I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

 

Wednesday, 16 September 2020

5:00pm

This meeting will proceed via Skype for Business. Either a recording or written summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website.

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

 

Deputy Chairperson

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

Members

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

 

Makalita Kolo

 

 

Anae Dr Neru Leavasa

 

 

Christine O'Brien

 

 

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Janette McKain

Local Board Democracy Advisor

 

9 September 2020

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 262 5283

Email: janette.mckain@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - New Zealand Biosecurity Services Ltd                                       5

8.2     Deputation - Aotearoa Muslim Youth New Zealand (AMY.NZ)                        6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Public Forum - Muslim Community Centre Project                                         6

9.2     Public Forum - Tongan Youth Trust                                                                  6

9.3     Public Forum - Mangere Housing Community Reference Group                   7

9.4     Public Forum - Do Good Feel Good                                                                   7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Governing Body Member Update                                                                                9

12        Chairpersons Report and Announcements                                                              11

13        Local Board Leads and Appointments Report                                                         19

14        Auckland Transport Report September 2020                                                           21

15        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One and Multi-Board Grants Round One 2020/2021, grant allocations                                                                                       31

16        Road Name Approval for a New Private Road at Auckland Airport off Te Kapua Drive, Māngere                                                                                                             43

17        Community Empowered Approach to Alcohol Licensing                                      51

18        Urgent Decision request to provide feedback on the Council's Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Review                                                                                      59

19        Project Streetscapes: Weed Management report                                                    89

20        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      127

21        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes                                                  131

22        Auckland Counil's Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for quarter four 2019/2020                                                                  139

23        Local Board Annual Report 2019/2020                                                                    175  

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

25        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               179

22        Auckland Counil's Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for quarter four 2019/2020                                                                       

b.      Financial section                                                                                                   

23        Local Board Annual Report 2019/2020

a.      Draft 2019/2020 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Annual Report                       

C1       Statement of proposal for a new Navigation Safety Bylaw                                       

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 19 August 2020,  as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.1       Deputation - New Zealand Biosecurity Services Ltd

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Danielle Hancock and Sophia Olo-Whaanga from New Zealand Biosecurity Services Ltd have been involved with a recent project for the local board as part of Pest Free Ihumatao and would like to update the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Danielle Hancock and Sophia Olo-Whaanga from New Zealand Biosecurity Services Ltd for their attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Pest Free Ihumatao presentation................................................................. 178

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Aotearoa Muslim Youth New Zealand (AMY.NZ)

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Mohammed Ashraf from the Aotearoa Muslim Youth New Zealand would like to introduce himself to the board and showcase some of the activities and programmes that they are doing. He would like to share some of the challenges they are facing and to seek opportunities on working with and aligning their actions to some of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board outcomes and to contribute to areas of youth and community engagement.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Mohammed Ashraf for his presentation and attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.1       Public Forum - Muslim Community Centre Project

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.    Ben Fayed and Soraiya Daud would like to discuss with the board a community center project that the Muslim communities would like to set up later this year.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Ben Fayed and Soraiya Daud for their presentation and attendance.

 

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Tongan Youth Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.    Reverand Ikilifi Pope would like to present before the board regarding the Tongan Youth Trust.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Reverand Ikilifi Pope for his presentation and attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Land proposal............................................................................................... 178

 

 

9.3       Public Forum - Mangere Housing Community Reference Group

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.    Sally Ikinofo Chairperson of the Mangere Housing Community Reference Group would like to take this opportunity for the group to present an update to the board (see Attachments A and B).

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Sally Ikinofo Chairperson of the Mangere Housing Community Reference Group for her presentation and attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Initial Terms of Reference for the Mangere Housing Community Regeneration Group...................................................................................................................... 178

b          The Mangere we have in 2020 and what we want in 2035......................... 178

 

 

9.4       Public Forum - Do Good Feel Good

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.    Chillion Sanerivi, Youth Systems Innovator from Do Good Feel Good would like to present before the board and share their learnings and insights over the last five years and what is next for Do Good Feel Good.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Chillion Sanerivi, Youth Systems Innovator from Do Good Feel Good for her  presentation and attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Do Good Feel Good presentation................................................................ 178

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


 

 

Governing Body Member Update

File No.: CP2020/11917

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 Minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from Cr Alf Filipaina and Cr Efeso Collins.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


 

 

Chairpersons Report and Announcements

File No.: CP2020/11918

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the Chairperson an opportunity to update the local board on any announcements and for the local board to receive the Chairperson’s written report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal update and written report of the local board Chair.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairpersons report

13

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


 

 


 


 


 


 


 

 

Local Board Leads and Appointments Report

File No.: CP2020/11919

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item allows the local board members an opportunity to present verbal and written updates on their lead rolls, such as relevant actions, appointments and meetings.

Topic Area

Lead

Alternate

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Arts, Community and Events (including libraries)

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Parks, Sport and Recreation and Community Facilities

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

1st  Anae Dr Neru Leavasa

2nd Christine O’Brien

Local planning, housing, and heritage – includes responding to resource consent applications on behalf of board

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

1st Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

2nd Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Transport

Makalita Kolo

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Economic development

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

1st Christine O’Brien

2nd Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Youth, Children, Seniors and Uniquely Abled    

Anae Dr Neru Leavasa

1st Harry Fatu Toleafoa

2nd Christine O’Brien

Landowner Consents (excluding filming)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua (until 27/4/21)

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich (from 28/4/21)

Landowner Consents Filming

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Events (receive staff notifications of areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk)

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Liquor Licences Hearings

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Resource Consent (proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua (until 27/4/21)

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich (from 28/4/21)

Resource Consents (notified hearings)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua (until 27/4/21)

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich (from 28/4/21)

Area Plan Working Group

MOLB

All board members

OPLB

Apulu Reece Autagavaia,

Dawn Trenberth

 

LGNZ (Local Government New Zealand

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Organisation / Initiative

Lead

Alternate

Community Impact Forum for Kohuora Corrections Facility

Makalita Kolo

 

Mangere Bridge BID

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

 

Mangere Town Centre BID

Makalita Kolo

 

Mangere East Village BID

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Otahuhu Business Association

Christine O’Brien

 

South Harbour Business Association BID

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

Auckland Airport Community Trust for

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Te Pukaki Tapu O Poutukeka Historic Reserve & Associated Lands Co-Management Committee

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

Ambury Park Centre

Anae Dr Neru Leavasa

Christine O’Brien

Mangere Mountain Education Trust     

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Youth Connections South Local Governance Group (3 members)

Makalita Kolo,

Harry Fatu Toleafoa,

Anae Dr Neru Leavasa

 

Christine O’Brien

Maori input into local board decision-making political steering group

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Ōtāhuhu Portage Project Steering Group

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

The Southern Initiative (TSI) Steering Group

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal and written reports from local board members.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


 

 

Auckland Transport Report September 2020

File No.: CP2020/12680

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report s

1.       To receive the Auckland Transport report to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for September 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each month, Auckland Transport provides an update for the Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board on transport related matters in their area, including the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and other projects or programmed being delivered in the area. 

3.       Auckland Transport’s monthly update is attached to this report as Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport September 2020 update (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport Septermber Report

23

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One and Multi-Board Grants Round One 2020/2021, grant allocations

File No.: CP2020/12099

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One and Multi-Board Local Grants Round One 2020/2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One and Multi-Board Round One 2020/2021 (see Attachment B and C).

3.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board adopted the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 17 June 2020 (Attachment A, MO/2020/82). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

4.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $373,000 for the 2020/2021 financial year.

5.       Twenty-nine applications were received for Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Grant Round One 2020/2021, and seven applications were received for Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Multi-Board* Grant Round One requesting a total of $192,685.10

*Multi-board refers to applications received by more than one local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One 2020/2021 listed in Table One.  

 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2109-102

Ki o Rahi Tamaki Makaurau

Sport and recreation

Towards "Te Whaitua o Ueunuku Ki o Rahi 2020" including uniforms, gift cards, taonga awards, first aid, a generator, sound system and photographer.

$2,830.88

Eligible

LG2109-104

Polynesian Entertainers Limited

Community

Towards the "Siva Afi Festival" workshop including venue hire, stage, lighting and sound, resources, tutor, production crew and producer fees, performance sticks and personal protective gear.

$12,228.79

Eligible

LG2109-106

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Community

Towards costs for two young people from the local board area to attend a week life skills camp, including  accommodation, food, activities and transportation.

$869.56

Eligible

LG2109-107

Time to Thrive to Stay Alive Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the "Mangere Bike Tours" programme, inlcuding training costs, food, instructor costs, bike and helmet hire, administration, transportation of bikes, promotion and staff uniforms.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2109-108

Time to Thrive to Stay Alive Charitable Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards pool hire, lifeguards, gold medallions, food, t-shirts and wireless rental costs for the “Mangere Have A Try School Triathlon” celebrations.

$4,173.25

Eligible

LG2109-109

Fatafata Mafana

Community

Towards venue hire costs for the “Fatafata Mafana” older persons programme.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2109-110

Sam Patua

Community

Towards venue hire, training resources and wages, for a driving programme in the local board area.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2109-112

Papatūānuku Kōkiri Marae

Arts and culture

Towards costs for "Te Ahi Kōmau Fire Food Festival" including event management, lighting, sound and staging

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2109-115

Waterlea School Administration

Community

Towards a community defibrillator.

$5,519.00

Eligible

LG2109-116

Compass Housing Services

Community

Towards costs of garden redevelopment, access pathways, decorative screens, insect hotels, wormeries and bokashi bins.

$4,303.00

Eligible

LG2109-119

Poly X Limited

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire for 10 days for the "Polynesian Night Markets" in Mangere.

$24,000.00

Eligible

LG2109-120

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Community

Towards costs for the health and wellbeing programme at Mangere Central, St Joseph's Catholic, Mangere East and Otahuhu Intermediate schools.

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG2109-122

The Auckland Softball Association Incorporated

 

Towards event costs including printing, security, softballs, toilet hire, trophies, waste removal and umpire fees for the “Brad Rona Classic Softball Competition”.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2109-123

Emma Herkt

Arts and culture

Towards art materials, snacks, tent and volunteer costs for the tamariki art programme at Ihumatao.

$973.29

Eligible

LG2109-124

Mangere Hawks Netball Club

Sport and recreation

Towards paint and a hand dryer for the netball club.

$4,971.98

Eligible

LG2109-126

Mangere Otahuhu Netball Centre

Sport and recreation

Towards paint for the club building.

$2,650.00

Eligible

LG2109-127

TOA Pacific Incorporated

Community

Towards costs for the celebration of "International Day for Older People" including venue hire, catering and a disc jockey.

$2,214.80

Eligible

LG2109-128

Burn Support Charitable Trust

Community

Towards hygiene burn kits for children in the local board area

$1,826.09

Eligible

LG2109-129

The Operating Theatre Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire and lighting for the theatre production "Greedy Cat by Joy Cowley" at the Mangere Arts Centre.

$8,318.96

Eligible

LG2109-131

Fahima Saeid

Community

Towards resource, materials, tutor and administration costs for the women’s business programme at the Mangere East Community Refugee Centre.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2109-133

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the Mangere-Otahuhu portion for the annual costs for “Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust”

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2109-136

Mafutaga Savavali Magele Tutoatasi Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire for zumba for the “Mafutaga Savavali Magele Tutoatasi” group.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2109-137

YMCA North

Community

Towards workshop and meeting costs, including uniforms, transport, graduation day costs, networking, team building, venue hire and volunteer costs.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2109-139

Solomon Brown

Events

Towards venue hire, promotional material printing, photo and video costs for the "PopUp" event in Mangere.

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG2109-140

Maia Collective

Events

Towards audio-visual fees, catering and beverage costs of the "Maia Collective" launch in Orakei.

$7,720.00

Ineligible

LG2109-142

The Red Book Agency

Community

Towards data internet for two months, 10 chrome books, resume printing, coaching video and journal fees, certificates and ceremony costs for free resume workshops.

$2,000.00

Eligible

LG2109-143

Paeaneer Ltd

Arts and culture

Towards facilitator costs for the Krum dancing workshop.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2109-145

Tom Malo

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire, equipment upgrades, fruit and vegetables, transport, equipment upgrades, promotion and fitness instructor costs, for the “Tom Malo Fitness Programme”.

$5,795.00

Eligible

LG2109-147

Pacific Island Law Students' Association

Community

Towards venue hire for the Pacific Law Students Association annual dinner in the local board area.

$2,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$162,394.60

 

 

 

 

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Multi-Board Grants Round One 2020/2019 listed in Table One.   

 

Table One: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Multi Board Round One 2019/2020 grant applications:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2021-110

Fahima Saeid

Community

Towards costs for the refugee ball at the Fickling Centre, including venue hire, artists and performers, sound system, food, transport and volunteer costs.

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-114

Auckland Softball Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards operating expenses for the Auckland Softball Association.

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-123

The Middlemore Foundation for Health Innovation

Community

Towards salary cost for a change behaviour specialist.

$2,500.00

Eligible

MB2021-131

Victory Youth Group (VYG)

Community

Towards the “VGA Showdown” event, including venue hire, carparking, a screen, audio, lighting and labour expenses.

$8,500.00

Eligible

MB2021-135

The Dawson Trust

Community

Towards the “Dawson lights Up” Christmas event, including sound, disc jockey, artists, vouchers, barbeque, marquee hire, bouncy castle and administration costs.

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-136

The ReCreators Limited

Community

Towards a Christmas upcycling workshop including facilitator fees, materials, preparation, project management and administration.  

$3,674.00

Eligible

MB2021-146

Loopy Tunes Preschool Music

Community

Towards the Loopy Tunes Preschool Music programme, including performance fees, venue hire (for four venues), travel costs (car hire, petrol and airfares), accommodation gifts, food, administration, advertising costs, and donations to a local marae.

$3,616.50

 

Total

 

 

 

$30,290.50

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2020/2021 on 17 June 2020 and will operate one quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year. 

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, and community networks.

11.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $373,000.00 for the 2020/2021 financial year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Due to the current COVID-19 crisis, staff have also assessed each application according to which alert level the proposed activity is able to proceed. For example, under alert level two, only gatherings of up to 10 people can take place. Events and activities have been assessed according to these criteria.

13.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     Based on the focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

16.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

18.     The board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.”

19.     A summary of each application received through Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One and Multi-Board Local Grants Round One is provided (see Attachment B and C).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

 

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

22.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board adopted the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Grants Programme 2020/2019 on 17 June 2020 see attachment A (MO/2020/82). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

23.     This report presents applications received in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Round One and Multi-Board Round One 2019/2020 (see Attachment B and C).

24.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $373,000 for the 2020/2021 financial year.

25.     Twenty-nine applications were received for Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Grant Round One 2020/2021, and seven applications were received for Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Multi-Board Grant Round One requesting a total of $192,685.10

26.       Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Following the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board allocating funding for local grants round one, the grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Mangere-Otahuhu Grants Programme 2020/2021 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Grants Round One 2020/2021, Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Mangere-Otahuhu Multi-Board Grant Round One 2020/2020, Application Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Helen Taimarangai - Senior Community Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


 

 

Road Name Approval for a New Private Road at Auckland Airport off Te Kapua Drive, Māngere

File No.: CP2020/12477

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to name a new private road at Auckland Airport, being constructed at the western end of existing Te Kapua Drive, Māngere.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council’s road naming guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       Applicant Auckland International Airport Ltd has proposed the road name options presented in the table below for consideration by the local board.

4.       Any of the proposed road name options would be acceptable for the local board to approve for use in this location, having been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met, and the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region. Mana Whenua were consulted and suggested the proposed names.

5.       The proposed name options for the new private road off Te Kapua Drive, Māngere, are:

 

Table 1: Proposed Road Name options

Applicant’s Preferred Name

Paitai Way 

First Alternative

Whanoā Way

Second Alternative

Awataotaoroa Way

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      Approve the name ‘Paitai Way’ for the new private road at Auckland Airport being constructed at the western end of Te Kapua Drive, Māngere, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent reference BUN60315725).

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       A new private road is being constructed at Auckland Airport at the western end of existing Te Kapua Drive, Māngere, as addressed under resource consent reference BUN60315725 approved on 17th May 2018 for Stage 4 of the ‘Landing’ development.

 

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

9.       Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names try to reflect local themes, with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged. Theme examples include:

-     a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

-     a particular landscape, environmental, or biodiversity theme or feature; or

-     an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

 

10.     Auckland International Airport Ltd’s proposed names have been suggested by Te Akitai Waiohua, who are mana whenua of the area. All names link to the local area. Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority and Makaurau Marae Maori Trust were also contacted for name suggestions; however, no additional comments were received.

11.     The proposed names and meanings are set out in the table below:

 

Table 2: Proposed Road Name Meanings

Proposed names

Meaning, as described by Te Akitai Waiohua

 

Paitai Way

Applicant’s Preferred Name

 

One of the original names of the area, short for ‘Paetai takō’ meaning ‘Clear of mangroves’. This development is adjacent to, and related to, the Paetai area.

 

Whanoā Way

Alternative option

 

One of the original names of the area was ‘Whanoā’, short for ‘Whanowhanoā’ meaning ‘annoyed’ or ‘vexed’. It was given this name in commemoration of an event which took place when the Tainui canoe arrived in Manukau and Hoturoa wherein the captain of Tainui became annoyed with his junior wife Mārama and her indiscretions - see online narratives for ‘Te Mānukanukatanga o Hoturoa’.

Note the macron is necessary for this name.

 

 

Awataotaoroa Way Alternative option

 

‘River’ - Awa, 'Long ballast’ - taotao (ballast), roa (long).

The original name of the Taotaoroa Creek area and the 19th century European settlement it. It was also the design inspiration for the nearby SH20a overbridge.

 


 

Assessment Advice:

12.     The names proposed by the Applicant have been assessed to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards are met and the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region. Mana whenua have been consulted and suggested the proposed names – see the Maori Impact Statement section of this report.

 

13.     The only point to note is that whilst ‘Awataotaoroa Way’ is technically suitable for use, this name is not recommended for this specific road because the addressing requirements generally call for short roads to have shorter road names and ‘Awataotaoroa Way’ is a relatively long name.

 

14.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are technically suitable for use in this location and not duplicated elsewhere in the region.

 

15.     Road type: The applicant’s original name preference was ‘Paitai Drive’, however, LINZ did not recommend the use of ‘Drive’ for the road type as there is already a ‘Paritai Drive’ in Orakei approximately15kms away; this would be too similar in sound and could potentially cause issues, hence the road type has been changed to ‘Way’.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The naming of roads is linked to the Auckland Plan Outcome “A Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world”. The use of Māori names for roads, buildings and other public places is an opportunity to publicly demonstrate Māori identity.

 

20.     To aid local board decision making, the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate, as well as a process to enable mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications in a manner and scale that they consider appropriate. Depending on the scale of the development and its level of significance, not all road naming applications receive comments from mana whenua.

 

 

 

21.     In this case, Auckland International Airport Ltd’s proposed names have been suggested by Te Akitai Waiohua, who are mana whenua of the area. Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority and Makaurau Marae Maori Trust were also contacted for name suggestions, however no additional comments were received. This is considered a satisfactory level of consultation considering Te Akitai Waiohua’s mana whenua status.

 

22.     The Applicant has followed the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines’ Principle that “the use of Te Reo Māori road names is actively encouraged” by proposing Māori road name options, as suggested by Te Akitai Waiohua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

 

24.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database containing all street addresses issued by local councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A: Location & Site Plans

47

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Emerald James - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


 

 

PDF Creator



 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

 

Community Empowered Approach to Alcohol Licensing

File No.: CP2020/12117

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on the community-led response to alcohol licensing.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu resolved to support local communities and build capacity for a community-led response to alcohol licensing and advertising. (work programme item # 765). 

3.       This report is based on the update provided by the specialist advisor, Dr. Grant Hewison (Attachment A) who is supporting the implementation of the work programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the report on Community Empowered Approach to alcohol licensing and advertising report (Attachment A).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Community Empowered Approach to alcohol licensing report from Dr Grant Hewison

53

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


 

 


 


 


 


 


 

 

Urgent Decision request to provide feedback on the Council's Council-Controlled Organisations (CCO) Review

File No.: CP2020/12403

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To notify the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board of a decision made under the local board’s urgent decision-making process to provide feedback to the Governing body on the Council’s Council-Controlled Organisations(CCO) review on 26 August 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board notes the report and following resolutions from the Urgent Decision on 26 August 2020:

a)         welcomes the findings and recommendations in the review of CCOs by the independent panel.

b)         welcomes the proposal in recommendation 34 on how to address CCO-local board engagement and request that this work be started as soon as possible; and further suggests

-     regular, frequent communication between the Chief Executives of CCOs and boards in order to build better working relations

-     that there is a focus on greater accountability of CCOs; while the board understands the need for efficiency in the CCO model, alongside is a critical need for transparency and public accountability.

-     that results from this review must lead to a new model that can demonstrate to local communities that the Council family entities that manage huge public resources are delivering with efficiency for them

c)         supports the recommendations to establish Māori responsiveness plan at the local board level and better tracking and reporting of progress on actions outlined in these plans.

d)         identify any views and preferences on the recommendation to approve a merger of two CCOs (namely Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development and Regional Facilities Auckland Limited).

e)         note that local boards will be able to provide input on the other relevant CCO review recommendations as they are further developed for implementation.

f)          provides views and preferences in the following table on the other findings and recommendations in CCO review.

 

 

Issue

Support/

Not support

Comment

1.

Note that the review stated that all 64 recommendations should be considered as a package.  Support all the recommendations and the implementation of them as a package.

 

Support

 

2

Agree that success of the review will lie in its implementation, and request to be involved in the full life cycle of the implementation programme.

 

Support

 

3

Request more detailed information about how local boards will provide input to the process of setting expectations and strategic direction for the CCOs.

 

Support

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board is of the view that its elected members are local leaders who are a critical link to our communities to ensure public accountability towards what is delivered through CCOs.

Local boards are the lever of influence in setting expectations and strategic direction for the CCOs to embed transparent practices for public accountability.

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board supports revenue mechanisms (levers) being supported by localized direction and strategically applied towards harmonizing economic gain and community need.

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board supports better localized engagement plans from CCOs, and these should be implemented as business as usual rather than something additional to engagement plans.

In setting the future direction for the investment of significantly large resources managed by CCOs, Auckland Council’s local boards must have a meaningful influence, for example, in areas such as town centre re-development, economic recovery, creating employment and improving business environment in the post-COVID scenario.

 

Local Board Specific Recommendations

4

Support the notion that recommendations 6, 34 and 53 will require more detailed input from local boards.

 

Support

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board expects that the outcomes of the CCO review will lead to better working relationships which deliver results on the local board plans in meaningful ways.

5

Support the idea that regular monitoring is in place to evaluate whether the changes resulting from recommendation 53 are working effectively.

 

Support

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board stresses the need for regular, meaningful communication with local boards. Such communication must be with an intent of gaining local perspectives to deliver better service outcomes in a fair and equitable manner.

6

Support the notion that CCOs should be more joined up in their approach to local activities

 

Support

Supports stronger working relationships between CCO directors and local boards, in particular, Panuku, ATEED and Auckland Transport.

7

Support the recommendation that reports from CCOs should be joined up in their reporting

 

Support

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board supports the idea of a joined-up report, however this can only be meaningful if:

-     CCOs make a cultural shift in working with local boards to include a local board lens in their thinking.

-     Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board asks that reports are at least quarterly

-     reports should include a section showing the forward plan in which the local opportunities are identified and for which boards are able to give inputs.

-     suggests the idea of a joint workshop of CCOs with local boards.

Notes that current 6-monthly reports are of not much value to boards as these are retrospective and do not allow for any strategic / directional influence by elected members. 

This is the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board’s starting point towards integrating strategies and a focused approach to delivering local board plans.

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board supports revenue mechanisms (levers) being supported by strategic and localized direction and strategically applied towards harmonizing economic gain and community need.

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board supports a better localized engagement plan that should be implemented as business as usual rather than something additional to engagement plans.

Merger of ATEED and RFA

8

Support / do not support the merger of RFA and ATEED.

 

Support

The move to serve better outcomes must include an intent to serve the southern area of Auckland; and Māngere-Ōtāhuhu  with its distinct Pasifika and Māori cultural identity, high youth population and unemployment.

That actions to develop opportunities for the Māngere–Otahuhu local board area ensure the area benefits and shares in the prosperity from international and national activities and events hosted in the Auckland region, e.g., Women’s World Soccer tournaments, Women’s Rugby, America’s Cup, and Super Rugby.

That the small scale local economy, economic growth in individual neighbourhoods, is critical to serve better outcomes. The adverse impact of COVID-19 in the south of Auckland gives evidence of the gap in focus on coordinated local economic development. The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board asks that future actions place a clear responsibility for framing and delivery on local economic development outcomes

9

Support the notion of a reduced number of CCOs that local boards and their communities need to interact with.

 

Support

 

 

10

Support / do not support the notion of bringing Auckland War Memorial Museum, Stardome and MOTAT into the merged entity.

 

Support

That strategic actions must deliver on service outcomes for the southern areas of Auckland and the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu community.

11

Support a more joined up approach with Eden Park Trust and look forward to providing input into a Stadia Strategy.

 

Support

 

12

Request involvement of local boards in discussions around developing guidance to CCOs on how to balance public and commercial interests

 

Support

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board notes its strong concern that, while it appreciates the need for CCOs to operate at arms length, the refined model must address a balance between public and private interests.

Once again, it is about establishing transparency and accountability at all levels, as even at arm’s length entities  such as CCOs are using public resources.

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board urges that the service outcomes of CCOs must address issues of equity in delivery, if public accountability is to be addressed through this review.

 

13

Welcomes discussion on how a merged RFA/ATEED will enhance the role of BIDs

 

Support

Specifically, an integrated framework to monitor and deliver on local economic development, including the role of Business Associations.

Panuku

14

Support recommendation 11 that council assumes responsibility from Panuku for identifying non-service properties to sell (excluding those in the CCO’s own unlock-and-transform areas)

 

Support

Supports the recommendation that council amends the Panuku constitution to make clear its twin purpose of redeveloping urban areas and managing the council’s non-service property

15

Support the need for a property strategy as outlined in recommendation 14.

 

Support

 

Other recommendations – note this is not an exhaustive list of all other recommendations in the report

16

Note recommendation 23 regarding the creation of a set of common key performance measures and request that local boards be able to provide input into how these are developed.

 

Support

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board seeks clear accountability of CCOs through their KPIs and connecting these to delivery and performance at the level of local boards.

The transparency and accountability of CCOs towards the public demands  closer working with local boards, whose members are elected by the local people. The CCOs use a significant portion of public resources and KPIs are a lever to use to demonstrate accountability at the grassroot level.

17

Note that recommendations 20, 25, and 30 from the review, and recommendation (e) from staff to the Governing Body will require additional staff at a time when the council is reducing staff numbers and request a commitment from the Chief Executive that staff will be made available for this project.

 

Support

 

18

Support recommendation 41 and request that IT systems be updated and aligned to ensure that an up to date directory of staff including all CCO staff is available to all.

 

Support

 

19

Support recommendation 43 that CCO boards need to become more diverse, and request that the recommendation is implemented more broadly to encompass that board members should have experience working with local communities.

Support

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board has a strong concern that the CCO boards do not mirror the ethno-cultural diversity of Auckland. In delivering outcomes for Māori, Pacific and our many diverse communities, the composition of the CCO boards need to display the experience, insights and perspective of all parts of the community.

A diverse membership on CCO boards would be a strength.

20

Note recommendation 44 regarding setting a tone for organizational culture and request more detailed information on how a culture change will be implemented at Auckland Transport, particularly in the context of emergency budgets.

 

Support

Elected members, representing the public, have a key role in shaping the strategic direction of CCOs decision making structure. 

21

Support/endorse the recommendations 26, 50 and 59 regarding induction and training and note the reduced staff/budget of the team that delivers these programmes.

 

Support

 

22

Request more information about recommendation 62 regarding “shared services” and whether this will include introducing IT and HR systems that are consistent and/or compatible across the council family.

 

Support

Work towards a more cost-effective model if business models have similar outcomes bringing value for money for rate payers.  

23

Note that the recommendations do not address the question of whether Governing Body members should be Auckland Transport board members.

Support

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board notes its concern that this is a significant gap and needs to be addressed as it is a key lever for public accountability.

Having elected members on CCO boards can further progress localised needs and help CCOs further understand the Auckland Council governance model.

The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu local board views a CCO with a diverse board or committee as a strength, and these bodies must represent Auckland’s diversity by having different people with different backgrounds, views and skills on the CCO boards.

24

Request that the implementation programme looks at the planning cycles for Auckland Council and CCOs and how they can be better aligned.

Support

The management of the planning process needs to be more transparent and with clear connections to the Local Board Plans and Long-term Plan; to be more visible and have a clear local level lens on future planning and delivery priorities.

 

g)         appreciates the opportunity to provide feedback to the Governing Body and the Chair Lemauga Lydia Sosene would like to speak to the feedback on 27 August 2020 at the Governing Body meeting.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Signed Urgent Decision

67

b

CCO Review Report

83

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 

Project Streetscapes: Weed Management report

File No.: CP2020/12685

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the recommended regional methodology to edge and maintain weeds on footpaths, berms and the kerb and channel on more than 5000km of urban roads in the Auckland region.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council manages edges and weeds on footpaths, berms and the kerb and channel in the urban road corridor for statutory, asset protection, amenity, and health and safety outcomes.

3.       The service level for weed management on berms and in the kerb and channel is the same across Auckland. However, the methodologies for edging and weed control on hard surfaces, either plant-based, synthetic herbicides or thermal, e.g. hot water/steam, differ between local board areas. In some cases, different methods are used within the same local board boundaries. This reflects the continuation of legacy council approaches.

4.       In April 2019, Auckland Transport transferred services and budget to the council’s Community Facilities department to manage weeds within the road corridor on their behalf. Auckland Transport retains responsibility for the road corridor as per the Local Government Act 1974 and the Land Transport Act 1998.

5.       The transfer was completed as part of Project Streetscapes (which did not include the Hauraki Gulf Islands), a variation to the Community Facilities outcome-based maintenance contracts. Part of the project included developing recommendations for a regionally consistent approach for edging and weed control on hard surfaces in the road corridor.

6.       Community Facilities has continued with the legacy approach to weed control while completing a review of weed management methodologies. The scope of the review and recommendations are for edging and weed control on hard surfaces within the urban road corridor, excluding the Hauraki Gulf Islands. Rural roads are not included due to differences in population, roading infrastructure and land use in rural areas.

7.       The evaluation criteria for the review’s recommendations include environmental impacts, community input, the council’s commitment to reduce carbon emissions in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan and the objectives of the council Weed Management Policy for effective, efficient, and sustainable outcomes.

8.       A council People’s Panel survey was conducted in October 2019 as one mechanism to gauge how Aucklanders feel about managing weeds on footpaths and kerbs (see Attachment A).

9.       The recommendation of this review is for a combination of plant-based herbicide with spot spraying of glyphosate for difficult to manage weeds. This is estimated to lead to a reduction in glyphosate, carbon emissions and water usage across the region while achieving effective control. This approach is estimated to be achievable within existing operational budgets.

10.     Feedback is sought from local boards to be included in the recommendation to the Governing Body on a standardised approach for edging and weed control on hard surfaces in the road corridor (see Attachment B). This will be presented at the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 12 November 2020.

11.     Should a local board choose to utilise alternative methodologies to those agreed, they have the option of using locally driven initiative (LDI) funding to cover the cost difference between the agreed regional weed management method and the alternative.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the recommended approach to a standardised methodology to managing weeds on footpaths, berms and the kerb and channel across more than 5000km of urban roads.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     Community Facilities carries out edging and weed management on footpaths, berms and the kerb and channel across more than 5000km of Auckland urban roads. This is done for asset protection and amenity, as well as health and safety outcomes, including:

·        preventing root intrusion causing damage to the road surface, kerb and channel, footpaths and other road assets

·        ensuring vegetation growing in the kerb and channel does not interfere with water flow

·        ensuring the safety of pedestrians and road users by maintaining clear sight-lines and minimising trip hazards

·        maintaining the streetscape in a tidy and aesthetically pleasing condition.

13.     Auckland’s moderate and wet climate makes the area particularly vulnerable to the detrimental effects of weeds. The climate causes vigorous growth, easy establishment, and increased infestation of weeds. The road corridor provides a dynamic environment for the spread of weeds including through vehicle and water dispersal.[1]

14.     Uncontrolled weeds on footpaths and the kerb and channel cause damage that can lead to increased repairs and renewals with a funding and environmental impact. This damage may create trip hazards, putting people at risk.

15.     Agrichemicals are used for edging and weed control in the urban road corridor. Edging is required on both sides of the road, which is over 10,000km of footpaths and berms. The Auckland Council Weed Management Policy guides the use of herbicide by the council and supports best practice weed control.[2] All agrichemical use must follow the rules of the Unitary Plan, which ensures that, when used correctly, agrichemicals can make a positive contribution to sustainable land use.[3]

16.     The outcome-based contract specifications for the road corridor do not permit herbicide application outside schools or early learning services on days that these institutions are in use. There are limitations on the time of spraying in urban areas and the contract specifications include instructions to not complete weed control where the berm is clearly being maintained by the adjacent property owner.[4]

17.     All of Auckland is covered by a ‘no-spray register’ for berms adjacent to private property. Any resident who agrees to manage weeds to a specified standard can apply to ‘opt out’ of weed management completed by the council, through recording their intent on the no-spray register. Residents can register through a dedicated form on the council website or through the council call centre.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Weed management in the road corridor

18.     The service level outcomes for weed management on berms and in the kerb and channel are the same across Auckland. However, the methodologies for their maintenance, either plant-based, synthetic herbicides or thermal, e.g. hot water/steam, differs between local board areas. In some cases, different methods are used within the same local board boundaries. These differences reflect the weed control methods and herbicides that were used by the legacy councils of Auckland City Council, Manukau City Council, Waitākere City Council, North Shore City Council, Papakura District Council, Rodney District Council and Franklin District Council prior to amalgamation.

19.     In April 2019, Auckland Transport transferred services and budget to the council’s Community Facilities unit to manage weeds within the road corridor. Auckland Transport retains responsibility for the road corridor as per the Local Government Act 1974 and the Land Transport Act 1998.

20.     Weed management on footpaths, berms and the kerb and channel is now part of the outcome-based Full Facilities contract for streetscapes. These include pest plant control, mowing, town centre cleaning, and waste removal completed on behalf of Auckland Transport.

21.     Community Facilities has continued with the legacy approach for edging and weed control on hard surfaces, while completing a review of the methodologies with a view to making recommendations to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for a consistent regional approach. The scope of the review and recommendations is only for the urban road corridor and does not include rural areas or the Hauraki Gulf Islands. This reflects the differences in population, roading infrastructure and land use in rural areas.

Comparison of weed management methodologies

Synthetic herbicide – glyphosate

22.     The synthetic herbicide used for edging and weed management on footpaths, berms and the kerb and channel in the urban road corridor in Auckland is glyphosate. Glyphosate is used by the council for weed management on parks and reserves, and by most road controlling authorities in New Zealand to control vegetation in the road corridor.[5]

23.     Glyphosate is a low toxicity broad-spectrum non-selective herbicide which is particularly effective on broadleaf weeds and grasses. Glyphosate is a systemic herbicide that is absorbed through green plant tissue and is then translocated throughout the plant, including the root system, to kill the entire plant.[6]

24.     Glyphosate is diluted with water and applied via foliar spray with a small left-hand steer vehicle in the urban road corridor. It is the most cost-effective method as it needs to be applied less frequently than other methods. In the urban road corridor, spot spraying with glyphosate typically occurs six times per year to achieve the desired level of service.

25.     There is some community and international debate about the health risk of glyphosate with several regions no longer using, or minimising the use of, glyphosate for weed control in public areas.

26.     Auckland Council’s agrichemical use is guided by the New Zealand Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in their role as the regulator of hazardous substances in New Zealand. The EPA gathers information from multiple credible sources when deciding whether substances are safe to use. The EPA has granted approval for the use of glyphosate-containing substances in accordance with the EPA code of practice. Should the EPA change their position on glyphosate, the council would respond appropriately.

27.     In October 2019 the EPA stated the following:

Products containing glyphosate are considered safe, provided that all of the rules around their use are followed. …We are aware that some reports linking glyphosate to health impacts are causing concern. We are in alignment with the vast majority of regulatory bodies around the world – including in the European Union, United States, Australia and Canada - which agree that glyphosate is unlikely to cause cancer.[7]

28.     For all agrichemical use, the council complies with the Environmental Protection Agency Code of Practice (NZS 8409:2004 Management of Agrichemicals) for the storage, mixing, use, disposal and certification of contractors.

29.     Glyphosate is strongly absorbed into soil and has no residual activity.[8] Community Facilities only uses approved formulations of glyphosate, with no human hazard ratings, within the road corridor.[9] While the formulation being used within the road corridor is also approved for use in the aquatic environment, it does have a hazard rating for toxicity for aquatic life at high concentrations.[10] As per the Code of Practice, glyphosate is only used in appropriate weather conditions to minimise spray drift by rain and wind.

30.     A caution for the use of glyphosate is the development of resistance in some weed species.[11]

31.     Local boards that use spot spraying of glyphosate for weed management include Franklin, Henderson-Massey, Howick, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Manurewa, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Papakura, Rodney, Waitākere Ranges, and Whau. All methodologies include some mechanical removal of weeds.

Plant-based herbicide

32.     Plant-based herbicides used in the urban road corridor include Biosafe and Bio Weed Blast. The active ingredient is a fatty acid which is a contact herbicide. When applied to weeds, it burns off the foliage, thus preventing or reducing seed production and restricting growth.

33.     As plant-based herbicides are not systemic, i.e. they do not kill down to the root, they must be applied more frequently than glyphosate to meet service levels. Although they can kill annuals, generally they will not kill longer-lived mature perennial weeds, as they re-sprout from specialised (e.g. rhizomes) root tissue after the foliage has been burned off. Fatty acid-based herbicides need to be applied to young or small plants for acceptable weed control.[12]

34.     Plant-based herbicides are diluted with water and applied via foliar spray with small left-hand steer vehicle in the urban road corridor, approximately 12 times per year. The exclusive use of plant-based herbicide is approximately three times more expensive than glyphosate because of the additional frequency and quantity of product required.[13] There is an additional cost consideration due to the corrosive impact of the fatty acid on equipment which needs to be replaced more regularly.

35.     While plant-based herbicides are inactivated on contact with the soil and have no residual activity[14], there is a health and safety risk to be managed by the operators. The active ingredient is an eye, skin and respiratory irritant. There is a strong notable odour from plant-based herbicide which can be, and has been, the source of complaints from the public.

36.     For all agrichemical use, the council complies with the Environmental Protection Agency Code of Practice (NZS 8409:2004 Management of Agrichemicals) for the storage, mixing, use, disposal and certification of contractors.

37.     Plant-based herbicide is approved for use in Auckland and has been used since prior to amalgamation. Although there are no restrictions imposed by the EPA for application within the road corridor, the products have a hazard rating for toxicity for aquatic life. Instructions from the manufacturer include applying when conditions are dry, and rain is not expected in the road corridor within the next two hours.[15]

38.     Local boards that use plant-based herbicide exclusively, include Albert-Eden, Puketāpapa, Waitematā (excluding the central business district), Waiheke and Ellerslie in Ōrākei. All methodologies include some mechanical removal of weeds.

Thermal – steam and hot water

39.     Thermal technologies include steam and hot water. Water heated to high temperatures is applied to weeds with a hose and lance to destroy the foliage. Thermal weed management leaves the roots primarily untreated.[16]

40.     Thermal technology requires significant water use, using between 10-12L of water per minute.[17] Non-potable water sources can be used to mitigate demand on treated water sources, however non-potable water is not currently available in most areas of Auckland. This leaves the implementation of this method vulnerable to water restrictions as we have seen in 2020.[18]

41.     This method utilises mobile diesel boilers to heat water to 98 degrees. Diesel boilers use up to 9L[19] of diesel an hour with associated carbon emissions of 24kg.[20] Thermal technology is more expensive than herbicide. A two-person team is required, and the application rate is slower as it requires a prolonged application to cover the foliage. Application speeds are approximately 1.1km/hr[21] for thermal compared to 1.8km/hr for herbicide.[22] Like plant-based herbicide, thermal weed management needs to be applied more frequently, approximately 12 times a year, to meet weed management service levels.

42.     Local boards that use thermal technology include Devonport-Takapuna, Kaipātiki, parts of Upper Harbour and Hibiscus and Bays. There is some use of spot spraying of glyphosate to address persistent weeds. All methodologies include some mechanical removal of weeds.

 

 

Thermal – hot foam

43.     A product called Foamstream has been trialled in Auckland in 2020. Foamstream is a soluble concentrate which is added to hot water to create a foam and has been used in the United Kingdom for weed management. [23] The foam acts as an insulator to keep the heat higher for longer. The manufacturer claims that the use of foam could reduce the frequency of treatment cycles compared to using steam/hot water alone. A review of the trial is currently underway and, if the product proves suitable, staff will seek approval from Auckland Transport and Healthy Waters for its use in the road corridor.

Combination of synthetic and plant-based herbicide

44.     This approach uses a combination of both glyphosate and plant-based herbicide. Plant-based herbicide is applied throughout the year to manage weeds, with the use of glyphosate by spot spraying at peak weed growing times on difficult to control weeds.

45.     An integrated approach results in a reduction of both products and provides more effective control of persistent weeds than by using plant-based herbicide alone. This methodology is used in the Auckland Botanic Gardens to reduce the use of glyphosate. The use of herbicide with a different mode of action in combination with glyphosate is one of the main strategies to avoid glyphosate resistance.[24]

46.     Local boards that use a combined approach include Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and Ōrākei (except for Ellerslie where only plant-based herbicide is applied). All methodologies include some mechanical removal of weeds.

Methodology comparison

47.     In 2015, a comparison of methodologies was completed (see Attachment C). The data in the table was reviewed by Price Waterhouse Coopers (PWC) and the effectiveness, environmental and human health information was independently peer-reviewed by the firm AECOM.

48.     For the current review, further analysis was completed to estimate quantities of water, herbicide and operational carbon emissions per methodology. This reflects the council’s commitments within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan[25], the Auckland water efficiency strategy and the Weed Management Policy. The data on herbicide volumes has come from contractor reporting for the urban road corridor (as the data includes pest plant control, the use for edging and hard surfaces is expected to be lower). Water usage and fuel consumption are from product specification sheets and supplier data. These are estimates only, with volumes of herbicide and water varying by area, season and weed levels.

49.     For the purpose of this review, updated supplier costings for a regionally consistent approach were requested. The difference in pricing for alternative methodologies compared to glyphosate was expected, reflecting the different frequencies and volume of product needed. For plant-based weed control to achieve similar outcomes, more frequent treatments are required than glyphosate, thereby increasing the costs of materials, labour and fuel. Thermal technology is applied at the same frequency as plant-based herbicide, 12 times a year, with a slower application rate requiring a two-person team. These are estimates only and may not include costs for change implementation e.g. purchase of machinery etc.


 

       Table 1: Comparison of estimated operational carbon emissions, volume of water, herbicide and cost per km per year for each weed management approach

Methodology

Carbon emissions[26]

Water usage

Herbicide

Active Ingredient

(kg)

Application rate

Cost

Glyphosate

(6x per year)

1.1kg

180L

1.8L

0.9kg glyphosate

 

1.8km per hour (single operator)

$783

Combination of plant-based/ glyphosate

(10x per year)

1.9kg

870L

0.7L of glyphosate & 8L of plant-based

0.4kg glyphosate

5.6kg fatty acid

1.8km per hour (single operator)

 

$1293


Plant-based herbicide

(12x per year)

2.3kg

1350L[27]

13.5L

9.5kg

fatty acid

1.8km per hour (single operator)

$2265

Thermal technologies – steam and hot water

(12x per year)

264kg

6545L

Approx. 0.5L of glyphosate

0.25kg

glyphosate

1.1km per hour (two operators)

$3485

 Auckland Council – People’s Panel survey

50.     In October 2019, a People’s Panel survey was conducted as one mechanism to gauge how Aucklanders view management of weeds on footpaths and kerbs. The survey was sent to 39,789 members of the People’s Panel. They were provided with the information on the council website on the different methodologies[28]. However, at the time of the survey, estimated emissions, volume of herbicide, and cost were not available.

51.     Of the 5686 respondents, 66 per cent stated that they ‘care’ about the weeds on our footpaths and kerbs. The results showed that 43 per cent of residents use synthetic herbicide (e.g. glyphosate) for weed management on their own property. Synthetic herbicide (e.g. glyphosate) was the least preferred method for weed management in the road corridor by 52 per cent of respondents.

52.     Nineteen per cent were willing to pay higher rates for the council to use alternatives to synthetic herbicide, 42 per cent were not willing to pay extra, and 36 per cent indicated they may be willing to pay more[29]. There were differences in responses by local board area as detailed in Attachment A (People’s Panel results by local board).

53.     There are members of the community that believe glyphosate should not be used by Auckland Council.

Regional review recommendation

54.     The review of methodologies to manage weeds in the urban road corridor takes into consideration the Auckland Weed Management Policy, Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan and community input.


 

Table 2: Summary of the advantages and disadvantages of the different weed management methodologies

Methodology

Advantages

Disadvantages

Synthetic herbicide – glyphosate

Low cost, low frequency of application, effective weed control

Reduced carbon emissions

Risk of community objection to the use of glyphosate

Restricted weather conditions for application

Herbicide resistance in some species

Plant-based herbicide

Reduction in glyphosate used by council for weed control

Immediate effect on weeds

Increased frequency and therefore a greater volume of herbicide compared to glyphosate

Plant-based herbicide is two to three times more expensive than glyphosate

The product is corrosive and has a strong odour

Restricted weather conditions for application

Thermal technology steam/hot water/hot water with a foam additive

Thermal technology does not use herbicide

Can be applied in any weather

Immediate effect on weeds

 

High water usage and carbon emissions

Spot spraying glyphosate is still required on high volume roads and to address persistent weeds

Thermal technology is more expensive than glyphosate

Combination of plant-based and synthetic herbicide, e.g. glyphosate

An estimated region-wide reduction in the use of glyphosate, carbon emissions and water use

Minimising the volume of agrichemical use across the region

Reduction in risk of plants developing glyphosate resistance

An increase in herbicide use in some local board areas

55.     The recommendation for a standardised methodology is a combination of plant-based herbicide with spot spraying of glyphosate for difficult weeds. This is estimated to lead to a reduction in glyphosate, carbon emissions and water usage across the region. There would be an increase in the use of plant-based herbicide. This approach is estimated to be achievable within current operational budgets.

56.     Thermal methodologies, including hot foam, could be used for sensitive areas but are not recommended for a region-wide approach due to their high emissions, water usage and cost. The exclusive use of plant-based herbicide is not recommended due to the additional volume of herbicide required and its cost.

57.     Local board feedback is sought on the standardised regional recommendation and on local priorities for weed control on footpath and kerb and channel (see Attachment B). Local board priorities will be included for consideration by the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 12 November 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

58.     Climate change adaptation – changes in Auckland’s climate may alter the prevalence and spread of weeds within the road corridor. In the future, different methodologies and products may need to be considered depending on weed species.

59.     Climate change mitigation – Auckland Council adopted Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan on 21 July 2020, which includes the reduction target for council to halve its carbon emissions by 2030 and reach zero net emissions by 2050.

60.     The choice of weed management methodologies has an impact on the council’s carbon emissions. The region-wide adoption of thermal would lead to an increase in carbon emissions at an estimated 1335 tons[30] or approximately 5 per cent of the council’s operational emissions for 2018/2019. This reflects the energy required to heat large volumes of water to 98 degrees with diesel boilers. The increase for the regional adoption of this methodology would impact on the council’s ability to meet the reduction targets of the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

61.     Community Facilities undertakes the maintenance of green spaces within the road corridor under contract to and on behalf of Auckland Transport. Auckland Transport “manages and controls” the Auckland transport system as per the Local Government Act 1974 and the Land Transport Act 1998.

62.     Auckland Council adopted a Weed Management Policy for parks and open spaces in August 2013 (resolution number RDO/2013/137). The Weed Management Policy is to guide the management of weeds in Auckland’s parks and open spaces, including the road corridor.

63.     The recommendation for a standardised approach has been provided in consultation with Auckland Transport and with consideration of the objectives of the Weed Management Policy.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

64.     The recommendations of this report will have differing impacts on local boards (except the Hauraki Gulf local boards which are excluded from the regional approach) given the different approaches currently in place. This report is to request feedback from local boards regarding their priorities for an effective, efficient, and sustainable standardised regional weed management methodology (see Attachment B).

65.     Should a local board choose to utilise alternative methodologies to those adopted as the region-wide approach, they are able to use locally-driven initiative (LDI) funding to cover the cost difference between the agreed regional weed management method and their preferred alternative.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

66.     The recommendations of the review take into consideration the Weed Management Policy, with the objective to minimise agrichemicals, and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework which were developed in consultation with mana whenua.

67.     An overview of the current methodologies and the priorities of the review were presented at the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Mana Whenua hui. The analysis and recommendations of the review will be presented to mana whenua for feedback in September 2020.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     Different methodologies to manage weeds have different financial implications. This reflects the associated costs of the methodologies to achieve weed management outcomes.

Table 3: Estimated cost of weed management methodologies per km per annum[31]

Methodology

Estimated cost per km (per annum)

Estimated cost (per annum) across 5055km

Synthetic herbicide, e.g. glyphosate

$783

$3,958,000

Combination of plant-based and synthetic herbicide

$1293

 

$6,536,115

Plant-based herbicide, e.g. biosafe

$2265

$11,499,575

Thermal technology steam/hot water

$3485

$17,616,675

69.     The recommended approach, a combination of plant-based herbicide and spot spraying of glyphosate for difficult weeds, is estimated to be able to be delivered within the existing operational budgets.

70.     To standardise thermal and plant-based methodologies across the region would require an increase in budget to meet weed management service levels. As there is no additional operational budget for streetscape maintenance, methodologies requiring additional expenditure could impact on other Full Facilities services delivered to local boards e.g. town centre and park maintenance, replanting of gardens, and ability to respond to a request for service.

71.     Should a local board choose to utilise alternate methodologies to those adopted as the region-wide approach, they could use LDI funding to cover the cost difference between the agreed regional weed management method and their preferred alternative.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

72.     The outcomes of this project have the following risks:

Options

Risk

Mitigation

No change

Continuing with legacy arrangements, with inconsistent funding

Communication on the rationale for any decision to continue with legacy weed management methodologies

Standardising a regional weed methodology

Depending on the choice of the methodology, there would be different environmental and social impacts, including community concern

Local board decision-making enables the prioritisation of funding for local priorities and the services that their communities most value

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

73.     Local boards provide feedback on the recommended approach to weed management in the kerb and channel and footpaths and rank their priorities for weed management in the road corridor.

74.     Once the feedback is received, it will be collated and included in a report to the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 12 November 2020.

75.     At the meeting of the Environment and Climate Change Committee, a decision will be made on the methodology to be applied across the Auckland region for weed management.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Results of October 2019 People's Panel survey

101

b

Local board feedback on weed management impact priorities

117

c

Weed control methodology table

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jenny Gargiulo, Principal Environmental Specialist, Community Facilities

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


 

 

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Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2020/11921

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      notes the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Calendar September

129

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


 

 


 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2020/11920

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are the notes from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board workshops held on 5, 12 and 26 August 2020.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the workshop notes from the workshops held on 5, 12 and 26 August 2020.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

5 August workshop notes

133

b

12 August workshop notes

135

c

26 August workshop notes

137

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Local Board Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 

Auckland Counil's Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for quarter four 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/11155

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter four, 1 April – 30 June 2020, and the overall performance for the financial year, against the agreed 2019/2020 local board work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an integrated view of performance for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and includes financial performance and delivery against work programmes for the 2019/2020 financial year.

3.       The COVID19 pandemic has resulted in significant pressure on council’s financial position. In response to the Ministry of Health’s orders and to ensure prudent financial management council’s focus and expenditure shifted to essential services. A pause on spending on non-essential services has had a significant impact on the delivery of work programme activities.

4.       Ninety nine (99) activities within the agreed work programmes were delivered including multi-year projects that have progressed as expected. Fifty eight (58) activities were undelivered, cancelled, put on hold or deferred.

5.       Key activity achievements from the 2019/2020 work programme include:

·    The Mangere Trade and Exchange network (stage 2) was completed, just before the lock down and a project coordinator was employed and established a data base of 24 businesses and community groups. Over the year, 14,000 kilograms of goods were re-used and diverted from landfill through the trade and exchange network. (Item # 724)

·    Work on “Pest free Ihumātao” involved using services of New Zealand Biosecurity for skill development; selection of four rangatahi and one tuakana for a kaitiakitanga cadetship. Pest plant control was undertaken around Oruarangi Awa and surrounding areas and ended with a a celebration at Makaurau Marae in July. (Item # 721)

·    The work on “Healthy rentals” resulted in 14 homes receiving energy efficiency advice and installations via the partnership with the AWHI Healthy Homes Initiative and Habitat for Humanity’s To Kāinga Whare Programme. Curtains were installed in 39 homes. (Item #765)

·    The funding agreements to support business associations were completed, though local businesses were severely impacted because of the lock down for public safety. (Item # 104)

·    Capacity building for community-led response to alcohol licensing and advertising resulted in regular communication on social media (Facebook) and meetings continued online. Two objections to grant of licenses were lodged and community members also spoke to council’s regulatory committee on Signage Bylaw to include reference to bottle stores. (Item #108)

·    Local board funding for event partnerships were used as planned. (#Items 251, 252 and #253). An estimated 5000 people attended the two movies in the park events.

·    The Community Arts Broker programme completed as planned; and during the lockdown projects were adapted to a digital platform and were well received. (Item #605)

·    Under the “Full facilities maintenance contracts”, within 24 hours of government’s COVID-19 Level 4 lockdown in March, Community Facilities and City Care closed all Auckland Council facilities and Parks, installed more than 4,000 advisory signage on a range of community facilities and locked vehicle gates to parks across the Auckland Region; they maintained regular site visits to monitor cleanliness, replace signage as required, undertook security checks. They also provided essential services and repairs were implemented to provide a safe, well maintained community facilities and parks.

City Care, the contracted agency, have been working hard to catch up on the backlog reporting on requirements. (Item #3146, 3147)

·    Whare Koa - Māngere Community House refurbishment or internal renewals was completed (Item #3747)

·    The board allocated funding of $138,984 through the Facility partnership grant to three organisations, namely, the Ōtāhuhu Rugby Football Club to replace kitchen benchtops and cupboards in the clubrooms and also to paint the outside and part of the inside of its clubrooms and Māngere Centre Park Sports Association to purchase new tables and chairs for its clubrooms. (Item #602)

·    The Norana Park walkway and path construction was completed and opened to the public.  It was well used by the public during the lock-down period. (Item #2081 - Norana Park)

6.       Key activities not delivered / not progressed as expected include:

·    Item #991 – Libraries: Support customer and community connection and celebrate cultural diversity – the planned activity through an LDI funding did not take place due to the lockdown.

·    Item #2203 - Old School Reserve: renew park roading and car parks: Confirmation to implement the concept is pending and budget is yet to be secured. If the project is not progressed within 10 years, it is advised that the investigation and design will need to be restarted.

·    Item #817 – Ōtāhuhu town centre upgrade: The project is one of large capital expenditure and had to be put on hold in late March due to the restrictions. Works re-commenced on 28 April 2020 under the Alert Level 3 guidelines. The project is progressing well, although there are constraints that will only allow completion of half of the scope (up to the end of SP3 – Great South Road from Criterion Street) due to the number of poor quality utility services found underground and a funding shortfall. Further funding for the project is currently subject to Emergency Budget consultation and the outcome of the shovel ready funding proposals.

·    Item # 2040 – Ōtāhuhu Portage route-Totoia: This is part of the Greenways/ Local paths network to open up the walking, cycling access to the historic crossing. The COVID 19 impact on overall council budget resulted in budget deferrals due to constraints. Currently Mana whenua and community design phase concluded with design brief for concept design being finalised to seek professional services for concept design phase.

·    Item #106 – Youth Connections: The “Local Governance Group” (LGG) comprising representatives of the two local boards, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu and Ōtara-Papatoetoe who had delegation on governance oversight was disestablished in June. The unspent budget of $51,500 was carried forward.

7.       Budgets of unfinished activities have been carried forward into 2020/2021 work programmes. (See also table no.10, para 27)

8.       The 2019/2020 financial performance report is attached but is excluded from the public. This is due to restrictions on releasing annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for the financial quarter four and year ending 30 June 2020.

b)      note the financial performance report in Attachment B of the report will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council Group results for 2019/2020 are released to the New Zealand’s Exchange (NZX) which are expected to be made public on or about 30 September 2020.

c)      note that COVID19 has resulted in significant pressure on council’s financial position and ability to deliver agreed 2019/2020 work programme activities because:

i)        asset based services were significantly impacted. Regional and community facilities were either fully or partially closed.

ii)       spending on contracts was restricted to essential services only.

d)      note that quarter three reporting was not supplied to the local board as there was limited capacity to access information.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has an approved 2019/2020 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Arts, Community and Events;

·        Parks, Sport and Recreation;

·        Libraries;

·        Community Services: Service, Strategy and Integration;

·        Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew;

·        Community Leases;

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        ATEED.

·        The Southern Initiative

10.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

 

 

 

 

 

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

 

11.     The COVID19 pandemic has resulted in significant pressure on council’s financial position and ability to deliver agreed 2019/2020 work programme activities. In response to the orders made by Director General of Health on 25 March 2020 under s 70 of the Health Act 1956 council’s focus and expenditure shifted to essential services only. Physical distancing requirements and measures to ensure prudent financial management meant that only essential activities and services could continue.

12.     Asset based services were significantly impacted as all regional and community facilities were either fully or partially closed depending on the Ministry of Health’s guidelines for each COVID19 alert level.

13.     Spending on contracts was restricted to essential services while in Alert Level 4.  These restrictions were reviewed as alert levels changed.  There are currently no restrictions, however, there continues to be extra spending approvals in place to ensure prudent spending and delivery of value for money for ratepayers.

14.     Reporting on quarter three reporting was not supplied to the local board as council staff working from home during the lockdown had limited capacity to access information and systems which affected their ability to deliver reports in a robust and meaningful way.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

15.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that have been delivered as expected (completed by the end of July 2020) or multi-year activities which have progressed as planned (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that are undelivered or have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

 

 

 

 

Graph 2: Work Programme by RAG status

16.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: work programme activity by activity status and department

 

Key activity achievements from the 2019/2020 work programme

17.     The key achievements in the delivery of the local board work programmes for 2019/2020 include:

·    Item #108 - Community-led response to alcohol licensing resulted in regular communication on social media and monthly meetings were held with community. Objections made against two applications and community representatives attended council’s Regulatory Committee to speak on the Auckland Council Signage Bylaw

·    Item # 605 - Community arts broker programme was completed and during the lockdown, projects were adapted to a digital platform and were well received. There were project providers who preferred to wait until lockdown levels were relaxed so as to deliver to a live audience. That has been accommodated with projects to be delivered as soon as possible. As the arts brokering is through a contracted role there be few months without community arts before the next year’s budgets are finalized.

·    Items #251 to #254- all events funding partnerships were completed.

·    Item #3589 - Walter Massey Park: develop new walkway and new outdoor fitness equipment: detailed design continuing based on local board feedback. Once completed further direction from the local board is required.

·    Item # 3591 & #2116 - Boggust Park - Concept plan implemented as agreed including seating, fitness equipment, pathway and toilet block. Currently it is in the defects repair period where any defects in the new work emerges within 12 months of the completed build date, the contractor is obligated to fix the defects. Finally, the park signage is being completed.

·    Item #2081 - Norana Park – the walkway and path construction is now compete and open. It was well used by the public during the lock-down period.

·    Item #2024 - renew paths throughout the local board area: Footpath physical works (renewals) completed at identified local streets and parks. 

·    Item #2536 - Williams Park - install sand carpet, irrigation and lighting on sports field, the works are complete and good community outcome achieved.

·    Item #2978 - Otahuhu Soccer Club - Toilet block renewal is completed.

·    Item #602 – Facility partnership grant allocated to two groups, namely Ōtāhuhu Rugby Football Club to replace kitchen benchtops and cupboards in the clubrooms, and also to paint the outside and part of the inside of its clubrooms and Māngere Centre Park Sports Association to purchase new tables and chairs for its clubrooms.

·    Item # 724 - The Mangere Trade and Exchange network (stage 2) was completed, just before the lock down and a project coordinator was employed and established a data base of 24 businesses and community groups. Over the year, 14,000 kilograms of goods were re-used and diverted from landfill through the trade and exchange network.

·    Item #765 - The work on “Healthy rentals” resulted in 14 homes receiving energy efficiency advice and installations via the partnership with the AWHI Healthy Homes Initiative and Habitat for Humanity’s To Kāinga Whare Programme. Curtains were installed in 39 homes.

Overview of work programme performance by department

Arts, Community and Events work programme

18.     In the Arts, Community and Events work programme, there are 15 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2020 (green), three activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), six activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and three activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities with significant impact other than COVID-19 are discussed below:

Table 1: Arts, Community and Events activities with significant impact other than COVID-19

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

#109 Responding to Māori aspirations

Amber

In progress

The project delivery group continued work through online- meetings and reference group ratified the work plan for future delivery. Subsequently work was completed as a hui, held in July, for local board boards to present back to Mana Whenua on the local board draft plans. 

 

Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme

19.     In the Parks, Sport and Recreation work programme, there are 6 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2020 (green), 10 activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and 1 activity that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities with significant impact other than COVID-19 are discussed below:

 

Table 2: Parks, Sport and Recreation activities with significant impact other than COVID-19

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

363 -  Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) FY20

Amber

In progress

Gifted names from mana whenua  are expected to be received  in September 2020. Bilingual signage design underway.

379 - Pukaki Crater - access easement

Amber

On Hold

A workshop will be held with the board on next steps regarding the establishment of an easement in Q1 of FY 20/21.

394 - Toia Pool and Leisure Centre: Operations

Amber

In progress

"Contracted centres” were re-opened on the 14 May, with managed social distancing and recommended public health measures. And took a staged approach to include public health practices to effectively manage water consumption.
Visitation, programme enrolments and bookings have gradually increased in all centres throughout the month of June as Aucklanders have become more confident about public hygiene and resumed their active habits."

395 - Moana-Nui-a-Kiwi pool and leisure centre: Operations

Amber

In progress

"The leisure teams supported communities with online content and contact calls to vulnerable members.
Gyms and childcare re-opened on a limited basis on the 21 May, with managed social distancing and recommended public health measures.
Pools re-opened under regional drought stage one water restrictions from the 2 June.

449 - Urban Forest (Ngahere) Strategy FY20

Amber

In progress

Planning recommenced at the end of June and ten year planting plan to be discussed in; update on the 2016 LIDAR and will complete the 'knowing' stage of the project. Funding has been carried forward to enable this work to be completed.

703 - Opportunities to increase public use of third-party facilities.

Amber

In progress

The Sport and Recreation Lead from board requested for widening the scope to prepare a Māngere Ōtāhuhu Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.  Purpose is to identify opportunities to increase public access to sport and recreation facilities.  Sport New Zealand has transferred an additional $25,000 for the cost of preparing the extended plan.  Further work in next financial year with budget carried over, and staff will seek tenders.

787 - Activation of parks, places and open spaces

Amber

In progress

Overall,  37 out of 47 planned activations were delivered across nine locations with a total of 1,525 attendees. 96 per cent of surveyed participants were very satisfied with the activations and 89 per cent were first time attendees. Memo on details provided to board.

1111 - Pukaki Crater Co-Management Committee

Amber

In progress

Further discussion on new lease for public access over crater to be discussed in quarter 1 of next year.

3399 - Ōtuataua Stonefields Reserve Service Assessment

Amber

On Hold

The project will be carried over into FY 20/21 and commence once government direction over proposed residential development adjacent to the reserve has been given.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Libraries work programme

20.     In the Libraries work programme, there are 5 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2020 (green), 1 activity that are in progress but are delayed (amber), 1 activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey). Activities with significant impact other than COVID-19 are discussed below:

Table 3: Libraries activities with significant impact other than COVID-19

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

991 - Support customer and community connection and celebrate cultural diversity 

Red

Not delivered

 

 

 Libraries were closed due to Covid-19 from 5pm 20 March. Ōtāhuhu and Māngere Town

Library's reopened on 20 May followed by Māngere Bridge Library on 5 June.

985 - Support customer connection and celebrate cultural diversity

Amber

In progress

 Libraries were closed due to Covid-19 from 5pm 20 March. Ōtāhuhu and Māngere Town

Library's reopened on 20 May followed by Māngere Bridge Library on 5 June.

 

Service Strategy and Integration work programme

21.     In the Service Strategy and Integration work programme, there are two activities on hold and delayed (amber). Activities with significant impact other than COVID-19 are discussed below:

Table 4: Service Strategy and Integration activities with significant impact other than COVID-19

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

#3835 Investigate and provide direction on future of Otahuhu Community Centre/Town Hall and former Library space

Amber

On hold

 Progression of the detailed seismic assessment and high level design investigations are on hold pending Emergency Budget 2020/2021 decisions

 

 

Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme

22.     In the Community Facilities: Build Maintain Renew work programme, there are 48 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2020 (green),  10 activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), 2 activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and 6 activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey).  Activities with significant impact other than COVID-19 are discussed below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 5: Community Facilities activities with significant impact other than COVID-19

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

2025 Seaside Park - renew car park and accessway

Red

In progress

 

The construction works are likely to take place in early winter which increases the risk of delay due to poor weather. Works will occur in two stage: car park access renewal and car park renewal. Design being amended to minimise impact. Currently the project is on hold. Project progress is dependent on the budget re-phasing anticipated in the Emergency Budget 2020/2021.

Finalise the design documentation and prepare information for tender for Stage 1, Key stakeholder engagement.

2040 Otahuhu Portage – Totōia - develop greenways link

Red

In progress

Mana whenua and community design phase concluded with design brief for concept design being finalised to seek professional services for concept design phase. Next steps: Concept design phase anticipated to begin late 2020 subject to Covid 19 restrictions.

 

2455 Moyle Park - install sand carpet, irrigation and lights

Amber

On hold

The investigation and design work have been placed on hold as Healthy Waters are currently investigating whether the park can be used to address current flooding issues being experienced and for stormwater management purposes for the HNZ Mangere West redevelopment. CF working with healthy waters to ensure the best outcomes for the user groups of the park and waiting on outcome on readjusted Work Programme due to Covid 19.

1986 Oruarangi Park - develop park facility

Amber

On hold

Waiting on the outcome of the subdivision development which is subject to public protests and it is uncertain. Continue to work with Park Advisors in the planning phase.

2467 Otahuhu Community Centre (Town Hall) - renew community centre

Amber

On hold

This facility is intended to be part of the regeneration programme, therefore, it is on hold. Project on hold due to Panuku and Community Services considering future use of facility, and outcome of the work programme. •    Indicative Seismic Assessment of both buildings – which identified the need for the Detailed Seismic Assessment of the former library (paused due to lock down) and presently confirmation is awaited from Commercial and Finance that budget can be released to undertake this work. 
Recent advice from Panuku notes that they are presently not looking for potential development.

 

 

2968 Mangere-Otahuhu - play provision assessment

Amber

On hold

This item relates to another FY20 project to create a concept plan for David Lange Park #26635. Resume investigation and progress public consultation and mana whenua engagement

 

3040 Mangere-Otahuhu - remove mangroves

Amber

In progress

Bird and sediment survey has been completed and report is being prepared. This report will go to the consent officer as confirmation of 2020 surveys complete. Request quote from contractor for removing seedlings.

3372

David Lange Park - develop concept plan

Amber

In progress

This funding relates to another FY20 project to create a concept plan for David Lange Park #26635. COVID has impacted the timeline. Resume investigation phase in financial year 21 and progress public consultation and mana whenua engagement

3590

Sturges Park - implement actions from the concept plan

Amber

In Progress

The need for handrails for pedestrians safety is under investigation and will be reported back to the board.

3592

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu - LDI minor capex fund 2018/19

Amber

On hold

No projects have been identified and further direction will be sought from the board in the next year.

 

 

Community Leases work programme

23.     In the Community Leases work programme, there are 13 activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2020 (green), 8 activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey).  Activities with significant impact other than COVID-19 are discussed below:

Table 6: Community Leases activities with significant impact other than COVID-19

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

1468 - 40 Cleek Road: Fountain of Knowledge Trust

Amber

Deferred

Lease application received and site visit undertaken. Item workshopped with the local board seeking informal support for a new lease to the group. Staff anticipates a report to be presented in quarter two of the 2020/2021 work programme.

1469 - 101R Robertson Road: Manukau Live Steamers Incorporated

Amber

Deferred

Lease application received and site visit undertaken. Item workshopped with the local board seeking informal support for a new lease to the group. Staff anticipates a report to be presented in quarter two of the 2020/2021 work programme.

3356 - Centre Park, 141R Robertson Road, Mangere: Lease to Papatuanuku Kokiri Marae Incorporated

Amber

Deferred

Lease renewal application received and initial site visit undertaken. Further disucssions required with various stakeholders prior to progressing this lease matter. Item deferred to 2020/2021 work programme.

3359 - Waterlea Park, 28R House Avenue, Mangere Bridge: Lease to The Girl Guide Association New Zealand  Incorporated - Mangere Bridge

 

Amber

Deferred

Item workshopped with the local board seeking informal support for a new lease to the group. Staff anticipates a report to be presented in quarter two of the 2020/2021 work programme.

3360 - Old School Reserve, 299R Kirkbride Road, Mangere: Lease to Nukutukulea Aoga Niue Incorporated

 

Amber

Deferred

Item workshopped with the local board. Staff to draft report recommending a new lease for the board's consideration in quarter one of 2020/2021 work programme.

3361 - Moyle Park, 48R Bader Drive, Mangere: Lease to Manukau Rugby League Football & Sports Club Incorporated

 

Amber

Deferred

Advice received from Legal Services. Item workshopped with the local board, staff anticipates a report to be presented in quarter one of the 2020/2021 work programme.

3362 - House Park, 247R Kirkbride Road, Mangere: Lease to Māngere Combined Tennis Club Incorporated

 

Amber

Deferred

Item workshopped with the local board. Staff to draft report recommending a new lease for the board's consideration in quarter one of 2020/2021 work programme.

3364 - Walter Massey Park, 394R Massey Road, Mangere East: Lease to Manukau City Association Football Club Incorporated

Amber

Deferred

Item workshopped with the local board. Staff to draft report recommending a new lease for the board's consideration in quarter one of 2020/2021 work programme.

 

Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme

24.     In the Infrastructure and Environment Services work programme, there are nine activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2020 (green), two activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), two activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey).  Activities with significant impact other than COVID-19 are discussed below:

Table 7: Infrastructure and Environment Services activities with significant impact other than COVID-19

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

#751 Business waste minimization education programme

Red

Not delivered

Only a small amount of the work could be delivered in the COVID -19 context and this item is not proposed to be discontinued in next year. 

 

ATEED work programme

25.     In the ATEED work programme, there were two activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2020 (green), no activities that are in progress or delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and one activity that has been cancelled in quarter four (grey).

 

26.     The cancelled work item on series of business knowledge sharing events are expected to be planned in the next financial year, 2020/2021.

 

The Southern Initiative work programme

27.     The Southern Initiative work programme, there are no activities that were completed by the end of the year or will be by end of July 2020 (green), 1 activities that are in progress but are delayed (amber), no activities that are significantly delayed, on hold or not delivered (red) and no activities that have been cancelled and deferred in quarter four (grey).  Activities with significant impact other than COVID-19 are discussed below:

Table 9: The Southern Initiative activities with significant impact other than COVID-19

Activity name

RAG status

Activity status

Explanation and mitigation

106 - Youth Connections

Amber

In progress

Visionary Group led by Tua Lefono has been funded ($22,500) to support the students who are enrolled in the Arborist programme to engage, train and achieve driver licensing, first aid and financial literacy partnering with community providers.

This support programme only initiated after the COVID-19 lockdown and is due to be completed by December 2020.

 

At time of writing this report the budget of $51,500 is now approved as a carry forward to next year for work item named “Youth Initiatives”.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement guidance

28.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

https://acintranet.aklc.govt.nz/EN/workingatcouncil/techandtools/infocouncil/Pages/Climate-impact-statement.aspx

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     This report informs the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board of the performance for quarter ending 30 June 2019 and the performance for the 2019/2020 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     Item #109 - Respond to Māori Aspirations – work progressed in building working relationships with mana whenua in developing the next three- year Local Board Plan. A hui was held in July where southern local boards presented their plans to mana whenua. 

32.     Item #1190 - Young Enterprise Scheme – the participating schools include Māori students from year 12 and 13 who gain skills under this programme

33.     Item #989 - Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthing responsiveness to Māori. Whakatipu i te reo Māori - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu: Celebrating te ao Māori with events and programmes including regionally coordinated and promoted programmes: Te Tiriti o Waitangi, Matariki and Māori Language Week.

34.     Item #763 - Makaurau Marae water sensitive design retrofit project: Rain tanks have been installed and non-potable water supply utilised for the toilet blocks and nursery at Makaurau Marae. Following discussions with Makaurau Marae around how to spend the remaining budget, a decision was made to supply, fit and install pipes from the rain tank to the other wharenui toilets. This work is scheduled to be completed by late July 2020, and the local board will be invited to visit the marae to view the work later in 2020.

35.     Item #764 - Papatūānuku Kōkiri Marae water sensitive design retrofit project: Funding was given to the Papatūānuku Kōkiri marae and installation works are in progress to connect an existing rain tank for irrigation use in the community garden. Final plumbing works are on track to be completed by the beginning of August 2020. When these works have been completed the local board will be invited to visit the marae to view the finished product.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     This report is provided to enable the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2019/2020 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial performance

37.     Auckland Council (Council) currently has a number of bonds quoted on the NZ Stock Exchange (NZX). As a result, the Council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board & Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 sections 97 and 461H. These obligations restrict the release of annual financial reports and results until the Auckland Council Group results are released to the NZX – on or about 30 September. Due to these obligations the financial performance attached to the quarterly report is excluded from the public. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Overview of work programme performance by department’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     The Emergency Budget was adopted on 30 July. Work programmes for 2020/2021 were approved at the board’s business meeting in August.

40.     Delivery of the activities in the 2020/2021 work programme has commenced. There is a reduced timeframe to deliver these work programmes (10 months).

41.     As the delivery timeframe for the 2020/2021 work programmes is reduced, the reporting timeframe is likely to change.

42.     Resourcing of the 2020/2021 work programmes was based on the current staff capacity within departments. If changes to staff capacity have an impact on work programme delivery, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

LBWP SharePoint extracts

153

b

Financial section  - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Daniel Poe - Local Board Advisor

Rina Tagore - Senior Advisor, Mangere-Otahuhu

Authorisers

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 



 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2019/2020

File No.: CP2020/12320

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2019/2020 Annual Report for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 29 October 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2019/2020 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 29 October 2020. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

3.          Auckland Council currently has a series of bonds quoted on the New Zealand Stock Exchange (NZX) Debt Market maintained by NZX Limited. As council is subject to obligations under the NZX Main Board and Debt Market Listing Rules and the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (FMCA), local boards may not release annual financial results in any form. Therefore, the attached A annual report is being presented as confidential.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      adopt the 2019/2020 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A.

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body by 29 October 2020.

c)      note that the draft 2019/2020 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Annual Report (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report) will remain confidential until after the Auckland Council group results for 2019/2020 are released to the New Zealand Stock Exchange which are expected to be made public by 30 October 2020.

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities, and the overall Financial Impact Statement for the local board.

5.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

6.       This story is particularly important this year in light of the impacts COVID -19 had on communities and the council in the third quarter of 2019/2020.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi relates to the local board area.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area

A visual layout of the local board area, summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved.

Funding information

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

8.       The Council’s Climate Change disclosures are covered in Volume four of the Annual Report and sections within the Summary Annual Report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

9.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

10.     Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the chairperson.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

11.     The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

12.     The annual report reports on both the financial and service performance in each local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

13.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

14.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English, and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

15.     The next steps for the draft 2019/2020 Annual Report for the local board are:

·     Audit NZ review during August and September 2020

·     report to the Governing Body for adoption on 29 October 2020

·     release to stock exchanges and publication online on 30 October 2020

·     physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2019/2020 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Annual Report  - Confidential

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

David Rose - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

David Gurney – Manager Corporate and Local Board Performance
Kevin Ramsay - Acting Group Chief Financial Officer

Victoria Villaraza - Relationship Manager, Mangere-Otahuhu and Otara-Papatoetoe Local Boards

      

 


 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

22        Auckland Counil's Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board for quarter four 2019/2020 - Attachment b - Financial section

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.
In particular, the report contains detailed financial information that have an impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 31 July 2020 that require release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

23        Local Board Annual Report 2019/2020 - Attachment a - Draft 2019/2020 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Annual Report

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

 In particular, the report contains detailed financial adjustments, assumptions and judgements that have impact on the financial results of the Auckland Council group as at 30 June 2020 that require final Audit New Zealand sign-off and release to the New Zealand Stock Exchange..
Review Date: 30/10/2020.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C1       Statement of proposal for a new Navigation Safety Bylaw

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

In particular, the report contains a working draft of a bylaw yet to be approved for public consultation.  This is a date after which a final version of the bylaw is approved by the Regulatory Committee.

s7(2)(f)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain the effective conduct of public affairs through the protection of such members, officers, employees and persons from improper pressure or harassment.

In particular, the report contains a working draft of a bylaw yet to be approved for public consultation.  This is a date after which a final version of the bylaw is approved by the Regulatory Committee.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Pest Free Ihumatao presentation                  Page 183

Item 9.2      Attachment a    Land proposal                                                Page 201

Item 9.3      Attachment a    Initial Terms of Reference for the Mangere Housing Community Regeneration Group                  Page 203

Item 9.3      Attachment b    The Mangere we have in 2020 and what we want in 2035                                                               Page 209

Item 9.4      Attachment a    Do Good Feel Good presentation                 Page 225


 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 


 

 


 


 


 


 


 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 


 


 


 


 


 

 



[1] Waitākere Ranges Strategic Weed Management Plan 2015

[2] Auckland Council Weed Management Policy

[3] E34 Agrichemicals and vertebrate toxic agents - Unitary Plan

[4] Streetscapes Specifications - 19 March 2019_

[5] Transport Authorities - Glyphosate use

[6] Novachem Manual - Glyphosate 510

[7] https://www.epa.govt.nz/news-and-alerts/latest-news/use-of-glyphosate-in-new-zealand/

[8] Novachem Manual - Glyphosate 510

[9] Product Label Green Glyphosate 510

[10] Supplementary material glyphosate

[11] http://resistance.nzpps.org/index.php?p=herbicides/glyphosate

[12] Vegetation management Trial 2002

[13] Review PwC Weed Management Cost

[14] Novachem – Bio Safe

[15] Information provided by Kiwicare

[16] Back to the future - electrothermal, systemic, weedkiller

[17] Water use from Weedtechnics A4-SW900-Product-Specifications and Foamstream M1200 – Weedingtech spec sheet.

[18] Watercare - Drought response

[19] Weedtechnics A4-SW900-Product-Specifications

[20] Measuring Emissions: a guide for organisations – Emission factors for stationary combustion fuels Diesel 1 litre = 2.66 kg CO2/unit

[21] Linear km covers both side of the road e.g 2.2km. (average walking speed of between 2.9 kilometres per hour (km/h) and 6.5 km/h).

[22] Review PwC Weed Management Cost 15092015

[23] Best Practice Guidance - Notes for Integrated and Non-chemical Amenity Hard Surface Weed

[24] http://resistance.nzpps.org/index.php?p=herbicides/glyphosate

[25] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/environment/Pages/auckland-climate-action-plan.aspx

[26] Emissions from direct/production and electricity use, but not including “embodied” or “life cycle emissions”. These emissions do not include fuel for the boiler pump or motorized sprayer.

[27] Water use -Bio Blast

[28] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/environment/plants-animals/pests-weeds/Documents/weedcontrolmethods.pdf

[29] People Survey - 2019

[30] 264 kg x 5,055km road corridor. This could be mitigated by the use of battery power, there are no options currently available in New Zealand

 

 

[31] Costings should not be treated a final pricing but as an indication of pricing differences between methodology.