I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waitematā Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 15 September 2020

1:00pm

This meeting will proceed via Skype for Business. Either a recording or written summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website

 

Waitematā Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chair

Richard Northey, (ONZM)

 

Deputy Chair

Kerrin Leoni

 

Members

Adriana Avendano Christie

 

 

Alexandra Bonham

 

 

Graeme Gunthorp

 

 

Julie  Sandilands

 

 

Sarah Trotman, (ONZM)

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Priscila  Firmo

Democracy Advisor

 

8 September 2020

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 353 9654

Email: Priscila.firmo@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Dirk Hudig - To update the board on Herne Bay Residents Association and Saint Marys Bay Residents Association's priorities and issues                                                                                                                    6

8.2     Deputation - Helen Geary, Friends of Leys Institute co-ordinator on Leys Institute                                                                                                                  6

8.3     Deputation - Wendy Gray to speak about the Western Springs Pines          6

8.4     Deputation - Deborah Manning, Friends of Western Springs Forest to speak about the Western Springs Pines                                                                       7

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

9.1     Public Forum                                                                                                        7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                9

11        Ward Councillor's report                                                                                             11

12        Indicative Business Case: Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium                       23

13        Waitematā Local Grants and Multiboard Grants Round One 2020/2021 grant allocations.                                                                                                                   43

14        Auckland Transport September 2020 Update to Waitematā Local Board          221

15        Endorsement of the preliminary design for the Myers Park stage two project - Mayoral Drive underpass                                                                                          239

16        Project Streetscapes: Weed Management report                                                  263

17        Urgent decision - Waitemata Local Board feedback on the Review of Auckland Council’s Council Controlled Organisations                                                          303

18        Waitematā Local Board Annual Report 2019/2020                                                315

19        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for quarter four 2019/2020                                                                             319

20        Chairperson's report                                                                                                 357

21        Board member reports                                                                                              375

22        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      379

23        Waitematā Local Board workshop records                                                            383  

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

25        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               389

18        Waitematā Local Board Annual Report 2019/2020

a.      Annual Report 2019 2020 - Vol 2 Waitematā Local Board                           389

19        Auckland Council’s Year End and Quarterly Performance Report: Waitematā Local Board for quarter four 2019/2020

b.      Waitematā Local Board Financial Report as at 30 June 2020                     389

C1       Statement of proposal for a new Navigation Safety Bylaw                                  389  

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 18 August 2020, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waitematā Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

 

8.1       Deputation - Dirk Hudig - To update the board on Herne Bay Residents Association and Saint Marys Bay Residents Association's priorities and issues

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the board on Herne Bay Residents Association and St Marys Bay Residents Association's priorities and issues.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Dirk Hudig will be in attendance to speak about Herne Bay Residents Association and St Marys Bay Residents Association's priorities and issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Dirk Hudig, St Marys Bay and Herne Bay Residents Association for his attendance.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Helen Geary, Friends of Leys Institute co-ordinator on Leys Institute

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To speak to the local board about the Leys Institute.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Helen Geary – Friends of Leys Institute coordinator will be in attendance to speak about Leys Institute.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Helen Geary for her attendance.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Wendy Gray to speak about the Western Springs Pines

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To speak to the local board about the Western Springs Pines.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Wendy Gray will be in attendance to speak about the Western Springs Pines.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Wendy Gray for her attendance.

 

 

 

8.4       Deputation - Deborah Manning, Friends of Western Springs Forest to speak about the Western Springs Pines

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To speak to the local board about the Western Springs Pines.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Deborah Manning, Friends of Western Springs Forest will be in attendance to speak about the Western Springs Pines.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Deborah Manning for her attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for a member of the public to address the 15 September 2020 Waitematā Local Board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Section 7.8 of the Waitematā Local Board’s set of Standing Orders provides for a member of the public to address a Waitematā Local Board meeting in its public forum section of the meeting.

3.       Formal approval from the Chair is not required.

Time

4.       A period of up to 30 minutes, or such other time as the local board or any of its committees may determine, will be set aside for a public forum at the commencement of meetings of the local board which are open to the public.

5.       Each speaker during the public forum section of a meeting may speak for three minutes.

6.       Standing orders may be suspended on a vote of not less than 75 per cent of those present to extend the period of public participation or the period any speaker is allowed to speak.

7.       This Standing Order does not apply to inaugural meetings and, where not appropriate, extraordinary meetings or a special consultative procedure.

Subjects of public forum

8.       The public forum is to be confined to those items falling within the scope or functions of that local board or committee. Speakers must not speak about a matter that is under judicial consideration or subject to a quasi-judicial process.

Questions of speakers during public forum

9.       With the permission of the chairperson, members may ask questions of speakers during the period reserved for public forum. Questions by members, if permitted, are to be confined to obtaining information or clarification on matters raised by the speaker.

10.     Members may not debate any matter raised during the public forum session that is not on the agenda for the meeting, or take any action in relation to it, other than through the usual procedures for extraordinary business if the matter is urgent.

11.     The meeting may not make any resolution on issues raised in public forum except to refer the matter to a future meeting, or to another committee, or to the chief executive for investigation.

12.     [Note: s 76 – 81, LGA 2002, regarding decision-making]

Language for speeches

13.     A member of the public may address a meeting in English, Māori or New Zealand Sign Language. However, the person should advise the chairperson of their intention to speak in a language other than English at least two clear working days before the meeting.

14.     Where practical, Auckland Council will arrange for a translator to be present at the meeting. The chairperson may also order the speech and any accompanying documents to be translated and printed in English or Māori or another language.

Chairperson’s discretion

15.     The chairperson may:

·   direct a speaker to a different committee if they consider this more appropriate, given the proposed subject matter

·   prohibit a speaker from speaking if they are offensive, repetitious or vexatious, or otherwise breach these standing orders.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      thank all public forum speakers for their presentations and attendance at the meeting.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waitematā Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Ward Councillor's report

File No.: CP2020/12461

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the opportunity for Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor Pippa Coom, Ōrākei Ward Councillor Desley Simpson and Albert-Eden Roskill Ward Councillors Christine Fletcher and Cathy Casey to update the local board on regional issues that they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waitematā Local Board’s Standing Orders clauses 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provide provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board, or on any matter the Governing Body member wishes to raise with the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      receive the written report update from the Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Pippa Coom and the verbal or tabled Ward Councillor reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ward Councillor Pippa Coom report September 2020

13

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Priscila  Firmo - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Waitematā Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Indicative Business Case: Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium

File No.: CP2020/11497

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement of the indicative business case for investment in the Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium buildings (Leys Institute).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To enable a decision on whether Auckland Council (the council) should invest in the Leys Institute, staff have undertaken an indicative business case assessment.

3.       Before closing in December 2019 because of earthquake risk to public and staff, library services and venue for hire services were delivered from Leys Institute. Since closing, library services have been delivered from a small (150m2) temporary library space called Little Leys and venue for hire customers have been directed to other nearby facilities.

4.       This indicative business case assessment has resulted from the West Waitematā Current State Analysis identifying an ongoing need for library services in the Ponsonby area and the Waitematā Local Board’s decision to receive the findings and develop an indicative business case for Leys Institute (WTM/2019/168).

5.       Findings from the investigations confirm there is:

·      a library space provision shortfall in the Ponsonby and wider west Waitematā area

·      a need for improved facility flexibility to deliver a range of modern library services that can adapt to changing customer needs

·      no need for provision of venue-for-hire services from Leys Institute

·      a requirement for seismic remediation of Leys Institute

·      a requirement to preserve the heritage value of Leys Institute, as a scheduled category A heritage building

·      a requirement for library services to continue to be delivered from Leys Institute, as set out in the Leys Institute Trust Deed, barring exceptional circumstances.

6.       There is a strong strategic case for change for the proposed project reflected in its high alignment with strategic council documents including the Auckland Plan 2050, Community Facilities Network Plan, and Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017.

7.       The indicative business case primarily focuses on the Ponsonby area which includes the Census Area Units of Freemans Bay, St Marys Bay, Herne Bay, Ponsonby East, and Ponsonby West.

8.       The indicative business case assesses the following four options for long-term library provision:

·      Option One | Status quo

·      Option Two | Restore Leys Institute (recommended option)

·      Option Three | Restore Leys Institute in later years

·      Option Four | Develop a new Leys Institute

9.       The results recommend option two, which shows a strong strategic and economic case for change based on an increasing shortfall in library provision and potential to improve services and outcomes. This option also aligns with the obligation for retaining Leys Institute as a library.

10.     Option three is the next best option with the same benefits of option two though delayed. A potential advantage of this option over option two is that it could allow time for the council’s financial position to recover from the impacts of COVID-19.

11.     Disadvantages include risk in further deterioration of Leys Institute and increasing costs.

12.     Option one is not recommended as the small size of Little Leys has limited potential to improve services and outcomes, relies on the continuity of a commercial lease, and leaves Leys Institute to deteriorate for an undetermined period.

13.     Option four is not recommended as it has been identified as the most expensive and does not meet obligations in the Leys Institute Trust Deed. The option was considered as an alternative to returning to Leys Institute if costs of restoration proved unfeasible.

14.     Staff recommend the development of a detailed business case, based on option two and including investigating alternative sources of funding such as community fundraising, philanthropic donations, targeted rates, service property optimisation and ring-fenced council funds.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      endorse the findings of an indicative business case for the upgrade of Leys Institute in Ponsonby, which found that:

i)        population growth is projected in the Ponsonby area in the short to long-term

ii)       there is a shortfall in existing library provision

iii)      there is a requirement to operate Leys Institute as a library in perpetuity

iv)      as a scheduled category A heritage building, the council has a requirement to protect it from destruction

v)      the buildings must be strengthened, to no longer be earthquake prone.

b)      endorse that there is a robust strategic case for investment in Leys Institute.

c)      endorse the development of a detailed business case for the restoration, modernisation, and seismic remediation of Leys Institute based on:

i)        the preferred option, option two: restore Leys Institute.

ii)       an indicative funding investment of $15.3 to $21.2 million

iii)      the inclusion of service property optimisation and ring-fenced council funds as a source of funding for up to $7.4 million

iv)      investigating alternative sources of funding including community fundraising, philanthropic donations, and targeted rates

d)      endorse the development of a detailed business case for the restoration of Leys Institute be included as a priority action in the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan.

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

The restoration of Leys Institute is a priority for Waitematā Local Board

 

15.     In 2015, the council’s Regional Strategy and Policy Committee prioritised Community Facilities Network Plan’s action 107 to investigate provision of library facilities in Ponsonby and Grey Lynn areas giving consideration to facility condition and suitability.

16.     Waitematā Local Board approved delivery of the action through their 2018/2019 and 2019/2020 work programmes (WTM/2018/77; WTM/2019/126).

17.     The West Waitematā Current State Analysis identified an ongoing need for local library services and that the current environment of Leys Library constrained delivery of these services. The local board endorsed the findings of the current state analysis and approved the development of an indicative business case to understand service and facility investment options for restoration of Leys Institute and Gymnasium in August 2019 (WTM/2019/168).

Indicative business cases are a tool to support decision-making

18.     The council uses a three-phase process to investigate large-scale capital projects and new investment in community services or facilities. This approach is based on the Better Business Case model developed by Treasury.

19.     The first phase beings with a needs’ assessment. This entails:

·      research into the profile of the community, including projected growth data

·      a summary of recent social research and any relevant community engagement surveys

·      a community facility stocktake (both council and non-council facilities)

·      a gap analysis which assesses current provision against council policy.

20.     An indicative business case considers the merits of a proposed investment. It considers strategic alignment with council objectives. It includes an economic case which considers the costs and benefits of various options that may achieve the council’s investment goals.

21.     A detailed business case can be built upon:

·      a needs assessment which demonstrates a robust case for change

·      a strategic assessment which shows alignment with the council’s objectives

·      an economic case that identifies a preferred option(s) that delivers community benefits and value for money.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

22.     The key findings of the indicative business case for investment in Leys Institute are outlined below (Attachment A to the agenda report provides a more detailed overview).

There is currently an under-provision of library services and this shortfall is increasing

23.     Growth is projected in the Ponsonby area, which will create additional demand for library services. The local population is project to grow 35 per cent from 17,489 to 23,561 people between 2021 and 2051.

24.     Prior to the Leys Institute Library (500m2) closing in December 2019, there was already a shortfall in library provision in the Ponsonby area. Now that library services are being delivered from the smaller Little Leys (150m2) this shortfall has increased.

25.     The Community Facilities Network Plan provision guidelines stipulate 1000 people per 41m2 of library space. According to these guidelines, there is currently a shortfall of 555m2 in library provision in the Ponsonby area and this is expected to increase to 815m2 by 2051.

26.     The small size and interior environment of Leys Institute Library constrained the delivery of library services, and this is also an issue with Little Leys.

Communities will change over the next 30 yearsPopulation will grow by 35% in the next 30 years

Pākehā will remain the majority
 
13,035 to 14,997

More over-65-year olds
 
2,180 to 4,910

Smaller percentage of 0 to14-year olds
 
2,320 to 2,320
35%Population growth 2021 to 2051
 	 
17,489 to 23,561
Population heat map 2018 to 2038
 
 
0%	30%		60%

There is adequate provision of venue for hire spaces

27.     The Ponsonby area is well provided for in terms of venue for hire provision.

28.     Since closing the Leys Institute in December 2019, customers have been successfully re-directed to other venues for hire in the local area.

29.     There is no requirement to reinstate venue for hire provision in the Ponsonby area.

There are compelling reasons for retaining Leys Institute

30.     The original Leys Institute trust deed outlines that the facility must be maintained for its original purpose, as a library, in perpetuity. In certain circumstances a court may make an order to vary the purpose of a trust however case law indicates that a high standard is required for approval.

31.     An application to vary the purpose of the trust would require:

·      proof that the council cannot afford to restore and maintain the Leys Institute

·      extensive public engagement

·      engagement with the Leys family

·      the development of a new Leys Institute.

32.     The Leys Institute buildings are listed as Historic Place Category 1 and scheduled as Unitary Plan Category A. These ratings mean the Leys Institute has exceptional overall heritage significance and is protected from destruction (partial or total), demolition, or relocation beyond the site.

33.     The buildings have been assessed as being five per cent of New Building Standard (5%NBS) and are considered earthquake prone. They must be strengthened, to no longer be earthquake-prone, by 2053.

There is a robust case for change for an upgraded and extended Leys Institute

34.     Findings from the West Waitematā Current State Analysis demonstrates a current and future need for library services.

35.     The strategic assessment in the indicative business case has strong alignment with the council’s plans and strategies.

Four options were assessed

36.     Staff assessed four options as part of the indicative business case:

Option one | Status quo

·    Temporary library, Little Leys, remains open

·    Lease is renegotiated beyond current three-year term

·    Leys Institute stays closed indefinitely

Option two | Restore Leys Institute

·    Seismic upgrade of library and gymnasium

·    Heritage preservation of library and gymnasium

·    Extend library services into underutilised space

·    Library is made fit-for-purpose

Option three | Restore Leys Institute in later years

·    Postpone consideration of the restoration of Leys Institute and Gymnasium (option two) to a subsequent annual plan or the next Long-term Plan (LTP) 2024-2034, when funding is more likely to be available. Little Leys provides library services in the meanwhile

Option four | Develop a new Leys Institute

·    Seek approval from high court to change purpose of trust

·    Develop a new Leys Institute on a different (unknown) site

Two options address the identified provision shortfall and deed of trust obligations

37.     The two preferred options to restore Leys Institute are in accordance with the findings of the West Waitematā Current State Analysis of Community Services approved by the Waitematā Local Board in August 2019 and the board’s approval to develop an indicative business case for the restoration of Leys Institute (WTM/2019/168).

38.     Both restoration options give the same long-term outcomes but differ in how long it will take to realise the outcomes and capital expenses over 30 years.

39.     Option three could delay realising the benefits for five to ten years. Meanwhile, library service provision would be inadequate and Leys Institute would continue to deteriorate.

40.     Assessing cost, over a 30-year period, option two is the most affordable of the options that provide additional space and deliver a fit-for-service library. Option two ($29.8 to $41.3 million) is less than option three ($34.3 to $47.6 million). Option three is more expensive because Leys Institute will deteriorate while it remains empty and because of cost escalations over the postponement period. Further financial information follows in the Financial Implications section (refer Table 2).

41.     Option one – status quo entails remaining at Little Leys and leaving Leys Institute as it is for an undetermined length of time.

42.     This option does not meet current provision requirements or address population growth. Option one is the least expensive option over 30 years ($16.4 to $22.8 million) but does not deliver short- or long-term service requirements.

43.     The status quo option has also been discounted because requirements to operate Leys Institute as a library and to protect Leys Institute are not met.

44.     Option four is the most expensive option over 30 years ($43.5 to $60.5 million) and has significant legal complexity. As this option is significantly more costly than restoration, it has been discounted.

45.     Table 1 summarises the assessment of each option against the critical success factors from the strategic case.

Table 1: Assessment of critical success factors for each option

Critical success factors

Option one

Option two

Option three

Option four

Strategic fit

Business need

Potential value for money

Supplier capacity and capability

Potential affordability

Potential achievability

Enable our communities

Focus on communities that need us most

Heritage value preserved

Seismic remediation

Library made fit-for-service

Heritage and trust constraints addressed

 

Key     strong         medium     weak

 

Staff recommend the development of a detailed business case based on option two

46.     Staff recommend the development of a detailed business case based on option two. There is a robust strategic case for change for options two and three but option two gives better value for money.

47.     Option two will also lower reputational risk to the council. Although no formal community consultation has occurred to date the community have been vocal about their desire to open Leys Institute as soon as possible.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.     Adaptive reuse is the technique of preserving the character of a heritage building while accommodating changes in demand, technology, and uses. Reuse is increasingly seen as an alternative to building new because of its closer alignment to sustainability, a circular economy, and sustainable urban environments.

49.     Rehabilitation of a heritage facility reduces the council’s impact on climate through the reuse of materials and reduced transportation. Materials are already produced and were transported onto site over 100 years ago.

50.     The recommended option to strengthen and preserve Leys Institute is an example of heritage preservation through adaptive reuse, investing in the existing built form.

51.     The location of Leys Institute enables the use of active and public transport. The building is located along key bus routes and adjacent to a town centre.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

52.     Staff from throughout the council group have contributed to the indicative business case including Panuku Development Auckland, Community Places, Libraries and Information, Finance, Legal, Heritage, and Community Facilities.

53.     If the necessary approvals are received to proceed to detailed business case, representatives from the same departments will contribute to its development.

54.     The indicative business case supports an increase in library service provision in Ponsonby which is supported by Libraries and Information. The provision of more flexible space will positively impact how library services can be delivered to a growing and changing local population.

55.     The indicative business case does not support an increase in venue for hire provision, reflecting adequate provision in the area. This also enables Community Places to prioritise the continued delivery of programmes and activities in other facilities in the area including Ponsonby Community Centre and Studio One Toi Tū.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

56.     Community support for restoring and reopening Leys Institute was expressed through the council’s Emergency Budget consultation process carried out in June 2020. Friends of the Leys Institute and members of the Leys family have also recently expressed their support for this direction.

57.     At workshops on 28 July and 25 August Waitematā Local Board have indicated, that the restoration of Leys Institute is a board priority.

58.     The local board have previously shown support for the restoration of Leys Institute at their August 2019 business meeting when they endorsed the development of an indicative business case (WTM/2019/168).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

59.     The Māori population in the study area is seven per cent of the Ponsonby population. The population is expected to be stable, staying at seven per cent until at least 2038.

60.     Two per cent of Leys Institute Library’s active members are Māori compared to 13 per cent of Auckland Māori visiting libraries each month.

61.     There is an opportunity to celebrate mana whenua significance, with reference to Leys Institute’s place on Te Rimutahi ridgeline and history as a traditional transport route from Maungawhau to Te Too, in the interior and surrounding landscape.

62.     Māori will benefit from the opportunity to increase Te Ao Māori at Leys Institute.

63.     Mana whenua and mataawaka will be consulted through the development of the detailed business case.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

A detailed business case will assess potential funding sources and prioritisation of budgets

64.     The impact of COVID-19 and the resulting economic slow-down has had a significant impact on the council’s revenue and borrowing capacity. The Emergency Budget 2020-2021 has highlighted the need to reduce capital expenditure across the council family and prioritisation of projects already being delivered. This presents a challenge for progressing a case for significant investment.

65.     A detailed business case will consider potential funding sources and prioritisation of existing budgets as part of the commercial and financial assessment.

66.     Indicative funding costs have been identified for all four options and a summary of both capital and operational expenses over the first 30 years is outlined in Table 2 below. The preferred option is circled and requires identification of between $15.4 to $21.4 million for the initial build.

Table 2: Indicative funding costs

 

Option one

Status quo

Option two

Restore Leys

Initial build

-

$15.4 to $21.4 million

Total CAPEX over 30 years

$0.4 to $0.6 million

$3.3 to $4.6 million

Total OPEX over 30 years

$16.0 to $22.2 million

$17.7 to $24.6 million

 

Option three

Restore Leys later

Option four

Develop new Leys Institute

Initial build

$19.1 to $26.6 million

$21.4 to $29.7 million

Total CAPEX over 30 years

$3.6 to $4.9 million

$4.2 to $5.9 million

Total OPEX over 30 years

$18.3 to $25.4 million

$26.9 to $37.3 million

NB. Costs are subject to change following completion of the seismic and geotechnical assessments in September/October.

67.     The initial build costs in Table 2 include expenses such as construction, professional fees, four per cent escalation for option three, legal fees of $100,000 for option four, and $200,000 for the development of a detailed business case for options two, three, and four.

68.     The capital cost for option four does not include an allowance for land to develop an alternate site.

69.     The operating costs in Table 2 include expenses and revenue such as salaries, maintenance, fees and user charges, outsourced works and services, lease, utilities, and two per cent escalation.

70.     The capital costs in Table 2 include capital renewals with four per cent escalation.

71.     The principal differences in costs, over 30 years, are:

·      option one includes no initial build

·      option three includes lease costs for the first ten years, escalation of initial build costs, and escalation of the first ten years of renewals (due to build postponement)

·      option four is a larger facility and therefore more expensive to maintain and operate. Land costs would need to be added to obtain full costs.

72.     Valuations indicate that approximately $7.4 million could be achieved through service property optimisation and the use of ring-fenced funding from sale of endowment properties. This means funding of $8.7 to $12.4 million would be needed to fund the initial build.

73.     The aim of service property optimisation is to release value of underperforming assets by selling land or development rights to provide funding for reinvestment in fit-for-purpose community facilities.

74.     Ring-fencing of council funds happens when land and/or buildings are gifted to the council under endowment that if they are sold, the sale proceeds are used for a specific purpose.

75.     Properties to be considered for service property optimisation and ring-fenced council funding include:

·      19 Jervois Road, St Marys Bay (local board service property)

·      24 St Marys Road, St Marys Bay (Leys Institute Trust property)

·      10 Fremlin Place, Avondale (Leys Institute Trust property)

·      3 Ponsonby Road, Grey Lynn (local board endowment property)

76.     Given Leys Institute’s rich history, and that the population of Ponsonby is well resourced, it could be worthwhile exploring what capacity fundraising and philanthropic donations could deliver through a detailed business case.

77.     Introducing a targeted rate could also be considered in the future. However, in the council’s current financial environment with a low ceiling for borrowing, Finance have advised this is unlikely to be feasible in the short-term.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

78.     The following table outlines the main risks and mitigations associated with the recommendations in this report.

Table 3: Risk identification and mitigations

Type of risk

Risk

Risk level

Mitigation

Financial

If there is significant movement in pricing due to the current buoyant construction market then higher costs can be expected

Low

This risk is mitigated by obtaining detailed costings from a quantity surveyor and including a construction contingency

Financial

If construction work reveals additional building issues then higher costs can be expected

Medium

This risk is mitigated by geotechnical and seismic assessments being completed early to inform design, and including a construction contingency

Financial

If the restoration project attracts low interest from the marketplace then higher costs can be expected

Low

This risk is mitigated by including a construction contingency

Financial

If contributions received from proposed funding sources are less than anticipated then alternative funding may be needed

Low

The risk is mitigated by gaining an early understanding of the revenue that could generated from the proposed funding sources

Financial

If seismic remediation costs are more than expected from the high-level estimates then additional funding will be required

Medium

This risk is mitigated by seismic assessments being completed early to inform design, and through good quality communication and using the most up-to-date information available at each phase of the project

Financial

If arguments are lodged against receiving resource consent then additional funding will be required for legal fees

Medium

This risk is mitigated through obtaining specialist heritage advice and working closely with the community

Legal / Compliance

If we do not receive resource consent to connect the library and gymnasium buildings then we will need to investigate other ways to increase library capacity

Low

This risk is mitigated through obtaining specialist advice early to inform design

Legal / Compliance

If the decision is made to remediate and restore Leys Institute Library and Gymnasium, works will be subject to heritage constraints which may impact what work can be initiated

Low

This risk is mitigated by obtaining specialist advice on any proposed modifications in advance to ensure any remediation and restoration is acceptable

Reputational

If assumptions prove incorrect then there may be a reduction in trust and confidence

Low

Assumptions are listed, below, and can be managed by keeping Leys Institute innovative, flexible, and dynamic in response to changing needs

Strategic

If the intensification provided for under the National Policy Statement (NPS) on urban development occurs then there may be unaccounted population increase in the Ponsonby area

Low

This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the population forecasts used are the most recent and are continually updated

Reputational

If communication is not clear and regular then community may feel isolated and lose trust in the council

Medium

Establish clear lines of communication

Develop and implement an agreed communication and engagement strategy

Ensure all project status information is accurate and up to date

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

79.     The next steps are outlined in Figure 1 below, subject to the decisions of the Parks, Art, Community and Events Committee and Finance and Performance Committee.

80.     If option two is approved, work will commence on the development of a detailed business case in 2021/2022. This will include the development of the financial, commercial, and management cases.

81.     Capital funding, for the development of the detailed business case, has been included within the indicative funding costs. Other costs can be met within existing funding.

82.     The timeframe for delivering the restoration of Leys Institute will depend on a range of factors including:

·      how long it takes to develop and obtain approval for a detailed business case

·      the time required to raise funding for the development.

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1: Project timing if option two is approved

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Indicative Business Case Summary

35

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Hannah Alleyne - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Libraries & Information

Justine Haves - General Manager Service Strategy and Integration

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

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Waitematā Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

Waitematā Local Grants and Multiboard Grants Round One 2020/2021 grant allocations.

File No.: CP2020/12701

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Waitematā Local Grants Round One and Multiboard Grants Round One 2020/2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Waitematā Local Grants Round One and Multiboard Grants Round One 2020/2021 (Attachments B and C).

3.       The Waitematā Local Board adopted the Waitematā Local Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 19 May 2020. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants submitted to the local board (Attachment A)

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $150,003 for the 2020/2021 financial year.

5.       Twenty-eight applications have been received for Local Grants Round One 2020/2021, requesting a total of $176,380.24 and eight applications have been received for Multiboard Round One 2020/2021, requesting a total of $32,467.00

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Waitematā Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received for the Waitematā Local Grants Round One, listed in Table One.

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2120-101

Noir Events Limited

Arts and culture

Towards costs for artsworks at the Turama Festival.

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG2120-102

New Zealand Sunday School Union Incorporated

Community

Towards a partial contribution for replacement of the first floor flooring cover.

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG2120-104

Tardigrade World Limited

Arts and culture

Toward the facilitator and artist fees.

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG2120-105

Rainbow Pride (Whakahihi) Auckland Incorporated

Events

Towards the Auckland Rainbow Parade, including entertainment, kids activities and music set-up.

$7,095.00

Eligible

LG2120-107

Grey Lynn Park Festival

Events

Towards stage equipment costs.

$4,546.00

Eligible

LG2120-108

Newmarket Arts Trust Board

Arts and culture

Towards artist fees for a new public artwork in Newmarket.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2120-110

Ponsonby Community Centre Incorporated

Community

Towards yoga tutor fees for a year.

$8,640.00

Eligible

Note: the applicant has requested more than the maximum amount stated for local grants due to a calculation

LG2120-111

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Community

Towards costs for eight participant`s from the Waitemata area, to attend a life skills camp

$869.56

Eligible

LG2120-113

Gladstone Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards costs of seating for the club

$5,213.00

Eligible

LG2120-120

Western Bay's Community Group Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire, materials, printing, event equipment hire and web hosting costs for community consultation meetings.

$5,318.00

Eligible

LG2120-123

Hapori Marketing Limited

Community, Events

Towards venue hire, marketing signs, social media promotion and advertising for the Shed Market on 22 November 2020.

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG2120-127

The Actor's Program

Arts and culture

Towards tutor fees for the Actors Programme.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2120-129

The Open Fort Limited

Community

Towards the cost of wages and materials for running workshops, advertising, signage costs, equipment hire and facilitation fees for eight facilitators for “Wild Streets: A Festival of Play

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG2120-130

Karangahape Road Business Association

Community

Towards costs of reprinting 'Centennial History of Myers Park' book.

$4,986.68

Eligible

LG2120-131

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards costs of managing and training volunteer counsellors.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2120-134

Circability Trust

Events

Towards production manager`s fees and transport costs for the 'International Day for Disabled' event.

$6,900.00

Eligible

LG2120-136

The Yes And Trust

Arts and culture

Towards costs for digital marketing, radio campaign, design, printing and distribution of promotional material for 'Auckland Improv Marathon'.

$7,307.00

Eligible

LG2120-140

The Makers Workshop Limited

Community

Towards the marketing consultants` fees, tutors fees, workshop tools and fundraising consultants fees for “The Warren” a start-up social enterprise, from 1 October to 31 March 2021.

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG2120-141

Nga Rangatahi Toa Creative Arts

Community

Towards costs of van hire, facilitator fees, set design, resources and materials for creative led workshops in October 2020.

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG2120-143

Ponsonby Business Association Incorporated

Events

Towards costs for the Auckland Gospel choir, childrens entertainment and santa for the Ponsonby Christmas Party in Western Park on 12 December 2020.

$4,180.00

Eligible

LG2120-144

Grey Lynn Business Association Incorporated

Community

Towards costs of event marketing, project management fees, creating an event award, venue hire and cleaning services for “The Urbans” event day.

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG2120-145

Garnet Station

Arts and culture

Towards costs of venue hire, professional fees` for actors, musicians and marketing for “Magic Afoot” at the Tiny Theatre from 18 to 22 November 2020.

$5,750.00

Eligible

LG2120-146

Grey Lynn Community Centre Incorporated

Community

Towards costs for plants and a contribution to the website design, hosting and signage for the initial stage of the zero-waste and community connection project.

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG2120-148

Fun and Games Toy Library Incorporated

Community

Towards annual rent for the Fun and Games Library from 31st October 2020 to 20th September 2021.

$5,335.00

Eligible

LG2120-149

Auckland City Centre Residents Group Incorporated

Community

Towards costs of venue hire, workshop facilitator fees, marketing, website development and catering for the outreach and engagement project from 1 October 2020 to 30 June 2021.

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG2120-150

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust

Community

Towards volunteer wages and travel costs for the volunteer programme from 1 October 2020 to 30 September 2021.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2120-151

Aaiotanga Peace Place Charitable Trust

Community

Towards costs for the professional fees for the production of the online newsletter.

$6,240.00

Eligible

LG2120-152

New Zealand Eid Day Trust Board

Community

Towards costs of security, cleaning, electrical equipment hire, venue hire, games and entertainment for the celebration of 'New Zealand Eid Day 2021'.

$7,500.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$176,380.24

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received Waitematā Multiboard Grants Round One, listed in Table Two.

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2021-107

The Therapy Box

Community

Towards costs activity materials, petrol and reimbursment for volunteers, for the diversional therapy care boxes project.

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-115

Charlotte Museum Trust

Community

Towards venue hire, co-ordinators fees and tutor costs

$3,500.00

Eligible

MB2021-119

CNSST Foundation, formerly known as Chinese New Settlers Services Trust

Community

Towards classroom rental costs, advertising, and contracted teacher fees for the "Unite Against COVID-19 CNSST Education and Well-being Programme"

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-133

Assistance Dogs New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards operating costs of Assistance Dogs for a four month period.from 2 November 2020 to 29 February 2021.

$3,500.00

Eligible

MB2021-134

Community Think Ltd

Community

Towards Camp 2021 costs venue hire, food, presenter koha.

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-136

The ReCreators Ltd

Community

Towards costs for facilitators, materials, preparation, project management and administration.  For Christmas upcycling workshops in local boards.

$4,467.00

Eligible

MB2021-138

The New Zealand Society of Authors Te Puni Kaituhi o Aotearoa (PEN NZ Incorporated)

Arts and culture

Towards costs for a project to record oral histories for .people who have made a significant contribution to New Zealand literature.

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2021-140

The Kids for Kids Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire and production cost of the Kids Youth Choir performance at Bruce Mason Centre from 2 to 6 November 2020.

$3,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$32,467.00

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The Waitematā Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2020/2021 on 19 May 2020 and will operate two quick response and two local grants rounds for this financial year. 

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

12.     Due to the current COVID-19 crisis, staff have also assessed each application according to which alert level the proposed activity is able to proceed. For example, under alert level two, only gatherings of up to 10 people can take place. Events and activities have been assessed according to these criteria.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement 

13.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; decreasing access to single-occupancy transport options, home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

14.     Thirteen applicants applying to local grants response round two have indicated that their project supports climate change outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

16.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Waitematā Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

18.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

19.     A summary of each application received through Waitematā Local Grants and the Multiboard Grants Round One 2020/2021 grant round is provided (refer Attachment B and C).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Maori. Auckland Council’s Maori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

21.     Eleven applicants applying to Local Grants round one, have indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

23.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $150,003 for the 2020/2021 financial year.

24.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $150,003 for the 2020/2021 financial year.

25.     Twenty-eight applications have been received for Local Grants Round One 2020/2021, requesting a total of $176,380.24 and eight applications have been received for Multiboard Round One 2020/2021, requesting a total of $32,467.00

26.       Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified that a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

28.     Staff recommend that due to current COVID19 crisis, if an applicant is unable to carry out the project in this financial year, then a clause is added to the recommendation, that the applicant can retain the funds to carry out the event in the next financial year or postpone the event date, to when alert levels have reduced, and the event can be conducted safely.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Following the Waitematā Local Board allocation of funding for the local grants round two and the multiboard grants round two, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waitematā Grants Programme - 2020 2021

53

b

Waitematā Local Grants Round One  2020/2021 grants applications

57

c

Waitematā Multiboard Grants Round One 2020/2021 grants applications

181

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ann Kuruvilla - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Marion Davies - Grants and Incentives Manager

Trina Thompson - Relationship Manager/Senior Advisor Waitematā Local Board

 


Waitematā Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 


 


 


 


Waitematā Local Board

15 September 2020

 

 

 

 

 

Waitematā

Local Grants and

2020/2021 Application Summaries

 

Table of Contents

Noir Events Limited. 3

Tardigrade World Ltd. 7

Newmarket Arts Trust 11

The Actors` Program.. 14

The Yes And Trust 18

Garnet Station & Tiny Theatre. 21

New Zealand Sundat School Union Inc. 24

Ponsonby Community Centre. 27

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated. 30

Western Bay's Community Group Inc. 36

The Open Fort 39

Karangahape Road Business Association. 43

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust 46

The Makers Workshop Limited. 58

Ngā Rangatahi Toa Creative Arts Initiative. 62

Grey Lynn Community Centre. 66

Fun & Games Toy Library. 70

Auckland City Centre Residents; Group Incorporated. 73

Auckland Regional Migrant Services Charitable Trust 76

Aaiotanga Peace Place Trust 80

New Zealand Eid Day Trust 84

Grey Lynn Business Association. 88

Hapori Marketing Limited. 91

RAINBOW PRIDE (WHAKAHIHI) AUCKLAND INCORPORATED.. 95

Grey Lynn Park Festival 98

Circability Trust 101

Ponsonby Business Association. 106

The Gladstone Tennis Club. 109

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2020/2021 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One

LG2120-101

Noir Events Limited

Legal status:

Limited Liability Company

Activity focus:

Arts and culture

Conflicts of interest:

 

Project: Tūrama Festival

Location:

Albert Park, 33-43 Princes Street, Auckland CBD, Auckland 1010

Summary:

Tūrama is originally a winter light based arts festival held in July. This year, the four day immersive sculptural arts and performance festival will be held in October, celebrating and showcasing works from local artists and performance groups that will spark curiosity and inspire Auckland's wide range of communities.

Expertise:

Our event management company has a strong background in event operations, having managed operations at creative music and arts festival such as Splore and New Zealand Fashion Week for many years. 
We have a vast past of experiences working with highly creative minds, managing events such as First Thursdays on Karangahape Road. 
Noir Events Ltd. brought Tūrama to life for the first time in 2019, bringing ver 40,000 people into the city center, bursting with positive reviews.

Focus specific:

Event producer/contractor/3rd party:

Environmental benefits:

Building/site accessible or visible to the public:

Dates:

01/10/2020 - 04/10/2020

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

Over 60,000

% of participants from Local Board

60 %

Promotion:

The local boards contribution will be recognized by Noir Events and Tūrama through acknowledgement in some advertising of the festival and on the website. As well as being mentioned/displayed by the artwork this grant supports during the live event.

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

Tūrama provides Auckland with high quality entertainment post COVID. People around the city will want to explore and get back in touch with their outdoor green spaces, which will be filled with an immersive and interactive experience. Tūrama will be held during the spring school holidays, making it easily accessible for families with younger children, not only for time but it is also incredibly affordable at $8 a ticket with children under 15 year old's going free. 
The artistic community will have commissioned work through working with Tūrama.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

·      Encourage access to and participation in local events and arts activities

 

Turama festival provides an opportunity for the community to easily access and participate in arts activities by hosting a public event in the city center.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Shae O'Niell

Arts Team Manager

Anna Hansen

Arts Team Manager

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·     

Tūrama - to give light to, to light with a torch, to illuminate in Te Reo Māori is a festival which values inclusivity. That means inviting Māori  to be a part of the process of making Tūrama the successful festival it is. We are currently in the process of collaborating with local iwi - Ngāti Whātua-o-Ōrākei and Ngāti Pāoa, recognising the kaitiakitanga and tikanga they have for the land.

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - In our Accessibility plan, we have outlined how Tūrama aims to be a festival that is accessible and enjoyable by all members of our communities. Some of our initiatives include ensuring the arts trail is wheel chair friendly for people with mobility disabilities. This year in 2020, we are working with Accessibility experts who will provide accessibility tours for people with hearing impairments. More information about this will be provided in our Accessibility Plan, a part of our Information Pack.

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

·      Promote smoke-free messages, Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

As Tūrama is a family friendly festival, therefore we will be encouraging Albert Park to be a smoke-free environment throughout the duration of the festival, to ensure that everyone will be able to enjoy their time there.
In our waste management plan, we have outlined how Tūrama aims to be a zero waste event and the initiatives we have put in place to ensure we divert as much non-recyclable and non-compostable waste  from landfill as possible. An example of one our initiatives is making one of our criteria for food vendors to trade one site will be to use only compostable or recyclable serve ware. A copy of our waste management plan will be attached in supporting documents.
Free water will be available for all attendees at the festival. Along with a choice of fresh and healthy kai options which have been carefully selected from a range of Auckland's finest food trucks. We are currently in the process of shortlisting healthy food vendors. 
Tūrama will host a sculptural art and performance trail which will travel around the park, which will promote attendees to be passively active, while being able to appreciate never before seen artworks carefully placed around Albert Park.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

5%

10%

20%

60%

%

5%

%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$7500.00

Requesting grant for:

The funding that we receive from this grant will go towards funding one of the artworks that will be commissioned to featured in Tūrama 2020. This will help New Zealands artists continue to design and create their vision, and inspire Auckland's city center.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

We would come up with a new and creative way to sell merchandise to raise funds to be able to continue the event. GoFundMe may also become an avenue to explore if we are unable to receive the appropriate funding.

Cost of participation:

$8.00 online, $10 on door. Kids 15 and under go free

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$852,150.00

$867,000.00

$327,500.00

$0.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Artworks

$180,000.00

$7,500.00

Event management

$272,290.00

$0.00

Site/Venue

$143,740.00

$0.00

Visual

$20,000.00

$0.00

Audio

$20,000.00

$0.00

Marketing & Communication

$95,000.00

$0.00

Logistics

$16,670.00

$0.00

Dressing

$27,550.00

$0.00

Health and Safety

$5,000.00

$0.00

Contingency and Miscellaneous

$71,900.00

$0.00

 

Income description

Amount

40,000 tickets at $7 each

$ 312,700.00

14 x Food vendors @ $1,200 each

$ 16,800.00

Total Sponsorship

$ 210,000.00

Funding & Grants

$ 327,500.00

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

ATEED Elemental

$200,000.00

Approved

Creative Communities Scheme

$50,000.00

Pending

Asia NZ Foundation

$20,000.00

Pending

Waitemata local board - Regional Event Fund

$50,000.00

Pending

Waitemata local board - Local Grant 120/21

$7,500.00

Pending

 

Donated materials

Amount

Nil

$0.00

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

Nil

 

$0.00

 

Additional information to support the application:

We have provided the Tūrama information pack which include our 10 Year Plan, Accessibility Plan, and Cultural Inclusion Plan.

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

CCS21_1_020

Tūrama

Creative Communities Scheme 21_1 -  Central & Gulf Islands 21_1

Undecided

$0.00

MB2021-101

Tūrama

2020/2021 Multi-board Local Grants Round One -  Withdrawn

Withdrawn

$0.00

QR2020-201

Turama 2020

2019/2020 Waitematā Quick Response, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

Applications prior to the 2017/2018 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

                         

2020/2021 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One

LG2120-104

Tardigrade World Ltd

Legal status:

Limited Liability Company

Activity focus:

Arts and culture

Conflicts of interest:

 

Project: Tardigrade World-late 2020

Location:

3/1 Cross Street, Auckland Central, New Zealand

Summary:

Tardigrade World runs a sustainability research assemblage, where the making of art acts as the medium for which issues around sustainability, climate change, social and political influences are discovered or expressed. Tardigrade World is an umbrella project that provides a space/resources for local artists to create multidisciplinary art projects that benefits and reaches towards communities through creative formats.

Expertise:

Tardigrade World takes pride in its members diverse fields of practices, the current members include photo/videographers; digital designers; creative fine artists; animators; dance choreographers and performers; university researchers; free writers; musicians/composers; producers and fashion designers.
Tardigrade World is equipped to deliver all diverse projects in the sustainable art field.

Focus specific:

Event producer/contractor/3rd party:

Environmental benefits:

Building/site accessible or visible to the public:

Dates:

02/10/2020 - 14/02/2021

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

500

% of participants from Local Board

85 %

Promotion:

Waste Archive is a marketing tool itself. We will also do online promote on social media and street posters.

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

Our Rona VS Art event - (a networking and panel day for artists) is in response to the trauma Covid 19 has brought to the art communities, Tardigrade World is hosting a recovery-networking event for artists in collaboration with Jang Huddle. This event aims to reconnect artists from community arts, dance, theatre, visual arts, designing, fashion and venues. There will be a panel of creative people, art installation, open mic session for artists to share their projects and seek support. Our magazine publication “Waste Archive“ is a project that encourages dialogues around climate change and recycling art. To raise an awareness on the importance of sustainability and creative art, Tardigrade World utilises this publication as a method to invite Auckland-based artists of diverse backgrounds to investigate ideas of reusable art, writings and collaborations. Embodied Dialogue is a movement workshop series. It invites members of the community to engage with hybrid choreographic language through movement exploration. This workshop is motivated by issues surrounding diasporic identities, immigrations, borders and cultural politics. We also have a fashion brand called Projacket created under Tardigrade World, this project employs marginalised artists to work with recycled materials, to reinvent meanings to everyday wear.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

·      Encourage access to and participation in local events and arts activities

 

Leading predominantly by females, Tardigrade World welcomes artists and community practitioners of all backgrounds to the dynamism and explosion of creative energy. The physical space of Tardigrade World on Karangahape Road has been set up in ways that accommodate most movement experiences, recycled art making, fashion design, and a few desks for digital designing.
 
Current members of Tardigrade World are experienced in hosting workshops, art directing, event and project managing in each of their fields. I.E. Java Bentley in sustainable fashion; Yin-Chi Lee in dance choreography, wushu workshops; Darryl Chin and JingCheng Zhao with extensive project managing experiences, Tommy Jiang and Cindy Jang with net working events...etc.
 
Driven to expand the concept of collaboration, and to outreach the ideology and practices of sustainable art process, Tardigrade Wold's space is open for all local artists to come experience the organisations' workshops/projects, or to facilitate and support outside artists to create their own work within the space.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Samoa House Library

 

Jang Huddle

Rona VS Art artist networking event and related events

Shift Aotearoa

Amber Liberte to perform live dance events when funding is available

Fluid Borders

 

Deborah Fletcher

Tempo Dance festival interview

Neza Jamnikar

Potential movement workshop collaborator when funding is available

Ellen Melville Centre

workshops and exbitions

Sustainable Future Collective

 

Mairangi Arts Centre

workshops

3R

contracted to utilise space for Creative New Zealand funded project

Abilities Incorporated

 

Hub Zero

 

Audio Foundation

 

Strange Heaven

 

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·      None identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Tardigrade World is an open environment that welcome all members of the community.
It's sub project - Projecket is aimed specifically to encourage and support marginalised artists, such as artists with disabilities, emerging female artists, immigrant artists, and LGBT artists, to have a safe platform to explore their creativity through sustainable art.

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

·      Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Encourage the reduction of carbon emissions or increase community resilience to the impacts of climate change*

Please see the main purpose of the project.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

20%

80%

%

%

%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$7500.00

Requesting grant for:

workshop facilitator's fees/artists fee

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

artist fee to make sure all the event could be carried out.

Cost of participation:

Koha is welcome but nothing will be compulsory.

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$48,000.00

$525.00

$75,000.00

$10,000.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

workshop facilitator's fees/artists fee

$48,000.00

$7,500.00

 

Income description

Amount

$5 Koha 7 workshops/projects 15 people/ workshop.

$ 525.00

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

CNZ application is under planning

$75,000.00

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

plastic sheets, old tools, second art supplies etc

$1,000.00

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

Nil

 

$0.00

 

Additional information to support the application:

At the moment Tardigrade World is a registered company that is not commercial driven. Tardigrade World prides its values of cultural, gender, racial and ethnic diversity, community collaboration and sustainable art practices. With limited board members at this stage, Tardigrade World is in the process of transforming into an incorporate society.
With more fundings available, Tardigrade World will be able to provide more resources for local artists to generate meaningful work, and to host diverse community events where members of the community can experience art in multidisciplinary forms.

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

LG2020-205

TW_video/print content_ June onward 2020

2019/2020 Waitematā Local Grants, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

CCS20_2_074

Napcourse 4-7 2020

Creative Communities Scheme 20_2 -  Central & Gulf Islands 20_2

Declined

$0.00

QR2014-117

Made in Asia(working title)

2019/2020 Papakura Small Grants, Round One -  SME assessment complete

Declined

$0.00

QR2020-107

Ugly Mugs

2019/2020 Waitematā Quick Response, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2020-110

print and deliver TW first magazine

2019/2020 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR1920-315

Waste Archive

2018/2019 Waitematā Quick Response, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,000.00

WMIF1901-010

Reduce commercial waste at the university food court!

WMIF April 2019 -  5a. Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG1920-202

Made in Asia

2018/2019 Waitematā Local Grants, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

Applications prior to the 2017/2018 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

 

2020/2021 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One

LG2120-108

Newmarket Arts Trust

Legal status:

Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Arts and culture

Conflicts of interest:

 

Project: New public artwork in Newmarket

Location:

Broadway, onside the Rialto centre.

Summary:

Tis will be a neon public artwork designed and installed by eminent neon artist, Paul Hartigan.

Expertise:

This is our sixth public art project.

Focus specific:

Event producer/contractor/3rd party:

Environmental benefits:

Building/site accessible or visible to the public:

Dates:

31/08/2020 - 18/12/2020

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

many thousands

% of participants from Local Board

95 %

Promotion:

Through our facebook and through the NBA publicity

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

Along with the other five artworks in the area, iterates a different dimension than just retail shopping.  The art is appreciated by locals and visitors.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

·      Empower our communities by supporting community-led initiatives

 

The arts trust is planning its sixth public art in the area.  This is wholly a community-led initiative

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Newmarket Business Association (NBA)

funding and support

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·      None identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - It can be appreciated by everyone

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

·      Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

Through theNBA and through our facebook site

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

100%

100%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

%

%

%

%

100%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$5000.00

Requesting grant for:

Artists fees

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

Seek other funds but this will be time consuming

Cost of participation:

nil

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$86,250.00

$0.00

$76,000.00

$5,000.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Creation and installation of artwork

$86,250.00

$5,000.00

 

Income description

Amount

Nil

$ 0.00

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

Newmarket Arts Trust

$69,000.00

Approved

Waitemata Local Board

$2,000.00

Approved

 

$

Pending

Rialto Centre

$5,000.00

Pending

 

Donated materials

Amount

Nil

$0.00

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

4

100

$2,115.00

 

Additional information to support the application:

None

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

LG2020-223

Neon Art Work

2019/2020 Waitematā Local Grants, Round Two -  Awaiting funding agreement

Approved

$2,000.00

LG1720-224

Installation of public art in Teed Street, Newmarket

2016/2017 Waitematā Local Grant, Round Two -  Accountability overdue

Approved

$7,500.00

Applications prior to the 2017/2018 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

                         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2020/2021 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One

LG2120-127

The Actors` Program

Legal status:

Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Arts and culture

Conflicts of interest:

 

Project: Tutor`s

Location:

283 Karangahape Rd, Newton, Auckland

Summary:

The Tutor`s role is to provide expert instruction to students enrolled in the Actors’ Program.
Depending on what the tutor is teaching and for how many hours, these are added for their time on to our Tutor timetable.
Tutor`s teach Monday to Thursday between 8:30 - 4:30. There are 5.5 hours of paid teaching time which equates to 22 hours per week @ $50 per hour.

Expertise:

Our grads have had great success over the last year. We have had number of actors performing in The Pop Up Globe, ATC shows, The Auckland Festival and in Professional
 
 
theatres around the country. On screen we have grads in Westside, Shortland St, Cul de Sac, Auckward Love, Monkey and Power Rangers (both screening in the US).

Focus specific:

Event producer/contractor/3rd party:

Environmental benefits:

Building/site accessible or visible to the public:

Dates:

01/10/2020 - 31/12/2020

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

500

% of participants from Local Board

300 %

Promotion:

 

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

By receiving support for contracted positions, this will improve the organisations sustainability and provide challenging, up-to-date training course for actors, which is strongly, uniquely and directly connected to the stage and screen industry.
 
Access and engagement with the wider community
The program offers the Auckland performing arts community the opportunity to participate in a course which provides a career pathway for all students.
The Graduation Production and Location Shoot not only benefits students but profiles the Production and the Program to the Auckland community by engaging them in the performances.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

·      Encourage access to and participation in local events and arts activities

 

The Actors’ Program offers actors and directors practical and effective tools to succeed as professional practitioners in the stage and screen industries. The Actors' Program is a one-year, rigorous, intensive, industry-related course. New Zealand’s aspiring actors and directors are offered a foot-in-the-door of their chosen profession by some of the nation’s leading performers and teachers. 
 
Access and engagement with the wider community
The program offers the Auckland performing arts community the opportunity to participate in a course which provides a career pathway for all students.
The Graduation Production and Location Shoot not only benefits students but profiles the Production and the Program to the Auckland community by engaging them in the performances.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

N/A

N/A

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·      None identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Open to all

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

·      Promote smoke-free messages, Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes, Encourage the reduction of carbon emissions or increase community resilience to the impacts of climate change*

Through our programs

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

50%

50%

%

%

%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$5000.00

Requesting grant for:

Tutor Fees

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

Apply to others for community support.

Cost of participation:

Student fees

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$52,175.00

$47,000.00

$0.00

$175.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Tutor Fees

$52,175.00

$5,000.00

 

Income description

Amount

Student fees

$ 47,000.00

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

Nil

$0.00

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

Nil

$0.00

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

Nil

 

$0.00

 

Additional information to support the application:

None

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

CCS21_1_126

We request support for our Graduation Production and Location Shoot Writer Fees.

Creative Communities Scheme 21_1 -  Central & Gulf Islands 21_1

Undecided

$0.00

QR2020-210

We request support for our Graduation Production Writer Fees.

2019/2020 Waitematā Quick Response, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2020-215

contracted Tutor`s positions

2019/2020 Waitematā Local Grants, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

ASF202006

 

2020 Waitematā Accommodation Support Fund -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,000.00

RegPr20_200045

Contracted Tutor`s positions

Regional Arts and Culture grants programme 20_2 Projects -  Audience

Undecided

$0.00

CCS20_2_104

Graduation Production and Location Shoot Writer Fees

Creative Communities Scheme 20_2 -  Central & Gulf Islands 20_2

Declined

$0.00

QR2020-126

We request support for our Graduation Production Writer Fees.

2019/2020 Waitematā Quick Response, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

CCS20_1_141

Graduation Production and Location Shoot Writer Fees

Creative Communities Scheme 20_1 -  Central & Gulf Islands 20_1

Declined

$0.00

LG2020-131

Tutors

2019/2020 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

ASF192002

 

2019 Waitematā Accommodation Support Fund -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

RegPr19_200015

We request support for our contracted Tutor`s positions.

Regional Arts & Culture Grants Programme 19_2 -  Submitted

Declined

$0.00

CCS19_1_172

We request support for our Graduation Production Writer Fees.

Creative Communities Scheme 19_1 -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,500.00

LG1820-236

Graduation Production and Location Shoot Professional Writer Fees.

2017/2018 Waitematā Local Grants, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

ASF1820-036

 

2018 Waitematā Accommodation Support Fund -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG1820-122

We request support for our Location Film Shoot

2017/2018 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One -  Withdrawn

Withdrawn

$0.00

ASF1720-039

 

2017 Waitematā Accommodation Support Fund -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR1720-417

We request support to purchase 2 x office computers.

2016/2017 Waitematā Quick Response, Round Four -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,450.00

LG1720-230

We request support for a Scholarship Fund.

2016/2017 Waitematā Local Grant, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR1720-229

We request support to purchase 6 x video cameras.

2016/2017 Waitematā Quick Response, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

CCS17_1_137

Graduation Production

Creative Communities Scheme 2017_1 -  Regional Assessment Committee Round 1 2017

Declined

$0.00

Applications prior to the 2017/2018 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

                         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2020/2021 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One

LG2120-136

The Yes And Trust

Legal status:

Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Arts and culture

Conflicts of interest:

None

Project: Auckland Improv Marathon

Location:

Covert Theatre, 51 Mackelvie Street, Grey Lynn, 1021

Summary:

The Auckland Improv Marathon is a mini-festival held over Labour Weekend. It involves improv workshops and performances from both local and other groups.

Expertise:

We are world renown for the quality of our improvisation workshops, shows and productions. We run a fulltime theatre with workshops and shows on a weekly basis.

Dates:

23/10/2020 - 26/10/2020

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

500

% of participants from Local Board

400 %

Promotion:

With in venue signage, on all print material  - posters, postcards, programs and acknowledgement at the shows in the venue.

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

It strengthens the local arts community through the workshops and performance opportunities. It adds a vibrancy to the community. It provides more access to the venue for audiences which in turn helps the theatre to be financially sustainable. By bringing in performers from other cities we'll be exposing our local performers to other practices that in turn strengthen the local arts scene.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

·      Encourage access to and participation in local events and arts activities

 

The Auckland Improv Marathon is like a mini-festival held over Labour day weekend. We are offering workshops and performance opportunities for the community to partake in as well as watch. This will strengthen the local arts community while also developing audiences.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Matias Avaca

Event director

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·      None identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - We have a accessible carpark outside the venue, are on a ground floor with a ramp and wheelchair friendly doors, have a accessible toilet, and an accessible service area at the theatre. We invested an extra $2500 so we could have retractable theatre seats that can be withdrawn to allow for two wheelchairs.

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

·      Promote smoke-free messages, Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

We have smoke-free signage in the venue, use recyclable products, have a water station in the bar and the workshops are active encouraging people to participate and move.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

25%

65%

%

10%

%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$7307.00

Requesting grant for:

We are asking for only support for marketing and promotion - to pay for a digital marketing campaign, radio campaign and to pay for the design, printing and distribution of the promotional collateral. By having a marketing and promotional campaign we are able to keep ticket prices down and make it more accessible for the community.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

We would contract our marketing campaign which has the flow on effect of lowering our audience numbers and participation. There are other expenses we need to cover that we're not requesting funding for such as hiring other workshops venues (Ponsonby community centre), paying workshop teachers, venue technicians and staff that will all come from ticket sales and workshop fees. Our financial shortfall is our marketing campaign, hence the funding application.

Cost of participation:

Tickets are $10-$15

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$7,307.00

$8,200.00

$0.00

$2,775.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Digital marketing

$1,650.00

$1,650.00

Design costs

$2,000.00

$2,000.00

Print costs

$1,157.00

$1,157.00

Radio campaign

$2,500.00

$2,500.00

 

Income description

Amount

Workshop income 80 people @ $50 each

$ 4,000.00

Performance income 420 tickets @ $10 each

$ 4,200.00

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

Nil

$0.00

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

Venue hire of the Covert Theatre

$900.00

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

2

100

$2,115.00

 

Additional information to support the application:

None

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

QR2020-215

Theatre lighting

2019/2020 Waitematā Quick Response, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

ASF202028

 

2020 Waitematā Accommodation Support Fund -  Project in progress

Approved

$9,000.00

CCS20_2_017

Auckland Improv Festival

Creative Communities Scheme 20_2 -  Central & Gulf Islands 20_2

Declined

$0.00

Applications prior to the 2017/2018 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

                         

 

2020/2021 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One

LG2120-145

Garnet Station & Tiny Theatre

Legal status:

Limited Liability Company

Activity focus:

Arts and culture

Conflicts of interest:

 

Project: Magic Afoot - a play for the stage

Location:

Tiny Theatre, 85 Garnet Rd, Auckland 1022

Summary:

Magic Afoot is a light-hearted stage play with a subtle theme of looking positively at climate change. In the immediate vicinity of Tiny Theatre are three well known NZ actors, Elizabeth Hawthorne, Peter Elliot, Jodie Rimmer, who will be invited to take part. The play will be free to its audience, as Tiny Theatre is adjacent to the well-patronised bar & cafe at Garnet Station.

Expertise:

1)Tiny Theatre has a 5 year track record of presenting successful entertainment events to its 1000 database supporters;
2) Writer Sandi Hall has had several plays produced, the last one being at Paekakariki's St Peter's Hall, financially supported by Kapiti Coast Local Board

Dates:

18/11/1920 - 22/11/1920

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

200+

% of participants from Local Board

200 %

Promotion:

We will design and print posters & flyers to be mounted in libraries and community centres. The WLB's logo would be part of the design. Additionally,  we will request a stand-alone WLBoard/Auckland Council sign that we can place near Tiny Theatre's door.

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

1) Presenting free, high quality entertainment to the Westmere community 2)Providing a space and place for the local community to connect and feel welcome  3) Offering different and positive points of view on climate change.  4) Offering a smoke-free entertainment event and venue

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

·      Encourage access to and participation in local events and arts activities

 

By presenting a free entertainment event at Tiny Theatre, one with a subtle climate change theme, and using local acting and musical talent, we offer access to and participation in a light-hearted play suitable for a general audience

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

N/A

N/A

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·      None identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Tiny Theatre is all "on the flat" and already includes a number of supporters with disabilities.

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

·      Promote smoke-free messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice

Both Tiny Theatre and Garnet Station are smoke-free environments.  Additionally, Garnet Station offers a full menu of vegetarian and vegan food, aerated spring water and a line of fruit juices

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

%

%

%

%

100%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$5750.00

Requesting grant for:

For the hire of the theatre, payment of the professional actors & musician, and marketing

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

Because it is  a free event, we would probably take a lack of funding support from Waitemata Local Board as a sign of general indifference to  the project and turn our energy and attention to another project

Cost of participation:

No cost

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$5,750.00

$0.00

$0.00

$500.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

$6250 (see uploaded budget)

$5,750.00

$5,750.00

 

Income description

Amount

This is a free event

$ 0.00

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

Nil

$0.00

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

Tiny Theatre is donating costumes, props, make-up, script copies, rehearsal coffees and snacks

$500.00

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

Nil

 

$0.00

 

Additional information to support the application:

Yes

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

No previous application

                         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2020/2021 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One

LG2120-102

New Zealand Sundat School Union Inc

Legal status:

Incorporated Society

Activity focus:

Community

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: Replacement of 1st Floor flooring cover with like material.

Location:

323 Queen St. Auckland CBD

Summary:

Replacement of 1st Floor flooring cover with like material. The flooring is badly worn; no pattern or colour remaining, holes and damage. It is very unattractive and would have been replaced years ago if funds had been available.

Expertise:

A similar project has been carried out on the ground floor. The project manager has had decades of business experience as well as experience in managing various building projects over his career, including construction of Children's camp buildings.

Dates:

01/09/2020 - 31/10/2020

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

1000 affiliates, 25 artists

% of participants from Local Board

25 %

Promotion:

None

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

Restoration of flooring in category B Heritage Building housing several artists studios, and to maintain funding from rentals for the Christian education of children to assist in developing their life skills.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

·      Ensure our communities have opportunities to lead active and healthy lifestyles

 

This Heritage B building houses the organisation's office as well as providing income to fund the charity. The grant is to be used to partially fund the replacement cost of badly worn flooring on the first floor of the premises. Tenants include Lifewise, a charity for the homeless, and also various artists studios.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

N/A

N/A

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·      None identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

No -

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

·     

Not relevant to this project, although we hope to achieve healthy lifestyles by participants in our educational programme.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

%

%

%

%

100%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$7500.00

Requesting grant for:

64%

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

Project will be delayed until funds available. Has already been delayed due to lack of funds.

Cost of participation:

nil

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$11,670.00

$0.00

$0.00

$4,170.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Foyerand hallways

$8,700.00

$7,500.00

Kitchen, Bathrooms

$2,970.00

$0.00

 

Income description

Amount

Nil

$ 0.00

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

Nil

$0.00

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

Nil

$0.00

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

Nil

 

$0.00

 

Additional information to support the application:

Covid-19 Lockdown has resulted in reduced income for the charity through having to give rent rebates to its tenants. It is a nonprofitable charity which exists through the assistance of many unpaid volunteers. Apart from maintaining an historic Category B Building, the charity runs Christian Education Courses for approx 1200 children through 55 different churches of various denominations.  We are hopeful that Council will give a grant to enable this work to proceed promptly.

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

No previous application

                         

2020/2021 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One

LG2120-110

Ponsonby Community Centre

Legal status:

Incorporated Society, Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Community

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: Free Seniors yoga

Location:

Ponsonby Community centre 20 Ponsonby Terrace Auckland 1011

Summary:

We will provide free Seniors yoga classes, twice a week, for an hour each. The classes are led by a qualified and experienced instructor specialising in over 65's health.

Expertise:

We have engaged a well respected, experienced and qualified yoga instructor who specialises in helping the elderly body. As a community centre we also specialise in assessing the need in a community and providing a solution.
The classes have also been approved as a community Strength and Balance programme by the ACC funded Live Stronger for Longer organisation.

Dates:

01/10/2020 - 01/10/2021

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

100

% of participants from Local Board

100 %

Promotion:

Our website and facebook events and pages acknowledge and thank the Waitemata local board for all assistance - all advertising includes the LB logo.

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

The Seniors yoga helps our retirees to remain active, promoting balance and strength. The mental health benefits are just as important - meeting twice a week, the attendee's have gained new friendships and relationships in an age group where loneliness and depression is highly prevalent.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

·      Ensure our communities have opportunities to lead active and healthy lifestyles

 

The seniors Yoga classes operate 2 days per week and are free to all over 65. The classes give seniors the opportunity to enjoy gentle regular exercise and is also a social occasion for those who may not have family or friends close by. Supported by ACC, the Seniors yoga helps our retirees to remain active, promoting balance and strength, which in turn reduces the amount of falls or accidents - a common occurrence as we age. The mental health benefits are just as important - meeting twice a week, the attendee's have gained new friendships and relationships in an age group where loneliness and depression is highly prevalent.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Francesca Hopkins

Yoga tutor

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·      None identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Our halls where the classes are held are wheelchair accessible and the tutor can and has, adapted the class content for those with physical and other disabilities.

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

·      Promote smoke-free messages, Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes, Encourage the reduction of carbon emissions or increase community resilience to the impacts of climate change*

Our centre and outdoor areas are all smoke free. We have recycling bins available in all rooms of the centre. We have free to use chilled water filter fountains available year round for all visitors tot he community centre. The entire programme is encouraging active lifestyles. Our attendee's enjoy walking to and from our classes and a number ride bicycles to attend.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

0%

0%

0%

0%

%

100%

%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$8640.00

Requesting grant for:

to pay the yoga tutor

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

we may have to start charging the Seniors to attend.

Cost of participation:

We provide the room for free @$38.50 per hour = $3696 per year, we also advertise the classes at a cost of approx $1500 per year

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$8,640.00

$0.00

$0.00

$5,196.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Tutor

$8,640.00

$8,640.00

 

Income description

Amount

Nil

$ 0.00

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

Nil

$0.00

 

 

Donated materials

Amount

Nil

$0.00

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

0

0

$0.00

 

Additional information to support the application:

please see attached testimonials from some of our attendees of the Seniors yoga and a letter of support from Chris Christensen wo runs the ACC funded Live Stronger for longer campaign

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

No previous application

                         

2020/2021 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One

LG2120-111

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Legal status:

Incorporated Society, Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Community

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: Two Waitemata youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

Location:

Central: 10 Maire Street, Nukuhau, Wairakei 3377, North: RNZAF base Whenuapai, Auckland, South: Burnham Military Camp, Powles Road, Burnham 7600

Summary:

Enabling two young people from the Waitemata Local Board area to attend Blue Light Life Skills Programme. This one-week residential programme is strategically targeted towards either developing potential leaders from low socio economic areas or as an intervention strategy for at-risk young people as well as a spring board for those from disadvantage. The programme focuses on the critical life skills such as self-development, self-control, and team work that will enable young people to be successful in their homes, schools, communities and employment.

Expertise:

Blue Light has been successfully delivering its Life Skills programmes in partnership with the NZ Defence Force for over 11 years. The demand for this programme continues to be considerably higher than current delivery capacity and is highly valued by Oranga Tamariki, Police Youth Services, and Secondary Schools. Blue Light in partnership with the NZ Police volunteers has been delivering its successful programmes and activities with youth in the community for over 36 years.

Dates:

12/10/2020 - 04/12/2020

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

30

% of participants from Local Board

100 %

Promotion:

Blue Light would publicly acknowledge the Waitemata local board on its Facebook, website and in the newsletters it sends to its donors and branches. The individual participants, their whanau and community as well as their referring agency would be made aware who had funded them on their Life Skills course.

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

The community benefits of Blue Light's Life Skills programme works towards students gaining a:
 
-              sense of contributing something of value to society in the future - through volunteer work and active involvement in their community
-              feeling of connectedness to others and to society - through participation in the recreational and social activities that contribute to positive outcomes in their communities 
-              belief that youth have choices about their future - through enabling youth to have a say about the issues that affect them, their family and community, putting these choices into practice and reviewing them
-              feeling of being positive and comfortable with their own identity - through reaffirming young people's chosen identities and connecting them to support agencies and groups within their own communities (be that cultural, spiritual, gender and or sexual for example). 
The course is about building strong connections and encourages active involvement in all areas of life including:
 
-              Family and whānau
-              Schools, training institutions and workplaces
-              Communities (sports, church, cultural groups)
-              Peer groups

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

·      Empower our communities by supporting community-led initiatives

 

Blue Light's project is to send two young people from the Waitemata Local Board area to attend a Blue Light’s Life Skills programme camp. This programme is a one-week residential course based around the successful model of youth development and run in partnership with the Youth Life Skills team within the NZ Defence Force.
 
Blue Light's Life Skills programme focuses on self-development, self-control, teamwork, discipline, respect, problem-solving and teaching everyday life skills such as making your bed and ironing your clothes. These are critical skills all young people need to succeed at school, at home, in employment and in the community.
 
The principles of the Life Skills programme are about involving young people and enabling them to have a say in decisions that affect them, their family, their community and their country, and putting into practice and reviewing those decisions.
 
Young people can earn up to 4 Level 1 and 8 Level 2 NCEA credits when they complete the course.  In some cases, this has been the difference between young people passing NCEA Level 1 and 2 or failing.
 
Young people will be nominated by local Police, local Blue Light branch members, community agencies and schools in the Waitemata Local Board area. Not only does this process support a hands on selection process it also means that these young people have a point of contact, mentor and supporter back in the Waitemata Local Board area once the programme is completed. Blue Light continues to strongly advocate for the young person and communicate with their referrer to ensure positive gains are ongoing.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Defence Force and Defence Force staff

Lead programme, supervise and mentor students on Life Skills camps

Blue Light volunteers

Support and Mentor participants

NZ Police staff

Support and Mentor participants

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

·      None identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Blue Light's Life Skills courses do not exclude young people experiencing disability. However, due to the nature of the physical training and the activities participants take part in, all potential participants are asked to self-select their physical, mental and cognitive suitability for this Life Skills programme. Blue Light is able to adapt this programme for participants who experience a learning disability such as dyslexia or a developmental disability such as dyspraxia in consultation with potential participants, their parents and whanau.

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

·      Promote smoke-free messages, Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes, Encourage the reduction of carbon emissions or increase community resilience to the impacts of climate change*

All Blue Light Life Skills programmes contain physical training and adventure based experiential learning as a key part of the programme. Students are empowered and supported on the programme to have greater responsibility for their own health and wellness and to understand the benefits of physical wellbeing while attending the programme and once they are back in their community. Students overall mental health and resilience is strengthened through education and enhanced community and social connectedness upon returning to the community. All Blue Light programmes are alcohol, smoke and drug free sites and all messaging both by programme staff and at the camp locations support this. All food and beverages supplied at the camps fit with Blue Light and NZ Health and Nutrition standards and guidelines and waste minimisation at the camp locations are practised and encouraged.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

100%

%

%

%

%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$869.56

Requesting grant for:

The part of the project Blue Light is requesting funding for is the Camp fee of each participant. This fee is a contribution of $434.78 ex gst per participant to the overall camp costs. The total annual programme cost of Blue Light's Life Skills camps, of which 12 are held each year, is $599,639.52 ex GST. The total cost per camp is $49,969.96 ex gst.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

Student participation from the local board areas is based upon funding gained in each area. If only part of the project is funded the number of participants would be reduced. In some cases the difference may be made up by Local Blue Light branches in support of specific nominees.

Cost of participation:

Yes. $434.78 ex gst per participant

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$49,969.96

$0.00

$30,254.69

$6,250.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Participation cost

$49,969.96

$869.56

 

Income description

Amount

Nil

$ 0.00

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

Auckland Foundation (4 participants)

$1,739.13

Pending

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board (2 particpants)

$869.56

Pending

Lion Foundation (towards cost of one camp)

$19,819.96

Pending

Franklin Local Board (2 participants)

$869.56

Pending

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board (2 particpants)

$869.56

Pending

Puketepapa Local Board (2 participants)

$869.56

Pending

Papakura Local Board (2 participants)

$869.56

Pending

Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board (2 participants)

$869.56

Pending

Waiheke Local Board (2 particpants)

$869.56

Pending

Waitakere Ranges Local Board (2 participants)

$869.56

Pending

Orakei Local Board (2 particpants)

$869.56

Pending

Manurewa Local Board (2 participants)

$869.56

Pending

 

Donated materials

Amount

Nil

$0.00

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

5

300

$6,345.00

 

Additional information to support the application:

None

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

LG2107-110

Seven Howick youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Howick Local Grants, Round One -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2117-104

Five Upper Harbour youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Upper Harbour Local Grants, Round One -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2106-110

Five Hibiscus & Bays youth attend Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Hibiscus and Bays Local Grants, Round One  -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2109-106

Two Mangere-Otahuhu youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grants, Round One -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2112-109

Two Orakei youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round One -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2110-109

Two Manurewa youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Manurewa Local Grants, Round One -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

QR2103-101

Two Franklin youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Franklin Quick Response Round One -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2119-107

Two Waitakere Ranges youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Waitākere Ranges Local Grants, Round One -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2115-106

Two Puketepapa youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Puketepapa Local Grant Round One -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2118-106

Two Waiheke youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Waiheke Local Grant Round One -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2114-108

Two Papakura youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Papakura Local Grant, Round One -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2113-111

Two Otara-Papatoetoe youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round One -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2102-112

Two Devonport-Takapuna youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Devonport Takapuna Local Grant Round One -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

QRTP2012-202

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR2021-205

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Whau Quick Response, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$800.00

QR2020-203

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Waitematā Quick Response, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR2014-205

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Papakura Small Grants, Round Two -  Awaiting funding agreement

Approved

$1,967.16

QR2013-203

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,967.16

QR2009-206

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,967.16

QR2007-110

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Howick Quick Response, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR2003-204

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Franklin Quick Response, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,000.00

QR2010-202

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Manurewa Quick Response, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,514.00

QR2001-215

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Albert-Eden Quick Response, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,000.00

MTSG1920-110

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant Round 1 2019/2020 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2005-224

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Henderson-Massey Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,000.00

LG2008-316

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Kaipātiki Local Grants, Round Three -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2006-241

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Hibiscus and Bays Local Grants, Round Two  -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2015-208

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Puketepapa Local Grants, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2004-203

2020 GBI Blue Light HUNTS course

2019/2020 Great Barrier Island Local Grants, Round Two -  Withdrawn

Undecided

$0.00

QR2013-126

Blue Light School Leavers Street Smart Handbook

2019/2020 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,960.00

QR2010-126

Blue Light School Leavers Street Smart Handbook

2019/2020 Manurewa Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,960.00

REGCD2048

Blue Light Youth Driver Navigator Programme - Auckland

Regional Community Development 2019/2020 -  Submitted

Declined

$0.00

QR1919-315

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Waitākere Ranges Quick Response, Round Three -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,500.00

QR1914-314

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Papakura Small Grants, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

QR1910-320

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Manurewa Quick Response, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

QR1909-348

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

QR1905-333

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Henderson-Massey Quick Response, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,890.00

QR1903-316

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Franklin Quick Response, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,890.00

LG1904-203

GBI Kids HUNTS course

2018/2019 Great Barrier Island Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$3,151.41

QR1905-220

Bryan & Bobby Educational Activity Books

2018/2019 Henderson-Massey Quick Response, Round Two -  Accountability overdue

Approved

$1,565.22

QR1905-117

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Henderson-Massey Quick Response, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR1903-102

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday 

2018/2019 Franklin Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

QR1914-104

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Papakura Small Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

QR1901-08

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Albert-Eden Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,500.00

LG1804-214

GBI Kids HUNTS Course

2017/2018 Great Barrier Island Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,245.00

Applications prior to the 2017/2018 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

                         

2020/2021 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One

LG2120-120

Western Bay's Community Group Inc.

Legal status:

Incorporated Society

Activity focus:

Community

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: WBCG Community Engagement projects

Location:

Varies: Street events, leeter drops, web hosted information programme

Summary:

Ensuring our community is engaged with upcoming important issues such as the Emergency Budget outcomes, sewer/stormwater separation, and the Annual Plan 2021

Expertise:

We ran the Community-Led design project for 254 Ponsonby Road

Dates:

01/10/2020 - 30/09/2021

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

2500

% of participants from Local Board

2000 %

Promotion:

Ponsonby News articles, Facebook, website, Community notice boards, and handout fliers

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

Improved engagement into decision-making
Greater social investment in community outcomes
Better infrastructure outcomes for the area

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

·      Empower our communities by supporting community-led initiatives

 

We are seeking funding to continue our work of ensuring the community understands it's options, and is able to advise Council of it's preferences.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual