2024/25

2025/26

2026/27

2027/28

$395,000

$150,000

$300,000

$150,000

$150,000

$300,000

$150,000

- Capacity building ($160k)

- External facilitation for direction setting ($55)

- Sector-specific resource development (to support communication and engagement) ($80k)

- Seed funding for research ($100k)

- Capacity building ($80k)

- Meetings ($30k)

- Resource updates ($40k)

Three-yearly ‘deep dive’.  Includes review of plan implementation, including facilitation, resource updates and group-led in person reviews across sectors involving multiple stakeholders.

Meetings ($30k);

Creation of annual report on progress and upload to digital plan ($70k)

Seed funding ($50k)

Meetings ($30k);

Creation of annual report on progress and upload to digital plan ($70k)

Seed funding ($50k)

Three-yearly ‘deep dive’.  Includes review of plan implementation, including facilitation, resource updates and group-led in person reviews across sectors involving multiple stakeholders.

Meetings ($30k);

Creation of annual report on progress and upload to digital plan ($70k)

Seed funding ($50k)

 

91.       The proposed budget includes capacity building sessions on the core goals, evidence and principles of the plan; annual reporting; sector specific resources; and the capacity for facilitated sessions to set direction, identify opportunities for further collaboration and identify risks and barriers to implementation of the plan across the region.

92.       It is highly desirable, and potentially likely, that Leadership Group members or sectors will contribute to the functioning of the group, either through in kind or financial contributions. As there are no actual such contributions at this stage (the group has not been established yet), this is not accounted for in the proposed budget. Such contributions would either expand the activities of the group or alternatively reduce the funding required from council.

93.     Climate action investment options – Costs and financial implications of climate investment package options will be discussed with elected members at a workshop on 23 September 2020.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

94.       The risk in relation to non-delivery of climate action is high as identified in council’s organisational risk register.

95.       Staff have identified a number of risks in relation to establishing partnerships and governance for implementation of the plan.

96.       Lack of interest: This is the main risk identified, which will be mitigated by staff through ensuring that the groups are provided with meaningful information that will benefit within roles as well as for the region as a whole (e.g., climate projections, emissions modelling and Te Ao Māori principles underpinning climate response). Much of this will support organisational responses to climate change.  In addition, opportunities will be sought for engagement, communication and networking.

 

 

 

97.       Conflict of interest: Group membership will be carefully considered to ensure there is no direct conflict of interest and full disclosure is obtained.  All information provided will be using that which is widely available through the digital Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

98.       Lack of funding: Without on-going funding (at least for the first three years) there is a risk to the on-going maintenance and delivery of partnerships and governance.  The implications of this will be a direct impact on our ability to deliver on our climate goals as a region.  This risk is mitigated through a proposal to be considered as part of the 10-year budget, however this would not be confirmed until next year.

99.       If the Climate Political Reference Group is not established there is a risk of reduced opportunities for political guidance and direction, particularly on time pressured issues and where potentially contentious issues may arise.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

100.     If endorsed, meeting dates for the Climate Political Reference Group will be established following appointments.  Group meetings will be every three months or by exception, for example where issues or opportunities arise that need political direction.

101.     Draft terms of reference will be tabled at the first meeting of the group (Attachment A).

102.     Membership of the regional partnerships and governance groups will be explored and confirmed with meeting dates established for 2021 after the launch of the digital Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

Options for climate action investment

103.     As outlined above, staff are currently developing some climate action investment package options and will seek feedback on these from the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum and iwi chairs.

104.     The climate action package options for investment will be presented to elected members for feedback at a workshop on 23 September 2020. 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A: Draft ToR for Climate Political Reference Group

29

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sarah Anderson - Principal Specialist Sustainability and Climate Resilence

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 September 2020

 


 


 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 September 2020

 

End of year report for natural environment and water quality targeted rates 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/09560

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the end of year report for 2019/2020 on delivery of the natural environment and water quality targeted rate work programmes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is investing in protecting our natural environment and cleaning up our waterways through two targeted rates, with a total value of $763 million over ten years.

3.       Key highlights from the second year of delivery of the natural environment and water quality targeted rate work programmes are summarised in the end of year report in Attachment A.

4.       The natural environment work programme has been streamlined from 10 into five programmes. All five natural environment work programmes are on track, with key achievements including:

·    Approximately 47 kilometres of tracks have been made kauri-safe in the Waitākere and Hūnua regional parks, as well as 11 kilometres of tracks in local parks. A total of 33 regional and local track upgrades were completed.

·    We have delivered 88,000 hectares of pest animal control on the mainland in priority ecosystems. This includes feral pig, possum, feral goat, feral deer, stoat and rat control. We have delivered pest plant control and survey works at more than 60 locations in regional parks and more than 80 locations in local parks to help protect areas of high ecological value.

·    The Tiaki Tāmaki Makaurau / Conservation Auckland website was launched in August 2020, providing a new online space to share community conservation information in one central location.

·    $1.63 million has been provided to support 219 community conservation initiatives. The number of community groups and landowners engaging in biodiversity management and restoration has approximately doubled since 2019/2020.

·    We have continued to work more closely with mana whenua, building on existing relationships and projects. Procurement for larger contracts now includes requirements for suppliers to include specific Māori wellbeing outcomes, in particular employment and capability building. In some cases, project delivery is Māori-led.

5.       All five water quality work programmes are on track, with key achievements including:

·    1.8 kilometres of major pipes have been constructed, servicing more than 3,000 properties. This will contribute significantly to reducing wastewater overflows in the inner city harbour.

·    The Safe Networks programme has carried out investigations and sampling to identify sources of water pollution at 108 stormwater outlets on 26 beaches. Fifteen kilometres of stormwater and wastewater networks have been inspected to help make beaches more swimmable.

·    The small sites sediment compliance team visited more than 5,000 building sites across Auckland to ensure that good practices around site management and sediment control were in place, with 342 fines issued for non-compliance.

·    $420,000 has been distributed to community groups and landowners to restore waterways, including $150,000 through the Community Coordination and Facilitation Grant and a boost of $270,000 to the Waterways Protection Fund.

6.       Physical works stopped during COVID-19 Alert Level 4, but most works resumed in Level 3, and we were able to continue progress on water quality projects, pest animal and plant control and track upgrades to manage kauri dieback.

7.       The next end of year report will be provided to the Environment and Climate Change Committee following the end of the 2020/2021 financial year. Throughout the year, quarterly updates will be provided to the Finance and Performance Committee and additional updates on specific programmes will be provided to committees and local boards as required.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      note the end of year report on the natural environment and water quality targeted rate work programmes shown in Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft end of year report for natural environment and water quality targeted rates 2019/2020

35

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Gael Ogilvie – General Manager Environmental Services

Craig Mcilroy – General Manager Healthy Waters

Authoriser

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 September 2020

 

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 September 2020

 

Waters Strategy and Long-term Plan update

File No.: CP2020/12924

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A noting report to update the Environment and Climate Change Committee on the Auckland Waters Strategy and how upcoming workshops will influence investment in water in the 2021-2031 Long-term Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Waters Strategy project began as a response to the 2017 Section 17A Value for Money review of three waters across the group. A recommendation of that work was for council to produce a Three Waters Strategy (drinking water, wastewater and stormwater).

3.       Work undertaken by Council in 2017-2019 expanded the scope of a Water Strategy to incorporate marine, ground water and other freshwater bodies, as well as issues relating to recreational use, ecosystem health, coastal management.

4.       A discussion document (Our Water Future - Tō Tātou Wai Ahu Ake Nei) was consulted on in February 2019. The purpose of the discussion document was to propose a framework for discussion of the water issues facing Auckland. This established a high-level vision for Auckland’s Waters ‘te Mauri o te Wai’, key values, issues and principles that can be used to inform strategy development. Actions and targets were not discussed. These are captured in table one:

Table one: Our Water Future Discussion Document

Vision

Values

Principles

Issues

Te Mauri o te Wai / the lifeforce of water

·    Ecosystem health

·    Water use (Supply and Demand)

·    Recreation & Amenity

·    Culture

·    Resilience (Hazards)

·    Recognise & treat water as a taonga

·    Work with ecosystems

·    Deliver-catchment-scale thinking and action

·    Right-sized solutions & multiple benefits

·    Work together

·    Look to the future

·    Cleaning up water

·    Growth in the right places

·    Meeting future water needs

·    Adapt to a changing future

5.       At the beginning of this council term, the Environment and Climate Change Committee was formed, and the Auckland Waters Strategy confirmed in the committee’s Terms of Reference. At the March 2020 committee the Auckland’s Water Strategy was confirmed as part of the committee work programme for 2020. The project did not report to committee during NZ’s initial lockdown period or during the drought response.

 

6.       Creating a clear water strategy will enable all council decisions and investments to contribute to improving the health of our waters. The Strategy is intended to direct investment and action in water space across the council group. It will articulate a vision, targets and approaches required to achieve them.

7.       Because of the complex nature of the water space, we use a framework of six areas to discuss the Auckland Waters Strategy. Five areas were developed in the 2019 discussion document Our Water Future. Governance has been added as a critical enabler of co-ordinated action. The governance workstream is also a reflection of recent recommendations by the CCO Review Panel.  Table two gives descriptions of each area:

Table two: Strategic Areas of the Auckland Waters Strategy

Area

Description

Supply & Demand

Access to water for use is essential to life, and critical for public health and the economy. This area will have a particular focus on municipal supply (Watercare), community supplies and non-potable supply (Watercare and Council) and will also consider broader issues of allocation by Council as the regulator.

Cultural Health

Water holds special significance to Māori.  Mana whenua whakapapa to significant water bodies and have kaitiaki obligations to protect them. The degradation of the mauri of these water bodies has significant impacts on the ability of mana whenua to exercise these obligations.

Ecosystem Health

The protection and enhancement of the ecological health and mauri of waterways (freshwater streams, lakes, rivers and wetlands, and their coastal receiving environments) and the species within them will be addressed in this area. Improvement will require a systems approach that incorporates action on-the-ground and improved planning frameworks.

Recreation & Amenity

Public access to safe water bodies provides opportunities for recreation, wellbeing and tourism.

 

Evolving Hazards

Water-related hazards will affect communities and community assets. Climate change is likely to drive increasingly intense storm events, coastal erosion, and localised floods.

Governance

Strong, enduring governance will be key to ensuring the strategy’s successful implementation.

 

8.       In June and July, the Governing Body held workshops with Watercare on the drought emergency response.

9.       Given that recent decisions as part of the drought response have altered Watercare’s long-term outlook on supply, elected members have prioritised the Supply and Demand work area. This is because the decisions made for this work area materially affect work for the Infrastructure Strategy and Long-term Plan 2012-2031.

10.     The Mayor asked for a workshop series with the aim of discussing long-term supply and demand. Workshops were held on the 1st and 29th of July. At the 29th July workshop, Watercare and Council parent staff were instructed to form a joint working group to develop and provide advice on options for long-term supply and demand targets to an Environment and Climate Change Committee workshop on 22 September.


 

 

11.     The other five areas of the Auckland Waters Strategy framework will also be progressed, but at a different rate and ensuring coordination with other related work programmes underway across council. There is much work underway, and work required, to enable committee to set direction in each area. As a result, each area will advance at different rates and therefore provide direction for further work at different times. Related programmes of work include Government’s national water reform work, Action for Healthy Waterways and the Council’s Too Much Water Policy (in development).

12.     Importantly, a water package is required for the Long-term Plan. There is a need to take a co-ordinated, whole-of-group view of investment in water for the 2021-2031 Long-term Plan, as well as communicate the benefits of integrated projects that have previously sat within separate asset management plans. Council group will collaborate to make sure that the package delivers on the evolving Auckland Waters Strategy work.

13.     The package will be presented to the Finance and Performance Committee on 4 November 2020. The Infrastructure Strategy Team will coordinate this work as it is a key component of the eventual Infrastructure Strategy.

14.     Table 3 summarises the timing and content of upcoming discussions between now and December 2020:

Table three: Timing of upcoming discussions

Month

Date

Detail

September 2020

TBC

 

Environment and Climate Change Committee Workshop

Workshop: Supply and Demand

October 2020

TBC date

 

Environment and Climate Change Committee Workshop

Workshop: Wider Water investment principles

November 2020

4 November

 

Finance and Performance Committee Meeting

Meeting: Water Investment in Long-term Plan

12 November

 

Environment and Climate Change Committee Meeting

Meeting: Forward Work Programme of Auckland Waters Strategy confirmed

September – April 2021

Water Strategy work continues: technical supporting work

December – April 2021

Water Strategy work continues: options development

April – September 2021

Water Strategy work continues: targets and actions agreed

Note that forward work programme dates will be discussed at November Environment and Climate Change committee. The forward work programme will need to reflect a suitable and constructive approach to mana whenua iwi and local board engagement.

 

15.     Please note also that a joint working group has been established to oversee and integrate council’s responses to current water issues. This reflects Council’s decision that Watercare and Council work more effectively together and will focus upon three areas of specific activity:

·    The response to the 2020-21 drought.

·    National Water Reform

·    The Group Auckland Waters Strategy

16.     Within each of these areas joint Watercare and Council work teams have been established. Because each of these areas of activity impacts the others, a primary role of the working group is to ensure integration.

17.     This report is a noting report and does not have direct impacts on the climate. That said, an Auckland Waters Strategy and investment in water in the 2021 Long-term Plan provides the opportunity for an integrated approach to acting to improve the mauri of water in Auckland. Both work programmes must be cognisant of the twin challenges of adapting to our changing water future as a result of climate change and mitigating further climate impacts through emissions reductions.

18.     Mana whenua priorities were incorporated into the Our Water Future - Tō Tātou Wai Ahu Ake Nei framework that now guides the strategy development. In particular, the vision ‘te mauri o te wai’ which was gifted to this kaupapa by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum.

19.     As the work of the strategy progresses, iwi, either via the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum or individually, will continue to be engaged in the strategy’s development. The forward work programme shown in table three will need to reflect a suitable and constructive approach to mana whenua iwi engagement.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      note the update on the Auckland Waters Strategy

b)      note that the 2020-2021 Drought Response and Auckland Waters Strategy will report to the Environment and Climate Change Committe

c)      note that council’s National Water Reform work programme will report to Governing Body

d)      note the programme of upcoming workshops and discussions as outlined in table three of this agenda report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Toby Shephard - Strategist

Authorisers

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 September 2020

 

Consultation on hard-to-recycle plastics and single use items: submission development

File No.: CP2020/11639

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To delegate authority to the Chair, Deputy Chair and an Independent Māori Statutory Board member of the Environment and Climate Change Committee to approve Auckland Council’s submission on the Ministry for the Environment’s consultation on hard-to-recycle plastics and single-use items.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 12 August 2020, the Ministry for the Environment released a consultation document looking into options for reducing the environmental impacts of hard-to-recycle plastics and single-use items.

3.       The consultation document, Reducing the impact of plastic on our environment: Moving away from hard-to-recycle and single-use items, presents eight options to reduce the environmental impacts of plastic products (see Attachment A).

4.       It identifies a preferred option of a mandatory phase-out (option six), similar to New Zealand’s recent plastic bag ban. This option would result in a legislated phase-out of PVC and polystyrene packaging (for example, biscuit, meat, yoghurt or sushi trays made from #3 or #6 plastics), oxo-degradable plastics, and up to seven single-use plastic items (including plastic straws, drink stirrers and fruit stickers). Oxo-degradable plastics degrade quickly when exposed to light or oxygen but remain in the environment as smaller pieces of plastic.

5.       Auckland Council’s Te Mahere Whakahaere me te Whakaiti Tukunga Para i Tāmaki Makaurau - Auckland Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 supports moves to reduce environmental and human health harm caused by residual waste. Plastic waste is one of three priority waste streams identified in the plan.

6.       Previous council submissions have supported using the legislative tool outlined in this consultation to phase out single-use plastic shopping bags, introducing mandatory product stewardship for plastic food and beverage packaging, and requiring permits for exporting plastic waste materials.

7.       Staff anticipate supporting the preferred option outlined by the Ministry for the Environment for a mandatory phase-out of hard-to-recycle plastic packaging and single-use plastic items. However, further analysis is required on the phase out of specific single-use plastic items.

8.       In particular, staff are aware that there may be members of the disability community who rely on some of the materials (such as plastic straws), which are proposed to be phased-out through this consultation. Staff will consult with the Disability Advisory Panel on these points through the development of the submission.

9.       Previous consultation on the waste plan also identified community support for addressing specific items that are not included in the Ministry’s proposed list of seven items, such as single-use takeaway coffee cups which are often lined with plastic. This community feedback will be considered by staff through the development of the council’s submission.


 

 

10.     Consultation on this topic closes on 4 November 2020, which falls between the scheduled Environment and Climate Change Committee dates. Staff recommend approval of the submission be delegated to the Chair and Deputy Chair of Environment and Climate Change Committee, and a member of the Independent Māori Statutory Board. This will enable elected members to provide guidance and input into the submission, which is due before the next Environment and Climate Change Committee meeting in November 2020.

11.     If the timelines for the submission are extended, staff will present it for approval to the whole Environment and Climate Change Committee.

12.     Local boards will also be sent a memo outlining the process and content of the consultation document to support them to provide feedback.

13.     Through the development of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan, Auckland Council engaged in extensive consultation with mana whenua and mataawaka. Based on this consultation, the plan highlights the council’s responsibility to recognise Māori values such as rangatiratanga, kaitiakitanga, kotahitanga, manaakitanga, and whanaungatanga.

14.     Staff will ensure these values are reflected in the submission. Staff will also seek guidance from Ngā Mātārae as to whether further consultation is needed.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      delegate authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Environment and Climate Change Committee and a member of the Independent Māori Statutory Board to approve Auckland Council’s submission on the consultation on hard-to-recycle and single-use plastics.

b)      note that the final submission will be provided to Environment and Climate Change Committee for their information.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Reducing the impact of plastic on our environment: Moving away from hard-to-recycle and single-use items – Ministry for the Environment consultation document - August 2020

61

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Briar Wyatt – Senior Waste Planning Advisor

Authorisers

Parul Sood – General Manager Waste Solutions

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 September 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 September 2020

 

Consultation on Building for Climate Change: Transforming operational efficiency and reducing whole-of-life embodied carbon

File No.: CP2020/12623

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To delegate authority to the Chair, Deputy Chair and an Independent Māori Statutory Board member of the Environment and Climate Change Committee to approve Auckland Council’s submission on the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment’s Building for Climate Change programme proposals “Transforming operational efficiency” and “Whole-of-life embodied carbon emissions reduction framework”.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 31 August 2020, the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released its “Building for Climate Change: Transforming operational efficiency and reducing whole-of-life embodied carbon” consultation papers. This is the first public consultation under its new Building for Climate Change programme, which is focused on the building and construction sector’s contribution to New Zealand’s goal of net zero carbon emissions by 2050.

3.       There are two proposals, and both are focused on new buildings:

i)          increasing the operational efficiency of buildings; and

ii)         reduce the embodied carbon across the lifecycle of buildings.

4.       The consultation document “Transforming operational efficiency” has three main objectives: reducing operational carbon emissions; reducing water use; and improving the health and wellbeing of building occupants.

5.       To meet these objectives, MBIE is proposing to regulate operational efficiency by setting a cap on operational emissions and water use and setting minimum indoor environmental quality parameters. The operational emissions cap and performance requirements will be reviewed and tightened at regular intervals to reach a final cap in 2035.

6.       The “Whole-of-life embodied carbon emissions reduction framework” will require buildings to initially report on their embodied carbon, and then will phase-in a whole life embodied emissions cap. The embodied emissions reporting and the cap will be mandatory, and buildings will be required to meet them in order to obtain a building consent.

7.       The “Whole-of-life embodied carbon emissions reduction framework” proposes to use public sector agencies with property portfolios to take the lead in establishing methods and processes to make the big changes required one step ahead of private sector buildings. Pilot projects with public sector clients working with Building Consent Authorities will demonstrate how whole-of-life embodied carbon for a building will be calculated, reported, managed and reduced.  

8.       The initiatives and interventions support the regional climate targets of halving emissions by 2030 and reaching net zero by 2050 adopted by Auckland Council through Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.


 

 

9.       The Building for Climate Change programme is particularly relevant to the Built Environment priority within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. The consultation documents are focused on new buildings and address all building sizes and most building types (residential, commercial and industrial). A focus of the Built Environment priority is to ensure that decisions made now do not lock Auckland into a high emissions pathway and that climate action supports and enables the delivery of low carbon, healthy buildings. Staff therefore anticipate that council’s submission would be supportive of the MBIE proposals, however further analysis is required on the details set out in the consultation paper and alignment with the specific action areas set out within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

10.     Submissions for the consultation are due on 30 September 2020 which falls between the scheduled Environment and Climate Change Committee dates. Staff recommend approval of the submission be delegated to the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Environment and Climate Change Committee, and a member of the Independent Māori Statutory Board. This will enable elected members to provide guidance and input into the submission.

10.     If the timelines for the submission are extended, staff will present it for approval to the whole Environment and Climate Change Committee.

11.     Local boards will also be sent a memo outlining the process and content of the consultation document to support them to provide feedback.

12.     Through the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, Auckland Council engaged in extensive consultation with mana whenua and mataawaka. Staff will ensure that the principles and priorities set out through this engagement are reflected in the submission. Staff will also seek guidance from Ngā Mātārae as to whether further consultation is needed and if so, how this might be achieved in the timeframe available.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      delegate authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Environment and Climate Change Committee, and an Independent Māori Statutory Board member to approve council’s submission on the government’s “Building for Climate Change: Transforming operational efficiency and reducing whole-of-life embodied carbon” consultation.

b)      note that the final submission will be provided to Environment and Climate Change Committee for their information.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Transforming operational emissions -  Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment consultation document, August 2020

139

b

Whole-of-life embodied carbon emissions reduction framework - Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment consultation document, August 2020

161

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Matthew Blaikie - Principal Specialist Climate Mitigation

Alec Tang - Chief Sustainability Officer (Acting)

Authorisers

Jacques  Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 September 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 September 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Governing Body

27 August 2020

 

 

Summary of Environment and Climate Change Committee information memoranda and briefings - 10 September 2020

File No.: CP2020/11747

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       To receive a summary and provide a public record of memos or briefing papers that have been held or been distributed to committee members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to the Environment and Climate Change Committee members via memoranda/briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       The following memos were circulated to members of the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

Date

Memo

15/07/2020

Engagement with Mana Whenua and consideration of Māori

Perspectives within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

(Attachment B)

16/07/2020

Strategic Approach to Planting Group (Attachment C)

3/09/2020

Memo - update on the 2020/2021 Healthy Waters capex work programme – Confidential

 

5.       The following workshops/briefings have taken place:

Date

Workshop/Briefing

31/08/2020

Environment and Climate Change Committee workshop - Implementing Te

Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan (Attachment D)

1/09/2020

Waste Political Advisory Group - Confidential

2/09/2020

Review of the Manukau Harbour Forum Governance and Management

Support Report Recommendations (Attachment E)

 

6.       These documents can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

at the top left of the page, select meeting/ Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te TaiaoEnvironment and Climate Change” from the drop-down tab and click “View”.

under ‘Attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘Extra Attachments’.

 

 

 

7.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Governing Body members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      receive the Summary of Environment and Climate Change Committee information items and briefings – 10 September 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward work programme

187

b

Engagement with Mana Whenua and consideration of Māori perspectives
within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Strategic approach to Planting Group (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Environment and Climate Change Committee workshop - Implementing Te
Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan  (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Manukau Harbour Outcomes and Forum Role (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Suad Allie - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 

 

 



Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 September 2020

 

 

Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te Taiao / Environment and Climate Change] Committee
Forward Work Programme 2020

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with environmental and climate change activities. The full terms of reference can be found here: [i Terms of reference].

This committee will meet bi-monthly commencing March 2020

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee in 2020

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Climate change

Strategic approach to Climate Change: - Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

Chief Sustainability Office

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019] Link to decision

 

 

To provide a pathway to zero emissions by 2050 and ensure the region is prepared for the impacts of climate change.  This addresses Council’s commitments to develop a plan to keep within 1.5 degrees of warming and the Climate Emergency declaration.

 

Progress to date:

Report September 2020

 

Regular and associated decisions to come before committee.

 

workshop

 

 

 

 

Workshop

Sign off

workshop

 

Launch TBC

Launch TBC

 

Council Controlled Organisation’s Climate Change Update

 

 

To give elected member’s visibility of the work undertaken by CCOs to adapt & mitigate the impacts of climate change.

For information: Currently providing CCO performance updates to the CCO Oversight Committee. The plan is for 1-2 CCOs to come present at this Committee meeting on their climate actions/programs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CCO Update

 

CCO Update

 

Coastal renewals, slips and remediation

Coastal Management Framework and delivery of individual coastal compartment management plans

Engineering and Technical Services

 

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

Coastal compartment management plans will apply a long term, sustainable approach to management of our coast over the next 100 years. Adaptive management plans will be developed in collaboration with mana whenua and communities. Plans will consider the experiences and values we place on the coast and how these may change over time due to coastal hazards and climate change.

 

 

 

 

Decision to be confirmed.

Report scheduled for 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mana whenua engagement

Mana whenua engagement

Nominations for community reference group

Draft technical reports complete

Waste minimisation

Allocation of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund

Waste Solutions

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

Decision making over grants from the Fund in line with its adopted policy. Grants contribute towards council’s aspirational goal of zero waste to landfill by 2040.

To approve allocation of grants for the 2020/2021 funding round.

 

Progress to date:

2019 decision Link to decision

Decision making in 2020 funding round in December 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public submssions in november

 

 

 

Review of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation fund

Waste Solutions

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

 

Review the Fund, in line with the recommendations of the S17A Value for Money review.

To approve any significant changes to the grant framework arising from the review.

Scheduled for February 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Update to the Resource Recovery Network Strategy

Waste Solutions

[From the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee 2013-2016]

 

 

To review strategy since it was adopted 5 years ago. This will support achievement of the council’s aspirational goal of zero waste to landfill by 2040.

To approve the updated Resource Recovery Network Strategy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water

Auckland’s Water Strategy

Chief Planning Office

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

*ENV/2019/75

The health of Auckland’s waters is a critical issue. Both freshwater and marine environments in Auckland are under pressure from historic under-investment, climate change and rapid growth. The draft Auckland Plan 2050 identifies the need to proactively adapt to a changing water future and develop long-term solutions.

 

 

 

Timing and decisions to be confirmed

 

Update on Auckland’s water strategy – November

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Environment Standards for human drinking water and wastewater discharges and overflows

 

Auckland Plan, Strategy and Research (Natural Environment Strategy, Infrastructure Strategy)

Healthy Waters

 

National Environmental Standard for Sources of Human Drinking Water

National Environmental Standard for Wastewater Discharges and Overflows.

The National Environmental Standards will have a significant impact on the council family and so the council will provide input into these. Further detailed opportunity to provide Auckland Council input on specific regulatory proposals, probably through Planning Committee, awaiting advice from MFE, likely in 2021.  Not linked to release of Water Services Bill in mid-2020.

Dates for the release of these NES are anticipated to be in 2021 at earliest.

Note: Overlap with Planning Committee

For information: Decision to provide feedback on the Water Services Bill and other reforms noted at Planning Committee in early 2020, when Natural Environment Strategy provided proposed council submission on the Taumata Arowai Water Regulator Bill. Status of proposed NES for human drinking water and wastewater discharges and overflows will be provided to relevant committees when more is known about central government process.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Quality Targeted Rate Programme

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Healthy waters and streams projects supported by the water quality targeted rate for projects that will ensure cleaner beaches, streams and harbours across the region

For information: Currently providing quarterly updates to the Finance and Performance Committee. End of year report will be provided to this Committee in September.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Healthy Waters Portfolio

Healthy Waters

 

There are several work programmes that require decisions from other committees but are relevant to the E&CC Committee.

 

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

 

 

 

 

Waitākere Ranges septic tank pump out scheme. Options are being consulted on as part of the Annual Budget. Decisions with the Finance and Performance Committee.

Rodney Drainage districts. Managing land drainage assets within Rodney and funding and responsibility for these assets. Decision making sits with Rodney Local Board and Finance and Performance Committee.

Clevedon wastewater. Possible opt-in targeted rate being proposed to the Governing Body as part of Annual Plan, decisions with the Finance and Performance Committee

For information: No decisions are required from Environment and Climate Change Committee at this stage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPSFM)

Plans and Places

Healthy Waters

Natural Environment Strategy

 

 

The NPSFM being implemented, with periodic reporting to council committees on progress, and responding to ongoing central government refinement of the framework for achieving water outcomes. Decision making for this area of work will be split between the Planning Committee (for planning decisions such as Plan Changes) and Environment and Climate Change for non-statutory functions

To provide guidance on the council’s implementation of non-statutory functions under the National Policy Statement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Environment

Natural Environment Targeted Rate Programme

 

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

 

Natural environment projects supported by the natural environment targeted rate will help protect the environment and tackle the pests, weeds and diseases that are threatening the native species

For information: Currently providing quarterly updates to the F&P Committee. End of year report will be provided to this Committee in September.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grants

Allocation of the Regional Natural Heritage Grant

Environmental Services

 

Decision-making over regional environment fund as per the grants funding policy and fund guidelines. Funds to contribute to council’s goals related to protecting our natural environment.

 

 

 

Decision to confirm allocation of grants for the 2020/2021 funding round.

Progress to date:

Link to decision

Report on progress to date expected November 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Allocate grants

 

Review of the council’s natural environment grants

Environmental Services

 

To review the council’s various natural environment grant schemes and ensure that these are well aligned to regional priorities and grants from other external parties.

 

 

 

Decision to approve any recommended changes to the council’s natural environment grants arising from the review.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Heritage

Regional Pest Management Plan

Environmental Services

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

Council has statutory obligations under the Biosecurity Act to control weeds and animal pests. The purpose of work in 2020 will be to resolve any remaining appeals against the plan and complete final steps required for it to become operative.

To update the committee when the plan becomes operative.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inter-regional marine pest pathway management plan

Environmental Services

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

To manage the spread of marine pests to avoid or minimise their negative impacts on the environment.

 

To approve a preferred option for management of marine pests and development of a plan under the Biosecurity Act

Progress to date:

Link to decision

Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kauri dieback work programme update

Environmental Services

 

 

 

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

The natural environment targeted rate included a $100m package to improve the protection of kauri in Auckland.  The work programme includes a significant track upgrade package to reduce the spread of kauri dieback, as well as funding for education, enforcement, monitoring, treatment and research.

 

 

To approve council’s ongoing implementation of our regional kauri dieback management work programme.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Memorandum to committee

 

 

 

Acquisitions

Land acquisition for stormwater purposes

Healthy Waters

 

Delegated responsibility of the committee.

To acquire land for stormwater management purposes, to prevent flooding, support growth, renew existing assets or improve water quality as required.

Decision to acquire land. Reports will come to committee as required.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Completed

Lead Department

Area of work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Decision

 

Strategic approach to Climate Change: - Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

Chief Sustainability Office

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

Link to decision

To provide a pathway to zero emissions by 2050 and ensure the region is prepared for the impacts of climate change.  This addresses Council’s commitments to develop a plan to keep within 1.5 degrees of warming and the Climate Emergency declaration.

 

To approve Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

Regular and associated decisions to come before committee

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan adopted July 2020

Decision can be found here

 

Urban Forest Strategy

Parks and Sustainability Office

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

Strategic approach to delivering on the wider social, economic and environmental benefits of a growing urban forest in the context of rapid population growth and intensification.

 

An updated on the implementation of the strategy, and an update on the Lidar data and outcomes of the analysis of the urban forest canopy cover across the city.

 

 

 

Report back 2021

Update provided to the Environment and Climate Change Committee 21 July 2020

Link to decision

 

Establishment of the Waste Political Advisory Group

Waste Solutions

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

To provide feedback and guidance on implementation of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018.

 

Approve establishment of the group and appoint representatives from the committee.

 

Link to decision approval of Waste Political Advisory Group

Appointment of the Weed Management Political Advisory Group

Community Facilities

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

Establishment of a political advisory group to provide feedback and guidance on implementation of the Weed Management Policy.

 

Decision to approve establishment of the group and appoint representatives from the committee.

 

Link to decision approval of Weed Management Political Advisory Group