I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 27 October 2020

9.30am

Local Board Chambers, and via videoconference
Pukekohe Service Centre
82 Manukau Road
Pukekohe

 

Either a recording or a transcript will be placed on the Auckland Council website.

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Deputy Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Lance Gedge

 

 

Amanda Kinzett

 

 

Matthew Murphy

 

 

Logan Soole

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Denise  Gunn

Democracy Advisor

 

19 October 2020

 

Contact Telephone 021 981 028

Email: denise.gunn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations

            8.1 Deputation: Wind-up of the Beachlands Log Cabin Trust                                  5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Approval for two new road names at 38 White Road & 23 Lockwood Road, Hunua, Papakura                                                                                                                         7

12        October 2020 - Auckland Transport  monthly report to the Franklin Local Board 17

13        Allocation of the Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund                            23

14        Grahams Beach Road Reserve Playground Concept Plan Proposed                   29

15        Local board views on plan change to enable rainwater tank installation for the Auckland region                                                                                                           33

16        Local Board views on Plan Change 46 (Private) Drury South                                37

17        Resource Recovery Network Strategy update                                                         45

18        Panuku Auckland Development- Franklin Local Board Six-Monthly Report 01 March to 31 August 2020.                                                                                                       65

19        Regional Facilities Auckland Quarter Four Performance Report for the period ending 30 June 2020                                                                                                    75

20        Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development six-monthly update to local boards: 1 January to 30 June 2020                                                                            87

21        Submissions and feedback on the draft Franklin Local Board plan 2020          105

22        Addition to the 2019-2022 Franklin Local Board meeting schedule for the Long Term Plan                                                                                                                              131

23        Urgent Decision - Franklin Local Board feedback on MBIE building for Climate Change                                                                                                                        135

24        Urgent Decision by Franklin Local Board to delegate approval of an extraordinary activity at Franklin Pool and Leisure                                                                       139

25        Urgent Decision - Franklin Local Board feedback on the Ministry for the Environment Consultation document: Reducing the impact of plastic on our Environment                                                                                                               159

26        Urgent Decision Keith Matheson acknowledgement                                            167

27        Governance Forward Work Calendar October 2020                                              173

28        Franklin Local Board workshop records                                                                177  

29        Consideration of Extraordinary Items 

 

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda an apology had been received from Member Murphy.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 22 September 2020, including the confidential section, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1   Deputation – Beachlands Log Cabin Trust wind-up

 

Purpose

1.    Jenny Carter and Roger Mudford will be in attendance to present on the wind-up of the Beachlands Log Cabin Trust.

 

 

Recommendation:

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)    receive the presentation on the wind-up of the Beachlands Log Cabin Trust and thank Jenny Carter and Roger Mudford for their attendance.

 

 


 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Approval for two new road names at 38 White Road & 23 Lockwood Road, Hunua, Papakura

File No.: CP2020/14673

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to name one new public road and one new private road, being a commonly owned access lot (COAL), created by way of a subdivision development at 38 White Road & 23 Lockwood Road, Papakura.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, Frost Family Trust, agent The Surveying Company Ltd have proposed the names presented in the tables below for consideration by the Local Board.

4.       The 6 proposed road name options have been assessed against the National Addressing Standards for road naming and the Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines. All technical standards have been met and the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region. Mana Whenua have been consulted. Ngai Tai ki Tamaki and Ngati Tamaoho indicated an interest in providing input into the decision. Local community groups have also been consulted and feedback received.

5.       The names proposed by the developer for the new public and private road at 38 White Road & 23 Lockwood Road are:

PUBLIC ROAD (38 White Road):

·    Nivekheath Rise (Applicant Preferred)

·    Frost Rise (Alternative 1)

·    Ranges Rise (Alternative 2)

COAL (23 Lockwood Road):

·    Fromac Close (Applicant Preferred)

·    Don Mackinnon Way (Alternative 1)

·    Wairoa Way (Alternative 2)

6.       The recommended names are informed by Auckland Council road naming guidelines, however the final decision on acceptance of this report and recommendation rests with the Franklin Local Board.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve 2 names for the public road and commonly owned access lot (COAL) at 38 White Road & 23 Lockwood Road, Papakura, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60315363 and SUB60315199):

i)   PUBLIC ROAD: Ranges Rise

ii)   COAL: Don Mackinnon Way

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Resource consent BUN60315363 (subdivision reference number SUB60315199) was issued in December 2018 for the construction of 13 residential lots, one public road, and one commonly owned access lot (COAL).

8.       In accordance with the National Addressing Standards for road naming (the AS/NZS 4819-2011 standard), the COAL requires a road name because it serves more than five lots.

9.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B respectively.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

11.     Auckland Council’s road naming criteria typically require that road names reflect one of the following local themes, with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area;

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     The applicant has proposed names around two themes: The first is to reference the local environment, such as the Hunua Ranges and the local waterway; and the second theme is to commemorate the Frost family (current owners and applicant) and their history in the local community.

13.     Kevin Frost (the applicant) has provided the following description of the Frost family history: “I have lived in Hunua with my wife and family for more than 30 years. My wife was born in Hunua and lived on the corner of Gellings and Nairn Roads, which was the family farm. My father-in-law, Don Mackinnon was on the Hunua School committee and my wife’s two older sisters went to Hunua School. My wife taught at Hunua School for 22 years and was Principal there for 16 of them. My two eldest sons attended the school. My eldest son, who is married with 3 children, all of whom attend Hunua School, is the Hunua Area Presbyterian Minister. This constitutes three generations of my family in the Hunua area, and two members have had high profiles in the community. My wife and I have walked most of the tracks in the Hunua Ranges including walking to Waharau on the Firth of Thames. We have been heavily involved in fundraising within the community.”

14.     It is noted that ‘Nivekheath’, ‘Frost’, and ‘Fromac’ are named after the applicants who are still living.

15.     The Applicant’s proposed names and meanings are set out in the table below:

Road ref.

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

PUBLIC ROAD

Nivekheath Rise

(Applicant preferred

Not recommended)

‘Nivekheath’ is made up of the applicant’s name (Kevin) in reverse, as well as the first five letters of his wife’s name (Heather).

(See note paragraph 17)

Frost Rise

(Alternative 1 - Not Recommended)

Last name of the applicant.

(See note paragraph 17)

Ranges Rise

(Alternative 2)

The Hunua Ranges to the east of the property provide for a range of recreational activities including tramping, trail running, mountain biking and swimming.

COAL

Fromac Close

(Applicant preferred - Not recommended)

The first three letters of the applicant’s surname and the first three letters of the applicant’s wife’s maiden name.

(See note paragraph 17)

Don Mackinnon Way

(Alternative 1)

Applicant’s father-in-law (deceased) who was on the Hunua School committee.

Wairoa Way

(Alternative 2 – not recommended)

Wairoa is the name of the local waterway.

(See note paragraph 29)

 

16.     All the name options listed in this report have been assessed by the Council Subdivision team to ensure that they meet the National Addressing Standards for road naming. The technical standards outlined in the Standards are met and Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed the names are not duplicated anywhere else in the region, therefore it is up to the local board to decide upon the suitability of these names within the local context.

17.     The suitability of the proposed names have also been assessed against the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.  While those Guidelines do not prohibit the names of living people, it does state that they should be avoided as community attitudes and opinions can change over time. The applicant is wanting to proceed with these names to acknowledge the contribution the Frost family has made to the community. As road naming is at the discretion of the local board, it is therefore up to the board to decide upon the suitability of these three names at this location.

18.     Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines. Road naming is an opportunity to recognise Maori cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land.  The Guideline provides a process to enable mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications. Commentary on the feedback received in this situation is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

19.     In addition, the applicant contacted the following local community groups for feedback on their proposed names:

 

·   YMCA Camp Adair

·   New Zealand Federation of Women's Institutes

·   Friends of Hunua Ranges (Chairman Merv Hood)

·   Hunua School (Board Chair Christine Woods)

·   Papakura East Presbyterian Church (Marion Gubb)

·   ChargeSmart Limited (CEO Nigel Broomhall) (neighbouring property)

·   Hunua Bowling Club

20.     Marion Gubb from the Papakura East Presbyterian Church indicated their preference for the two names ‘Frost Rise’ and ‘Don MacKinnon Way’.

21.     Christine Woods, Chair of the Hunua School Board responded on 24 August, acknowledging the service of the Frost family but, noting that the majority of the roads in the area are named after settler families, suggested this would be an opportunity to seek an alternative name from appropriate iwi to acknowledge Maori history in the area, and suggested the input of Ngati Tamaoho.  While already contacted as part of the mana whenua feedback process, the agent directly contacted Ngati Tamaoho 25 August, seeking input and on the 31 August, the agent advised that no further correspondence had been received.

22.     ‘Way’, ‘Rise’, and ‘Close’ are acceptable road types for the new public and private roads, suiting the form and layout of the road, as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

23.     Permission from relatives has been obtained for the use of the name Don Mackinnon.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Tamaoho, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Te Ahiwaru Waiohua, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, Ngāti Paoa, Ngāti Maru, Ngāti Tamaterā, Waikato-Tainui, and Ngāti Whanaunga (Mana Whenua) were contacted by council on behalf of the Applicant and in accordance with the process set out in the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines, on 23 July 2020.

28.     A response was received from Ngāti Tamaoho, indicating interest on the 25 August and advising that they would be responding with comments. On 26 August, the agent responded indicating urgency was required and on the 31 August, the agent advised Council staff that no further correspondence had been received from Ngati Tamaoho. It is noted that Hunua School was transferred to the Ngati Tamaoho Settlement Trust as part of the Treaty settlement between the Crown and Ngāti Tamaoho on 30 April 2017. This land neighbours the development site.

29.     Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki commented that they wanted the applicant to engage with them directly so that they could discuss their application. The agent contacted Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki directly 7 & 10 August, however on the 31 August, the agent advised Council staff that no further correspondence had been received from Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki.  Notwithstanding, advice has been received that as Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki have interests in the Wairoa River catchment and Hūnua, and are recognised as kaitiaki of the Wairoa River, therefore the developer proffered use of ‘Wairoa’ as a potential road name has not been supported.

30.     No other iwi has provided responses or comments or suggested any other road name options.

31.     The applicant has indicated that they have made reasonable effort and have provided additional time to receive mana whenua feedback, beyond that and they are now taking on cost and time penalties. As a result, the applicant has requested that this report now be considered by the local board.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by local councils.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan

13

b

Location Plan

15

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

October 2020 - Auckland Transport  monthly report to the Franklin Local Board

File No.: CP2020/13408

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Franklin Local Board (FLB) about transport related matters in this area including its Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains information on AT’s local and regional projects and activities including the possibility of a demand-led transport trial in Pukekohe.

3.       A separate report from Auckland Transport (AT) is on this agenda requesting a Franklin Local Board decision on the allocation of the Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport monthly update report for October 2020.

b)      provide feedback on the proposal to investigate a demand-led transport trial in Pukekohe to be considered by the Auckland Transport board.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

4.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report on a monthly basis to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This monthly reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play in the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

5.       This report updates the local board on AT projects and operations in the Franklin Local Board area. It summarises consultations and Traffic Control Committee decisions and includes information on the status of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and Community Safety Fund (CSF).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       This section of the report contains information about local projects, issues and initiatives.  It provides summaries of the detailed advice and analysis provided to the local board during workshops and briefings. 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

7.       A separate report on this month’s agenda makes recommendations regarding the LBTCF allocations.

Community Safety Fund (CSF)

8.       The Community Safety Fund is funded from AT’s safety budget and is dependent on the level of funding AT receives from Council. Public consultation and the design work informed by this consultation, is progressing, with a view to having projects designed and ready to go, when money becomes available.

9.       Safety projects for delivery in FY20/21 have been prioritised according to DSI (death and serious injury) data and therefore local board community safety fund projects will continue with planning and design but cannot be delivered in the 2020/2021 financial year.

10.     Local Boards will be advised of any change in the funding position that would allow projects to move from design into construction.

Responses to Resolutions

11.     The most recent resolutions of the Franklin Local Board are recorded below in bold font, with the AT response directly below each resolution.

            Resolution number FR/2020/63

b)  request that Auckland Transport progress the warning system for the           Tourist Road / Monument Road intersection

12.     A workshop was held on the 8 September 2020 with the FLB regarding LBTCF allocations through the Emergency Budget, where the local board provided guidance on this particular project.

13.     The local board is advised it can progress this project by allocating funding from their available LBTCF allocation, and this option is addressed in a separate report on this agenda.

Local Projects and activities

Waiuku Temporary Roundabout, Court, Queen St & Victoria Ave

14.     The intersection of Court, Queen St. and Victoria Ave has been identified as the most suitable site for a trial for a temporary roundabout.

15.     This project was previously out for consultation and closed on the 16 September 2020.

16.     A workshop will be held with the local board to present the outcome of the community feedback and next stages of construction.

17.     Construction is expected to be undertaken during the first quarter of 2021.


Image 1 –  Waiuku Temporary Roundabout

 

Bus Patronage Figures

18.    At the time of writing of this report, the data for September 2020 was not available. An updated table will be provided in next month’s report.

Public Transport – On-demand Trial in Pukekohe

19.     To trial a replacement of three bus routes in Pukekohe with an on-demand led travel option. The on-demand system would operate in the area shown below which is slightly larger than the existing bus catchment.

 

20.       At least four vehicles would be required to run the service, in order to meet peak passenger demand.

21.     Ideally six vans would be required in order to satisfy all customers at peak times.

22.     AT HOP machines will be installed into all vehicles and the fare system will be fully integrated into the AT HOP system. The booking system is not yet confirmed but is likely to be via an App and / or phone booking system.

23.     AT looked at 14 routes across the region that have excessively high subsidy rates per passenger. Locations were assessed on the basis that fixed schedule routes would be replaced by an on-demand service. Criteria included wait time savings, convenience and ability for smaller on-demand vehicles to meet passenger demand

24.     Of these, the Pukekohe scored particularly well as it is a relatively self-contained catchment area, and the additional convenience offered by on-demand services is expected to grow patronage by 30,000 per annum.

25.     An on-demand solution will result in shorter wait times for customers (all day) as well as shorter walk distances. The solution would offer safety benefits to customers particularly late in the evening.

26.     The service is expected to cost around $300,000-$600,000 more per annum to operate (than the current bus operation) but result in nearly 30% more patronage (assuming 6 vans are operating).

27.     The Franklin Local Board has advocated for improvements to public transport throughout the Franklin area. This is partly a result of ongoing advocacy by the local board to Auckland Transport over the past 22 months.

28.     A workshop was held on 13 October 2020 to brief the local board and seek their views on this proposal.

29.     This report seeks the local board’s feedback to formalise the local board’s views on this trial.

30.     AT plan to go out to the wider community in the coming weeks to obtain local input to design of any on-demand system.

31.     Following that, AT will need to complete a business case to secure funding from NZTA and then seek AT to approval from the AT Board on 1 December 2020.

32.     Formal resolutions from this report will provide guidance to AT and provide the AT Board with early local perspective. Following this AT will need local input prior to making any investment decisions.

33.     If approved, a trial could start as early as April 2021. The operator (Ritchies), technology supplier and vehicles would all need to be in place for this to happen. A trial is likely to last 12 months.

34.     An update to the local board can be provided in December 2020 via a workshop.

Regional Impacts

Auckland Transport – Future Connect

35.    Future Connect will be AT’s long-term plan for Auckland’s future integrated transport system. It maps Auckland’s Strategic Networks, the most critical links of our current and future transport system and will ultimately set a 30-year vision for all modes: public transport, general traffic, freight, cycle and walking.

36.    Strategic Networks have been investigated to surface critical problems, opportunities and Focus Areas. This will help inform the development of the Regional Land Transport Plan (our 10-year investment programme) and will guide future planning and investment.

37.    Future Connect was introduced to Local Board Chairs at the 14 September Chairs Forum. In October and November the project team will be available to talk to interested Local Board Transport Representatives. This will be an opportunity to provide a more detailed project overview, answer questions, seek local knowledge and opportunities for alignment with Local Board Plans.


Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     AT engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

39.     AT’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report is confined to AT and does not impact on other parts of the Council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Auckland Transport consultations

Local Board consultations

41.    AT provides the local board with the opportunity to comment on transport projects being delivered in the local board area.

42.    The local board’s views on any proposed schemes are taken into account during consultation on those proposals.

43.    In the reporting period from September 2020, no proposals were put forward for comment by the local board.

 Traffic Control Committee resolutions

44.     Traffic Control Committee decisions within the FLB area are reported on a monthly basis. In the September 2020 reporting period, there were four decisions in the local board area, which are noted in the table below:


 

Table 1: Traffic Control Committee Decisions

Street

Type of report

Nature of restriction

Decision

Maraetai Drive / Maraetai Coast Road

 

Temporary Traffic and Parking changes (Event)

 

Temporary Traffic and Parking Controls

Carried

Maraetai Drive / Rewa Road / Carlton Crescent / Beachlands Road / Shelly Bay Road / Pony Park Place

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

 

No Stopping At All Times / Bus Stop / Bus Shelter / Edge Line / No Passing / Shoulder Marking / Traffic Island / Roundabout / Give-Way Control

 

Carried

Waihoehoe Road / Drury Hills Road / Appleby Road / Fielding Road / Cossey Road

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

 

Footpath / Shared Path / Edge Line / Stop Control / No Passing / Traffic Island

 

Carried

John Main Drive / Roslyn Farm Street / Road Six / Road Seven / Road Eight / Road Nine / Road Ten

 

Permanent Traffic and Parking changes

 

No Stopping At All Times / Angle Parking / Traffic Island / Road Hump / Footpath / Give-Way Control / Edge Line

 

Approved in principle

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

45.     There are no specific impacts on Māori for this reporting period. AT is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi-the Treaty of Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori.

46.     Our Maori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to with 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them.

47.     This plan in full is available on the AT Website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     AT’s capital and operating budgets have been reduced following the announcement of the Emergency Budget. Some projects we had planned for 2020/2021 may not be able to be delivered.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

50.     AT will provide an update report to the local board next month.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kenneth Tuai – Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon –Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Allocation of the Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2020/14897

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       For the Franklin Local Board to allocate its Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) for financial year 2020/2021 to transport projects in its area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       This report outlines:

·      confirmation of the Franklin Local Board’s transport capital fund allocation for 2020/2021 as $271,086

·      an update on the status of Franklin Local Board’s LBTCF projects

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Local Board Transport Capital Fund report

b)      allocate $40,000 to the Tourist-Monument electronic signage project

c)      allocate $205,000 to the Shelly Bay Road kerb and channel improvements project

d)      allocate $20,000 to complete design for the Station Road parking project.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

2.       This report focuses on allocating the remaining budget left in the LBTCF for the 2020/21 financial year.

3.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme.

4.       Any project must also:

·   be safe

·   not impede network efficiency

·   be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

2.       Auckland Council consulted on an Emergency Budget in May-July 2020 to take into account the effects of COVID-19 on its financial position. This has impacted the amount of funding available to the local board to deliver LBTCF projects.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

5.       Following the setting of the Emergency Budget the LBTCF programme received $5,000,000 for the 2020/21 year for allocation across the 21 local boards.

6.       Decisions about the 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 financial years will form part of the Long-term Plan/Regional Land Transport Plan discussions but early indications are that these years will also see a more constrained capital programme than prior to the COVID crisis.

7.       Advice from the AT Finance Department set the following criteria for the fund following the setting of the Emergency Budget:

8.       The $5,000,000 for 2020/21 will be split using the Local Board Funding Policy.

9.       Currently, with budgets unknown for financial years 2021/2022 and 2022/2023, local boards are unable to combine future years allocations into a single project.

10.     Local boards are encouraged to target delivery of smaller projects or complete design and documentation for a project that can be physically delivered in 2021/2022.

11.     The Franklin Local Board’s share of the 2021/2022 allocation is $271,086

 

Progress report on current local board projects and status:

Project Name

Status

External Consultation Complete

Estimated Cost to Complete

Tourist-Monument Electronic Signage

In design phase

No

$40,000

Beachlands Kerb and Channel Improvements 2019

(4 sites)

All 4 sites were tendered pre Covid but have not been able to be awarded due to hold being placed on all new projects until Emergency Budget confirmed. These can be delivered as individual projects and are ready to tender

Yes

Shelly Bay Rd

$205,000

Karaka Road

$253,000

First View Ave

$585,000

Second View Ave

$323,000

Station Road Parking Improvements

(Contribution to a Community Safety Fund project )

Project in detailed design.

Likely to be ready for construction in the 2021/2022 financial year

No

$110,000 left in current allocation

$20,000 needed to complete design in 2020/2021

12.     AT attended a workshop on the 8 September 2020 where a progress report was given on the local board’s 2016-2019 LBTCF projects as well as advice on how to plan for the next two years, as budgets will be constrained.

13.     The Franklin Local Board’s position as outlined in the table above, highlight there are a number of high value projects which the local board can choose to prioritise for funding.

14.     As public funds have already been expended in getting these projects to delivery stage, AT’s advice is to prioritise their delivery rather than to seek out new projects.


 

Allocation of 2020/2021 LBTCF Budget

15.     At the 8 September 2020 workshop the following recommendation was made to the local board based on various previous discussions and guidance by the local board on their priorities. This was positively received and this report, and its recommendations, reflect those discussions.

16.     The local board can support delivery of these projects by passing resolutions to allocate funding for 2020/2021 budget.

 

Project

Estimated Cost to Complete

2020/2021 Budget

2021/2022 Budget

2022/2023 Budget

Comment

PLANNING BUDGETS

$271,086

$558,590*

$558,590**

 

Tourist-Monument Electronic Signage

$40,000

  $ 40,000

 

 

Allows for 2 ‘static’ signs with flashing amber lights, solar powered, as shown below.

Shelly Bay Rd Kerb and Channel Improvements

$205,000

$ 205,000

 

 

Board’s highest priority Beachlands site

Station Rd Parking Design

$20,000

$  20,000

 

 

Complete the design in 2020/2021

Station Rd Parking Construction contribution

$90,000

 

$  90,000

 

Complete construction in 2021/2022. Main funding from CSF budget in 2021/2022

Karaka Rd Kerb and Channel Improvements

$253,000

 

$ 253,000

 

 

First View Ave Kerb and Channel Improvements

$585,000

 

$215,590

$ 369,410

Split payment over 2 years

Second View Ave Kerb and Channel Improvements

$323,000

 

 

 

Insufficient funding to deliver in Year 3 under current planning amounts however this may change in 2 years time

New Board Project

 

 

 

$189,180

Board could introduce new project

 

 

$265,000

$558,590

$558,590

 

*Subject to confirmation in late 2020/2021                             ** Subject to confirmation in late 2021/2022

3.       Funding for the remaining projects – 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 will need to be reviewed once future years LBTCF are confirmed through the Long-term Plan/ Regional Land Transport Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

4.       AT engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

5.       Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

6.       The impact of information in this report is mainly confined to AT. Where LBTCF projects are being progressed by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities group, or another part of the council family, engagement on progress has taken place. Any further engagement required with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

7.       AT attended a workshop with the Franklin Local Board in September 2020 where a recommendations were presented to the local board based on previous discussions, prioritisation and resolutions by the local board.

8.       The LBTCF projects being put forward for consideration have been workshopped extensively with the local board during the last term.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

9.       Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, as result of decisions in this report, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

10.     There is currently $271,086 in the Local Board’s transport capital fund.

11.     The projects outlined in this report seek local board funding to progress. The advice to the local board is that it should allocate its funding to projects for the 2020/2021 as soon as possible.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     AT will put risk management strategies in place on a project by project basis.

13.     There is a risk that the any unallocated funds from the 2020/2021 LBTCF will not be able to be carried into the new financial year.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     Board to consider the option presented and give direction on whether they wish to proceed with usage of the funding available.

15.     It should be noted that only 2020/2021 projects are critical at this time. The Board can confirm projects for 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 once the Long Term Plan budget is completed and actual budgets for those years are known

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.


 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kenneth Tuai – Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jonathan Anyon – Elected Member Relationship Team Manager, Auckland Transport

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Grahams Beach Road Reserve Playground Concept Plan Proposed

File No.: CP2020/14388

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the Grahams Beach Road Reserve playground concept plan by the Franklin Local Board and to allow the progression to detailed design and physical works.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Plans to develop Grahams Beach Road Reserve playground started in 2018/2019 in the Community Facilities financial year 2018/2019 Work Programme and were identified as a park asset renewal project.

3.       The design has been endorsed by the local community who have had a key role in the design process.

4.       The proposed plan continues to deliver optimal space for vehicle parking, boat launching and retains picnicking space.

5.       The concept plan identifies opportunities to increase utilisation of park assets.

6.       This plan will be a step towards delivering the Local Board Plan 2017 desired outcome of communities feeling ownership and connection to their area, and will aid in ensuring places and facilities are fit for purpose.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the Grahams Beach Road Reserve playground concept plan (Attachment A) and allow the progression to detailed design and physical works.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Grahams Beach Road Reserve is approximately 1 hectare along the Awhitu Peninsula. The reserve has direct views across the Manukau Harbour and provides multiple amenities and facilities for park users.

8.       The reserve is surrounded by large native trees that offer shade and includes:

·        an informal carpark

·        boat ramp

·        toilet and changing facilities

·        covered barbeque area

·        seating

·        open green space

·        a playground.

9.       Grahams Beach has many visitors throughout the year and is considered a retreat from the city of Tamaki Makaurau.

10.     The playground is estimated to be over 20 years old and nearing the end of its asset life. The playground is centrally located and has undisturbed views which opens itself to the rest of park providing lots of natural surveillance.

11.     Supporting park infrastructure has been minimal in recent years and playground asset is expected to be reaching the end of their functional life.  

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The proposed concept plan for Grahams Beach plans to offer further informal recreational functions for the locals and visitors of Grahams Beach.

13.     The consultation process has help determine development of this playground design to ensure the design is practical and works within the needs of community.

14.     Consultation for Grahams Beach has been in two parts, first was promoted by an installed sign at the park, regular local board social media updates and councils ‘have your say’ website.

15.     The Have Your Say survey extended over 6 weeks however results were minimal with only 9 responses on the survey. Though a low input from the community the ideas and concerns helped form a basis for the initial plan.

16.     During the development of the detailed plan the Franklin Local Board were approached by the residents as they had strong concerns that the initial design would impact negatively to the way people used Grahams Beach and asked for reconsideration.

17.     It was understood that the local community had not submitted feedback during the consultation phase and although the consultation period had closed. Staff and the local board agreed to the make necessary changes.

18.     Staff provided a number of options for the community to consider via email due to alert level restrictions. However the local community where able to provide accurate advice to staff to ensure functional issues of trailer maneuvering were well considered. 

19.     With the direct help of the community and local board members, staff were able to achieve the endorsement from the community as shown in the proposed design (Attachment A).

20.     The proposed plan aims to address all the concerns by

·    Ensure size of playground is similar to the existing playground

·    Ensure playground does not extend into the informal car park and trailer maneuvering space

·    Ensure playground is shaded by trees for natural shade

·    Include partial fencing along the playground towards the informal parking and roadside

21.     Grahams Beach – Playground Features

·    Same central location that is nearby to toilet, informal car park and green space

·    Play equipment will include a bespoke sand play module with monkey bars and a slide, swing set with a basket, seesaw and a spinner.

·    New seating area with a rubbish bin

·    Partial fencing towards the informal carpark and roadside for safety precautions


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     In June 2019, Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and committed to the community to look at ways on how we can consider climate implications in everything that we do. Auckland faces risks such as heat waves, droughts and tropical storms.

23.     Retaining our green spaces is a proven climate solution as it reduces harmful carbon pollution that is driving climate change.

24.     Ways on how this project can aid in this plan will be to recycle and reuse materials to reduce landfill impacts and source sustainable materials for the new playground.

25.     Protecting the existing trees is also important in climate change and strategically placing the playground around shady cool spaces to protect park users from the rising heat.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     Council staff from Community Facilities and Community Services were engaged to form the recommendations in this report. Staff agree that utilisation of the park will provide a wide range of recreation opportunities for the wider community.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     Renewing this playground will benefit the community as it aligns with the Franklin Local Board Plan outcome 5 ‘Communities feel ownership and connection to their area’ as the community have been involved throughout the design process of this playground.

28.     In 2019, staff presented the initial concept plan during a workshop to discuss and review the plans in order to continue progress. The board initially agreed with this plan.

29.     The local community did raise concerns over the initial design due to the reduction of the informal car park. These concerns have been recognised and plans have been amended.

30.     The local community were re-engaged to ensure the design outcomes are reflective of their concerns. Community members who were involved in resolving concerns voted via email which were collated by a local spokesperson, who passed this on to Council. In September 2020, the community unanimously voted that the proposed playground design was favoured. Refer to Attachment A.

31.     The Franklin Local Board has actively been involved throughout the re-engagement of the design and have been supportive of the alterations to meet the needs of the community.

32.     The revised plans also still deliver on the initial feedback from community members who have asked for updated fun and exciting new equipment.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

33.     Parks and heritage are of fundamental importance to mana whenua, their culture and traditions. Development of the reserve will benefit Maori and the wider community through increased access to recreational opportunities and increased community well-being.

34.     The proposed design for Grahams Beach Road Reserve playground did not allow for opportunities of development as it was intended to retain the existing level of service, in line with the renewal programme guidelines.

 

 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     Grahams Beach has been allocated two hundred thousand dollars ($200,000) from 2019/2020 Capital Renewals Programme. Based on the current design this funding is sufficient to proceed with physical works.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     In Attachment A the location of the swing set is close to the nearby trees, until construction commences there is a risk of interference with tree roots. This will be mitigated during construction by hand digging where needed, supervision of arborist and undertaking tree protection.

37.     Physical works to be programmed outside the busy summer period to reduce public disturbance.

38.     Failure to approve this concept plan could be an opportunity missed to provide fit for purpose park assets.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     Subject to local board approval, staff will commence detailed design work of Grahams Beach in order achieve physical works in financial year 2020/2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Grahams Beach Road Reserve_Concept Plan  (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jennice Stringer - Project Manager (Ops)

Authorisers

Rod Sheridan - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Local board views on plan change to enable rainwater tank installation for the Auckland region

File No.: CP2020/15013

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To invite local board views on a plan change by Auckland Council to enable rainwater tank installation across urban and rural Auckland.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Decision-makers on a plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan must consider local boards’ views on the plan change, if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

3.       Each local board has a responsibility to communicate the interests and preferences of people in its area on Auckland Council policy documents.  A local board can present local views and preferences when expressed by the whole local board.[1]

4.       Auckland Council’s plan change would change the Auckland Unitary Plan by adding a line entry in rural and urban zone activity tables, stating that a rainwater tank is a permitted activity. Additionally, a number of baseline standards designed to avoid objectionable outcomes would be developed for the installation of rainwater tanks along with assessment criteria where a resource consent was still required. Rainwater tanks would be excluded from the definition of “Building” in the Auckland Unitary Plan, and therefore would avoid many rules pertaining to buildings which have the potential to trigger the need for resource consent.

5.       This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on the council’s plan change.  Staff do not recommend what view the local board should convey.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      provide local board views on council’s proposed change to the Auckland Unitary Plan to enable rainwater tank installation for the Auckland region

b)      appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at a hearing on council’s enabling rainwater tanks plan change for the Auckland region

c)      delegate authority to the chairperson of the Franklin Local Board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in resolution b) is unable to attend the private plan change hearing.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.  Decision-makers must consider local boards’ views when deciding the content of these policy documents.[2]

7.       If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planner includes those views in the hearing report. Local board views are included in the analysis of the plan change, along with submissions.

8.       If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who decide on the plan change request.

9.       This report provides an overview of the plan change.

10.     The report does not recommend what the local board should convey. The planner must include any local board views in the evaluation of the plan change. The planner cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Plan change overview

11.     The plan change applies to the Auckland region. The definition of “Building” in the Auckland Unitary Plan will be amended so that a rainwater tank will not be considered a building. A new definition will be introduced for “rainwater tank”. The activity tables of the following zones will have a new line entry stating that rainwater tanks are a permitted activity. The zones directly concerned are as follows:

·         Single House Zone

·         Large Lot Zone

·         Rural and Coastal Settlement Zone

·         Mixed Housing Suburban Zone

·         Mixed Housing Urban Zone

·         Terrace Housing and Apartment Buildings Zone

·         Special Character Areas Overlay - Residential

·         Rural Production Zone

·         Mixed Rural Zone

·         Rural Coastal Zone

·         Rural Conservation Zone

·         Countryside Living Zone

·         Waitākere Foothills Zone

·         Waitākere Ranges Zone.

 

12.     The purpose of the plan change is to enable rainwater tank installation across the Auckland region without the need for resource consent. Some baseline standards will be developed to avoid objectionable outcomes.

13.     The notified plan change and section 32 document providing the rationale for the council plan change are available on the council’s website at:

https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/unitary-plan/auckland-unitary-plan-modifications/Pages/details.aspx?UnitaryPlanId=83

 

14.     Public submissions will be loaded onto the council’s website once the notification period has closed.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan include:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

16.     The need to initiate a plan change to enable rainwater tank installation is a response to Auckland’s current drought and potential water shortage in 2020/2021.

17.     This uncertainty in water supply is likely to continue as our climate changes. Climate projections released by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research indicated that the Auckland region is likely to experience an increase of unpredictable rainfall and drought events in the Auckland region. 

18.     Removing unnecessary restrictions around the installation of rainwater tanks will support Auckland’s water security and resilience to climate change.

19.     The proposed plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan supports Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. One of the goals of the climate plan is to prepare Aucklanders to adapt to the impacts of climate change.  

20.     Easing barriers to the installation of rainwater tanks supports water supply management and aligns with the ‘Built Environment’ priority area in the Auckland Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     Other parts of the council group directly involved with the plan change include Healthy Waters, which has assisted with scoping the plan change, consultation and providing information for inclusion in the section 32 document (which provides the rationale for the plan change). Consultation has also occurred with Watercare and the Independent Māori Statutory Board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This plan change affects all local boards.

23.     Factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view:

·    interests and preferences of people in the local board area

·    well-being of communities within the local board area

·    local board documents, such as the local board plan and the local board agreement

·    responsibilities and operation of the local board.

24.     This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views. The decision-maker will consider local board views, if provided, when deciding on the plan change.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     If the local board chooses to provide its views on the plan change it includes the opportunity to comment on matters that may be of interest or importance to Māori People, well-being of Māori communities or Te Ao Māori (Māori worldview).

26.     The council has initiated consultation with all iwi authorities in the Auckland region including the Independent Māori Statutory Board. Healthy Waters have engaged with iwi in the past on the matter of rainwater tanks and to date iwi have been very supportive of harvesting rainwater for household use.

27.     The hearing report will include analysis of Part 2 of the Resource Management Act which requires that all persons exercising RMA functions shall take into account the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti o Waitangi.   

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The plan change does not pose any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There is a risk that the local board will be unable to provide its views and preferences on the plan change, if it doesn’t pass a resolution. This report provides:

·    the mechanism for the Franklin Local Board to express its views and preferences

·    the opportunity for a local board member to speak at a hearing.

30.     If the local board chooses not to pass a resolution at this business meeting, these opportunities are forgone.

31.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s).[3]  This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     The planner will include, and report on, any resolution of the local board in the hearing report. The local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose. 

33.     The planner will advise the local board of the decision on the plan change request by memorandum.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Barry Mosley - Principal Policy Planner , Plans and Places

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Local Board views on Plan Change 46 (Private) Drury South

File No.: CP2020/14508

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To invite local board views on Private Plan Change 46 (Private) lodged by Drury South Limited for the Drury South Industrial Precinct.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Decision-makers on a private plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan must consider local boards’ views on the plan change, if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

3.       Each local board has a responsibility to communicate the interests and preferences of people in its area on Auckland Council policy documents, including private plan changes.  A local board can present local views and preferences when expressed by the whole local board. 

4.       Drury South Limited lodged a private plan change request in relation to land within the Drury South Industrial Precinct at Maketu Road, Quarry Road, and Fitzgerald Road, Drury.  Plan Change 46 (Private) Drury South would change the Auckland Unitary Plan by rezoning 11ha of land from Light Industry to Mixed Use, rezoning a further 20ha of land from Heavy Industry to Light Industry and amending the provisions of the Drury South Industrial Precinct.

5.       Seven submissions have been received on the plan change.  The key themes arising from submissions are the design of the internal transport network, including the future connection to be made with Mill Road and provisions made for cycling, the effects of trip generation on the surrounding transport network, landscaping provisions (particularly in relation to the national electricity transmission network bisecting the precinct), the nature of consultation with iwi on the plan change, and the noise and vibration provisions proposed within the precinct.

6.       This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on Private Plan Change 46.  Staff do not recommend what view the local board should convey.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      provide local board views on private plan change 46 by Drury South for the Drury South Industrial Precinct

b)      appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at a hearing on private plan change 46

c)      delegate authority to the chairperson of Franklin Local Board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in resolution b) is unable to attend the private plan change hearing.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.  Decision-makers must consider local boards’ views when deciding the content of these policy documents.

8.       A private plan change request will be included in the Auckland Unitary Plan if it is approved. Local boards must have the opportunity to provide their views on private plan change requests – when an entity other than council proposes a change to the Auckland Unitary Plan. 

9.       If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planner includes those views in the hearing report. Local board views are included in the analysis of the private plan change, along with submissions.

10.     If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who decide on the private plan change request.

11.     This report provides an overview of the private plan change, and a summary of submissions’ key themes. 

12.     The report does not recommend what the local board should convey, if the local board conveys its views on private plan change 46. The planner must include any local board views in the evaluation of the private plan change. The planner cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The private plan change applies to land within the Drury South Industrial Precinct, located at Maketu Road, Quarry Road and Fitzgerald Road, Drury.  The land is zoned a combination of Light Industry, Heavy Industry and Open Space – Informal Recreation as shown below in Figure 1.

14.     The Drury South Industrial Precinct provides for land-extensive industrial activity, employment opportunities and areas of stormwater management, whilst ensuring that critical infrastructure is provided and potential ecological, cultural and landscape effects are managed.

15.     The precinct is divided into five sub-precincts.  Of particular relevance to this private plan change request are:

16.     Sub-precinct A Light Industry, which applies to the majority of the precinct (approximately 115ha);

17.     Sub-precinct C Commercial Services, which applies to 21ha of land and seeks to enable office activity, and limited supporting activities such as commercial services, food and beverage and childcare and healthcare facilities;

18.     Sub-precinct E Heavy Industry, which applies to 46ha of land.


 

Figure 1: Drury South Industrial Precinct and surrounding area – existing zoning and precinct in the AUP(OP)

19.     The plan change request is set out in Attachment A.  The proposed plan change seeks to:

a)        Reduce the extent of the Drury South Industrial Precinct: Sub-precinct C from 21ha to 10ha and rezone the land from Business - Light Industry Zone to Business – Mixed Use Zone. 

b)        Rezone approximately 20ha of land from Business – Heavy Industry to Business – Light Industry to provide an appropriate separation distance between the proposed Business – Mixed Use and the Business – Heavy Industry Zone;

c)        Amend the Drury South Industrial Precinct: Sub-precinct C provisions to:

i.        enable a greater range and scale of commercial activity by providing for retail, offices and one supermarket in the sub-precinct.  The applicant proposes to address potential effects on surrounding centres and the transport network by applying controls on the scale of retail and office tenancies, and gross floor area thresholds that apply to retail, offices and trade suppliers cumulative across the sub-precinct;

ii.       provide for greater height by enabling buildings up to 25m in height;

iii.      manage noise and vibration effects at the interface with high-use roads and industrial zones, particularly the interface with Maketu Road;

d)      Make amendments to the Drury South Industrial Precinct provisions, including:

i.        removing bespoke landscaping provisions and instead relying on the Business – Light Industry provisions;

ii.       precluding restricted discretionary activities from public or limited notification;

iii.      enabling trade suppliers to locate in Sub-precincts A (Light Industry) and C;

e)      Realign the boundary of the Drury South Industrial Precinct as depicted in Precinct Plan 1 to align with the extent shown on the Unitary Plan Viewer and exclude the land that now falls within the Drury South Residential Precinct.

20.     Drury South Limited states the purpose of private plan change 46 is to provide for a greater range of activities in sub-precinct C reflecting the changing planning and policy context; more appropriately provide for light industrial activities, and more efficiently and effectively manage the visual effects of development on the surrounding area through amendments to the landscaping and building form precinct provisions.

Figure 2: Amendments to the Drury South Industrial Precinct proposed through PC46

 


 

21.     Drury South Limited included technical reports that evaluate traffic, stormwater and flooding, economic effects, urban design, landscape and visual effects and acoustic effects.  The reports and other application details are available from council’s website at https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/unitary-plan/auckland-unitary-plan-modifications/Pages/details.aspx?UnitaryPlanId=74. Council’s planner, and other experts, will evaluate and report on:

·   technical reports supplied by the applicant

·   submissions

·   views and preferences of the local board, if the local board passes a resolution.

Submissions

22.     Seven primary submissions and two further submissions were received on Plan Change 46.

23.     Key submission themes are listed below.   

·       design of the internal transport network

·       design and recognition of the future connection to be made with Mill Road

·       provisions made for cycling,

·       the effects of trip generation on the surrounding transport network,

·       landscaping provisions (particularly in relation to the national electricity transmission network bisecting the precinct),

·       the nature of consultation with iwi on the plan change

·       noise and vibration provisions proposed within the precinct

·       preclusions to public and limited notification sought by the plan change applicant within the precinct

·       identify a key theme 

24.     The submissions received are summarised in Tables 1 and 2 below:

Table 1: Summary of submissions received on Plan Change 46

Submissions

Number of submissions

Support/accept with amendments

4

(Lomai Properties, Counties Power Limited, Classic Developments NZ Limited, Kāinga Ora Homes and Communities)

Amend the plan change/ amend if it is not declined

2

(New Zealand Transport Agency, Auckland Transport)

Decline

1

(Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua)

 


 

Table 2: Submissions received on Plan Change 46

Submitter

Relief sought

Key themes and context

Lomai Properties Ltd

Accept the plan change with amendments

Landowners within Drury West (Waipupuke), seeking confirmation that external transport effects are addressed.

The New Zealand Transport Agency

Amend the plan change

Seeks greater recognition/provision for Mill Road corridor and cycling infrastructure within precinct, opposes notification preclusion, seeks amendments to noise and vibration rules.

Counties Power Limited

Accept the plan change with amendments

Seeks amendments to landscaping rules/types to avoid conflict with overhead power lines.

Classic Developments NZ Limited

Accept the plan change with amendments

Landowner of adjoining residential precinct, seeks that infra costs levied through Development Contributions reflect traffic effects associated with PC46.

Auckland Transport

Amend the plan change if it is not declined

Seeks amendments related to internal transport network, provision for cycling infrastructure, opposes notification preclusion.

Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

Decline the plan change

Seeks the plan change is rejected due to lack of iwi consultation, engagement and consideration of submitter’s cultural preferences.

Kāinga Ora Homes and Communities

Support the plan change subject to amendments

Supports subject to the proposed noise and vibration standards being deleted.

 

25.     Information on individual submissions, and the summary of all decisions requested by submitters, is available from council’s website: https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/unitary-plan/auckland-unitary-plan-modifications/Pages/details.aspx?UnitaryPlanId=74

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     There were no submissions that raised specific climate concerns.   Submissions from NZTA and AT sought amendments to make greater provisions for cycling infrastructure, which may have a tangential impact on transport mode share and consequently climate change impacts.

27.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

28.     The local board could consider if the private plan change:

·    will reduce, increase or have no effect on Auckland’s overall greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. does it encourage car dependency, enhance connections to public transit, walking and cycling or support quality compact urban form)

·    prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change. That is, does the proposed private plan change elevate or alleviate climate risks (e.g. flooding, coastal and storm inundation, urban heat effect, stress on infrastructure).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     As referenced above, Auckland Transport have canvassed their views through a submission on the plan change.  They will have the opportunity to speak to their views if required at a hearing.

30.     Healthy Waters are part of Council’s internal review team, and will assess relevant submissions and provide expert input into the hearing report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     The private plan change request does not relate to public land for which the local board has decision-making powers.

32.     This plan change relates to the Franklin Local Board area only.

33.     Factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view:

·    interests and preferences of people in local board area

·    well-being of communities within the local board area

·    local board documents, such as local board plan, local board agreement

·    responsibilities and operation of the local board.

34.     This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views. The decision-maker will consider local board views, if provided, when deciding on the private plan change.    

         

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Drury South Limited advised council that it consulted with the iwi authorities that have an interest in this area.  This included:

a)      meeting with Ngāti Tamaoho Trust and Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua on 24 June 2019, who indicated that they were not concerned with the plan change; and

b)      sending consultation letters to the remaining iwi groups[4] on 3 March 2020, to which there were no responses

36.     Iwi authorities were provided direct notice of the plan change by Auckland Council upon notification.  As referenced in Tables 1 and 2 of this report, despite the above advice from Drury South Limited, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua has lodged a submission seeking that the plan change be declined, on the basis that there has been a lack of iwi consultation, engagement and consideration of the Submitter’s cultural preferences resulting in a failure to give effect to sections 6(e), 6(f), 7(a) and 8 (key principles) of the RMA. 

37.     The hearing report will include analysis of Part 2 of the Resource Management Act which requires that all persons exercising RMA functions shall take into account the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti o Waitangi.[5]  

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     The proposed change in zoning from Light Industry to Mixed Use may require the upgrade of existing infrastructure in the area and the provision of new infrastructure. This is a matter that will need to be considered by the hearings panel. However, there are no financial implications for the local board in providing its views for the panel to consider.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     There is a risk that the local board will be unable to provide its views and preferences on the plan change, if it doesn’t pass a resolution. This report provides:

·    the mechanism for the Franklin Local Board to express its views and preferences

·    the opportunity for a local board member to speak at a hearing.

40.     If the local board chooses not to pass a resolution at this business meeting, these opportunities are forgone.

41.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a private plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s).[6]  This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     The planner will include, and report on, any resolution of the local board in the hearing report. The local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose. 

43.     The planner will advise the local board of the decision on the private plan change request by memorandum.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sanjay Bangs - Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Resource Recovery Network Strategy update

File No.: CP2020/15274

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for local boards to give formal feedback on the Resource Recovery Network Strategy update provided as Attachment A.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Resource Recovery Network Strategy, which was approved in October 2014, is being refreshed. This will respond to the updated Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan. It will also reflect the current global context including changes to global recycling markets and the impacts of COVID-19.

3.       Key features of the strategy refresh include:

·        expanding the current strategy from 12 community recycling centres in total to 23 facilities by 2031, including nine additional community recycling centres and two resource recovery parks (capital expenditure to be funded through the central government waste levy)

·        seeking additional funding for ongoing operational support for community recycling centres beyond their current five-year contracts to enable continued service provision (to be funded through the waste targeted rate).

4.       The aim of the network is to maximise diversion of waste from landfill, contribute to creating a circular economy, achieve wider social and economic benefits and deliver local green jobs. The network helps to drive the aspiration of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan to achieve a zero waste Auckland by 2040.

5.       The Resource Recovery Network of nine community recycling centres has provided 80 local jobs. The network diverted 5,213 tonnes of materials from landfill in 2019/2020.

6.       Central government funding has boosted the development of existing sites in the Resource Recovery Network. The revised Resource Recovery Network Strategy will build on this funding and enable greater accessibility for residents and businesses.

7.       A number of local boards have provided support for the Resource Recovery Network through the funding of scoping and feasibility studies, assistance with identifying suitable sites and support for local initiatives such as education outreach.

8.       Staff presented the key points of the strategy refresh to the Waste Political Advisory Group and local boards in September and October 2020. Formal feedback from local boards will be included in a report to Environment and Climate Change Committee seeking adoption of the updated Resource Recovery Network Strategy in November 2020.

9.       Approximately $8.6 million spread over 10 years is proposed to fund new and existing sites. This funding will be sought through the Long-term Plan 2020-2031 process.

10.     An additional $28 million for the new resource recovery facilities, spread over ten years, is proposed to be funded through the budget allocated to Auckland Council from the central government waste levy.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the Resource Recovery Network Strategy update, provided as Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      note that local board feedback will be included in a report to Environment and Climate Change Committee in November 2020 seeking adoption of the updated Resource Recovery Network Strategy.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     The Resource Recovery Network is one of the nine priority actions in Te Mahere Whakahaere me te Whakaiti Tukunga Para i Tāmaki Makaurau – Auckland Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018.

12.     The network was initially identified as a key initiative under the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2012 and has been developing across the region since that time.

13.     The purpose of the Resource Recovery Network is ‘to maximise the diversion of reusable and recyclable materials from landfill and, in the process, generate multiple environmental, social, cultural and economic benefits for Auckland’. The network helps to drive the aspiration of the plan to achieve a zero waste Auckland by 2040, taking care of people and the environment and turning waste into resources.

14.     A 10-year strategy for the Resource Recovery Network was adopted in 2014 (resolution REG/2014/121). This strategy enabled the establishment of 12 community recycling centres across the Auckland region by 2024, funded by a combination of waste levy funding and targeted rates.

15.     Community recycling centres provide communities with a ‘one stop shop’ for people to drop off unwanted goods and recyclables. The focus is on reuse, repair, repurposing and upcycling resources, as well as providing low cost retail goods to the community. 

Progress of the Resource Recovery Network

16.     As of September 2020, nine community recycling centres have been established. These centres are located in Waiuku, Helensville, Henderson, Wellsford, Warkworth, Aotea / Great Barrier, Devonport, Waiheke and Whangaparaoa. Community recycling centres are also under development in Western Springs and Onehunga.

17.     Across the nine existing sites, 80 local full-time and part-time jobs have been created. In the 2019/2020 financial year, 5,213 tonnes of materials were diverted from landfill for reuse or recovery.

18.     The development of the Resource Recovery Network in Auckland has been further boosted by central government Waste Minimisation Fund and shovel-ready funding, including:

·        $2.3 million from the Waste Minimisation Fund was provided to support development of a Community Recycling Centre in Onehunga

·        $10.6 million in shovel-ready funding for infrastructure development for the existing Devonport, Waiheke, Helensville, Warkworth, Wellsford and Western Springs community recycling centres as well as the Waitākere Waste Transfer Station/ Resource Recovery Park.


 

19.     The recent central government shovel-ready investment will fast track the improvement of existing community recycling centres through developing fit for purpose infrastructure. It will expand employment by increasing the volume of materials and the number of related activities they can undertake to work towards zero waste.

Strategic context

20.     COVID-19 continues to put pressure on international recycling markets, as countries restrict import and export activity through their borders. In addition to this, China implemented its National Sword policy in January 2018, which sets tight contamination limits on imported recyclable materials, including paper and plastics. As a result, global commodity prices for these products have dropped significantly as there is an oversupply to other existing markets.

21.     Several strategic changes have occurred since the initial Resource Recovery Network was approved in 2014. These include the adoption of the Long-term Plan 2018-2028, the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan 2020.

22.     These strategic changes draw focus to the significance of the Resource Recovery Network, which is identified as a priority action in the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan and is also an action in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan. The revised Resource Recovery Network Strategy will also feed into the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031 which is currently being developed for adoption in June 2021.

23.     The opportunities for community recycling centres to divert waste from landfill, generate income and create local jobs are expected to increase significantly over the next few years as government policy changes come into effect. These include the increase in the waste levy, a container return scheme currently under consideration by the government, and the 2019 Climate Change response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Act.

24.     An overview of the revised strategy was presented to the Waste Political Advisory Group on 1 September 2020. The Waste Political Advisory Group indicated its support for the draft strategy refresh.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Key features of the refreshed Resource Recovery Network Strategy

25.     The refreshed Resource Recovery Network Strategy provides a pathway for futureproofing and scaling up the network. In developing the strategy, the priorities, budgets and method of delivery from the original 2014 strategy have been reassessed.

26.     The refreshed strategy focuses on five key areas:

·        increasing the number of sites from 12 to 21 community recycling centres to provide more equitable access to all Aucklanders and establishing two commercially focused resource recovery parks, bringing the total number of sites to 23 by 2031

·        supporting existing sites and operators to thrive

·        strengthening and enabling the network

·        developing a fit for purpose operating and governance model

·        fostering financial sustainability.

27.     Overall, the review has suggested that the strategy approved in 2014 is still valid. Two key changes have been identified that will require additional budget to enable the network to reach its full potential. These key changes are outlined below. Further detail is provided in the draft Resource Recovery Network Strategy update in Attachment A.

Increasing the number of resource recovery facilities

28.     One of the key changes in the updated strategy is an increase in the number of sites planned. The original strategy proposed 12 community recycling centres. The updated strategy proposes an expanded network with an additional nine community recycling centres and two resource recovery parks. This will bring the total number of sites up to 23, including:

·        21 community recycling centres that are strategically located across Auckland. They will be connected with their local communities, providing trusted places to take unwanted goods as well as fostering local innovation and resilience.

·        two resource recovery parks, which are larger-scale facilities that focus mainly on diverting commercial waste from landfill back into the circular economy, while also accepting and diverting domestic waste. One of these will be the upgrade of Waitākere Transfer Station to a resource recovery park and the second will be in south Auckland.

29.     Staff anticipate that an appropriate site will be found in south Auckland for a resource recovery parks. A resource recovery park in the south could provide an opportunity for economic transformation led by Māori or Pacifika businesses, social enterprises and local businesses. Studies have found that recycling results in around 10 times more jobs compared to sending materials to landfill.

30.     The location of facilities will be determined by the availability of suitable sites, opportunities for joint ventures or partnerships, local board feedback, location of existing facilities and accessibility for Auckland residents and businesses. Centres will be equitably spread across the region, depending on the availability of appropriate sites.

31.     Increasing the number of sites will enable greater accessibility for residents and businesses to maximise diversion from landfill and deliver further local green jobs.

Ongoing operational funding

32.     Another key change in the updated strategy is the provision of ongoing operational funding for existing community recycling centres.

33.     When the strategy was originally created in 2014, it was expected that the centres would become self-funding by the end of their initial five-year contract period. Revenue would be generated from income from gate fees, the sale of reusable and recyclable materials, and other services that the centres provide.

34.     This intention was reflected by a reducing management fee from the council over the course of the centres’ five-year contracts. However, although sites that have come to the end of their contracts have significantly reduced their management fee from the council, they are not in a position to be completely self-funding.

35.     This has been caused by a combination of factors, including sites not being developed as quickly as anticipated and the impacts of COVID-19. China’s National Sword restrictions on global recycling have also presented a challenge due to reduced revenue from recycling commodities such as paper, cardboard and plastics.

36.     To ensure the on-going viability and impact of the existing sites, an ongoing site management fee from council will be required beyond the initial five years. This will be negotiated on a site by site basis and will be reassessed as the increase in the waste levy and introduction of product stewardship schemes come into force. 

37.     No additional operational funding is planned for resource recovery parks, which should operate as commercial ventures and be self-funding.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     The expanded Resource Recovery Network is part of Action E6 in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan (manage our resources to deliver a zero waste, circular economy).

39.     The Auckland Zero Waste Programme as part of Auckland’s Climate Plan estimates that this programme will reduce emissions by 39,650 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalents per year by 2030.

40.     Resource recovery facilities also provide zero waste learning opportunities which will have impacts on residents’ purchasing decisions, with resulting climate impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     Waste Solutions staff have worked closely with Community Empowerment Unit and The Southern Initiative who have provided support the development of the community recycling centres. The Southern Initiative have also advocated for a resource recovery park in south Auckland as a contribution to the economic transformation for the south.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     Several local boards have provided support and funding to enable the Resource Recovery Network through their local board work programmes. This has included funding for a range of initiatives from feasibility studies, local capacity building and waste minimisation and learning.

43.     Local boards have also provided feedback through the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 development process. A number of boards supported the establishment of community recycling centres in their area, with Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Manurewa, Ōtara-Papatoetoe and Papakura stating the establishment of a southern community recycling centre should be a priority.

44.     Staff will engage with local boards on individual sites in their local areas as new facilities are investigated and developed.

45.     Staff attended workshops with local boards between 15 September and 14 October 2020 to present on the key points of the strategy refresh.

46.     This report presents the draft Resource Recovery Network Strategy and seeks formal feedback from the local board ahead of Environment and Climate Change Committee adoption of the strategy in November 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.     Mana whenua and matāwaka were engaged in the development of the 2018 Waste Management and Minimisation Plan and identified priority actions for Māori.

48.     The draft Resource Recovery Network Strategy aligns to a number of the Māori priorities that were identified, in particular:

·        protection of Papatūānuku by keeping waste from landfill

·        developing respectful and innovative partnerships for waste minimisation in order to restore the ‘mauri’ of Papatūānuku

·        nurturing relationships, looking after people, taonga and taiao

·        fostering mutual respect. 

49.     The council also partners with Para Kore ki Tāmaki – a Māori-developed and implemented programme that integrates mātauranga Māori and zero waste principles and practices to support marae, Māori organisations, Kura Kaupapa Māori and Kōhanga Reo to divert significant quantities of recycling and organic waste from landfill.


 

50.     The draft Resource Recovery Network Strategy was presented to the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Mana Whenua Forum on 11 September 2020, and then at a workshop on 14 September 2020. As a result of the workshop a number of mana whenua identified interest in potential opportunities for engaging with the development of the Resource Recovery Network.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

51.     The 2020/2021 net operating cost of the community recycling centres that are currently in operation is approximately $2.6 million per year. An additional budget of approximately $8.6 million spread over 10 years is proposed to fund new and existing sites.

52.     Ongoing operational funding will mainly be provided through the solid waste targeted rate. Changes to the strategy will not result in any increase to the waste targeted rate until 2025 in order to maintain budgets during the post COVID-19 recovery and response phase. Any minor increases in operational expenditure over this period will be covered by waste levy funding from central government.

53.     No operational expenditure is planned for resource recovery parks, which should operate as commercial ventures and be self-funding.

54.     An additional $28 million in capital expenditure is proposed for the new resource recovery facilities, spread over ten years. The new facilities are proposed to be funded through the budget allocated to Auckland Council from the central government waste levy. The waste levy will increase incrementally from its current rate of $10 per tonne to $60 per tonne by 2025.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     The key risks and mitigations associated with the revised Resource Recovery Network Strategy are outlined in Table 1.

Table 1: Resource Recovery Network Strategy key risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Community recycling centres will not be able to become financially viable.

The increase in the waste levy will provide a greater incentive to keep resources out of landfill and increase use (and revenue generation) of community recycling centres. It will also provide increased funding to the council to establish new facilities.

The introduction of product stewardship schemes, such as a container return scheme will provide additional revenue for community recycling centres and attract new users of the facilities.

Additional operational funding provided as proposed in the refreshed strategy will support the centres until sufficient revenue is generated.

Suitable sites will not be available for the proposed additional nine community recycling centres.

Staff are investigating a wide range of opportunities to secure sites, including new models of ownership and operation. This could include joint ventures or lease arrangements.

 


 

 

Risk

Mitigation

There will not be suitable operators to tender for the operation of the community recycling centres.

Staff are undertaking early engagement in areas where community recycling centres are planned to build capacity and link interested groups to existing operators and the national membership body for community recyclers, the Zero Waste Network.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.     Local board feedback will be included in a report to Environment and Climate Change Committee on 12 November 2020 seeking adoption of the updated Resource Recovery Network Strategy.

57.     Budgets to deliver the revised strategy will be sought through the Long-term Plan 2020-2031 process.

58.     The Resource Recovery Network will continue to develop over the next 10 years, with the Western Springs and Onehunga Community Recycling Centres expected to be operational by the end of 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Resource Recovery Network Strategy

53

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jenny Chilcott – Senior Waste Planning Specialist

Julie Dickinson – Principal Advisor Waste Planning

Authorisers

Barry Potter, Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Lesley Jenkins, acting for Louise Mason, General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Panuku Auckland Development- Franklin Local Board Six-Monthly Report 01 March to 31 August 2020.

File No.: CP2020/14506

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Franklin Local Board on Panuku Development Auckland (Panuku) activities within the local board area and the region for the six months from 01 March to 31 August 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report is a record of events for the Franklin Local Board area during the stated time period. CCOs are legally required to prepare six-monthly and annual reports containing financial and other information about their performance. By reporting clearly the record of events, this report enables the council, and Panuku, to meet its legislative reporting obligations and also satisfy New Zealand Stock Exchange obligations. No decisions are to be made from this report.

3.       The Auckland Plan sets out, among other things, reporting requirements (statutory or otherwise), audit and risk reporting requirements, attendance at council meetings, and the process for buying, managing and selling assets.

4.       Panuku collaborates with other CCOs, government and non-governmental organisations as appropriate to obtain positive outcomes for Auckland.

5.       Panuku is charged with balancing our obligation to deliver returns for council with ensuring our regeneration projects are good quality, strategic and better for the environment.

6.       The activities of Panuku cover four broad areas: 

·   urban regeneration of particular neighbourhoods, as determined by Auckland Council

·   review of, and where appropriate, redevelopment of council non-service property

·   management of council property assets including commercial, residential, and marina infrastructure

·   other property related services such as service property optimisation (such as redevelopment incorporating a service delivery function), strategic property advice, acquisitions and disposals.

7.       The Auckland Council Group (‘the council group’) is made up of Auckland Council, and five substantive council-controlled organisations (CCOs) of which Panuku is one. Panuku delivers core activities and plays a major role in achieving the council group’s strategic outcomes for Tāmaki Makaurau. The Governance Manual for Substantive CCOs sets out the council’s expectations for CCOs including Panuku, and the key policies that guide our activities.

8.       Panuku has supported Auckland Council throughout its response to COVID-19 and continues to do so.

9.       Throughout the alert Level 4 lockdown, our primary focus was to support our tenants and find savings across our organisation.

10.     Our capital programme delivery was impacted by the Alert Level 4 lockdown; however this resumed on the return to Alert Level 3, with only minor delays across our capital programme as a result.

11.     Like Auckland Council, Panuku has made savings, with the majority of our people earning over $100,000, our executive leaders and our board taking voluntary salary reductions.

12.     To respond to the changing property market and the impacts of the Auckland Council group we confirmed a new organisational structure to deliver our programme.

13.     We have supported Auckland Council through the Emergency Budget 2020/2021. Our capital envelope for this financial year will allow us to deliver a credible urban regeneration programme in our neighbourhoods across the region.

14.     Panuku currently manages the Unlock Pukekohe programme, which falls within the Franklin Local Board area.

15.     Panuku Development Auckland currently manages 16 commercial and residential interests in the Franklin Local Board area.

16.     No properties were purchased in the Franklin Local Board area during the six-month reporting period.

17.     No properties were sold in the Franklin Local Board area during the six-month reporting period.

18.     Six properties are currently under review as part of our rationalisation process, in the Franklin Local Board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Panuku Auckland Development- Franklin Local Board Six-Monthly Report 01 March to 31 August 2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

19.     Panuku helps to rejuvenate parts of Auckland, from small projects that refresh a site or building, to major transformations of town centres or neighbourhoods.

20.     The Auckland Plan is the roadmap to deliver on Auckland’s vision to be a world-class city. Panuku plays a significant role in achieving the ‘Homes and Places’ and ‘Belonging and Participation’ outcomes.

21.     Panuku leads urban redevelopment in Manukau, Onehunga, Wynyard Quarter, Waterfront, Northcote, Avondale, Takapuna, Henderson, Old Papatoetoe, Ormiston, Panmure, Pukekohe, the City Centre and redevelopment of the Haumaru Portfolio.

22.     Panuku manages around $3 billion of council’s non-service property portfolio, which is continuously reviewed to find smart ways to generate income for the region, grow the portfolio, or release land or property that can be better used by others. ‘Non-service properties’ are council-owned properties that are not used to deliver council, or CCO, services.


 

23.     As at 31 August 2020, the Panuku-managed non-service property portfolio comprises 1,674 properties, containing 998 leases. This includes vacant land, industrial buildings, warehouses, retail shops, cafes, offices, medical centres and a large portfolio of residential rental homes. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.     Panuku is contributing commercial input into approximately fifty region-wide council-driven renewal and housing supply initiatives.

25.     Panuku works with partners and stakeholders over the course of a project. It also champions best practice project delivery to achieve best value outcomes within defined cost, time and quality parameters.

26.     Below is a high-level update on activities in the Franklin Local Board area.

Unlock Pukekohe

27.     COVID-19 impacts – As most of the work for this programme is in the planning phase, there has been limited impact compared to other programmes. It has however affected the timeline for the parking strategy. Some tactical planning and projects are being adjusted to respond to the new market environment. The Twilight Markets scheduled for March and April were cancelled due to the initial lockdown.

28.     Stakeholder relations – As the newest location that Panuku is establishing, work is continuing to build relationships with key stakeholders such as the business association and key community network groups. Interactions with iwi are continuing, with the current focus on exploring a partnering approach for the Unlock Pukekohe programme.

29.     Car parking – We are working closely with Auckland Transport and the Franklin Local Board to agree on an approach to parking solutions for the town centre, enabling the release of up to eight off-street car park sites for future redevelopment. The development of under-utilised sites at 172-182 Manukau Road (balance of land properties left over from an Auckland Transport roading project) requires further discussion.

30.     Master planning – We have been working on a programme business case and a high-level masterplan for Pukekohe, following the goals set out in the Kia Puāwai High-Level Project Plan. The Programme Business Case was set to be approved by the Panuku Board at its August meeting; however, this has been deferred to a later date.

31.     The draft masterplan was socialised with the Franklin Local Board and Councillor Cashmore. They provided full support with the ongoing caution around the future arrangement of parking.

32.     The draft masterplan is now being refined and documented to support a proposed community engagement phase from February 2021.

33.     Site sales – In March we received informal feedback from the Franklin Local Board for our indicative site sales sequence. We have since activated workstreams to prepare the Edinburgh Superblock and the Countdown car park for sale. The Manukau Road sites are still under negotiation.

34.     Innovating Streets – Funding has been secured for Pukekohe to be part of Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency's Innovating Streets initiative.  The fund has been designed to help councils create more people friendly places, including improved processes that enable communities to meaningfully input into the creation of their local transport infrastructure and places. Innovating Streets projects are designed to trial quick, low-cost improvements and may include the use of pop-ups like road art, planters and street furniture. There are two projects we will be looking to deliver in Pukekohe before the end of this financial year - testing the Saturday farmer’s market in a new location at Roulston Street and the town square, and trial a one-way layout for parts of King Street, Roulston Street and Devon Lane. All proposals will be tested on the ground ahead of any permanent delivery, to be improved upon in response to feedback and findings.

Placemaking

35.     Placemaking for Panuku is a process that fosters the creation of vital public spaces; the kind of places where people feel a strong relationship with their communities, a commitment to making things better and the creation of built environments that people can value as special places.

36.     In navigating these uncertain times, we continue to assist in building social cohesion and connection to place. With the potential for disruption and delay across development programmes, placemaking will continue building trust and relationships within local communities supporting resilience. We intend to continue delivering smaller more agile initiatives that will build momentum for upcoming Panuku projects. Overall, we are working with a new and innovative approach to enable us to act with flexibility and the ability to pivot and work with rapid change.

37.     Our team works closely with local communities to learn what is happening, test ideas, show progress, build trust and ensure that regeneration fits with the characteristics of a place. Placemaking has been involved from early on in Pukekohe to support a place-led process of urban renewal throughout the project.

Placemaking approach in Pukekohe

38.    At the concept design stage, Panuku will follow the ‘do-learn-do' approach to gain an understanding of the local issues, unheard voices and opportunities. This approach will be most visible via the ‘tactical pilot initiatives’ that will be staged as part of the first phase of regeneration activity – ‘sowing the seeds and preparing the groundwork’. These works will provide an opportunity to test consequential project ideas through short-term activations – aided by project/development managers to ensure that their proposed project goals can be achieved and are valued by Pukekohe’s diverse communities and local businesses.  

39.    We will ensure the community plays an active role in building their places through short-term activations, such as pop-up events and workshops. We will experiment with new place-led initiatives to provide an opportunity to test ideas through short-term improvements for Pukekohe’s public realm. This participation and inclusion will enable better decision-making for Pukekohe’s future. 

40.     We will support long-term resilience by empowering key community stakeholders. We will engage with and empower local community stakeholders to ensure that the vision can be achieved and sustained into the future. This self-sufficiency is anticipated to include a continual programme of works that are led by community stakeholders well after the Kia Puāwai a Pukekohe project has been completed. This will include the creation of a core group of community leaders to help guide and inform our work on the ground. 

41.     Ngā Pou Herenga - Our approach to placemaking is strengthened and guided by recognising mana whenua values and in particular their role as kaitiaki. Placemaking will honour collective knowledge and understanding, and support wellbeing. 

 Placemaking activities

42.     No placemaking activities were held during the reporting period due to COVID-19 restrictions. The focus has instead been on continuing relationship building and development.

43.     Exploration and early meetings are underway for Roulston Park and skate park upgrades.

44.     We are establishing relationships to support and enable local contributions to the Innovating Streets process.


 

Properties managed in the Franklin Local Board Area

45.    Panuku currently manages nine commercial and seven residential interests within the Franklin Local Board area.

 

Strategic Asset Optimisation

Service Property Optimisation

46.     Service Property Optimisation is a self-funding development approach targeting sub-optimal service assets, approved in 2015. The process involves an agreement between Community Services, Panuku and local boards and is led by Panuku. It is designed to equal or enhance levels of service to the local community in a reconfigured form while delivering on strategic outcomes such as housing or urban regeneration, with no impact on existing rate assumptions.

47.     Using service property optimisation, underperforming assets will have increased utility and efficiency, lower maintenance and operating costs, as well as improved service delivery benefiting from the co-location of other complementary services or commercial activities. Optimisation will free up a range of undercapitalised development opportunities such as air space, full sites, or part sites.

48.     Using service property optimisation as a redevelopment and funding tool, the local board can maximise efficiencies from service assets while maintaining levels of service through the release of some or all of that property for sale or development.

49.    Local boards are allocated decision making for the disposal of local service property and reinvestment of sale proceeds under the service property optimisation approach.

Portfolio review and rationalisation

Overview

50.     Panuku is required to undertake ongoing rationalisation of the council’s non-service assets, including the identification of properties from within the council’s portfolio that may be suitable for potential sale and development if appropriate. This contributes towards Auckland Council’s Emergency Budget asset recycling target, as well as outcomes identified in the Long-term Plan, by providing the council with efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its activities and projects.

51.     Panuku has a focus on achieving housing and urban regeneration outcomes for properties no longer required for a council service use. Identifying potential sale properties contributes to the Auckland Plan focus of accommodating the significant growth projected for the region over the coming decades.

Process

52.     Once identified as no longer delivering the council service use for which it was acquired, property is taken through a multi-stage rationalisation process. The agreed process includes engagement with council departments and CCOs, the local board, mana whenua and the relevant ward councillor The Finance and Performance Committee has the delegation to approve recommendations for disposal. Panuku works closely with Auckland Council business units, Auckland Council’s Finance team and Auckland Transport to identify and progress potential surplus properties to help achieve disposal targets.

Acquisitions and disposals

53.    Panuku manages the acquisition and disposal of property on behalf of Auckland Council. Panuku purchases property for development, roads, infrastructure projects and other services. These properties may be sold with or without contractual requirements for development.

54.     All land acquisition committee resolutions contain a confidentiality clause due to the commercially sensitive nature of ongoing transactions, and thus cannot be reported on while in process. 

Acquisitions

55.    Panuku undertakes acquisitions for Auckland Council’s parks team and Healthy Waters under delegation from council’s Chief Executive. Panuku does not unilaterally decide which properties to buy and when, but rather follows a directive to manage the commercial transactions following committee approval to purchase a particular property. A prerequisite of the committee resolution is reporting to the local board.

56.    Panuku has purchased one property for open space across Auckland, in Flat Bush between March 2020 and August 2020 at a cost of $3.3 million.

57.     No properties were purchased in the Franklin Local Board area during the reporting period for open space.

Disposals

58.     In the current reporting period from March 2020 to August 2020, the Panuku disposals team has entered into four sale and purchase agreements, with an estimated value of $5.4 million of unconditional net sales proceeds. 

59.     Panuku 2020/21 disposals target is $24 million for the year. The disposals target is agreed with the council and is reviewed on an annual basis. 

60.     No properties were sold in the Franklin Local Board area during the reporting period.

61.     The following properties in the Franklin Local Board Area have been approved for sale through the optimisation process:

Property

Details

39R Pohutukawa Road, Beachlands

The Franklin Local Board approved the sale of 39R Pohutukawa Road and 17W Hawke Crescent, Beachlands, under the service property optimisation policy on 26 March 2019.

Subsequently, the PACE Committee approved the revocation of the reserve status for both of these properties on 13 February 2020.

To complete the reserve revocation process, we have notified iwi and are about to start public notification.  Following this process, there will be a plan change to enable the properties to be sold on the open market.

These properties cannot be sold under the Service Property Optimisation Policy until an eligible project has been formally identified.

17W Hawke Crescent, Beachlands

Under review

62.     Properties currently under review in the Franklin Local Board area are listed below. The list includes any properties that may have recently been approved for sale or development and sale by the governing body:


 

Property

Details

18-22 (Rear) Keven Road, Clarks Beach

A 249m2 narrow strip of vacant land that is the remainder of land originally vested with the former Franklin District Council as a plantation reserve. The reserve status was revoked in 2003. The site is not required for open space network purposes.
The site was included in Schedule A of Auckland Council’s Emergency Budget asset recycling programme and the Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal at its 16 July 2020 meeting.

8 Magnolia Drive, Waiuku

A 312m2 site not required for open space network purposes. It as vested upon subdivision as a reserve with the former Franklin District Council in 1999.
It is a recreation reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.
The site was included in Schedule A of Auckland Council’s Emergency Budget asset recycling programme and the Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal at its 16 July 2020 meeting.
Panuku is undertaking a reserve revocation and plan change process before taking the site to market.

24 Saleyard Road, Whitford

A residential property acquired for transport purposes. AT is legalising the area required for roading purposes.
The residual part of the property was included in Schedule A of Auckland Council’s Emergency Budget asset recycling programme and the Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal at its 16 July 2020 meeting.
Disposal of the residual land is on hold at the request of the council's Healthy Water department.

54 Whitford Park Road, Whitford

A vacant former residential site that was acquired for transport purposes. AT is legalising the area required for roading purposes.
The residual part of the site was included in Schedule A of Auckland Council’s Emergency Budget asset recycling programme and the Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal at its 16 July 2020 meeting.
Disposal of the residual land is on hold at the request of the council's Healthy Water department.

 


 

 

Property

Details

751 Whitford-Maraetai Road, Whitford

A residential property acquired for transport purposes. AT is currently legalising the area required for roading purposes.
The residual part of the property was included in Schedule A of Auckland Council’s Emergency Budget asset recycling programme and the Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal at its 16 July 2020 meeting.

72R Karaka Road, Beachlands

A vacant site that was transferred from the Crown to the former Manukau City Council in 1977 as road reserve. It is subject to the Reserves and Domains Act 1953.
It is not required for transport infrastructure purposes or open space network purposes.
The site was included in Schedule A of Auckland Council’s Emergency Budget asset recycling programme. At its 16 July 2020 meeting, the Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal of the site.
Panuku is undertaking a reserve revocation process before taking the site to market.

18-22 (Rear) Keven Road, Clarks Beach

A 249m2 narrow strip of vacant land that is the remainder of land originally vested with the former Franklin District Council as a plantation reserve. The reserve status was revoked in 2003. The site is not required for open space network purposes.
The site was included in Schedule A of Auckland Council’s Emergency Budget asset recycling programme and the Finance and Performance Committee approved the disposal at its 16 July 2020 meeting.

 

Housing for Older People - Haumaru Housing 

63.     The council owns 1,452 units located in 63 villages across Auckland, which provide rental housing to low income older people in Auckland.  

64.     The Housing for Older People (HfOP) project involved Auckland Council partnering with a third-party organisation, The Selwyn Foundation, to deliver social rental housing services for older people across Auckland. 

65.     The joint venture business, named Haumaru Housing, took over the tenancy, facilities and asset management of the portfolio, under a long-term lease arrangement from 1 July 2017.  

66.     Haumaru Housing was granted community housing provider (CHP) status in April 2017. Having CHP registration enables Haumaru to access the government’s Income Related Rent Subsidy (IRRS) scheme. 

67.     Auckland Council has delegated Panuku to lead a new multi-year residential development programme.  

68.     The following Haumaru Housing villages are located within the Franklin Local Board area: 

Village 

Address 

Number of units 

Albert

Albert Place Pukekohe

30

Henry Curd

4-8 Henry Curd Terrace Pukekohe

10

Kent

14 Kent Street Waiuku

8

Lawrie

111 Queen Street Pukekohe

7

Norfolk Rise

2 Norfolk Rise Waiuku

16

Parkway

16 Princes Street Pukekohe

28

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

69.     The Panuku urban regeneration programmes support the regeneration of existing town centres while also addressing climate mitigation and adaptation.

70.     Mitigation of climate change involves reducing the carbon emissions that contribute to climate change. Our neighbourhoods are transport-oriented communities that utilise existing infrastructure and transport links and we seek to make local walking and cycling safe and viable alternatives to the private vehicle. Panuku has also adopted a Homestar-6 minimum standard to ensure we can reduce energy, water and landfill waste. We are working to adopt similar standards for our public realm and commercial developments, whilst also taking guidance from precinct sustainability rating tools like Green Star Communities.

71.     Adaptation to climate change involves planning for the changes to our climate and associated impacts that are already happening or are projected to happen, including sea-level rise, hotter temperatures, extreme weather events, flooding and droughts. Climate change is likely to subject the Franklin Local Board Area to hotter temperatures and more frequent flooding and drought. Panuku seeks to future-proof our communities by:

·    specifying that infrastructure and developments are designed to cope with warmer temperatures and extreme weather events

·    the use of green infrastructure and water sensitive design to increase flood resilience and provide ecological and biodiversity benefits

·    the provision of increased shade and shelter for storm events and hotter days

·    initiatives to build community resilience

72.     Sustainability outcomes have been considered in Pukekohe's Programme Business Case, including the social and economic benefits of new commercial development activity, sustainable procurement and Homestar residential builds.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

73.     The views of the council group are incorporated on a project by project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

74.     Any local or sub-regional impacts related to local activities are considered on a project by project basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

75.     Panuku works collaboratively with mana whenua on a range of projects including potential property disposals, development sites in the area and commercial opportunities. Engagement can be on specific individual properties and projects at an operational level with kaitiaki representatives, or with the Panuku Mana Whenua Governance Forum who have a broader mandate.

76.     Panuku will continue to partner with Māori on opportunities which enhance Māori social and economic wellbeing.  

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

77.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

78.     There are no risks associated with receiving this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

79.     The next six-month update is scheduled for March 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Perin Gerrand - Engagement Coordinator

Authorisers

Hannah Ross - Senior Community Affairs Advisor

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Regional Facilities Auckland Quarter Four Performance Report for the period ending 30 June 2020

File No.: CP2020/14766

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Regional Facilities Auckland has provided a performance report for Quarter Four, for the period ending 30 June 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Regional Facilities report is available as Attachment A to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the Regional Facilities Auckland Quarter Four Performance Report for the period ending 30 June 2020 (Attachment A of the report).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

27 October 2020 Regional Facilities Auckland Quarter Four Performance Report for the period ending 30 June 2020

77

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jan Brown – Manager Local Board Engagement, Regional Facilities

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development six-monthly update to local boards: 1 January to 30 June 2020

File No.: CP2020/15014

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide local boards with an update on Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development activities in each local board area as well as Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development’s regional activities for the period 1 January to 30 June 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To inform the local board about local/regional initiatives and how they are tracking.

3.       The role of Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) is to support:

·        the growth of Auckland’s key internationally competitive sectors

·        the provision of quality jobs across Auckland.

4.       ATEED has supported multiple local board/regional initiatives that have supported economic development through development of businesses and an increase in events and sustainable tourism growth (including for Māori) across Auckland.  

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the update from Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development for the period 1 January to 30 June 2020.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       ATEED has two areas of delivery focus:

·        Economic Development – including business support, business attraction and investment, local economic development, trade and industry development, skills employment and talent and innovation and entrepreneurship.

·        Destination – supporting sustainable growth of the visitor economy with a focus on destination marketing and management, major events, business events (meetings and conventions) and international student attraction and retention.

6.       ATEED works with local boards, the council and other council-controlled organisations (CCOs) to support decision-making on local economic growth and facilitates or coordinates the delivery of local economic development activity. It further ensures that the regional activities it leads and/or delivers fully support local economic growth and employment.

7.       Additional information about ATEED’s role and activities can be found at: www.aucklandnz.com/ateed

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       From 1 January to 30 June 2020, 3726 businesses had been through an ATEED intervention, including 3174 businesses for Economic Development-related programmes and 549 for Destination-related programmes.[7]

9.       The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdowns have seen a marked increase in demand for business support in both resource and monetary terms, cancellation and postponement of major events and significant fallout incurred by the tourism sector. Figure 1 shows the number of businesses in each local board area who have sought out an ATEED Economic Development and/or Destination intervention.

10.     Waitematā Local Board had the highest number of business interventions, while Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board had the lowest. Because Waitematā Local Board includes the region’s CBD, it is unsurprising that it has had the highest number of interventions. The data shows that within a local board area, between 1 per cent and 4 per cent of businesses took part in an ATEED intervention.

11.     Most local board areas had higher rates of participation in Economic Development-related programmes compared to Destination-related interventions over the six months. The following local board areas had Destination-related interventions of over 25 per cent:

·        Waiheke

·        Waitematā

·        Rodney

·        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu.

12.     The businesses in these local board areas have high rates of Auckland Convention Bureau[8] membership and many benefit from ATEED’s tourism advocacy programme.

Māori businesses

13.     Māori businesses are represented in ATEED interventions across all local board areas, with Waitematā Local Board having the highest intervention uptake. This is due to the high number of businesses in the Waitematā Local Board area relative to other local board areas.

Jobseekers in Auckland

14.     During the April to June 2020 quarter, New Zealand experienced a rapid increase in the number of people who became recipients of a jobseeker benefit from the Ministry of Social Development. Jobseeker benefit data acts as a proxy for unemployment figures. The number of new recipients of the Jobseeker – Work Ready benefit from April to June 2020 can be compared for each local board area in Figure 3. Please note that the data from the Ministry of Social Development grouped together Waiheke and Aotea / Great Barrier local boards and cannot be separated for the purposes of this graph.

15.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki and Henderson-Massey Local Board areas have the highest numbers of recipients in the second quarter of the year. Aotea / Great Barrier, Waiheke, and Devonport-Takapuna Local Boards reflect the lowest number of recipients in Auckland. The number of recipients generally correlate with socio-economic status and population size.

Economic Development

Locally driven initiatives

Table 1: Locally driven initiatives

Local board

Initiative

Update

Budget

Albert-Eden

Sustainability Kick Start

Business participation: 10

Programme completed: March 2020

$24,000

Franklin

Hunua Trail Plan Implementation

Project reinstated after Covid-19 interruptions in Q4 with expected increase in project activity going into 2020/21.

$80,000

Hibiscus and Bays

Pop-Up Business School

Course delivered: 10-21 February 2020

Registrations: 57

$7500

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$3500

Manurewa

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$2000

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

Onehunga Sustainability Development Programme

First year of two-year project. First stage focuses on retail/services. Waste audits scheduled for April-June, however continued business participation in programme uncertain due to pandemic.

$20,000

Ōrākei

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$2000

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$3000

Business Sustainability Follow-Up Programme

Programme launched mid-March, however continued business participation in programme uncertain due to pandemic.

$20,000

Little India Promotion

The promotion part of Visitor Attraction Programme, launched in February. Programme put on hold in March due to the pandemic.

$20,000

Upper Harbour

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$2000

Waitematā

Sustainability Kick Start Programme

 

Business participation: 10

Programme completed: March 2020

 

$24,000

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$5000

Whau

Young Enterprise Scheme

Local board funds supported the Kick Start Days (February). Sponsorship Agreement signed. Expected draw-down of funds by 30 June 2020.

$1000

Supporting local business growth

16.     A key programme in supporting the growth of Auckland’s internationally competitive sectors and the provision of quality jobs is central government’s Regional Business Partnership Network. This is delivered by ATEED’s Business and Innovation Advisors, whose role is to connect local businesses to resources, experts and services in innovation, Research and Development, business growth and management.

17.     Three thousand and seven businesses participated in this programme from January 1 to June 30, represented below in Figure 4 which also breaks down business uptake per local board area.

18.     Demand for business support increased significantly between March and June because of the fallout from the pandemic. To this end, programme coverage for the region ranged from 1 per cent to 2 per cent of all businesses in each local board area. Local boards with the highest coverage in percentage terms were Waitematā (2.1 per cent), Upper Harbour (2 per cent), Maungakiekie-Tāmaki (2 per cent), and Kaipātiki (1.8 per cent).

Other support for new businesses

19.     Figure 5 shows the number of Auckland businesses that took part in ATEED’s business innovation clinics per local board area from January to June 2020. Local board areas with the highest number of participants were:

·        Albert-Eden

·        Kaipātiki

·        Manurewa

·        Ōrākei

·        Waitematā.

20.     As businesses refocus their efforts to cope with uncertainties arising from the pandemic, ATEED has reviewed one of its programmes with a decision for it to be discontinued - no workshops took place over the relevant six-month period. The ‘Starting Off Right’ programme gave free support and provided expert advice to new business owners and managers. ATEED is working on an alternative approach to support Auckland business start-ups and entrepreneurs.

Film activity

21.     ATEED’s Screen Auckland team issues film permits for filming in public open spaces. This activity supports local businesses and employment, as well as providing a revenue stream to local boards for the use of local parks.

22.     Between 1 January and 30 June 2020, a total of 246 film permits[9] were issued across Auckland. During lockdown, most filming activity ceased, however once the more restrictive alert levels were lifted in May, there was an increase in permits being issued.

23.     Although Waitākere Ranges Local Board had the most permits issued (46), Franklin Local Board’s share of the permit revenue was the highest ($9921.74) from its 12 permits. Total revenue for all local boards was $45,342.49.[10] This information is shown in Figure 6 and Table 2 below.

 

Table 2: Film permits and revenue

Local Board

Film permits

Revenue

Albert-Eden

15

$2893.92

Aotea / Great Barrier

0

$0.00

Devonport-Takapuna

16

$3756.51

Franklin

12

$9921.74

Henderson-Massey

31

$3147.82

Hibiscus and Bays

18

$4066.08

Howick

3

$460.87

Kaipātiki

5

$1085.21

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

8

$2452.18

Manurewa

3

$252.18

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

6

$600.00

Ōrākei

8

$1017.39

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

14

$2782.60

Papakura

0

$0.00

Puketāpapa

4

$973.91

Rodney

26

$2817.39

Upper Harbour

0

$0.00

Waiheke

0

$0.00

Waitākere

46

$4860.87

Waitematā

30

$4210.34

Whau

1

$43.48

Total:

246

$45,342.49

 

Young Enterprise Scheme

24.     The Auckland Chamber of Commerce has delivered the Lion Foundation Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) since January 2018. ATEED plays a strategic role and provides funding for this initiative. Through the programme, students develop creative ideas into businesses, complete with real products and services generating profit (and sometimes losses). During the period, there were 53 schools (1523 students) that completed the programme. This year, the programme took place mostly online.

Table 3: YES Schools

Local Board

Schools involved

Albert-Eden

Auckland Grammar School

Diocesan School for Girls

Epsom Girls Grammar School

Mt Albert Grammar School

St Cuthbert's College (Epsom)

Devonport-Takapuna

Rosmini College

Takapuna Grammar School

Westlake Boys' High School

Westlake Girls' High School

Franklin

Onewhero Area School

Pukekohe High School

Wesley College

Henderson-Massey

Henderson High School

Massey High School

Waitakere College

Hibiscus and Bays

Kingsway School

Whangaparāoa College

Howick

Macleans College

Edgewater College

Pakuranga College

Saint Kentigern College (Pakuranga)

Kaipātiki

Birkenhead College

Glenfield College

Northcote College

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

Al-Madinah School

De La Salle College

King's College

Māngere College

Southern Cross Campus

TKM o Nga Tapuwae

Manurewa

Alfriston College

Manurewa High School

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

One Tree Hill College

Onehunga High School

Ōrākei

Baradene College

Glendowie College

Sacred Heart College (Auckland)

Selwyn College

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

Aorere College

Ormiston Senior College

Papatoetoe High School

Sancta Maria College

Sir Edmund Hillary Collegiate Senior School

Rodney

Mahurangi College

 

Upper Harbour

Albany Senior High School

Hobsonville Point School (Secondary)

Kristin School

Waitematā

Auckland Girls' Grammar School

St Mary's College (Ponsonby)

Western Springs College

Whau

Auckland International College

Avondale College

Kelston Girls' College

 

25.     Figure 7 shows the number of schools participating in the Young Enterprise Scheme by local board area.


 

26.     Higher participation in the scheme occurred in the following local board areas:

·        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

·        Albert-Eden

·        Ōtara-Papatoetoe.

27.     This is mainly due to there being a higher number of schools in these areas.

Local jobs and skills hubs

28.     The City Centre, Manukau and Northern hubs were all closed during lockdown and were open in June but with limited public-facing services. A reorganisation of the jobs and skills hubs services is underway in response to the impact of COVID-19 on the labour market and the funding received in the central government budget in May this year.

The South and West Auckland Prosperity Project

29.    ATEED, the Southern Initiative (TSI) and the Western Initiative (TWI) have been working together on a project that is focused on how we can ensure that the mega economic shock of Covid-19 does not create further disparity and inequity for South and West Auckland, in partnership with Stakeholder Strategies. The presentation of the South and West Prosperity Project has been compiled using Auckland, South and West, Māori and Pacific-specific data, and includes a number of next steps for ATEED, TSI and TWI, and direction for the eco-system to enable prosperity for South and West Auckland.

Destination

Visitor survey insights report

30.     The Auckland Domestic Visitor Insights Report was created to inform the Auckland tourism industry about the changing domestic visitor market to assist with improved product development and destination marketing. This report was released in May 2020 for the year up to January 2020. It contains insights that can be used to market regions and local board areas to domestic visitors. Relevant insights are captured below.

31.     Central Auckland (Albert-Eden, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Puketāpapa, Ōrākei, & Waitematā local boards):

·        The majority of domestic visitors surveyed (78 per cent) came to Central Auckland, with an average satisfaction of experienced activities and attraction of 8.2/10. The top three attractions were Queen Street, Sky Tower and downtown waterfront/viaduct area.

·        Of the surveyed domestic visitors that came to Auckland Central (year to December 2019), the most popular activities were frequenting a restaurant/café (59 per cent) followed by shopping (55 per cent). Other activities included visiting the casino or participating in gambling (21 per cent) and attending an event, concert or festival (20 per cent).

32.     North Auckland (Devonport-Takapuna, Hibiscus and Bays, Kaipātiki, Rodney, and East Upper Harbour local boards):

·        Just under half of surveyed domestic visitors (43 per cent) visited North Auckland. Their average satisfaction with experienced activities and attractions was 8.2/10. Of these domestic visitors, the top attraction was Albany (30 per cent), followed by Devonport (27 per cent) and Takapuna (27 per cent). This group also visited Wellsford (17 per cent) and Whangaparaoa Peninsula (13 per cent).

·        The most common activity undertaken by surveyed international (39 per cent) and domestic (50 per cent) visitors was visiting a restaurant/café.


 

33.     East Auckland (Franklin (East) and Howick local boards):

·        A third of surveyed domestic visitors (32 per cent) visited East Auckland. Average satisfaction with East Auckland’s experienced activities/attractions was 8.2/10. Almost half (46 per cent) of domestic visitors went to Sylvia Park, a quarter (24 per cent) visited Howick and 18 per cent visited Half Moon Bay. In comparison to the international market, domestic visitors called in on the Howick Historical Village (13 per cent) and the Pakuranga Night Markets (11 per cent) in greater numbers.

·        Further, surveyed domestic visitors visited art galleries, museums, historic sites (10 per cent) in the region more than surveyed international visitors.

34.     South Auckland (Franklin (West), Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Manurewa, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, and Papakura local boards):

·        Over half of surveyed domestic visitors (52 per cent) to Auckland visited South Auckland, with the average satisfaction with South Auckland’s activities and attractions being 8.0 out of 10. Over half of surveyed domestic visitors that visited South Auckland visited the Auckland Airport (53 per cent); a third (33 per cent) visited Manukau; and a quarter (26 per cent) visited Rainbow’s End. In comparison to the international market, surveyed domestic visitors visited the Ōtara Market (13 per cent) and Ōtara (10 per cent) in greater numbers.

·        Of the visitors that visited South Auckland, the top three activities for surveyed international and domestic visitors was visiting a restaurant or café, shopping and general exploration.

35.     West Auckland (Henderson-Massey, West Upper Harbour, Waitākere Ranges, and Whau local boards):

·        Over a third of surveyed domestic visitors (35 per cent) to Auckland visited West Auckland. The average satisfaction with West Auckland’s activities and attractions for the international market was 8.2 out of 10. A third of the surveyed domestic visitors who visited West Auckland went to Piha Beach (34 per cent); 20 per cent visited Titirangi; and 19 per cent visited the Avondale Sunday Markets. In comparison to the international market, domestic visitors visited the Kumeu Farmers’ Market (14 per cent) and Parakai Hot Pools (13 per cent) more often.

·        Visiting a restaurant or café, shopping and going to the beach were the top three domestic visitor activities.

36.     Hauraki Gulf Islands (Aotea / Great Barrier and Waiheke local boards):

·        20 per cent of surveyed domestic visitors to Auckland visited Hauraki Gulf Islands. Average satisfaction with the area’s experienced activities/attractions was 8.5/10 (highest satisfaction rating from the domestic market). The top domestic visitor attraction was Waiheke Island (44 per cent), followed by Rangitoto Island (18 per cent) and Onetangi Bay on Waiheke Island (18 per cent). In comparison to the international market, domestic visitors visited the Kaitoke Hot Springs on Great Barrier Island (12 per cent) and Whittaker’s Musical Museum on Waiheke Island (11 per cent) in greater numbers.

·        The top three activities for surveyed domestic visitors was visiting a restaurant (33 per cent), general exploration (24 per cent) and sightseeing (22 per cent). Visiting wineries/breweries was a common activity cited by both international and domestic markets and was unique to the Hauraki Gulf Islands.


 

Local board destination management and marketing activities

37.     During the six months to July 2020, there were a number of tourism-related ATEED interventions in each of the local board areas, including:

·        Spring Campaign: Number of businsses promoted and supported through a multi-platform campaign to drive domestic visitation and spend in the spring off-season in Auckland.

·        Tourism Advocacy: Number of businesses promoted for example in:

o   offshore trade events

o   trade shows

o   marketing material

o   broadcasts

o   social media

o   specific campaign content.

·        Tourism Destination Development/Innovation: Tourism business capability building through coaching and facilitation. This includes one-on-one advice from ATEED Tourism team members for new and existing Auckland businesses.

·        Tourism Famils (familiarisation trips for travel agents or media): Number of businesses who benefited from agent famils (ATEED links tourism operators to travel agents which results in bookings being made with the operators) and media famils (ATEED facilitated media files/hosting media to showcase tourism products).

38.     Figure 8 below shows the number of Auckland businesses in local board areas (excluding Rodney and Waitematā local boards) involved in an ATEED tourism intervention (January-June 2020). Figure 9 depicts the number of Auckland businesses in the Albert-Eden, Rodney and Waitematā local board areas involved in an ATEED tourism intervention for the same period of time.

39.     Waitematā and Rodney Local Boards are excluded from Figure 8 to allow for intervention participation scales of the other local boards to be appreciated without distraction. Instead, Waitematā and Rodney local boards are depicted in Figure 9 and compared to the Albert-Eden Local Board to highlight a much larger uptake of interventions by businesses in the two previously mentioned local board areas.

40.     The reason for the difference in scale amongst the identified boards is because Waitematā includes the region’s central business district – it is therefore unsurprising that it maintains the highest number of business interventions.

41.     Specific tourism interventions in the period included the Nau Mai multi-media content series in collaboration with New Zealand Media and Entertainment, which saw ambassadors promoting their favourite places in Auckland including where they love to eat, shop and go on ‘staycations’. These stories were aimed at encouraging Aucklanders to experience and explore their own region and targeted and encouraged other regions in the upper North Island to come and visit Auckland. Ambassadors mentioned attractions such as cafés, walks, beaches, parks, venues from the Matakana Farmers’ Market in Rodney Local Board to Castaways Resort on the west coast in Franklin Local Board, Ambury Farm in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and Waiheke Island’s Oyster Inn.

42.     In March, the ‘Journeys North’ project in collaboration with Northland Inc saw the development of ‘Auckland Journeys’ offering visitors richer and easier journeys in the region to enjoy. Promoted locations included:

·        Puhoi to Pakiri in Rodney

·        Auckland Airport to Wellsford through Waitākere and Kumeu in the Waitākere Ranges

·        Rodney.

43.     ‘Famils’ are a means of promoting Auckland to influential international travel sellers, and prior to March hosted guests from the United States. Orewa and Waiheke Island were profiled in Air New Zealand’s in-flight magazine. Two episodes of Emmy award-winning US Travel show Samantha Brown’s Places to Love which focused on marketing Auckland to domestic and overseas viewers aired in January with an advertising spend rate of NZ$2.1 million per episode, and a reach of 700,000+ people per episode. Samantha enjoyed sailing in the Waitematā Harbour, eating and drinking in the city’s centre, hiking with a local Māori guide in the Parnell Domain, and taking a surf lesson at Piha beach.

Examples of separate local board area activities include:

44.     Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board – Direct/indirect marketing activity increased in late June/July including:

·        Surfer Today articulating the best surf spots in New Zealand featuring the Great Barrier Island.

·        Stuff.co.nz published an article detailing the successes of Aotea / Great Barrier Island and other small towns, in terms of recovery from the pandemic.

·        New Zealand Herald in an article about the ‘Life on Great Barrier Island: Local remedies led to thriving Māori health business’ and other articles (‘Off the Beaten Track’ andThe Best of Great Barrier’) promoting Aotea / Great Barrier Island as a great place for domestic tourists to visit.

·        Radio New Zealand interviewed the owner of Great Barrier Island’s ‘The Curragh’ to talk about the upswing in domestic tourism after lockdown.

·        ATEED will continue to play a supportive and facilitative role for tourism product development in the region to help raise the profile of Auckland as a destination.   

45.     Devonport-Takapuna Local Board – Devonport, Takapuna and Milford Business Improvement Districts were supported via the marketing activity of Explore North Shore – a digital site encouraging visitation and activity into the North Shore. Takapuna Beach Business Association received a grant from the local board for providing highly targeted and relevant tactics for businesses impacted by the Hurstmere Road infrastructure upgrade. The grant is endorsed and managed by ATEED.

46.     Franklin Local Board – Ongoing support to the East Auckland Tourism Group and the Franklin Tourism Group through regular attendance at board meeting and important events, working with ATEED and leveraging this relationship for mutual benefit across marketing and product opportunities, and working with individual operators on product development for example the continuing development of the Hunua Trail and the Glenbrook Vintage Railway. Additionally, there was a focus on ongoing work with the development of Clevedon as a destination.

47.     Howick Local Board – Continued engagement and strategy sessions through the ATEED Tourism Innovation team and South Auckland tourism clusters as well as managing an increased Howick Local Board grant to East Auckland Tourism development.

48.     Rodney Local Board – Initiated multi-linked support for Aotea Organics in Rodney, which is one of the oldest organic farms in New Zealand. Multi-linked means that ATEED has a very large suite of products and services it can offer businesses, in this case ATEED was able to establish links and actions for tourism; inclusion in the travel maps, identification of event hosting, and research and development activity.

49.     Waiheke Local BoardCollaboration with the Waiheke Island Tourism Group and other key stakeholders on the sustainable future of tourism for the island.

Māori Tourism Development Activity

50.     ATEED worked with 45 Māori businesses in the tourism and 23 Māori businesses on the Māori and Iwi Tourism Development programme. Table 4 details the number of Maori tourism businesses by local board area:


 

Table 4: Māori Tourism businesses

Local board

Māori businesses

Māori and Iwi tourism development businesses

Albert-Eden

4

3

Aotea / Great Barrier

1

1

Henderson-Massey

4

4

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

5

2

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

1

1

Orākei

2

1

Rodney

4

3

Waiheke

1

-

Waitākere Ranges

4

1

Waitematā

18

7

Whau

1

-

 

51.     Waitematā Local Board had the most Māori businesses involved in an ATEED tourism intervention, once again, owing to its inclusion of the CBD and being a top tourist destination. Just under half of local boards are not included in this table because no businesses that were involved in an ATEED tourism intervention were identified as Māori.

52.     The Māori Tourism Innovation Partnership Programme has been established to enable ATEED to work collaboratively with the tourism industry to support the sustainable growth of tourism within Tāmaki Makaurau  The programme aims to grow and strengthen the Auckland visitor economy by supporting iwi, hapū, marae, Māori Trusts, Urban Māori Authorities and Māori Tourism collectives within the region, and to aid the development of new Māori tourism experiences, build capability and business partnerships to meet the diverse needs of international and domestic markets.

Delivered, funded and facilitated events

53.     The Tāmaki Herenga Waka Festival occurred on 31 January 2020 celebrating Auckland’s Māori heritage. The event was attended by nearly 6000 people and received media coverage. Overall customer satisfaction with the festival was 90 per cent.

54.     To date, event cancellations and postponements due to COVID-19 have resulted in the loss of an estimated 74,179 visitor nights and over $10 million in GDP for the local economy. Cancelled events include the 2020 Auckland Lantern Festival, the 2020 Pasifika Festival and the 2020 Corona Piha Pro Challenger Series event.

55.     Diwali and the second year of Elemental are confirmed to join other exciting events for the region in the coming months. Elemental 2020, like its inaugural festival last year, will take place all over the Auckland region. It will feature over 30 free and ticketed events in October. Elemental 2019 was attended by over 147,000 people. Due to uncertainty in the domestic tourism market, it is unlikely that there will be the same attendance for the 2020 festival.

56.     Diwali is an annual festival that celebrates traditional and contemporary Indian culture in Aotea Square in the city centre and is set to occur in the last weekend of October this year. Last year’s festival was attended by approximately 65,000 people, up 9 per cent from an estimated 59,990 in 2018. Due to COVID-19, festival attendance is uncertain, but likely to decrease.

57.     Figure 10 shows businesses ATEED works with across its major events. Major events stallholders are businesses that were supported through ATEED delivered events. Major Events Investments are those that were supported through ATEED sponsored events. Local boards not included in the graph were not part of such interventions.

Go With Tourism

58.     Go with Tourism (GWT) is a jobs-matching platform that targets young people (18-30 years) and encourages them to consider a career in tourism. Since 2019, GWT has been expanded from an ATEED initiative to a national programme.

59.     The platform signed up over 550 businesses prior to COVID-19, 149 of those were in Auckland.

60.     In response to the pandemic, GWT formed a new ‘Support the Tourism Workforce’ Strategy which aims to help redeploy displaced tourism workers and provide guidance to businesses as they navigate their way through the impacts of the pandemic and, in due course, begin a post-crisis rebuild. Go with Tourism has received over 2200 requests for assistance from employees and businesses, since adopting the new strategy.


 

61.     The industries most represented in the Auckland GWT programme (classified by Australian and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification codes) are:

·        Accommodation and Food Services (60 per cent)

·        Arts and Recreation Services (19 per cent)

·        Administrative and Support Services (7 per cent)

·        Transport, Postal and Warehousing (5 per cent).

62.     Because the programme is sector-focused, there is a cluster of businesses in tourism-heavy Waitematā Local Board (central city), and surrounding areas (Albert-Eden, Devonport-Takapuna, and Ōrākei local boards). Local boards not included in the graph did not have any businesses take part in the interventions.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

63.     ATEED is currently considering how we respond to climate impacts in our projects and programmes. In the interim, ATEED assesses and responds to any impact that our initiatives may have on the climate on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

64.     The proposed recommendation of receipt of this paper by the local board has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required in the preparation of this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

65.     Local board views were not sought for the purposes of this report. However, such views were sought in the development of some of the initiatives as described in this paper.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

66.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no impact on Māori. ATEED assesses and responds to any impact that our initiatives may have on Māori on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

67.     The recommendation to receive the report has no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

68.     The proposed decision to receive the six-monthly report has no risk. ATEED assesses and manages any risk associated with our initiatives on a case-by-case basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

69.     ATEED will provide the next six-monthly report to the local board in February 2021 which will cover the period 1 July to 31 December 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Stephanie Sole, Strategy & Planning Graduate, ATEED

Authorisers

Quanita Khan, Manager Strategy and Planning, ATEED

Lesley Jenkins, acting for Louise Mason, General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Submissions and feedback on the draft Franklin Local Board plan 2020

File No.: CP2020/14817

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview of feedback and submissions received from public consultation on the draft Franklin Local Board Plan 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board complete a local board plan for adoption by 31 October of the year following election and uses the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with its communities.

3.       In June 2020, the local board approved a draft Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 for public consultation. The consultation period ran from 13 July to 13 August 2020.

4.       A total of 467 submissions were received, including 174 submissions through the online survey tool, 172 hard copy submissions and 50 pieces of feedback through social media.

5.       Staff have prepared a report (Attachment A) summarising the results of the consultation.

6.       All feedback will be available on the Auckland Council website at https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/franklinplan

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive submissions and feedback on the draft Franklin Local Board Plan 2020.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 requires that each local board must:

·    adopt its local board plan by 31 October of the year following an election

·    use the special consultative procedure (SCP) to engage with their communities.

8.       On 16 June 2020, Franklin Local Board approved the release of a draft Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 for public consultation.

9.       The key features of the draft Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 were:

·    additional focus on impacts of climate change

·    continued emphasis on community empowerment

·    improved responsiveness to Māori


 

10.     The outcomes of the draft local board plan were:

i.     our strengths generate local opportunity and prosperity

ii.    improved transport options

iii.   places and facilities are fit for purpose

iv.   kaitiakitanga and protection of our environment

v.   cultural heritage and Māori identify is expressed in our communities

vi.   a sense of belonging and strong participation.

11.     In addition to understanding the needs and aspirations of the community, feedback was sought on how the local board can support the community and local businesses in recovering from the impact of COVID-19.

How we consulted

12.     The consultation was held between 13 July and 13 August 2020. A range of engagement activities were undertaken to encourage the public to have their say, with a focus on digital and online platforms:

·    Public submissions: These were hard copy and online collected via email, post, libraries, service centres, local board offices, People’s Panel and the online survey tool akhaveyoursay/lovelocal

·    Have Your Say: Face-to-face hearing style and Skype enabled engagement events (spoken interaction) were held on 11th August and 27th July.

·    Social media: Comments were received on the Franklin Local Board Facebook page. 

13.     The following community meetings, drop-in sessions and partnership events were part of the engagement process:

Theme of event

Date and time

Location

Patumahoe drop-in session

10th August 2020, 7pm

Patumahoe Rugby Club

Pukekohe raising awareness

7th August 2020, 11am

Outside Paper Plus, King St Pukekohe

Franklin Arts Group raising awareness

6th August 2020, 11am

Franklin Arts Centre

Clarks Beach Residents & Ratepayers Meeting raising awareness

5th August 2020, 7pm

Clarks Beach Bowling Club

Kawakawa Bay Community Association Meeting raising awareness

3rd August 2020, 7pm

Kawakawa Bay Community Hall

St Josephs Catholic School Pasifika Parents Fono facilitated engagement

2nd August 2020, 11am

St Josephs Catholic Church Pukekohe

Clevedon Community and Business Association raising awareness

1st August 2020, 1pm

Clevedon District Centre

Waiuku Community Clinic

29th July 2020, 2pm

Waiuku Service Centre

Pukekohe Library drop-in session

29th July 2020, 10am

Pukekohe Library

Pohutukawa Coast Community Association raising awareness

25th July 2020, 2pm

Ambrosia Café, Beachlands

Pukekohe Markets raising awareness

25th July 2020, 8am

Pukekohe Markets

Waiuku Library drop in session

22 July 2020, 12pm

Waiuku Library

Glenbrook Beach Residents & Ratepayers visioning session

21st July 2020, 7pm

Glenbrook Beach Hall

 

Theme of event

Date and time

Location

Karaka Residents & Ratepayers raising awareness

20th July 2020, 7.30pm

Karaka Hall

Beachlands Countdown raising awareness

18th July 2020,

9am

Outside Beachlands Countdown

Waiuku New World raising awareness

18th July 2020, 8.30am

Outside Waiuku New World

 

14.     Due to the restrictions of the COVID-19 alert system, the following meetings were cancelled when Auckland moved to alert level 4 in March 2020:

·    Franklin Local Board and Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki on Friday 26th June 2020

·    Local Board Chair presenting the draft plan to the Huakina Development Trust meeting on 12th August (to representatives of Franklin and North Waikato marae).

15.     The local board received the following feedback:

·    174 submissions through the online survey tool

·    172 hard copy submissions

·    50 pieces of feedback via social media.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Summary of consultation feedback

16.     The results and analysis of the public consultation will form the basis for the development of the final local board plan.

17.     Staff have prepared a report (Attachment A) summarising the results of the consultation. The key messages of the report are described below.

18.     74 percent of submitters responded positively to the direction of the plan, while 22 percent responded negatively.  The remaining 4% were unsure.

19.     74 percent of submitters identified ‘fit for purpose places’ as the higher priority outcome, ahead of ‘belonging and participation’ (18 percent) and ‘cultural heritage and Māori identify’ (8 percent).

20.     Overall, 45 percent of submitters thought the board should deliver trails as Auckland Council can afford it, while 38 percent wanted the board to investigate a targeted rate to deliver them sooner.  The remaining 17 percent were unsure.

21.     In relation to a targeted rate for public transport, 49 percent of submitters thought the board should ‘keep asking for it, accepting this means communities will need to wait for population growth before new or improved services are offered’, while 33 percent wanted the board to ‘investigate a targeted rate to deliver new or improved services sooner’.  The remaining 18 percent were unsure.

Impact of COVID-19

22.     Overall 42 percent felt that the plan would help the community recover from the impact of COVID-19, while 15% did not. The remaining 42 percent were unsure.

23.     Promoting ‘buy local’, support for local businesses, and local events that bring people together were identified as key initiatives that could support recovery.

Publishing the results of public consultation

24.     To conclude this phase of the local board plan development, staff recommend that the local board receive the submissions and feedback for consideration.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     Receiving the submissions and feedback has a neutral climate impact. The submissions are available online to reduce the printing of hard copies. 

26.     The draft Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 reflected the impacts of predicted climate change. It considered such impacts as increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the local board area.

27.     The climate impact of any initiatives the Franklin Local Board chooses to progress will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements and project management processes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     Staff will work closely with the local board in the development of the final plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     The Franklin Local Board will consider all submissions and feedback to the draft Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 prior to adopting the final local board plan in November 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     The draft Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 was developed with consideration given to existing feedback from mana whenua and mataawaka. This included seeking their views and values in January 2020.

31.     The following events were held with mana whenua through the Māori input into Local Board Decision-making programme:

·        southern local boards hui with mana whenua, Thursday, 30 January 2020, Ngati Otara Marae Kohanga Reo, 100 Otara Road, Otara. The following iwi participated in the hui: Ngati Tamaoho, Ngāti Whanaunga, Te Ahiwaru Waiohua and Ngāti Whātua.

·        southern local boards hui with mana whenua, mana whenua rōpū sharing priorities plans and aspirations with local boards, Tuesday 14th July 2020, Manukau Civic Annex Ground Manukau Civic Building. The following iwi participated in the hui: Ngati Tamaoho, Ngati Whanaunga and Te Akitai.

32.     Verbal feedback was received from all participating mana whenua iwi at the above hui.

33.     Written submissions were received from Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki and Ngāti Te Ata. 

34.     43 submissions were received from those identifying as Māori.

35.     This includes 14 video submissions generated through a community partner, via the Pukekohe North Steering Group.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     There are no financial implications associated with receiving the submissions and feedback.

37.     Budget to implement initiatives and projects is confirmed through the annual plan budgeting process.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     There is a risk relating to managing public expectations. The process of consultation is likely to have raised expectations as to the inclusion of the communities’ priorities and aspirations, while the full social and economic effects of COVID-19 are still being determined.

39.     The local board will consider all submissions and feedback before making changes to the draft Franklin Local Board Plan 2020.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The submissions and feedback are available on the Auckland Council website.

41.     The Franklin Local Board will adopt the Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 on 10th November 2020.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

27 October 2020 Summary of feedback on the draft Franklin Local Board Plan 2020

111

b

October 2020 Draft Franklin Local Board Plan Submissions vol 1 (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

October 2020 draft Franklin Local Board Plan submissions volume 2 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lucy Stallworthy - Local Board Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Addition to the 2019-2022 Franklin Local Board meeting schedule for the Long Term Plan

File No.: CP2020/14950

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   To seek approval for three meeting dates to be added to the 2019-2022 Franklin Local Board meeting schedule in order to accommodate the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 timeframes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       The Franklin Local Board adopted the 2019-2022 meeting schedule on Tuesday 26 November 2019.

2.       The local board is being asked to approve three meeting dates as an addition to the Franklin Local Board meeting schedule so that the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 timeframes can be met.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the addition of three meeting dates to the 2019-2022 Franklin Local Board meeting schedule to accommodate the 10-Year Budget timeframes as follows:

                  i.        Tuesday, 1 December 2020, 9.30am

                 ii.        Tuesday, 4 May 2021, 9.30am

                iii.        Tuesday, 15 June 2021, 9.30am

 

 

Horopaki

Context

3.   The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) have requirements regarding local board meeting schedules.

4.   In summary, adopting a meeting schedule helps meet the requirements of:

·      clause 19, Schedule 7 of the LGA on general provisions for meetings, which requires the chief executive to give notice in writing to each local board member of the time and place of meetings.  Such notification may be provided by the adoption of a schedule of business meetings.

·      sections 46, 46(A) and 47 in Part 7 of the LGOIMA, which requires that meetings are publicly notified, agendas and reports are available at least two working days before a meeting and that local board meetings are open to the public.

5.   The Franklin Local Board adopted its 2019-2022 business meeting schedule at its Tuesday 26 November 2019 business meeting.

6.   The timeframes for local board decision-making in relation to the local board agreement which is part of the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 were unavailable when the meeting schedule was originally adopted.

7.   The board is being asked to make decisions in early-December, early-May and mid-June to feed into the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 process. These timeframes are outside the board’s normal meeting cycle. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.   The local board has two choices:

i)        Add the meetings as additions to the meeting schedule.

or

ii)       Add the meetings as extraordinary meetings.

9.   For option one, statutory requirements allow enough time for these meetings to be scheduled as additions to the meeting schedule and other topics may be considered as per any other ordinary meeting. However, there is a risk that if the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 timeframes change again or the information is not ready for the meeting there would need to be an additional extraordinary meeting scheduled anyway.

10. For option two, only the specific topic 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 may be considered for which the meeting is being held. There is a risk that no other policies or plans with similar timeframes or running in relation to the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 process could be considered at this meeting.

11. Since there is enough time to meet statutory requirements, staff recommend option one, approving this meeting as an addition to the meeting schedule, as it allows more flexibility for the local board to consider a range of issues. This requires a decision of the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     This decision is procedural in nature and any climate impacts will be negligible. The decision is unlikely to result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions. The effects of climate change will not impact the decision’s implementation.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     There is no specific impact for the council group from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     This report requests the local board’s decision to schedule additional meetings and consider whether to approve them as extraordinary meetings or additions to the meeting schedule.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     There is no specific impact for Māori arising from this report. Local boards work with Māori on projects and initiatives of shared interest.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     There are no financial implications in relation to this report apart from the standard costs associated with servicing a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     If the local board decides not to add this business meeting to their schedule this will cause a delay to the 10-Year Budget 2021-2031 process, which would result in the input of this local board not being able to be presented to the Governing Body for their consideration and inclusion in the 10-Year Budget.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     Implement the processes associated with preparing for business meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Beth Corlett – Advisor Plans and Programmes

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision - Franklin Local Board feedback on MBIE building for Climate Change

 

File No.: CP2020/14378

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To report on the urgent decision made by Franklin Local Board on the approved feedback to the draft Auckland Council submission -  Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) Building for Climate Change: Transforming operational efficiency and reducing whole-of-life embodied carbon.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.   On 31 August 2020, the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment released its “Building for Climate Change: Transforming operational efficiency and reducing whole-of-life embodied carbon” consultation papers. This is the first public consultation under its new Building for Climate Change programme, which is focused on the building and construction sector.

 

3.   The proposals were organised under two themes, both of which focused on new buildings:

a)   increasing the operational efficiency of buildings; and

b)   reducing embodied carbon across the lifecycle of buildings.

 

4.   The Franklin Local Board has commented that predominantly rural communities are evolving to be increasingly urbanised as development has been enabled through special housing area zoning and the Auckland Unitary Plan. The local board is seeing large growth in the Beachlands, Clevedon, Drury, Paerata and Pukekohe areas and communities have asked the local board to respond to growth so that what is special and unique about these communities is protected, and so that community preferences are understood by both council and developers.

 

5.   The Franklin Local Board has also said planning and preparing facilities and places for change also extends to planning how Auckland Council responds to the effects of climate change. It is council’s responsibility to lead planning, and the local board will advocate strongly for local place-based interests, particularly as they relate to coastal communities.

 

6.   The local board seeks to provide feedback alongside the Auckland Council’s submission.

 

7.   The final date for submissions was 30 September 2020. The opportunity for the local board to make a decision on this information fell outside the scheduled business meeting times.

 


Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board note the urgent decision as follows:

(a)  agrees with the intent of improving the operational efficiency of new buildings and the whole-of-life carbon emissions reduction framework as it aligns well with the Local Board Plan 2020.

 

(b)  agrees with the reason for the programme to be focused on new buildings, but notes that there needs to be a plan to address existing buildings to improve health and wellbeing outcomes. There is a need to address the low operational efficiency and poor thermal performance of our current buildings which can be improved by:

 

      (i)         adding water tanks that capture water that can be used for                                maintenance and cleaning the building

       (ii)       utilising new technology to provide heat to swimming pools as well                   as hot water for our offices.

 

(c)  seeks that where there are buildings which have planned refurbishments in the coming years due to requirements such as seismic strengthening, asbestos or building use changes; this presents a good opportunity to phase-in requirements relating to operational efficiency, occupant health improvements and whole-of-life embodied carbon emission reduction.

 

(d)  understands the need to take a gradual approach to the implementation because of the cost implications.

 

(e)  disagrees with this framework imposing more red tape on the building process and would encourage the Ministry for Building and Innovation and Employment to co-design this framework and the implementation process with the building industry.

 

(f)  seeks more offsets for the use of more energy efficient environment-friendly technology included in the whole-of-life embodied carbon emissions reduction.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

29 September 2020 Franklin Local Board Urgent Decision - feedback on  Ministry of Business Environment and Infrastructure Submission - Building for Climate Change: Transforming operational efficiency and reducing whole-of-life embodied carbon

137

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision by Franklin Local Board to delegate approval of an extraordinary activity at Franklin Pool and Leisure

 

File No.: CP2020/15072

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To report on the urgent decision made by Franklin Local Board regarding delegated approval of an extraordinary activity at Franklin Pool and Leisure Centre, Pukekohe, in March 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       At its meeting on 26 November 2019 the Franklin Local Board resolved (FR/2019/168) the following in relation to urgent decision-making:

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)           adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meeting with requirements of a quorum.

b)           delegate authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board.

c)           agree that the relationship manager (or any person/s acting in this role) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off an authorisation memo.

d)           note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary business meeting of the local board.

3.       The Franklin Local Board received a briefing from Parks Sport and Recreation staff on a proposal to use the Franklin Pool and Leisure Centre for the Franklin Bulls National Basketball League games at a board workshop on 4 February 2020.

4.       Further information was requested from staff to obtain a detailed plan from Franklin Basketball and Belgravia Leisure on how they intended to safely manage the event and mitigate disruption to existing users and the public.

5.       An urgent decision was required to enable the Franklin Bulls and Belgravia Leisure reasonable time to progress planning before the season commenced in April 2020.

6.       This urgent decision was not included on the March 2020 agenda (which meeting was cancelled due to COVID-19 lockdown), hence the inclusion on this agenda.

 


 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the urgent decision on 3 March 2020 that the Franklin Local Board:

i)          supported a trial hosting of Franklin Bulls National Basketball League competition home games in the Franklin Pool and Leisure Centre for the 2020 season.

ii)         delegated final approval, following the submission and acceptance of a detailed event management plan, to the Head of Active Recreation

iii)         requested that staff update the board on the performance of Belgravia Leisure in managing the hosting operation, including mitigating the impact on the community, as part of the Belgravia Leisure contract review.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

October 2020 Urgent Decision to delegate approval of an extraordinary activity at Franklin Pool & Leisure Centre 3 March 2020

141

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision - Franklin Local Board feedback on the Ministry for the Environment Consultation document: Reducing the impact of plastic on our Environment

 

File No.: CP2020/15114

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.   To report on the urgent decision made by Franklin Local Board on the Ministry for the Environment’s consultation document: Reducing the impact of plastic on our environment: Moving away from hard-to-recycle and single-use items.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.   In December 2019, the government made a commitment to address hard-to-recycle plastics used in Aotearoa New Zealand in response to a report released by the Office of the Prime Minister’s Chief Science Advisor – Rethinking Plastics in Aotearoa New Zealand.

 

3.   The Ministry for the Environment is consulting on proposed mandatory phase-outs of specific hard-to-recycle plastic packaging materials and single-use items sold, used and manufactured in Aotearoa New Zealand.

 

4.   Feedback is sought on two proposals outlined by the Ministry for the Environment:

 

a)   Proposal 1: phasing out hard-to-recycle plastic packaging made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polystyrene packaging, and all oxo-degradable plastic products.

 

b)   Proposal 2: a phase-out of specified single-use plastic items, including plastic straws and fruit stickers.

 

5.   The draft Franklin Local Board Plan 2021 supports a local transition to a circular economy approach to waste management; and to enable local climate action through funding aimed specifically at projects that:

a)   advocate for and support locally accessible landfill diversion facilities such as the Waiuku Community Recycling Centre and support community-led initiatives that enable locals to divert waste from landfill.

b)   work with local business, industry and resident groups to deliver a circular economy and low carbon living education programme to enable our community to respond to climate change issues.

c)   support community-led waste reduction and management education programmes and initiatives

 

6.    The local board wanted to provide feedback, which was due by 5pm on Wednesday 30 September 2020 to ensure it was incorporated into the main Auckland Council submission. 

 

7.   The opportunity for the local board to make a decision on this information fell outside the scheduled business meeting times.

 

 

 

 


Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board note its urgent decision input on Auckland Council’s submission to the Ministry for the Environment’s consultation document: Reducing the impact of plastic on our environment. The local board:

(a)  agrees with the consultation document to reduce the environmental impacts of specific plastic materials and supports option six which is a mandatory phase-out of hard to recycle plastics including packaging made from PVC, polystyrene, oxo – degradable products and single use plastic items.

(b)  seeks future consideration of the way that products are packaged and sold online as there are many local businesses that realise the need to move in this direction and a consistent approach to all industries is needed to make sure that hard to recycle plastics and single use plastic items are properly phased out permanently.

(c)  supports a system in place to deal with the unused PVC, polystyrene and oxo-degradable products after the deadline so that it is disposed of properly.

(d)  seeks alternatives to single use plastic bags to collect fruit and vegetables in a hygienic way, especially in light of the current COVID-19 environment and suggest investigating the use of mesh bags or other environment friendly bags.

(e)  supports industries that turn domestic and commercial plastic into premium products like fence posts and suggest that Auckland Council and the Ministry for the Environment work with industries like Future Post based in Waiuku to collect soft plastics that are not currently being collected.

(f)  encourages supermarkets to assume greater environmental responsibility, aligning with industries like Future Post, to limit the amount of plastic that comes into the community.

(g)  supports greater incentives for local companies to support research and design in development of products that support the circular economy, for example replacing plastic-based food packaging with bio-based/vegetable material.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent Decision: Franklin Local Board feedback on the Ministry for the Environment consultation document: reducing the impact of plastic on our environment

163

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 


 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Urgent Decision Keith Matheson acknowledgement

File No.: CP2020/13580

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report on the urgent decision made by Franklin Local Board on the provision of a gift voucher to Mr Keith Matheson in recognition of his many years of service to the Paparimu Hall Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Generally, council will not contribute to flowers, gifts, gift vouchers or cards for births, farewells, or other special occasions or events from operational budgets. This is particularly sensitive expenditure in the current Emergency Budget environment. However, if a local board wishes to recognise outstanding contribution by a community member then the local board can do so by resolving on the expenditure of their Locally Driven Initiatives (discretionary) budget, including using the urgent decision-making process.

3.       The Franklin Local Board consider that Mr Matheson has made an outstanding contribution to the Paparimu Hall Committee and wished to acknowledge this service when he stepped down at the committee’s Annual General Meeting on Monday 21 September 2020.

4.       This decision needed to be made before the next available Franklin Local Board business meeting (on 22 September 2020) as the gift was to be presented to Mr Matheson at the Paparimu Hall Committee’s Annual General Meeting, held on Monday 21 September 2020.

5.       The opportunity for the local board to make a decision on this information fell outside the scheduled business meeting times.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board note the Urgent Decision to:

a)      approve $200 for a gift voucher for Mr Keith Matheson to come from the Franklin Local Board’s Locally Driven Initiatives (discretionary) budget.

b)      recognise Mr Matheson’s many years of service to the Paparimu Hall Committee, serving as a Committee member from 1974-1980 and again from 1984, and who stepped down from his role as chairperson on 21 September 2020 a position he held since 1997.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

15 September 2020 Urgent Decision - Keith Matheson

169

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor - Franklin

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Relationship Manager for Franklin and Howick Local Boards

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Memo                                                         15 September 2020

To:                Carol McKenzie-Rex – Relationship Manager: Franklin and Howick Local Boards

From:            Andrew Baker – Chair: Franklin Local Board

 

 

Subject:       Urgent decision request of the Franklin Local Board

 

 

Purpose

1.       The purpose of this memo is to seek an urgent decision for the provision of a gift voucher to
Mr Keith Matheson in recognition of his many years of service to the Paparimu Hall Committee.

 

2.       Mr Matheson has served as a member of the Paparimu Hall Committee from 1974 - 1980 and from 1984.  He has held the position of chairperson from 1997, a role he is stepping down from at the Committee’s Annual General meeting to be held on Monday 21 September 2020.

 

Urgent decision-making process

 

3.       At its meeting on 26 November 2019 the Franklin Local Board resolved (FR/2019/168) the following in relation to urgent decision-making:

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a.       adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and meeting with requirements of a quorum.

b.       delegate authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board.

c.       agree that the relationship manager (or any person/s acting in this role) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off an authorisation memo.

d.       note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary business meeting of the local board.

 

Reason for the urgency

 

4.       This decision needs to be made before the next Franklin Local Board business meeting as the gift will be presented to Mr Matheson at the Paparimu Hall Committee’s Annual General Meeting to held on Monday 21 September 2020.

 

5.       The opportunity for the local board to make a decision on this information falls outside of the scheduled business meeting times.

 

 

Decision sought from the chair and deputy chair (or any person acting in these roles)

 

6.   That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      Approve $200 for a gift voucher for Mr Keith Matheson, in recognition of his many years of service to the Paparimu Hall Committee (serving as a Committee member from 1974-1980 and from 1984) and who is stepping down from his role as chairperson, a position he has held since 1997, to come from the Franklin Local Board’s Locally Driven Initiatives (discretionary) budget.

 

Background

 

7.   Generally, council will not contribute to flowers, gifts, gift vouchers or cards for births, farewells, or other special occasions or events from operational budgets. This is particularly sensitive expenditure in the current Emergency Budget environment. However, if a local board wishes to recognise outstanding contribution by a community member then the local board can do so by resolving on the expenditure of their Locally Driven Initiatives (discretionary) budget, including using the urgent decision-making process.

 

8.   As mentioned in paragraph 2 (above), Mr Matheson has made an outstanding contribution to the Paparimu Hall Committee and the Franklin Local Board wishes to acknowledge this service when he steps down at the committee’s Annual General meeting to be held on Monday 21 September 2020.

 

Authorisation of the urgent decision-making process:

 

 

Signed by Carol McKenzie-Rex
Relationship Manager, Franklin Local Board                                     Date:   15/09/20

 

 

 


Franklin Local board Resolution

That the Franklin Local Board:

 

a)      Approve $200 for a gift voucher for Mr Keith Matheson, in recognition of his many years of service to the Paparimu Hall Committee (serving as Committee member from 1974-1980 and from 1984) and who is stepping down from his role of chairperson, a position he has held since 1997, to come from the Franklin Local Board’s Locally Driven Initiatives (discretionary) budget.

 


Andrew Baker
Chairperson, Franklin Local Board                                                     Date:  15/09/20

 

 


Angela Fulljames
Deputy Chair, Franklin Local Board                                                   Date:  15/09/20

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar October 2020

File No.: CP2020/14386

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Franklin Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Franklin Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar dated October 2020 (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

27 October 2020 Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar

175

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 

Franklin Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2020/14419

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for workshops held on 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29 September 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board holds weekly workshops to facilitate oversight and delivery of projects in their work programme or that have significant local implications.

3.       The local board does not make decisions at these workshops.

4.       Workshops are not open to the public, but a record of what was discussed and presented at the workshop are reported retrospectively.

5.       Workshop records for the Franklin Local Board are attached for 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29 September 2020.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29 September 2020.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

1 September 2020 Franklin Local Board workshop record

179

b

8 September 2020 Franklin Local Board workshop record

181

c

15 September 2020 Franklin Local Board workshop record

183

d

22 September 2020 Franklin Local Board workshop record

185

e

29 September 2020 Franklin Local Board workshop record

187

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise  Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager

 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 October 2020

 

 


 

    

    



[1] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, section 15(2)(c).

[2] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, ss15-16.

[3] Local Government Act 2002, Schedule 7, clause 36D.

[4] Ngai Tai Ki Tamaki, Ngati Maru, Ngati Tamaoho, Ngati Te Ata, Ngati Whanaunga, Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua, Te Akitai Waiohua, Waikato – Tainui

[5] Resource Management Act 1991, section 8.

[6] Local Government Act 2002, Schedule 7, clause 36D.

[7] Some businesses were involved in an ATEED intervention for both Destination- and Economic Development-related activities, hence the numbers adding to over 3726. Business names must remain confidential for privacy reasons.

[8] Auckland Convention Bureau is responsible for positioning Auckland as a premium business events destination and for sales and marketing activity to grow the value and volume of business events in Auckland.

[9] This does not reflect all filming that takes place in studio, private property or low impact activity that does not require a permit.

[10] This includes local board fees only, other permit fees are directed to Auckland Transport (Special Events) and Regional Parks. Figures exclude GST and are as per the month the permit was invoiced, not necessarily when the activity took place.