I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Planning Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 3 September 2020

10:00am

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

 

Kōmiti Whakarite Mahere / Planning Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Chris Darby

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Josephine Bartley

 

Members

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Richard Hills

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Pippa Coom

IMSB Member Liane Ngamane

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Cr John Watson

 

IMSB Member Hon Tau Henare

Cr Paul Young

 

Cr Shane Henderson

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Duncan Glasgow

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere /

Governance Advisor

 

31 August 2020

 

Contact Telephone: 09 890 2656

Email: duncan.glasgow@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee guides the physical development and growth of Auckland through a focus on land use, transport and infrastructure strategies and policies relating to planning, growth, housing and the appropriate provision of enabling infrastructure, as well as programmes and strategic projects associated with these activities. The committee will establish an annual work programme outlining key focus areas in line with its key responsibilities, which include:

 

·         relevant regional strategy and policy

·         transportation

·         infrastructure strategy and policy

·         Unitary Plan, including plan changes (but not any wholesale review of the Plan)

·         Resource Management Act and relevant urban planning legislation framework

·         oversight of Council’s involvement in central government strategies, plans or initiatives that impact on Auckland’s future land use and infrastructure

·         Auckland Plan implementation reporting on priorities and performance measures

·         structure plans and spatial plans

·         housing policy and projects

·         city centre and waterfront development

·         regeneration and redevelopment programmes

·         built and cultural heritage, including public art

·         urban design

·         acquisition of property relating to the committee’s responsibilities and in accordance with the LTP

·         working with and receiving advice from the Heritage Advisory Panel, the Rural Advisory Panel and the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board to give visibility to the issues important to the communities they represent and to help effect change.

 

Powers

 

(i)      All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities, including:

(a)     approval of a submission to an external body

(b)     establishment of working parties or steering groups.

(ii)      The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iii)     If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Planning Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Environment and Climate Change Committee and/or the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, then the Planning Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committee(s). For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of those committees for decisions.

(iii)     The committee does not have:

(a)     the power to establish subcommittees

(b)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2).

 


 

Auckland Plan Values

 

The Auckland Plan 2050 outlines a future that all Aucklanders can aspire to. The values of the Auckland Plan 2050 help us to understand what is important in that future:

 

 


 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·           Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·           Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·           Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·           In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·           The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·           However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·           All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·           Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·           Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·           All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·           Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·           Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·           Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 

 


Planning Committee

03 September 2020

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        9

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   9

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               9

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          9  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    9

5.1     Public Input: Queenstown Lakes Community Housing Trust - Affordable Housing and Inclusionary Zoning                                                                      9

5.2     Public Input: Brennan Rigby – Affordable Housing and Inclusionary Zoning                                                                                                                              10

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                        10

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                              10

8          Affordable housing report back: Approval for forward work programme            11

9          Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) – Request to make operative Private Plan Change 32 (Avondale Jockey Club)                                                                          99

10        Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) – Request to make operative Plan Change 34 (Special Character Statement for Special Character Areas Overlay – Howick Business)                                                                                                                    103

11        Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) – Proposed Plan Change – Temporary Activities                                                                                                                     123

12        Summary of Planning Committee information items and briefings (including the Forward Work Programme) - 3 September 2020                                                    209  

13        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

14        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               219

C1       CONFIDENTIAL: Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) – Proposed Plan Change 41 – Ōkura Precinct – Update                                                                                   219  

 


1          Apologies

Apologies from Cr C Fletcher and Cr D Newman have been received.

 

2          Declaration of Interest

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 That the Planning Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 13 August 2020, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

4          Petitions

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

5          Public Input

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

5.1       Public Input: Queenstown Lakes Community Housing Trust - Affordable Housing and Inclusionary Zoning

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Julie Scott will speak to the committee about Queenstown Lakes Community Housing Trust’s utilisation of land via the Inclusionary Zoning process, key benefits of Inclusionary Zoning and how it has benefited Queenstown Lakes Community Housing Trust, and how local council responded to development industry and developer views now to Inclusionary Zoning.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning Committee:

a)      receive the public input from Julie Scott of Queenstown Lakes Community Housing Trust regarding affordable housing and inclusionary zoning and thank her for attending.

 

 

 

5.2       Public Input: Brennan Rigby – Affordable Housing and Inclusionary Zoning

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Brennan Rigby will speak to the committee about inclusionary zoning and the use of council land for housing.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning Committee:

a)      receive the public input from Brennan Rigby regarding affordable housing and inclusionary zoning and thank him for attending.

 

6          Local Board Input

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 

7          Extraordinary Business

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Planning Committee

03 September 2020

 

Affordable housing report back: Approval for forward work programme

File No.: CP2020/10540

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for a forward work programme on affordable housing.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Auckland Plan 2050 prioritises secure, quality, affordable housing.

3.      Affordable housing is defined as a ‘home that a household could occupy for less than 30 per cent of its income’.

4.       More Aucklanders now rent and more people earning average wages make up the ‘intermediate housing market’.[1]

5.      The number of households in the intermediate housing market increased by 35 per cent since 2013 to 89,190 in 2018. This is forecast to increase to 123,350 by 2028.

6.      The housing shortage is unlikely to be solved by a potential recession. Sustained focus on increasing affordable housing is important in the response to future housing demand and as part of the economic recovery from COVID-19. Implementation will need to be adaptive.

7.      In 2019, the Committee resolved [PLA/2019/17] that the council should intervene and lead on affordable housing by investigating regulatory and non-regulatory interventions.

8.      Staff completed all investigation actions. Research, modelling, qualitative assessment and targeted engagement were used to investigate interventions.

9.      This work found strong forecast growth in the intermediate housing market with potential negative impacts on the wellbeing of Aucklanders. It also identified interventions that the council can focus on to help increase the supply of appropriate housing for rental or purchase.

10.    The resulting forward work programme (Attachment A) focuses on the council’s key levers, a mix of quick wins and longer-term improvements, including:

·        enhanced measurement, monitoring and reporting

·        helping affordable housing providers through consents processes

·        responding to the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Kāinga Strategic Plan

·        delivering a small number of affordable houses on surplus land including in partnership with community housing providers, mana whenua, mataawaka, trusts or organisations

·        continuing to support affordable housing

·        investigating new policies, interventions, advocacy to and collaboration with government.

11.     Staff will provide an update, advice and seek decisions in November for inclusionary zoning and increasing housing stock for older people. Progress will be reported through the Auckland Council and Government Joint Work Programme on Housing and Urban Development quarterly. An annual work programme update will be provided at the end of the 20/21 financial year.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning Committee:

a)      approve the affordable housing forward work programme in Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

Affordable housing is 30 per cent or less income spent on housing purchase or rent

12.     The Auckland Plan 2050 prioritises secure, quality, affordable housing.

13.     The affordable housing definition the council uses is: ‘a home that a household could occupy for less than 30 per cent of its income whether purchasing or renting’.

14.     Wages have not kept pace with house prices. More people earning average wages make up the ‘intermediate housing market’.

15.     These people are spending 30 per cent or more of their income on rent, are ineligible for social housing and are unable to afford to purchase a home (Figure 1).

Affordable housing position: do more to intervene/lead by investigating interventions

16.     In 2019, the Planning Committee agreed that Auckland Council’s preferred position on affordable housing was to do more to intervene and lead by investigating regulatory and non-regulatory interventions [PLA/2019/17 refers]. 

17.     This subsequent work contributes to the Auckland Council and Government Joint Work Programme on Housing and Urban Development [PLA/2019/16]. 

18.     An environmental scan of government initiatives on affordable housing and an overview of Auckland Council’s regulatory process and role, is provided in Attachment B.

19.     The council is also partnering with Kāinga Ora on the Auckland Housing Programme to deliver over 20,000 dwellings.[2]

Research, qualitative assessment and targeted engagement used to investigate interventions

20.     Staff used a combination of methods to complete (Figure 2) the investigation of interventions required by the Committee’s 2019 decision:

·       Research: quantitative, qualitative, demographic and modelling

·       Qualitative assessment of interventions: Summary Attachment C, full Attachment D

·       Targeted engagement: supply, council role and work programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Research to better understand affordable housing problem, needs and lived experience

21.     In 2018, 89,190 households were in the intermediate housing market or 17 per cent of all households in Auckland, up 22,990 (or 35 per cent) from 2013. Professionals make up 71 per cent of the growth in the intermediate housing market.

22.     Prior to COVID-19 it was forecast that the intermediate housing market would increase to 123,350 by 2028. Of this future growth 58 per cent is expected to be made up of couples with children.

23.     The intermediate housing market now includes more professionals, working families and older people (Figure 3).

24.     A housing pathways approach provided insights into the lived experience of the diverse groups navigating the intermediate housing market.

25.     The data was used to develop narratives about who and how Aucklanders are impacted.

26.     The narratives are important as they help the council to analyse the impacts at an individual and community level. Not just the measurable outcomes, such as economic impacts, but less-tangible such as wellbeing and the sense of pride or failure caused by the circumstances of the individual. Examples are provided below.

27.     Accounts were given of service professionals like teachers and police workers:

·       making radical decisions to move out of Auckland in pursuit of homeownership

·       remaining unhappy renters or precarious owners

·       lack of salary weighting in high housing cost areas impact recruitment and retention

·       knock-on impact exists for Auckland, as essential services increasingly stressed.

28.     Women can be particularly vulnerable to poverty in retirement and generally are:

·       still exposed to a significant gender pay gap

·       take extended career breaks to raise children

·       after a break down in a relationship, left with very limited retirement savings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


29.     The housing pathways and narratives show that there are commonalities of experience:

·       access to intergenerational wealth is prevalent for offspring of existing homeowners

·       underrepresented homeownership, for example Māori and Pacific people, are less able to support their children into homeownership 

·       Māori and Pacific families, are well represented in the uptake of community housing and assisted homeownership

·       many Māori and Pacific families learnt about community housing through workplace presentations and word of mouth by friends and whanau

·       socialising alternative pathways is critical to secure housing for groups that may otherwise be excluded.

30.     Most accounts of successful navigation out of the intermediate housing market included the use of financial tools such as Kiwisaver, Welcome Home grants (now known as First Home grants), and/or loans. For many, these tools can help to bridge the deposit gap. Often, multiple sources of finance were used.  Less prevalent was the use of shared equity schemes and co-housing arrangements.

Qualitative intervention assessments used to develop a work programme that takes a balanced approach in an uncertain context

31.     The qualitative intervention assessments were used by staff to form a work programme that takes a balanced approach within an increasingly uncertain context.

32.     The proposed forward work programme (Attachment A) continues to progress nearly all interventions investigated. The work programme:

·       uses and builds on current levers and initiatives (enhanced status quo)

·       responds to research, feedback from community housing providers and the Kāinga Strategic Action Plan

·       complements government and sector initiatives

·       enables improved targeting of support, monitoring and reporting focused on affordable housing

·       focuses on priority groups including Māori, Pacific peoples, lower income and older people including through support for affordable housing providers.

33.     Inclusionary zoning and increasing housing stock for older people will be reported back on separately to the Committee in November 2020. These two initiatives are complex and would benefit from separate advice and decision-making about inclusion in the work programme.

34.     Figure 4 provides an overview of the key finding and next step for each intervention investigated.

 

· 

Inclusionary zoning.

Auckland Unitary Plan

· 

Improve knowledge, tracking and reporting on progress. Inform evidence base.

 

Research, monitoring and reporting

· 

Further investigate how the Premium Key Account and Qualified Partner services could assist community housing providers or other affordable housing providers

Regulatory: Consents

See also Research, monitoring and reporting

Intervention

Key findings

Next Step

Modelling inclusionary zoning, other planning mechanisms and incentives.

 

Retained affordability mechanisms and rental tenure security for renters.

·  Benefits of mandatory or voluntary provisions in the Unitary Plan including inclusionary zoning do not justify a Plan change at this time.

·  Better potential to achieve outcomes sought through collaboration with government as part of wider policy change.

·  Modelling inclusionary zoning and shared ownership schemes shows the need for supply and demand side interventions that can bridge the affordability gap.

·  Data and monitoring improvements required to support future affordability policies or regulatory change.

Recommended for phased implementation:

On policy or regulatory change to increase delivery of affordable housing in the context of the National Policy Statement: Urban Development and Resource Management Act reform.

Advocate to / collaborate with government

Report back to committee for decision in November
Recommended for phased implementation

Improving council processes for affordable housing outcomes

 

Concessions or grants for community housing providers

·  Community housing providers cite high complexity, costs and timeframes for consents.

·  Council can provide support to help affordable housing providers[3] to better understand consents requirements and help improve quality of proposals to help reduce timeframes and costs.

·  Defining criteria for support and enhancements to data capture and reporting required to target support and better monitor progress including the number of affordable houses delivered.

Recommended for phased implementation

Training and guidance, fees free provision of technical advice at pre-application meetings (one per application and maximum fee cap).

 

Regulatory: Consents

Do further work

Partnerships with government, iwi, community housing providers and developers

·  Council/Panuku can use surplus land for housing developments in partnership with government, community housing providers, mana whenua, mataawaka and private developers.

·  Relatively cost-effective way to deliver a small number of affordable houses targeted and tailored to need of priority groups while growing capacity of providers.

Recommended for phased implementation

·    Deliver further affordable housing developments on surplus council land in partnership with government, community housing providers, mana whenua and mataawaka and private developers. A recent example is Barrowcliffe - Kōtuitui Place.

Partnerships on surplus land

The experience and needs of people in the intermediate housing market

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

·  Strong forecast growth in intermediate households, varies by local board area, diversity in the intermediate housing market with more older people, professionals and families.

·  Negative wellbeing impacts including, physical illness, mental health issues including stress and anxiety, a range of tools and strategies are used to navigate the intermediate housing market including family support, government, community housing providers.

·  Particular challenges for people who cannot obtain a deposit or access lending and cannot draw on family support. This includes many Māori and Pacific people perpetuating housing and wealth inequality. Sense of pride and wellbeing benefits for those who gain homeownership.

Recommended for phased implementation

Continue research on affordable housing to inform evidence base for future policy / interventions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research, monitoring and reporting

Investigate: Increasing the stock of housing for older people

·  Haumaru Housing is a joint venture with Panuku / Council providing a stock of housing for older people. Supported by government Income Related Rent Subsidy and a funding facility from council.

·  Can provide wellbeing benefits for older people including Māori and Pacific people who are less likely to own their own homes.

·  Haumaru and Panuku are working on options to expand the current stock to meet strong demand.

Report back to committee with an update in November:

Increasing the stock of housing for older people.

 

 

 

 

Supporting work areas

·  Further work on new models and policies is needed to respond to forecast growth and demand for different typologies.

Do further work:

Alternative financing models, more direction in Panuku Letter of Expectation to achieve a suitable mix of housing including affordable housing, and ways council could support shared ownership schemes. See also

Investigate new models / policies

See also Regulatory: Consents

Responding to the Kāinga Strategic Action Plan

35.     The Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Kāinga Strategic Action Plan identifies actions that the council can lead to improve housing outcomes for Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau.

36.     The work programme responds to the resolution to investigate Kāinga Strategic Action Plan (Figure 5).

Targeted engagement focused on sector views of council’s role in affordable housing

37.     People from the housing sector (banks, developers, community housing providers), partners, Māori and Pacific experts, academics and commentators provided views (Figure 6) on supply, the council role and work programme.

38.     While their understanding of the council’s role varied, their view of the problem definition and suggestions for further actions shows alignment with the forward work programme. This creates a platform for ongoing engagement and partnerships.

39.     Key stakeholders and partners (government and sector) also shared their views on the proposed initiatives. Themes of the feedback were:

·       varied views on the benefits of inclusionary zoning

·       support for initiatives that make it easier for affordable housing providers to navigate consents

·       support for initiatives that target Māori, Pacific and low-income, older and vulnerable people

·       need to support capacity of community, Māori and Pacific housing providers

·       positive feedback about the council staff and processes

·       interest in collaboration and partnerships.

COVID-19 brings significant and uncertain social, economic and fiscal impacts

40.     COVID-19 has contracted the economy and brought job losses with unemployment expected to continue to increase. The second wave in August 2020 will create further uncertainty and exacerbate these impacts.

41.     A range of positive and negative factors are impacting on the affordable housing market, and it is difficult to determine the overall impact in the longer term.

42.     Factors that may assist people in the intermediate housing market include extremely low mortgage rates which could fall further if the official cash rate is lowered again. The wage subsidy scheme has been extended to protect jobs and mortgage assistance is available.

43.     At the same time however, lenders are tightening borrowing criteria, and many overseas-based New Zealanders are returning home with significant purchasing power. Reopening the border to immigration will add further upward pressure on house prices.

44.     Early indications are of house prices continuing to increase through the first half of 2020 with more first home buyers entering the market, and more people falling into mortgage arrears.

45.     Those who remain employed may benefit from these conditions. Those facing unemployment are likely to experience significant housing stress, particularly renters unless rents fall.

Increasing supply of and access to affordable housing remains a key priority

46.     Disparities experienced by socio-economically disadvantaged groups including Māori and Pacific peoples and low-income people are likely to be exacerbated by COVID-19. These groups may fall further behind on the housing continuum and become more at risk of homelessness.

47.     Even with record high numbers of new dwellings consented in the six months leading up to the first COVID-19 lockdown, Auckland’s housing supply was barely keeping pace with population growth. The housing shortage is unlikely to be solved by a potential recession. This would take several years of zero population growth and continued record-high building.

48.     Implementing the Urban Growth Agenda and Auckland Council and Government Joint Work Programme on Housing and Urban Development is even more important in the ongoing COVID-19 recovery period.

49.     Sustained focus on partnerships and solutions, particularly targeted towards the lower quartile of the intermediate market is required to move more people into homeownership and affordable, stable, quality rentals.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     New Zealand is likely to see future climate related migration including from the Pacific islands. This will increase demand for housing and may exacerbate housing inequality. The forward work programme can help respond to increased demand for affordable housing in this context.

51.     Development of new homes increases our carbon footprint. There are greenhouse emissions from demolition, construction, transportation and energy use.

52.     The council will consider Te Tāwhiri-ā-Tāruke: Auckland’s Climate Plan in the construction and longer-term sustainability of development. This includes ensuring the location of the development reduces car dependency and that the dwellings are energy efficient.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

53.     The work programme impacts operations across the council group. Those areas are aware of the impacts of the proposal and their implementation role.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

54.     Lack of affordable housing is impacting across all local board areas to varying degrees. The work programme provides an Auckland-wide approach that will deliver benefits broadly.

55.     Research commissioned to support this advice provides insights into changes in the intermediate housing market at a local board level and can inform local decision making.

56.     Local Board engagement will occur in the context of future projects that may be deployed in specific locations such as partnered developments.

57.     The council will continue to provide advice and support local boards on affordable housing initiatives and local responses.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

58.     Māori earn lower incomes on average, have lower rates of homeownership, are more likely to live in crowded homes and have poorer wellbeing outcomes. They are over-represented in the intermediate housing market.

59.     High rent and discrimination in the rental market can mean more Māori are marginalised in high poverty neighbourhoods in poor-quality, cold, damp or mouldy housing. The majority of Māori are missing out on the positive benefits of homeownership including the ability to accumulate wealth and transfer this to future generations.

60.     The forward work programme responds to the Kāinga Strategic Action Plan. This helps support Māori in need of affordable, appropriate housing and mana whenua and mataawaka trusts and organisations wanting to develop housing for Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

61.     There are no financial implications as the forward work programme will be progressed through existing budgets.

62.     Any future funding required outside existing budgets will progress through standard Annual Plan, Long-term Plan, or unbudgeted expenditure decision - making process.

63.     Where any fee waiver initiatives are progressed for regulatory approvals, this will result in reduced revenue generation for that area of Regulatory Services.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

64.     Risks are being managed using the council’s normal project management and business case mechanisms and by adopting an adaptive management approach. Each of the forward work programme’s actions will have a project plan that will identify timeframes, risks and mitigations.

Risk (If…)

Consequence (Then…)

Mitigation

There are reduced staff or financial resources within the council.

It may be difficult to make progress on the affordable housing forward work programme.

Focus on further prioritisation of key interventions that have lower cost or staff resourcing requirements.

Use an adaptive management approach to respond to uncertain / changing circumstances.

The sector, may struggle to engage because of competing priorities.

It may be difficult to agree and make progress on the forward work programme.

Will engage proactively with stakeholders and partners to understand pressures and availability.

Make it easy and valuable to engage and participate.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

65.     Research and targeted engagement reports will be provided to the committee for information before the next agenda.

66.     Staff will report in November to seek decisions on inclusionary zoning and to provide an update on increasing housing stock for older people.

67.     Progress against the work programme will be reported through the Auckland Council and Government Joint Work Programme on Housing and Urban Development quarterly. An annual work programme update will be provided at the end of the 20/21 financial year.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work programme

25

b

Government environmental scan and council overview

27

c

Summary qualitative assessments

55

d

Full qualitative assessments

61

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Pania Elliot - Principal Policy Analyst

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki – General Manager - Community & Social Policy

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 



Planning Committee

03 September 2020

 

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Planning Committee

03 September 2020

 

Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) – Request to make operative Private Plan Change 32 (Avondale Jockey Club)

File No.: CP2020/11942

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To make operative Private Plan Change 32 (Avondale Jockey Club) to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Private Plan Change 32 is a privately initiated plan change from the Avondale Jockey Club which  seeks to rezone 1,870m2 of land at Avondale Racecourse from Special Purpose – Major Recreation Facility to Terraced Housing and Apartment Building Zone in the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) (AUP). The request also proposes to remove the land in the private plan change area from the Avondale Racecourse Precinct.

3.       Plan Change 32 was notified on 29 August 2019, with 10 submissions and one further submission received, and was heard and considered by independent hearing commissioners on 6 March 2020.  A decision was issued by the chairperson on behalf of council on 10 July 2020 to approve the plan change with no modifications.

4.       No appeals were received, and therefore the plan change can now be made operative.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning Committee:

a)      approve Private Plan Change 32, Avondale Jockey Club to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) under clause 17(2) of Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991

b)      authorise staff to complete the necessary statutory processes to publicly notify the date on which the plan change becomes operative as soon as practicable, in accordance with the requirements in clause 20(2) of Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Private Plan Change 32 seeks to rezone 1,870m2 of land at Avondale Racecourse from Special Purpose – Major Recreation Facility to Terraced Housing and Apartment Building Zone in the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) (AUP). The request also proposes to remove the land in the private plan change area from the Avondale Racecourse Precinct.

6.       Plan Change 32 was notified on 29 August 2019, with 10 primary submissions and one further submission received, and was heard and considered by independent hearing commissioners on 6 March 2020.  A decision was issued by the chairperson on behalf of council on 10 July 2020 to approve the plan change with no modifications.

7.       No appeals were received, and the plan change can now be made operative.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991 sets out the statutory process for plan changes.

9.       Clause 17(2) states that ‘a local authority may approve part of a policy statement or plan, if all submissions or appeals relating to that part have been disposed of’. There were no appeals received and council can now approve the plan change.

10.     Clause 20 of Schedule 1 sets out the process that is required to be undertaken for the notification of the operative date.  Plans and Places staff will notify the operative date as soon as possible following the Planning Committee’s resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     As a procedural request, impacts on climate change are not relevant to this recommendation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     Auckland Transport and Watercare Services Limited provided comments on the application prior to notification. Auckland Transport made a submission in support of the plan change, under the condition that the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) provides a mechanism to assess the effects of traffic.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     Whau Local Board was consulted on Plan Change 32 prior to notification.  The Local Board Chair supported the plan change.

14.     Local Board views were not sought for this report as making Plan Change 32 operative is a procedural matter.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     Prior to notification, the applicant circulated the Plan Change to the 11 iwi groups recognised as having an interest in the site. In summary, Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara, Ngāti Te Ata, Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua and Te Kawerau Ā Maki responded. Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua was the only group who expressed concern over land to be retained as a buffer between the racecourse and the residents but noted that this was only an opinion as this was not their primary area of interest. All other groups that responded confirmed that they had no issues with the plan change or deferred to other iwi.  Ngāti Te Ata deferred to Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara; and Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara deferred to Te Kawerau Ā Maki who had no objections.

16.     No iwi groups submitted on the plan change.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

17.     There are no financial implications associated with making the plan change operative.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

18.     There are no risks associated with making the plan change operative.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

19.     The final step in making the plan change operative is to publicly notify the date on which it will become operative, and to update the Auckland Unitary Plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Katie Maxwell - Graduate Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Planning Committee

03 September 2020

 

Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) – Request to make operative Plan Change 34 (Special Character Statement for Special Character Areas Overlay – Howick Business)

File No.: CP2020/11560

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to make operative Plan Change 34 to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part): Special Character Statement for Special Character Areas Overlay – Howick Business.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Plan Change 34: Special Character Statement for Special Character Areas Overlay – Howick Business (Plan Change 34), a council-initiated plan change, sought to address two matters. The first is to add a special character statement for the existing Howick Business Special Character Area (Howick Business SCA) to Schedule 15 of the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) (Auckland Unitary Plan).

3.       The second matter that Plan Change 34 addressed was to amend the extent of the existing Howick Business SCA to include four additional sites because of the contribution buildings on those sites made to the special character values of the area. These four sites are within the Howick town centre and are zoned either business or open space.

4.       A panel of independent commissioners have approved Plan Change 34, subject to modification (the decision). This decision on Plan Change 34 includes adding the special character statement for the Howick Business SCA. The decision also adds the four sites within the extent of the Howick Business SCA.

5.       This decision was publicly notified on 25 June 2020. No appeals were received on this decision.

6.       The relevant parts of the Auckland Unitary Plan can now be amended and made operative as set out in the decision (and included in Attachment A of the agenda report).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning Committee:

a)      approve Plan Change 34 to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) that adds four additional sites and a special character statement for the Special Character Areas Overlay in the Howick town centre, as identified in Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      request staff to complete the necessary statutory processes to publicly notify the date on which Plan Change 34 will become operative as soon as practicable.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Plan Change 34 is a council-initiated plan change that was notified on 24 October 2019. The plan change sought to address two matters.

8.       The first matter was to add a special character statement for the existing Howick Business SCA to Schedule 15 of the Auckland Unitary Plan. Prior to the approved plan change, the Howick Business SCA was the only special character area in the Auckland Unitary Plan that did not have a special character statement. Special character statements are important because they identify the special character values of the special character area.

9.       The second matter that Plan Change 34 addressed was to amend the extent of the existing Howick Business SCA to include four additional sites. This is due to the contribution that buildings on these sites make to the special character values of the special character area. These four sites are within the Howick town centre and are zoned either Business – Town Centre or Open Space – Community.

10.     The map below shows the location of the Howick Business SCA and the four sites to be added to the special character area.

11.     Independent hearing commissioners were given delegated authority by Auckland Council to hear and make the decision on the plan change. The hearing commissioners approved Plan Change 34, subject to modification (the decision) on 11 June 2020. The decision included adding the special character statement for the Howick Business SCA, with some text changes from what was in the notified plan change. The decision also added the four sites within the extent of the Howick Business SCA. This is the same as what was notified in the plan change.

12.     The decision was publicly notified on 25 June 2020. No appeals were received on this decision.

 

13.     The relevant parts of the Auckland Unitary Plan can now be amended and made operative as set out in the decision and shown in Attachment A of the agenda report. Amendments include changes to the extent of the SCA Overlay in the GIS Viewer and text changes to Schedule 15.1.6.1 and Chapter D18.1. Text to be added is shown as underlined and text to be removed is shown struck through. Red text that is underlined was inserted by the hearing commissioners in the decision. Red text that is underlined and struck through was proposed to be added by Plan Change 34 but was deleted by the hearing commissioners in the decision.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) sets out the statutory process for plan changes.

15.     Clause 17(2) of Schedule 1 states that “a local authority may approve part of a policy statement or plan, if all submissions or appeals have been disposed of”.  There were no appeals received on Plan Change 34 and the council can now approve the plan change.

16.     Clause 20 of Schedule 1 sets out the process that needs to be undertaken for the notification of the operative date.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     As a procedural request, impacts on climate change are not relevant to this recommendation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The final step in making additional parts of the Auckland Unitary Plan operative is a procedural step and therefore does not have any impact on the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The Howick Local Board was consulted on Plan Change 34 prior to notification. The local board’s views were also sought for the section 42A hearing report.

20.     The Howick Local Board views were not sought for this report as it addresses factual and procedural matters. Staff have updated the Howick Local Board on the decision to Plan Change 34.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     Relevant iwi authorities were consulted on the draft plan change prior to notification in accordance with Schedule 1 of the RMA. The final step in making additional parts of the Auckland Unitary Plan operative is a procedural step.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The cost of making additional parts of the Auckland Unitary Plan operative is covered by the Plans and Places department’s operational budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     There are no risks associated with making the relevant parts of Plan Change 34 operative.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     Following a resolution from this Committee, staff will publicly notify the date on which the relevant parts of Plan Change 34 will become operative and update the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part), in accordance with Schedule 1 of the RMA.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Updates to the Auckland Unitary Plan

107

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Katrina David - Principal Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Planning Committee

03 September 2020

 

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Planning Committee

03 September 2020

 

Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) – Proposed Plan Change – Temporary Activities

File No.: CP2020/10932

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To obtain the Planning Committee’s approval to publicly notify changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) temporary activity standards and the Pukekohe Park precinct.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Temporary activities include festival and events, concerts, parades, sporting events and filming. Temporary activities are managed under both the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) (AUP) and the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015. There is some duplication between the AUP standards and the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015. The bylaw is currently under review.

3.       Four issues have been raised by different council departments and Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) in relation to the management of temporary activities in the AUP.

4.       The issues are:

a)      temporary activity standards in the AUP – some of the temporary activity standards are overly onerous and are triggering the need for costly and time-consuming resource consents (issue raised by ATEED);

b)      temporary activities (including filming) on Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua and the appropriate management methods (issue raised by ATEED);

c)      a gap in the coastal temporary activities and noise from activities that are not defined in the AUP as “noise events” (issue raised by the Plans and Places Department);

d)      provision for temporary emergency works over and above that provided for under the emergency works sections of the Resource Management Act (sections 330 – 330B) (issue raised by the Auckland Emergency Management Team).

5.       Two changes have been identified to the temporary activity standards and one change to the Pukekohe Park precinct. These changes would reduce compliance costs by enabling an increase in the number of temporary activities able to be undertaken as permitted activities. These changes are:

a)      requiring a traffic management plan (as a permitted activity standard) for an event in a rural or Future Urban zone where more than 500 vehicle movements per day on adjacent roads are generated;

b)      increasing the duration of those temporary activities that are defined as noise events (i.e. they exceed the noise standards for the zone) from six to eight hours;

c)      aligning Anzac Day in the Pukekohe Park precinct to the definition under the Anzac Day Act 1966.

6.       Two additional minor changes are proposed to address anomalies - a gap in the coastal temporary activities and the temporary activities Activity Table.

7.       No changes are recommended to temporary activities (including filming) on Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua or the provision for temporary emergency works over and above that provided for under emergency works sections of the Resource Management Act.

8.       The AUP objectives and policies seek to enable temporary activities so that they can contribute to a vibrant city and enhance the well-being of communities. At the same time, the AUP seeks to mitigate adverse effects on amenity values, communities, the natural environment, historic heritage and sites and places of significance to Mana Whenua. The proposed plan change does not alter these objectives and policies.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning Committee:

a)      approve the notification of the proposed plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) to amend the temporary activity standards and the Pukekohe Park precinct in accordance with the changes in Attachment A. These changes involve:

i)        amending rows A5 and A6 in the Temporary Activities “Activity Table” to refer to “temporary activities in public places or on private land”

ii)       requiring a traffic management plan (as a permitted activity standard) for an event in a rural or Future Urban zone where more than 500 vehicle movements per day on adjacent roads are generated

iii)      increasing the duration of those temporary activities that are defined as noise events (i.e. they exceed the noise standards for the zone) from six to eight hours

iv)      adding a noise standard for temporary activities that generate noise but are not defined as “noise events” in the noise chapter of the Auckland – wide provisions

v)      aligning Anzac Day in the Pukekohe Park precinct to the definition under the Anzac Day Act 1966

b)      endorse the section 32 evaluation report contained as Attachment B to the agenda report

c)      delegate to the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Planning Committee, and a member of the Independent Māori Statutory Board, the authority to make minor amendments to the proposed plan change prior to public notification.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Temporary activities are defined in the AUP as:

An activity that:

•     is outside the normal expected use of a site (or area within the coastal marine area);

And

•       has a start and end date and time.

 

Includes:

•       filming activities at temporary locations and activities accessory to that filmingactivity;

•       activities accessory to a building or construction project, such as scaffolding, fencing,offices or storage sheds;

•       Council HazMobile collections;

•       carnivals;

•       concerts;

•       fairs;

•       festivals and events;

•       public meetings;

•       parades;

•       special events;

•       sporting events;

•       overflow parking;

•       temporary military training (land based only);

•       emergency response training, including live burns carried out by the New Zealand Fire Service; and

•       structures accessory to temporary activities.

10.     Temporary activities are managed under both the AUP and the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015. The bylaw is currently under review.

11.     The AUP has an enabling approach to temporary activities – providing for them as permitted activities subject to compliance with standards. Where a standard is not able to be met, a temporary activity is a restricted discretionary activity and requires a resource consent.

12.     Some of the temporary activity standards are overly onerous and are triggering the need for costly and time-consuming resource consents. There is also some duplication between the AUP standards and the Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015. For example, a Traffic Management Plan can be required under both the AUP (for an event in a rural or Future Urban zone where more than 500 vehicle movements per day on adjacent roads are generated) and the bylaw.

13.     The standards relate to the duration of noise events, the requirement for a resource consent to address traffic management issues for events in rural areas and the interpretation of Anzac Day in relation to the Pukekohe Park precinct.

14.     In addition to the above matters, the Plans and Places Department have also identified a discrepancy in the Temporary Activities Activity Table (E40.4.1) and a gap in the coastal temporary activity provisions (E25.6.14) which can also be addressed by this plan change.

15.     The proposed changes are identified in Attachment A.

16.     The AUP objectives and policies seek to enable temporary activities so they can contribute to a vibrant city and enhance the well-being of communities. At the same time, the plan seeks to mitigate adverse effects on amenity values, communities, the natural environment, historic heritage and sites and places of significance to Mana Whenua. The proposed plan change does not alter the objectives and policies.

17.     Temporary activities with significant adverse effects which do not meet a relevant standard will still require a resource consent.

18.     No changes are recommended to temporary activities (including filming) on Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua or the provision for temporary emergency works over and above that provided for under emergency works section of the Resource Management Act.

 

19.     The reasons for retaining the status quo in respect of these two matters are:

Issue: Sites and Places of Significance to Mana Whenua Overlay

Status quo – any temporary activity is a restricted discretionary activity. This provides the following:

·    Plan users are able to clearly identify effects associated with known temporary activities on specific sites (note: different temporary activities have different effects and sites and places of significance have multiple values);

·    Conditions can be imposed to avoid, or mitigate those effects;

·    Iwi involvement in the resource consent process;

·    A resource consent may be applied for that seeks more than one temporary activity on a site and place of significance to Mana Whenua. This would enable a much more efficient process than a series of “one off” resource consent applications;

·    Affords a high level of protection for sites of significance to Mana Whenua as all temporary activities continue to be subject to a resource consent.

Issue: Temporary Emergency Activities

Status quo – rely on the provisions of the RMA (and the forthcoming replacement legislation). This provides the following:

·     Lessons learnt after the Christchurch and Kaikoura earthquakes could be factored into the new legislation to provide greater powers and more appropriate timeframes to respond to an emergency/natural disaster;

·     The new legislation will be able to address the short comings of the current RMA timeframes;

·     This addresses the issue nationally at the lowest cost and highest net benefit (as opposed to individual councils undertaking plan changes).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     ATEED advise there are approximately 1600 – 1800 events annually in the Auckland region. Not all these events require an event permit.

21.     In 2017 there were 1379 event permits issued while in 2018 there were 1438 event permits. (Note: these figures exclude events permitted by ATEED and Regional Facilities Auckland (RFA) and in some cases, one permit may include multiple events).

22.     According to resource consent data, 18 events required a resource consent in 2018 and 14 events required a resource consent in 2019. These figures do not show those events that did not take pace due to the applicants being dissuaded to apply having reviewed the resource consent requirements. The standards that are triggering the need for resource consent are:

·     Pack in/pack out of the event

·     Duration of the event

·     Noise levels during pack in and pack out of the event

·     Event is located on a site or place of significance to Mana Whenua.

23.     An analysis of resource consent processing costs for temporary activity consents for 2018 indicate that costs can range from $4500 - $10,000 for each application with an average cost of just under $6000. These figures exclude the cost of putting the application together and advice from experts on matters such as noise and traffic management.

24.     A summary of the options, costs and benefits of those options, recommendation and reasons for Issue 1 – Temporary Activity and Precinct Standards, is contained in the tables below.  For a fuller analysis refer to the attached Section 32 Analysis.

Issue 1 – Temporary Activity & Precinct Standards

Option

Description

Option 1 – No change/status quo

 

This option retains the status quo. This means that a resource consent would be required for any activity not meeting the temporary activity standards which include noise limits, the duration of activities and traffic.

Option 2 – Amendments to the standards relating to noise limits & duration of activities to provide some additional flexibility

This option involves some minor changes via a plan change to the temporary activity standards and a Pukekohe Park precinct standards which include, the duration of activities, traffic management and the definition of ANZAC day. Events of a significant duration and/or those that generate substantial noise would still trigger the need for resource consent.

Option 3 – Global resource consent

 

This option involves ATEED applying for resource consent for a number of recurring events at known locations. A global consent would negate the need for specific one-off resource consent applications, but these would still be required for any events/activities not captured by the global consent.

Note: Existing Use Rights remains an option for any event that was lawfully established and can demonstrate existing use rights

 

This option relies on existing use rights for recurring temporary activities that were lawfully established prior to the AUP e.g. Auckland marathon. Activities must however have been lawfully established and the effects of the use the same or similar in character, intensity and scale to those which existing before the AUP became operative in part. Events that have increased in size annually may therefore not be able rely on existing use rights.

 

Option

Costs

Benefits

Option 1

The time and costs associated with event organisers applying for multiple resource consents and the Council processing of those consents.

A higher level of protection is afforded to the amenity values of sites in proximity to temporary activity locations.

Option 2

A reduced level of protection is afforded to the amenity values of sites in proximity to temporary activity locations.

Threshold for a resource consent can be set at level that enables certain temporary activities with minor adverse effects to occur as permitted activities.

Reduces costs for some temporary activity organisers.

Option 3

The time and costs required to prepare a global resource consent.

This is off set by the time and costs savings associated with the status quo – where multiple resource consents are required.

Affords a higher level of protection to the amenity values of sites in proximity to temporary activity locations as all temporary activities that exceed the current standards are subject to a resource consent

 

Recommendation:

Option 2 – Plan Change for minor amendments to the temporary activity and Pukekohe Park precinct standards relating to the duration of activities, traffic management and the definition of ANZAC day to provide some additional flexibility.

 

(Note: Existing Use Rights - this option continues to be available for any event that can establish existing use rights)

Reasons:

·     Adjusting the requirements between what is a permitted activity and when resource consent is required will be effective in enabling a greater number of temporary activities to occur (without the need for resource consent);

·     Removes the time and costs associated with the resource consent process for those temporary activities that would be able to meet the new standards;

·     Threshold for a resource consent can be set at level that enables certain temporary activities with minor adverse effects to occur as a permitted activity;

·     Reduces costs for some temporary activity organisers. This is particularly important for community fundraising events.

 

25.     The options, costs and benefits of those options, recommendation and reasons for Issue 2 – Gap in the noise rules for coastal temporary activities, is contained in the tables below.  For a fuller analysis refer to the attached Section 32 Analysis.

Issue 2 – Gap in noise rules for coastal temporary activities

Option

Description

Option 1 – No change/status quo

This option retains the status quo. This means that activities in the costal marine area (CMA) that are not defined as “noise events” have no applicable noise standards.

Option 2 – Plan Change to introduce a new noise rule for coastal temporary activities

 

This option addresses the gap in the provisions by introducing a noise standard or cross reference to a noise standard for activities in the CMA that are not defined as noise events. (Note: noise events are defined in the AUP as “an event that exceeds the general noise controls for a site (or area within the CMA) either in level or duration”.

 

 

Option

Costs

Benefits

Option 1

Potential environmental (amenity values) costs of temporary activities in the coastal marine area with no relevant noise standards

There are benefits for temporary activities in the CMA as they do not need to comply with any noise standards at the coastal interface.

Option 2

Costs associated with a plan change.

The additional of a noise standard imposes an additional constraint on temporary activities in the CMA.

Appropriate that temporary activities in the CMA do have a noise control at the coastal interface.

This will assist in managing the effects of temporary activities on amenity values.

 

 

Recommendation:

Option 2 – Plan Change to introduce a new noise rule for coastal temporary activities

 

Reasons:

·     Appropriate that temporary activities in the CMA do have a noise control at the coastal interface;

·     If the noise standard is exceeded, then the activity is defined as a noise event and a different set of standards apply including the number, duration and noise limits for noise events;

·     Addresses the issue in a cost-effective manner, particularly as this change is bundled with other changes.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     The propose changes to the temporary activity standards and the Pukekohe Park precinct are neutral in terms of climate change impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     ATEED raised the issues associated with the AUP and temporary activities in a presentation to the Planning Committee in March 2019.

28.     Feedback received from ATEED, the council’s Events team, event organisers and an analysis of resource consents for temporary activities has indicated that some of the current temporary activity standards in the AUP are onerous in some areas.

29.     Auckland Transport were consulted on the proposed changes to the traffic management plan requirement in Standard - E40.6.2.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     A memo was sent to all local boards on 17 July 2020 outlining the proposed changes, the rational for them and the likely timeframes. No feedback was received.

31.     Local boards are able to provide their formal feedback once submissions have closed. Formal feedback received from local boards will be included in the hearing report, along with the points raised by submitters. Those local boards that provide formal feedback will also have the opportunity to speak to their views at the hearing.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     Māori are both participants in temporary activities and organisers of events.

33.     The Auckland Plan identifies four directives under the Māori Identity and Wellbeing outcome. Direction 4: Showcase Auckland’s Māori identity and vibrant Māori culture. Focus Area 6: Celebrate Māori culture and support te reo Māori to flourish, states that “a culturally vibrant Tāmaki Makaurau showcases Māori art, music and performance locally and globally. Continued expansion and resourcing is needed for events, and activities associated with Māori events, such as Matariki. Celebrations steeped in Māori culture can ignite all cultures in Auckland to celebrate their relationship with the land”. The plan identifies a need for a programme of Māori local and regional events and activities throughout the year. The proposed changes to the temporary activity provisions will assist Māori event organisers.

34.     The Māori Plan identifies key directions. These include:

“A city/region that caters for diverse Māori lifestyles and experiences” (Māori communities are culturally vibrant across Tāmaki Makaurau); and

“People engaged in their communities.”

35.     Actions by the Auckland Council group identified in the Māori Plan include:

Wairuatanga – Promote Distinctive Identity

“Recognised sense of identity, uniqueness and belonging”

Domains/Wellbeing Areas

Issue of Significance

Actions

Cultural

Distinctive Identity - Māori retain a sense of place and identity, and the wider community understands the value of diversity and embraces our unique culture.

Support an investigation into the feasibility of a Māori-led international indigenous arts festival in Tāmaki Makaurau.

Social

Cultural & Spiritual Connection - Māori are enabled to maintain a social, cultural and spiritual connection to our uniquely cultural support systems including marae, wānanga and contemporary supports.

Partner with urban Māori authorities and Mataawaka marae to develop strategies and programmes that will increase the capacity of these organisations to engage with whānau Māori to provide more opportunities to participate in culturally supportive activities.

Economic

Thriving Business Networks - Māori business owners are enabled and supported to develop stronger business networks that will facilitate further business growth opportunities and support promotion of Māori businesses to the wider business community.

Facilitate opportunities for Māori business owners to participate in Major Events, including international events to build exposure and valuable business networks.

 

36.     Temporary activities including festival and events, concerts, parades, and sporting events with a Māori focus are an important tool in achieving these directions. Reducing compliance costs will assist Māori event organisers.

37.     A memorandum outlining the draft proposed plan change was sent to all Auckland’s 19 mana whenua entities as required under the Resource Management Act, on 14 July 2020.

38.     Responses were received from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and Ngai Tai ki Tamaki.

39.     Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei had no concerns with the proposed changes and did not need to engage further. Ngai Tai ki Tamaki advised that a potential concern is the MACCA (The Marine and Coastal Area Act – Takutai Moana) claims and legal processes.  The proposed changes however do not impact on the activities able to be undertaken in the coastal marine area. They address a gap in the noise standards.

40.     Consultation has also been undertaken with the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     The proposed plan change involves changes to some of the standards for temporary activities and the Pukekohe Park precinct in the AUP. This will make it easier for event organisers – i.e. they may not need a resource consent.

42.     One staff member from Plans and Places (0.25 of an FTE) has been allocated to this project, with assistance from the Plans and Places Planning Technicians.

43.     Staff from across the Council (CPO, ATEED, AT) and the IMSB will contribute knowledge and information. This will ensure the project team has a robust mix of capability and knowledge in the areas of planning, events and impacts on Māori.

44.     In terms of financial implications – these include the typical costs of a plan change which are approximately $40,000 for a “simple plan change”. This is funded by both Plans and Places (plan change preparation) and Democracy Services (hearing and decision) from the existing 2020/2021 budget. On the savings side, the reduction in resource consent requirements will mean that some community-initiated events will not require resource consent which is a potential saving for local board funded events of between $5,000 to $10,000 for a typical event.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

45.     The risks and mitigations associated with Issue 1 – Temporary Activity & Precinct Standards options are:

Issue 1 – Temporary Activity & Precinct Standards

Option

Risks

Mitigations

Option 1

Potentially requires a significant number of temporary activities to go through a resource consent process.

Not as many temporary activities take place and this lessens the “quality of life” for Aucklanders and economic opportunities for event organisers.

The costs of the resource consent process for “community events” are subsidised by Local Boards.

Option 2

A higher level of effects would be permitted, so the protection of amenity values associated with nearby sites would be lessened.

Setting the standards at a level where adverse effects are still appropriately managed.

 

The Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 can also be used to manage the effects associated with temporary activities, especially events.

Option 3

Lengthy and costly process of putting the global resource consent together.

It can only address those known temporary activities – so is not future proofed.

ATEED prepares the “global resource consent” on behalf of event organisers. (Note: RFA has done this for three of its sites – Aotea Square, Auckland Zoo, Western Springs Park)

 

The costs of the resource consent process are subsidised by Local Boards.

 

46.     The risks and mitigations associated with Issue 2 – Gap in noise rules for coastal temporary activities options are:

Issue 2 – Gap in noise rules for coastal temporary activities

Option

Risks

Mitigations

Option 1

Significant adverse effects which impact on the amenity values of adjacent residential or open space areas could occur from temporary activities.

Council would be powerless to take action, other than that provided for under section 16 of the RMA (Duty to avoid unreasonable noise).

The Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015 can also be used to manage the effects associated with temporary activities, especially events.

Option 2

More restrictive standards are applied to temporary activities in the CMA (coastal interface) though the plan change process.

While the usual noise limits for the adjacent zone (typically open space, residential or rural) will apply, the “noise event” standards come into play if these are exceeded.

 


 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

47.     The key steps associated with any change to the AUP temporary activity provisions are outlined in the table below:

Key Steps

Date

Status

Notification of plan change (if approval is obtained from the Planning Committee)

End of Sept 2020

To be undertaken

Report to local boards to seek their formal views

Nov 2020

To be undertaken

Plan Change process (i.e. public notification, submissions, further submissions, preparation of the hearing report, hearing, release of decision, appeal period)

Sept – April 2021

To be undertaken

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed Changes to E40. Temporary activities, I434. Pukekohe Park Precinct & E25. Noise and vibration

135

b

Section 32 Evaluation report

141

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tony Reidy - Team Leader Planning

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Planning Committee

03 September 2020

 

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03 September 2020

 

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Planning Committee

03 September 2020

 

Summary of Planning Committee information items and briefings (including the Forward Work Programme) – 3 September 2020

File No.: CP2020/11561

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       To receive a summary and provide a public record of memos or briefing papers that have been held or been distributed to committee members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to committee members via memo/briefing or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       The following information items are attached:

 

Information Items

 

Auckland Monthly Housing Update – August 2020

5.       The following memoranda have sent:

Date

Memorandum

12/8/2020

Auckland Council and Crown Auckland (housing and urban growth) Joint Work Programme – progress update

12/8/2020

Passing of the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Act

12/8/2020

Urban Development Act

26/8/2020

Resource Management System: A comprehensive review – Report of the Resource Management Review Panel

28/8/2020

Auckland Council’s Strategic Approach to Groundwater

 

6.       These documents can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

at the top left of the page, select meeting/Te hui “Planning Committee” from the drop-down tab and click “View”;

under ‘Attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘Extra Attachments’.

7.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Planning Committee members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Planning Committee:

a)      note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      receive the Summary of Planning Committee information items and briefings – 3 September 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward Work Programme

211

b

Auckland Monthly Housing Update – August 2020 (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Auckland Council and Crown Auckland (housing and urban growth) Joint Work Programme – progress update (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Passing of the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Act (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Urban Development Act (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Resource Management System: A comprehensive review – Report of the Resource Management Review Panel (Under Separate Cover)

 

g

Auckland Council’s Strategic Approach to Groundwater (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Duncan Glasgow - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Planning Committee

03 September 2020

 

 

Kōmiti Whakarite Mahere / Planning Committee

Forward Work Programme 2020

This committee guides the physical development and growth of Auckland through a focus on land use, transport and infrastructure strategies and policies relating to planning, growth, housing and the appropriate provision of enabling infrastructure, as well as programmes and strategic projects associated with these activities. The full terms of reference can be found here.

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee in 2020

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Unitary Plan Monitoring including Climate response (led by Plans and Places)

Auckland Unitary Plan Monitoring Report

Plans and Places

Statutory requirement under section 35 of the Resource Management Act to provide a comprehensive monitoring report five years from date the Auckland Unitary Plan became ‘operative in part’ (i.e. by November 2021). This work will consist of interim monitoring reports ahead of November 2021. Examples of monitoring topics include urban growth and form, quality built environment, historic heritage, indigenous biodiversity, Maori economic, social and cultural development, natural hazards (including flooding) and climate change. This work may result in plan changes being recommended ahead of the review of the Auckland Unitary Plan in 2026.

Decisions required: Interim reports seeking committee feedback and decisions on possible plan changes ahead of the review of the Auckland Unitary Plan in 2026. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

W

 

 

 

 

 

Enabling Rainwater Tanks Plan Change

Decisions required: committee delegated authority to approve notification of the plan change PLA/2020/47

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C

 

 

 

 

 

Mandating the installation of rainwater tanks in certain situations – staff to report back to Planning Committee with options (April 2021)

Decisions required: committee to consider options and recommendations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strategic approach to post-Covid Auckland

Strategic response to Covid-19

Chief Planning Office

Progress the COVID-19 strategic response discussion – workstreams and workshop date tbc

Decision required: to be confirmed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Plan 2050

Auckland Plan 2050 Implementation and Monitoring

Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Six monthly implementation update

Decision required Approving minor updates to the Plan to keep it up to date

 

 

C

 

 

 

 

 

C

 

 

 

Annual scorecard

Decision required: depends on outcomes of scorecard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Further work arising from the deep-dive

Decision required: depends on outcomes of deep-dive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resource Management Act framework reform

Resource Management Act Framework

Chief Planning Office

Resource Management Act comprehensive reform - Further consideration of later stages of reform and recommendations. 

Decision required: awaiting confirmation of implications of recommendations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Urban Growth and Housing

National Policy Statement on Urban Development

Chief Planning Office

The NPS UD was gazetted by the government on 20 July 2020 and comes into force on 20 August 2020 with ongoing timeframes for implementation. The purpose of the NPS UD is to require councils to plan well for growth and ensure a well-functioning urban environment for all people, communities and future generations

Decision required: consider the significant policy and implementation issues that are presented by the NPS UD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

W

 

 

 

Kainga Ora

Chief Planning Office

 

Ongoing Kainga Ora implementation issues and relationship management

Decision required: to be confirmed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M

 

 

 

 

 

Crown Auckland Council Joint Work Programme

Chief Planning Office

Quarterly update on the Crown and Auckland Council Joint Work Programme on Urban Growth and Housing.

Decision required: Receive update on JWP and any proposed changes to the workstreams following the Political Governance meeting in February 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M

 

 

 

 

Affordable Housing

Chief Planning Office

To progress the resolution (PLA /2019/17) on Auckland Council’s role and position on affordable housing in phases:

Progress report and approach to advice

Decision required: receive Affordable Housing progress update and insights

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C

 

 

 

 

Research findings

Decision required: consider research and implications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consider options

Decision required:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport Strategy Programme (led by Auckland Plan Strategy & Research, CPO in conjunction with others)

ATAP Refresh

Including climate lens and monitoring. Terms of reference to be decided. Indicative timing only

Decision required: tbc

Terms of Reference endorsed at Emergency Committee
14 May 2020
EME/2020/62

 

 

 

 

C

 

 

 

 

C (tbc)

 

 

Future Connect and Regional Land Transport Plan

 

Including climate lens and monitoring. Provide direction for RLTP 2021-2031. Phase 1 of this process, being run by AT, is called ‘Future Connect’ and involves definition of focus areas for planning and investment and ranking of issues. AT’s focus is the period 2028-2031 and future priorities.

Decision required: Much of the committee work in relation to the RLTP, which will follow Future Connect will take place in early 2021. Provision is made here for a possible direction-setting workshop towards the end of 2020.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

W

 

 

 

Congestion Question

Congestion question project final report. Next steps known post-election 2020.

Decision required: project updates and reporting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C (tbc)

 

 

City Centre to Mangere light rail

Subject to Cabinet consideration. Next steps known post-election 2020.

Decision required: subject to Cabinet consideration

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Harbour Crossing

The business case is being finalised.  The team is planning to provide a progress update to committee when complete.  The business case is a joint piece of work between Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency, Auckland Transport (AT) and Auckland Council. 

Decision required: consideration of business case

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(tbc)

 

 

Increasing mobility options & networks (walking, cycling & micro-mobility, & connecting networks)

Status update to be confirmed

Decision required: to be confirmed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional parking strategy review

 

AT has started work on updating some parts of its 2015 parking strategy.  Timing is uncertain but the indicative completion date is mid-2020. Concurrently, Transport Strategy has initiated a research project looking beyond operational issues, analysing statutory (and potential) mechanisms pertaining to supply and management of parking. The purpose is to support our climate action planning, inform the AT parking strategy refresh and to inform any Unitary Plan review.

Decision required: to be confirmed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public Transport Operating Mechanism review

Following direction from the Mayor and Chair, Transport Strategy will be working with MoT and AT as part of the PTOM review process.  Next steps to be confirmed September 2020.

Decision required: to be confirmed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hamilton to Auckland High Speed Rail business case

Status update to be confirmed.

Decision required: to be confirmed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Infrastructure

Upper North Island Supply Chain Strategy work programme

Engagement with Ministers and engagement with the work underway ahead of report back to Cabinet (previously scheduled for May 2020). Next steps known post-election 2020.

Decision required: to be confirmed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Infrastructure Strategy

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research

30 Year Infrastructure Strategy – strategic insights and direction (for subsequent referral to Finance Committee – forms part of LTP)

 

Decision required: timeframe and decisions to be confirmed in line with LTP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Auckland Unitary Plan oversight

Review of Schedule 10 Notable Trees Schedule

Plans and Places

Environment and Climate Change Committee noted (resolution ECC/2020/30) that staff will consider the timing of a full review of Schedule 10 – Notable Trees in the context of resourcing constraints and priorities and report back to Planning Committee.

Decision required: consider a full review of Schedule 10 Notable Trees Schedule

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C

 

Making Plan Changes Operative

Plans and Places

Statutory requirement under the Resource Management Act to make plan council and private changes operative once the decision on the plan change is made and any appeals are resolved.

Decision required: Make plan changes operative.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Private Plan Changes

Plans and Places

Private plan change requests not dealt with under staff delegation. These will be brought to committee as and when required.

Decision required: Accept/adopt/reject/deal with the request as a resource consent application.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plan Change – Residential

Plans and Places

Monitoring of the Auckland Unitary Plan has indicated that some improvements can be made to the provisions for residential development.

Decision required: Provide direction on the scope and timing of a potential plan change.

 

 

 

 

 

W

 

 

 

W (tbc)

 

 

Plan Change - Onehunga Wharf Panuku and Plans and Places

Present draft plan change to committee prior to seeking public feedback. Will seek committee accept plan change as a public plan change in early 2021.

 

Decision required: Presentation of draft plan change prior to public consultation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plans Change – Events on Public Space

Plans and Places

Enable events on public space that have obtained an event permit to be undertaken more easily.

Decision required: Endorsement of proposed plan change for notification.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C

 

 

 

Auckland Housing Programme – area plans and potential plan changes

Plans and Places

 

Kainga Ora has prepared a spatial development strategy for the Mt Roskill and Mangere areas. These may need area plans for consultation with the community and local boards. 

Some plan changes may come out of this work for parts of these areas.

Decision required: Endorsement of draft area plans for public consultation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C

 

 

Converting Road Reserve, Unformed Legal Roads & Pedestrian Accessways to
Open Space

Plans and Places

Scoping report identifying opportunities to offer unutilised areas of road reserve and unformed legal roads back to Māori former landowners

Decision required: Consider recommended approach.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C


 

Completed

Lead Department

Area of work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Decision

CPO

Kāinga Ora - Homes and Communities second Bill

Approval process for council’s submission

Political working group established to develop and approve submission by Planning Committee 5 December 2019

PLA/2019/92

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research, CPO

Submission on the Land Transport (Rail) Legislation Bill

Review and approve council’s submission

Council’s submission approved by Planning Committee 4 February 2020

PLA/2020/9

Urban Growth and Housing

Submission on the Urban Development Bill

Review and approve council’s submission

Council’s submission approved by Planning Committee 4 February 2020

PLA/2020/10

CPO

Submission on the draft National Policy Statement Indigenous Biodiversity

Review and approve council’s submission

Council’s submission approved by Planning Committee 5 March 2020

PLA/2020/15

Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Auckland Plan 2050 Implementation and Monitoring

Receive an update on the Auckland Plan 2050 and the first Auckland Plan 2050 Three Yearly Progress report

Updates received by Planning Committee 5 March 2020

PLA/2020/16

Auckland Design Office

City Centre Masterplan Refresh adoption

Consider and adopt refreshed City Centre Masterplan

City Centre Masterplan Refresh adopted by Planning Committee 5 March 2020

PLA/2020/17, PLA/2020/18, PLA/2020/19

Financial Strategy and Planning

Submission on the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Bill

Review and approve council’s submission

Council’s submission approved by Planning Committee 5 March 2020

PLA/2020/20

DPO

Shovel-ready projects for Central Government

Agreement on list for submission to central government

Process agreed at Emergency Committee 9 April 2020

EME/2020/13

CPO

Submission on the Accessible Streets Regulatory Package

Review and approve council’s submission

Council’s submission approved by Emergency Committee 16 April 2020

EME/2020/23

 

Silverdale West Dairy Flat Structure Plan

Consider and approve the final structure plan

Final structure plan approved by Governing Body 30 April 2020

GB/2020/38

Auckland Plan Strategy & Research, CPO

NZTA Innovating Streets Fund

Approval of council approach and submission

Endorsed first round of funding and approved process for developing the second round at Emergency Committee 7 May 2020

EME/2020/55

 

 

Approval of second round funding bids to NZTA

Approved Council and AT proposed list of projects for further development and refining, and authority delegated to approve the final submission, at Planning Committee 4 June 2020

PLA/2020/30

CPO

Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2021-2031, and draft National Rail Plan

 

Approve council submission on GPS and Draft national rail plan

Council’s submission approved by Emergency Committee 7 May 2020

EME/2020/56

Plans and Places

National Environmental Standards on Air Quality – council submission

Approve council submission

Council’s draft submission endorsed, and authority delegated to approve final submission, Planning Committee 4 June 2020

PLA/2020/31

Chief Planning Office

Resource Management Act Framework

Fast-track consenting legislative change

Approve council’s submission

Authority delegated to approve council’s submission on the COVID-19 Recovery (Fast-track Consenting) Bill, at Planning Committee 4 June 2020

PLA/2020/32

Plans and Places

Strategic Land Use Frameworks for Dairy Flat and Kumeu Huapai Future Urban Areas

Approval to prepare strategic land use frameworks for Wainui Silverdale Dairy Flat and Kumeu-Huapai.

Approved preparation of spatial land use frameworks, and established a Political Working Party to approve the draft spatial land use frameworks, at Planning Committee 2 July 2020

PLA/2020/37

Plans and Places

Plan Change - Whenuapai

Decision required: Approve next steps.

Next steps approved in confidential section of Planning Committee 2 July 2020

PLA/2020/44

 

 

 

 

 

     

 


Planning Committee

03 September 2020

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Planning Committee

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       CONFIDENTIAL: Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) – Proposed Plan Change 41 – Ōkura Precinct – Update

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege.

In particular, the report discusses current proceedings in the Environment Court and High Court.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

   



[1] Currently in the private rental market; have at least one member of the household in paid employment; are ineligible for social housing, cannot afford to buy a house at the lower quartile house price under standard bank lending criteria – 10 per cent deposit and no more than 30 per cent of the household’s gross income paid in mortgage expenses.

 

[2] The Auckland Housing Work Programme will deliver 10,000 additional homes in both Mt Roskill and Mangere and 1200 new dwellings will be developed in Oranga and Northcote respectively.

[3] Includes community housing providers or other providers of affordable housing including private developers.